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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
bill
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bill goes through parliament (=it goes through the process of being made a law)
▪ The bill is currently going through Parliament.
a bill is passed by parliament (=it is made into a law)
▪ The bill was passed by Parliament last May.
a fuel bill
▪ Insulating your house will cut your fuel bill.
a gas bill (=a bill you have to pay for gas you have used)
▪ Household gas bills have increased dramatically.
a phone bill (=a bill for phone calls)
▪ Our last phone bill was huge.
an electricity bill (=a bill you have to pay for electricity you have used)
▪ I pay my electricity bill by direct debit.
an energy bill
▪ We are looking at ways of cutting our energy bill.
bill of exchange
bill of fare
bill of lading
bill of rights
bill of sale
double bill
padding...bills
padding the bills of Medicare patients
pass a law/bill/act
▪ The first Transport Act was passed in 1907.
private member's bill
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
clean
▪ The influential Bell study gave them largely a clean bill of health as a model for determining disputes concerning entitlement to benefit.
▪ And with a clean bill of health, Granato is promising to be same kind of performer he always was.
▪ A clean bill of health has certainly helped, while the catches, crucially, have been sticking.
▪ If the ship was given a clean bill of health, Customs Officials went on board.
▪ They gave it a clean bill of health.
▪ Charles ended up with a clean bill of health and a parking ticket.
▪ Still, clean bills of health come easily from an impoverished medical system that revolves around pseudo-medicine and bribes.
double
▪ But sometimes a double bill would show at the Ritz and nowhere else.
▪ He guessed they were on their way to Badstoneleigh because of the double bill at the Pavilion.
▪ A double bill in the afternoon.
▪ In the early 1960s one result of shrinking cinema audiences was the Sunday double bill of low budget horror movies.
▪ Now that's a double bill.
private
▪ Nevertheless, some private members' bills have been important and become a focus for public attention.
▪ A private member's bill to effect this change was brought forward in late February, 1925.
■ NOUN
dollar
▪ Gomez slid three one-thousand dollar bills from the wallet.
▪ Co., which makes the stock that dollar bills are printed on.
▪ He rolls up a dollar bill, and stares at it as if deliberately recalling something.
▪ Open, it yielded a few dollar bills.
▪ I got an autographed dollar bill and Viral Hepatitis I started bullying her.
▪ Once, he even found a twenty dollar bill.
▪ He hands over one crisp dollar bill and 40,000 sucres in coins and stained notes.
▪ No, there was no wallet with dollar bills.
electricity
▪ On this the farm worker is most scathing: fresh air does not pay his electricity bill.
▪ Margaret had discovered the address from an electricity bill she had found in the laundry.
▪ Voice over Okan, a production engineer, has seen his collection of reptiles grow as has his electricity bill.
▪ People who are behind with their electricity bills could find themselves restricted to a consumption of as little as one kilowatt.
▪ Charges cut ELECTRICITY bills are to be cut by one percent from April.
▪ So lots of tanks, thousands of fish - and huge electricity bills?
▪ If you're worried about electricity bills, turn the monitor off at the end of the day.
fuel
▪ Grants are not available to pay for fuel bills.
▪ There are ways of paying your fuel bills which make budgeting a lot easier.
▪ Like the Picasso, it has five seats, so why put up with the added weight and bigger fuel bills?
▪ You won't notice the difference, but will save 10% on fuel bill.
▪ The system can pinpoint individuals if fuel bills and maintenance charges fall outside the average for their type of car.
▪ They had to take out a loan to pay their last fuel bill.
▪ Two-thirds of the total cited heating and fuel bills in particular as being more expensive than they had anticipated.
▪ In its condensing mode, the unit achieves up to 95% efficiency, contributing to reduced fuel bills.
gas
▪ If the Government won't boost pensions, can't it help with gas bills and the like?
▪ I got the gas bill and the bill for electricity.
▪ You think to yourself, yes I could get the kids shoes or pay the gas bill.
