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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
colon
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
ascending
▪ Ratios for the ascending colon were similar.
▪ Four specimens were from the jejunum and 11 from terminal ileum or ascending colon.
descending
▪ The investigation started with an endoscopic examination up to the junction of the sigmoid descending colon.
distal
▪ This occurred in both the proximal and distal colon.
▪ There was no significant difference in percentage of cells in S phase in the distal colon of rats in both diet groups.
▪ The proliferative zone, however, was expanded in the distal colon of the higher fibre diet fed rats.
▪ Colonic cancer in the proximal colon is very rare, most lesions occur in the distal colon.
▪ H antigen was expressed to a varying degree in all biopsy specimens but was weaker in the distal colon.
▪ Lewis a expression was seen throughout the colon, while Lewis B was expressed more strongly in the proximal than distal colon.
human
▪ This experiment shows a previously unknown dietary effect upon bacterial activity in the human colon.
▪ It allows the study of regional transit of solids in the unprepared human colon without the need for colon intubation.
▪ Furthermore, the higher concentrations used in this study reflect total bile salt concentrations in human colon.
normal
▪ The same spectrum of peptides was also found in extracts of normal colon mucosa but in still lower concentrations.
▪ In addition, mast cells in normal colon, adenoma, or carcinoma samples consistently showed strong positive staining for cytochrome P450 3A.
▪ Biopsy specimens of normal colon were obtained from patients without any evidence of colonic neoplasia.
▪ Methods Studies were undertaken in 176 male patients who were having investigational colonoscopy and who were found to have a normal colon.
▪ We used a drawing of a normal colon and a distended colon to help them understand the problem.
proximal
▪ There is currently no satisfactory means of preventing proximal colon cancer in the general population.
▪ Nor do we yet have evidence that removal of proximal adenomas prevents proximal colon cancer.
▪ No such levelling off has been identified in the proximal colon.
▪ Delayed release mesalazine formulations release their contents rapidly in the distal small intestine and proximal colon.
▪ This occurred in both the proximal and distal colon.
▪ Colonic cancer in the proximal colon is very rare, most lesions occur in the distal colon.
▪ It is likely that the drug would be more effective in the proximal colon.
▪ Lewis a expression was seen throughout the colon, while Lewis B was expressed more strongly in the proximal than distal colon.
sigmoid
▪ These findings are consistent with decreased transit in the proximal and rapid transit through the sigmoid colon in patients with active colitis.
▪ We used a perfusion system where segments of the sigmoid colon and rectum were isolated.
▪ The investigation started with an endoscopic examination up to the junction of the sigmoid descending colon.
▪ In the sigmoid colon, however, 47% of strictures were malignant.
▪ Similarly, the transverse colon was recognised by its characteristic triangular folds and the sigmoid colon by its circular folds.
▪ The rectum, sigmoid colon, and terminal ileum seem to be particularly at risk from pelvic radiotherapy.
▪ In circumstances where the topography was not clear, patients received only sigmoid colon infusions.
transverse
▪ This patient had a previous left hemi-colectomy with a transverse colon rectal anastomosis for a colonic stricture.
▪ Specimens taken at various levels in the colon showed a microscopic colitis that was maximal in the transverse colon.
▪ The abdomen was distended and the outline of the transverse colon clearly visible.
▪ At colectomy two Dukes's A cancers were found; one in the sigmoid and one in the transverse colon.
▪ We chose to place the manometric catheter into the transverse colon.
▪ Similarly, the transverse colon was recognised by its characteristic triangular folds and the sigmoid colon by its circular folds.
▪ Shortly after admission abdominal distension and tenderness over the transverse colon was noted.
▪ A plain supine abdominal radiograph showed gaseous dilatation of the transverse colon and small bowel.
■ NOUN
cancer
▪ These subjects had an examination for evaluation of occult blood, positive stools or for screening for colon cancer, or both.
▪ Decreases your risk of colon cancer. 6.
▪ There is currently no satisfactory means of preventing proximal colon cancer in the general population.
▪ Then they studied blood and tissue samples from 211 Ashkenazim who had been colon cancer patients.
▪ The possibility of introducing anti-oncogenes into those with a predisposition to colon cancer is undoubtedly one of the most exciting prospects.
▪ For patients with a family history of colon cancer, one in three carried the mutated gene.
▪ Nor do we yet have evidence that removal of proximal adenomas prevents proximal colon cancer.
▪ In the bed was a sixty-seven-year-old man with a severe colon cancer.
■ VERB
use
▪ Reconstructive surgery using stomach, colon, or jejunum, with or without oesophagectomy, has been performed to relieve dysphagia.
▪ The next question is whether to use a colon, comma, or dash after the salutation.
▪ But play around a little, using colons, dashes, semicolons, and ellipses-among others.
▪ Answer: b. Why: Only use a colon when the statement completely and naturally stops.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
Colons and Semicolons Most business documents contain colons that serve one or two functions.
▪ Answer: b. Why: Only use a colon when the statement completely and naturally stops.
▪ Despite research contributions for many countries the normal and pathological motor function of the colon remains poorly understood.
▪ Eighty eight percent examinations reached the right colon.
▪ These L4 then emerge on to the mucosal surface, migrate to the colon, develop to the adult stage.
▪ This experiment shows a previously unknown dietary effect upon bacterial activity in the human colon.
▪ Unfortunately in the colon the situation is far less clear.
▪ We elected to include this patient in the study since the entire remaining right colon had active ulcerative colitis.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
colon