▪ However, increasing water, electricity and gas bills are adding to production cost pressures, the association says.
▪ She followed her last winter gas bill with a decision to turn off several heaters.
▪ What she couldn't understand was the more she shivered ... the higher the gas bills.
▪ Voice over Meanwhile downstairs neighbour Nikki Davies was delighted with her gas bills.
▪ You can use gas stamps to pay your electricity bill and electricity stamps to pay for your gas bill.
phone
▪ The phone rings, though, so it looks as if somebody pays the phone bills.
▪ You are required by the District Attorney to provide your phone bills, both business and personal.
▪ For example, competition could cut the size of phone bills and end the imposition of unreasonable bank charges on small businesses.
▪ Customers can pay by credit card or with their monthly phone bill starting next month.
▪ My phone bill can stand it!
▪ Pac Bell has sought to make amends with the Stinsons by agreeing to pay their cellular phone bill.
▪ He stayed for weeks, ran up astronomical phone bills, and then vanished.
▪ Is it not true that too many people have phone bills that are too high?
reform
▪ On March 19 it passed a regulatory reform bill, which is intended to lighten the weight of government on small businesses.
▪ The question is not whether a reform bill will pass but how strong it will be.
▪ For example, the House leadership may put the Senate welfare reform bill up for a vote.
▪ In 1859 Beresford headed a protest against the Derby ministry's reform bill but did not press his opposition to a vote.
▪ But many of the same provisions remain in the welfare reform bill signed by President Clinton last month.
▪ On Aug. 10 the Chamber of Deputies approved a state reform bill on privatization.
▪ Former colleagues tell me the bipartisan reform bill, sponsored by Sens.
tax
▪ That means that Londoners will face higher council tax bills.
▪ Parliament is scheduled to review the new tax bill tomorrow.
▪ Having recently paid a larger than expected tax bill, the account is currently empty.
▪ The results would then be totted up every year to produce a tax bill.
▪ With interest and penalties, the tax bill came to just under $ 25, 000.
▪ The cash was promised to local authorities in last year's budget to ease the impact of poll tax bills.
▪ The House version of the tax bill was 1, 379 pages long, the Senate version 1, 580 pages.
treasury
▪ Why would you expect the yield on treasury bills normally to be rather lower than on government bonds? 2.
▪ Investors holding ninety-day Treasury bills experience very small changes in the value of those bills as interest rates fluctuate.
▪ As the volume of Treasury bills declined in the 1970s the discount houses facilitated the rapid growth in the commercial bill market.
▪ During the same period, one-year Treasury bills produced an average annual return of 7. 5 percent.
▪ When college is two to three years away, put additional money into certificates of deposit or Treasury bills for safety.
▪ Calculate the issue price of a 91-day Treasury bill with a par value of 10,000 and a discount rate of 9 percent.
▪ The rate of return on short-term Treasury bills is highly responsive to inflation.
water
▪ In the past week or so householders throughout the country have been opening their April water bills and gaping.
▪ In addition to simple rage over the hike in water bills, other issues fueled the recall movement.
▪ Borders businesses are also likely to benefit as a 17 percent reduction in water bills is planned.
▪ The inequities in water bills -- due to the lack of lift charges -- are still with us, he noted.
▪ By militant diktat no Kashmiri pays income or sales tax nor electricity or water bills.
▪ Sewer rates, which are included on water bills, would not be affected.
▪ On the same day a water bill was approved which covered water-related projects in 17 western states.
▪ The city limits encompassed 91 square miles, and the water bill for the average household was $ 8.
welfare
▪ But the Republican governors recoiled from the prospect of reopening the welfare bill for anything.
▪ The current welfare bill includes money for day care.
▪ The president kept the Republicans from including Medicaid in the welfare bill.
▪ But the welfare bill has split the Democratic Party on the eve of its national convention in Chicago.
▪ The goal of the welfare bill is to devolve power and responsibilty to the states.
■ VERB
approve
▪ In November 1991 the House of Representatives had approved the bill by 409 votes to 21.