Condor \Con"dor\ (k[o^]n"d[o^]r; in defs. 2 & 3, k[-o]n"d[-o]r), n. [Sp. condor, fr. Peruvian cuntur.]

  1. (Zo["o]l.) A very large bird of the Vulture family ( Sarcorhamphus gryphus), found in the most elevated parts of the Andes.

  2. (Zo["o]l.) The California vulture ( Gymnogyps californianus), also called California condor. [Local, U. S.]

    Note: In the late 20th century it is classed as an endangered species. The California condor used to number in the thousands and ranged along the entire west coast of the United States. By 1982 only 21 to 24 individuals could be identified in the wild. A breeding program was instituted, and by 1996 over 50 birds were alive in captivity. As of 1997, fewer than ten of the bred birds had been reintroduced into the wild.

  3. A gold coin of Chile, bearing the figure of a condor, and equal to twenty pesos. It contains 10.98356 grams of gold, and is equivalent to about $7.29. Called also colon.

  4. A gold coin of Colombia equivalent to about $9.6

  5. It is no longer coined. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] ||

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
colon

punctuation mark, 1540s, from Latin colon "part of a poem," from Greek kolon (with a long initial -o-) "part of a verse," literally "limb, member" (especially the leg, but also of a tree limb), also, figuratively, "a clause of a sentence," from PIE root *(s)kel- (3) "bent, crooked" (see scoliosis). Meaning evolved from "independent clause" to punctuation mark that sets it off.

colon

"large intestine," late 14c., from Latinized form of Greek kolon (with a short initial -o-) "large intestine," which is of unknown origin.

Wiktionary
colon

Etymology 1 n. 1 (context grammar English) The punctuation mark "'''(unsupported: :)'''". 2 (context rare English) The triangular colon (especially in context of not being able to type the actual triangular colon). 3 (context rhetoric English) A rhetorical figure consisting of a clause which is grammatically, but not logically, complete. Etymology 2

n. (context anatomy English) Part of the large intestine; the final segment of the digestive system, after (distal to) the ileum and before (proximal to) the anus Etymology 3

n. 1 (context obsolete English) A husbandman. 2 A European colonial settler, especially in a French colony.

WordNet
colon
  1. n. the part of the large intestine between the cecum and the rectum; it extracts moisture from food residues before they are excreted

  2. the basic unit of money in El Salvador; equal to 100 centavos [syn: El Salvadoran colon]

  3. the basic unit of money in Costa Rica; equal to 100 centimos [syn: Costa Rican colon]

  4. a port city at the Caribbean entrance to the Panama Canal [syn: Aspinwall]

  5. a punctuation mark (:) used after a word introducing a series or an example or an explanation (or after the salutation of a business letter)

  6. [also: colones (pl), cola (pl)]

Gazetteer
Colon, NE -- U.S. village in Nebraska
Population (2000): 138
Housing Units (2000): 54
Land area (2000): 0.132249 sq. miles (0.342524 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 0.132249 sq. miles (0.342524 sq. km)
FIPS code: 10005
Located within: Nebraska (NE), FIPS 31
Location: 41.297761 N, 96.606757 W
ZIP Codes (1990): 68018
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Colon, NE
Colon
Colon, MI -- U.S. village in Michigan
Population (2000): 1227
Housing Units (2000): 639
Land area (2000): 1.391219 sq. miles (3.603240 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.317522 sq. miles (0.822379 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 1.708741 sq. miles (4.425619 sq. km)
FIPS code: 17360
Located within: Michigan (MI), FIPS 26
Location: 41.955853 N, 85.322522 W
ZIP Codes (1990): 49040
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Colon, MI
Colon
Wikipedia
Colon (punctuation)

The colon ( : ) is a punctuation mark consisting of two equally sized dots centered on the same vertical line. A colon precedes an explanation, or an enumeration, or list. A colon is also used with ratios, titles and subtitles of books, city and publisher in bibliographies, Biblical citations between chapter and verse, and—in American English—to separate hours and minutes, for business letter salutations and in formal letter writing.

In Unicode, it is encoded at . Its alt code is alt+58.

Colón

Cristóbal Colón is a Spanish language name of explorer Christopher Columbus.

Colón may also refer to:

Colón (currency)

The colón () refers to two Central American currencies:

  • the Costa Rican colón (CRC), used in Costa Rica since 1896
  • the Salvadoran colón (SVC), used in El Salvador from 1892 until 2001, when it was replaced by the American dollar
Colon (character)
Colón (Madrid Metro)

Colón is a station on Line 4 of the Madrid Metro. It is located in fare Zone A.

Colón (Metrovalencia)

Colón is a metro station of the Metrovalencia network in Valencia, Spain. It is situated on Carrer de Colón, in the southeastern part of the city centre. The station is an underground structure.

Colon

Colon usually refers to:

  • Colon (organ) or large intestine, the final section of the digestive system
  • Colon (punctuation), the punctuation mark " : "

It may also refer to:

  • Costa Rican col%C3%B3n, the currency of Costa Rica
  • Colon (CONFIG.SYS directive), usage of :label in DR DOS configuration files
  • Colon (rhetoric), a clause which is grammatically, but not logically, complete
  • Colon (grape), a French wine grape that is also known as Gros Verdot
  • Colon classification, a library classification system named for the use of the punctuation mark
  • Colon, Michigan, village located within Colon Township
  • Colon, Nebraska, village in Saunders County
  • Colón, Panama, a sea port on the coast of Panama
  • Bartolo Colón, American baseball player for the New York Mets
  • Fred Colon, fictional Discworld character
  • Willie Colón, Puerto Rican salsa musician
  • Willie Colon, American football (born 1983)
Colon (rhetoric)

A colon (from Greek: , pl. , cola) is a rhetorical figure consisting of a clause which is grammatically, but not logically, complete. In Latin, it is called a membrum or membrum orationis.

Sentences consisting of two cola are called dicola; those with three are tricola. The corresponding adjectives are dicolic and tricolic; colic is not used in this sense. In writing, these cola are often separated by colons.

An isocolon is a sentence composed of cola of equal syllabic length.

The Septuagint used this system in the poetic books such as the Psalms. When Jerome translated the books of the Prophets, he arranged the text colometrically.

The colometric system was used in bilingual codices of New Testament, such as Codex Bezae and Codex Claromontanus. Some Greek and Latin manuscripts also used this system, including Codex Coislinianus and Codex Amiatinus.

Colón (surname)

Colón is a Spanish surname, comparable to the Italian and Portuguese Colombo, or English surname Columbus. Notable people with the surname include:

  • Cristóbal Colón, the Spanish language name for the Genoese explorer Christopher Columbus (1451-1506)
  • Bartolo Colón (born 1973), Dominican baseball pitcher
  • Carlos Colón, Sr. (born 1948), Puerto Rican wrestler
  • Carly Colón (born 1979), Puerto Rican wrestler, son of Carlos Colón, Sr.
  • Eddie Colón (born 1982), Puerto Rican wrestler, son of Carlos Colón, Sr.
  • Orlando Colón (born 1982), Puerto Rican wrestler, nephew of Carlos Colón, Sr.
  • Willie Colón (born 1950), Puerto Rican American salsa musician
  • Carlos Colón, musician, member of The Deadlines

Usage examples of "colon".

The sim waiter brought out my cola and a bottle of Bardolino with two wine glasses.

The large intestine is about five feet in length, and is divided into the Caecum, Colon, and Rectum.

It is from one to two inches in length, and is found attached by its head to the mucous membrane of the caecum, and, in rare instances, in the colon and small intestine.

This intestine is about five feet in length, and consists of the caecum, colon, and rectum.

It has three divisions, known as the caecum, the colon, and the rectum.

The caecum gradually blends into the second division of the large intestine, called the colon.

After a preliminary course in anatomy it was found that caecum and transverse colon also provided excellent sites for excitation.

Birthday, the frequently-used black microwave that can be found in most college dorms, a counter with bread crumbs, cheese bits, and cola stains, a sink of dirty plastic dishes, two pastel green love-seats, and one square wooden coffee-table that also serves as a foot-stool.

Rather, it is a simple fluoroscopic test used to study the large bowel, or colon.

Ramage had decided to continue in that direction because Colon had covered all the flat areas flanking the track from San Ildefonso to the point where he was captured.

Florendo cut, he found that this megacolon was jampacked from the base of the descending colon all the way up and half-way across the transverse colon.

When the colon is distended, it becomes a mechanical impediment to the free circulation of the blood in other organs, and causes congestion of the portal system, predisposing to chronic inflammation or cirrhosis of the liver.

She reached out and ordered her selections, cola, salad with the spiciest Thai dinner on the menu.

The path intersected the Margherita Bridge, Via Cola di Riezo, and passed through Piazza del Risorgimento, hitting no churches at all until it dead-ended abruptly at the center of St.

Nancy bought several large bottles of RC Cola, a six-pack of toilet paper, a pack of evil-looking black cigarillos, a bunch of bananas, and a pack of Doublemint chewing gum.