▪ The House has already approved an immigration bill that includes an amendment sponsored by Rep.
▪ On Dec. 30 the Majlis approved a bill allowing defendants the right to legal representation in court.
▪ The House will likely approve a single bill containing controls on both legal and illegal immigration.
▪ On Aug. 10 the Chamber of Deputies approved a state reform bill on privatization.
▪ Lawmakers approved a bill repealing the tax in 1979, but Gov.
▪ The Supreme Soviet failed twice more to approve the bill before the successful vote on May 20.
face
▪ That means that Londoners will face higher council tax bills.
▪ Against this income stream, Flynn faced mounting tuition bills, which averaged $ 29, 328 annually over 11 years.
▪ This left the couple facing a bill for professional costs through no fault of their own.
▪ If you own sale falls through you may face a hefty interest bill.
▪ He faces a total bill of £2,255.
▪ Now he faces the bill and mounting costs.
▪ Ratepayers face a £40, bill for the case brought against the council - and which it won.
fill
▪ It is the one construction which will fill the bill exactly.
▪ It just happened that Bobby filled the bill in this case.
▪ And certainly, Peter Weiss' Marat-Sade fills the bill for audience and company alike.
▪ In the end, only some form of income subsidy will fill that bill.
▪ In lieu of real out-of-town travel, Kingfisher fills the bill nicely.
▪ For many of these postindustrial wanderers, the primal quality of pentecostal worship seemed to fill the bill.
▪ Had she been a man, his dear friend Aspasia could have filled the bill.
▪ Luckily, Colossal still fills the bill.
fit
▪ John Bowes perfectly fits that bill.
▪ And the martini fits the bill?
▪ A floral design with a Regency stripe background, for example, fits the bill perfectly.
▪ The martini perfectly fits the bill because of its simplicity.
▪ Many other jobs get handed out simply because a minister happens to know some one who might fit the bill.
▪ There were of course other ways in which Worldwide Plaza fit the bill very well.
▪ If you truly can not find a newsgroup that fits the bill, you can always start your own.
▪ On the surface, taxing international air travel fits the bill perfectly because it carries little apparent political pain.
foot
▪ But, though local firms contributed, the public still footed much of the bill.
▪ The National Science Foundation, which was footing the bill, decided to hire an independent contractor to complete the project.
▪ If taxpayers footed the bill, those costs might well be higher.
▪ If the project would cause damage, then the developer would have to foot the bill himself.
▪ It follows talks with some of the unhappy policyholders without guaranteed annuities who will have to foot some of the bill.
▪ The International Olympic Committee probably would foot the repair bill, and the international track federation would pay travel costs.
▪ Gloucestershire County Council is footing the bill.
▪ But the prospect of having to foot another bill for Aryanised assets has sparked some ugly reactions.
introduce
▪ In the autumn of 1984 I introduced a bill to bring the first pension reforms into effect.
▪ He introduced a bill to legalize abortion two years before Roe v. Wade.
▪ If the state bar decides against a complete ban, Miss Roybal-Allard may introduce a new bill requiring it to have one.
▪ Like many other states, Arizona has introduced bills to regulate HMOs in an effort to protect those enrolled in the plans.
▪ Though no progress was made when Henry Wilson introduced a bill in 1896, there was growing police backing for legislation.
▪ Y., has introduced a bill to ban federal funds from being spent on programs that teach ebonics as a language.
▪ At least 20 states have introduced bills to change that.
▪ The majority Nationalists introduced an alternative tax bill Tuesday to block the opposition bill.
pass
▪ On March 19 it passed a regulatory reform bill, which is intended to lighten the weight of government on small businesses.
▪ Soon after his announcement the House passed the bill, 328-101, and the Senate was expected to approve it Thursday.
▪ If passed the bill would effectively bar Hindus from converting mosques into temples.
▪ In 1994, the California legislature passed a bill to permit physicians to prescribe marijuana.
▪ The Michigan House of Representatives passed a bill on Dec. 8 requiring parental consent for unmarried girls under 18 to have abortions.
▪ Moreover, the most important legislation for bond market investors -- the 1996 budget bill -- has already been passed.
▪ Congress, pass my comprehensive crime bill.
▪ The Senate has passed a similar bill, which will be combined with the House version.
pay
▪ Now they have to spend their mornings planning budgets and their afternoons paying bills.
▪ Several pioneering journalists had taken this step and then paid the bill by writing self-congratulatory accounts of their daring.
▪ And the faithful still see annexation as one way to pay that bill -- and no proof it will work is required.
▪ Josie was sitting at the table with an open cheque book in front of her, paying bills.
▪ But something more was going on than just paying bills.
▪ There are ways of paying your fuel bills which make budgeting a lot easier.
▪ And then, it must figure out how to pay the bill.
send
▪ They just send the bill and the army pays.
▪ Republicans estimate this change would send monthly bills up by about $ 10 by 2002.
▪ Did the Handsome Prince send Rapunzel a bill for a cut and blow dry?
▪ The panel will try to smooth out differences between the measures, then send a final bill to both chambers for approval.
▪ It is too complicated to send large numbers of bills over to their accountant every day.
▪ The providers of those services would stay in private business but would no longer send bills to myriad insurers and government agencies.
▪ Darlington Borough Council staff have sent out more than 70,000 bills which are expected to arrive today and tomorrow.
▪ Then I sent in my bill.
settle
▪ Please that this letter as confirmation that Oxford University Press will be settling their bills for room and breakfast.
▪ It turned out he wanted me to settle my bill.
▪ But then there was nothing left to pay the drivers or to settle the mounting bills.
▪ But carrying large amounts of foreign currency to settle the bills is anything but a joy.
▪ When I got back he was at the cashier's desk settling the bill.
▪ I settled the bill - a pretty useful one, what with the line of brandies I had moodily consumed.
▪ You pick up your gear and you settle your bill.
▪ He settles all their Mess bills and buys them lavish presents.
sign
▪ Bush promised to sign the bill without delay.
▪ President Bush has indicated he would sign the bill.
▪ The captain then signs the bills of lading and precedes his signature with a statement that shipment is subject to charter party conditions.
▪ When he signed the bill, Clinton said he would fight this year to restore benefits for legal immigrants.
▪ Everything is signed Your bill is then settled the evening before you leave the ship.
▪ The center said the loan had a favorable interest rate and came two weeks after President Clinton signed a bill NationsBank supported.
▪ Governor William Donald Schaefer signed the bill into law within hours of its enactment by the House.
▪ But Clinton insisted those provisions be taken out before he signed the bill, she said.
top
▪ Tom Jones is topping the bill and among others, Joe Longthorne is guesting.
▪ Liberal chums tell me that old, white, military men top the bill.
▪ They're topping the bill in the Central Match Live which kicks off at ten to three.
▪ Pickled cucumbers and beetroot and horseradish sauce topped the bill.
veto
▪ The difference is that last year George Bush promised to veto the bill, and did so.
▪ Clinton vetoed the bill after being lobbied by trial lawyers, but Congress overrode the veto.
▪ The Republican governor, Arne Carlson, has promised to veto the bill.
▪ Clinton already has vetoed one farm bill contained in omnibus balanced-budget legislation.
▪ Accordingly, on Oct. 22, Bush carried out his threat to veto the bill.
▪ But if Clinton vetoes the spending bill because of other disagreements, the Headwaters purchase becomes far less certain this year.
▪ He denied allegations that a threatened boycott of Idaho potatoes by pro-choice advocates had influenced his decision to veto the bill.
▪ But Clinton said he vetoed that bill, partly because Republicans removed restrictions on corporate raids on pension funds.
vote
▪ Lawmakers initially had been scheduled to vote on the bill Friday, but postponed the balloting for lack of sufficient votes.
▪ But will he vote against the mastectomy bill?
▪ John Vasconcellos, D-San Jose, voted for the bill while urging the state to follow through with a job-creation program.
▪ The education measure disturbed Bryant enough that he voted against the bill in its final form.
▪ Dole voted against the bill on the ground that it contained $ 5 billion in wasteful social spending.
▪ I will vote against the bill and I know there are others who will vote like me.
▪ Connie Mack, R-Fla., as the Senate voted 74-22 for the bill.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a clean bill of health
▪ Three months after the operation, the doctors gave her a clean bill of health.
▪ And with a clean bill of health, Granato is promising to be same kind of performer he always was.
▪ Charles ended up with a clean bill of health and a parking ticket.
▪ If the ship was given a clean bill of health, Customs Officials went on board.
▪ The influential Bell study gave them largely a clean bill of health as a model for determining disputes concerning entitlement to benefit.
▪ They gave it a clean bill of health.
fill the bill
▪ And certainly, Peter Weiss' Marat-Sade fills the bill for audience and company alike.
▪ Another thing was that most of the Republicans who might have filled the bill lived in the suburbs.
▪ For many of these postindustrial wanderers, the primal quality of pentecostal worship seemed to fill the bill.
▪ Had she been a man, his dear friend Aspasia could have filled the bill.
▪ In lieu of real out-of-town travel, Kingfisher fills the bill nicely.
▪ It is the one construction which will fill the bill exactly.
▪ It just happened that Bobby filled the bill in this case.
▪ Luckily, Colossal still fills the bill.
fit the bill
▪ I need someone who can speak both French and Spanish. Do you know anyone who fits the bill?
▪ We know what kind of house we want, but we haven't yet found one that fits the bill.
▪ We wanted an experienced journalist, and Watts fit the bill.
▪ A floral design with a Regency stripe background, for example, fits the bill perfectly.
▪ And the martini fits the bill?
▪ But it also fits the bill because people could order their favorite liquor.
▪ Many other jobs get handed out simply because a minister happens to know some one who might fit the bill.
▪ Only the Lockheed Hercules would fit the bill.
▪ The fact that she and Hugh happened to fit the bill seemed to give her every opportunity for finding out.
▪ The martini perfectly fits the bill because of its simplicity.
▪ There were of course other ways in which Worldwide Plaza fit the bill very well.
foot the bill
▪ It will be, as usual, the taxpayer who will be footing the bill.
▪ The program asks businesses to foot the bill for daily newspapers in the classroom.
▪ Airlines currently foot the bill for the security systems.
▪ Her father is footing the bill for lessons, which cost about $ 100 for two hours.
▪ If taxpayers footed the bill, those costs might well be higher.
▪ Individuals in dysfunctional environments often be-come dysfunctional in other aspects of their lives, with their organizations ultimately footing the bill.
▪ It has already been argued in some detail that foot the bill is semantically transparent.
▪ Many customers will have to foot the bill for water meters, which most companies will eventually install.
▪ Sometimes they came alone, sometimes with a man in tow - to foot the bill!
▪ These two mindless cads decided to bring the girl along to the East and have her foot the bill.
pick up the bill/tab (for sth)
▪ The company's picking up the bill for my trip to Hawaii.
▪ After its shareholder equity turned negative last year, parent Dasa started picking up the bills.
▪ But remember - raid your savings now and Santa won't pick up the bill.
▪ Everything depended on contributors picking up the bill in ten, twenty or thirty years.
▪ I wonder to myself as I pick up the tab for breakfast.
▪ In addition, my company will pick up the tab for all legal and moving expenses.
▪ Often, the book publisher, not the author, picks up the tab.
▪ There is a growing, often unstated, anticipation that the private sector will pick up the bill for public services.
▪ When the check comes, the lobbyists almost always pick up the tab.
run up a debt/bill etc
▪ For Gieves the tailors, the extent to which clients indulged in running up bills regardless had become extremely serious.
▪ Having run up a debt of over £100,000, they're unlikely to be forgotten by Virgin Records in a hurry.
▪ He spent 3 months there, running up bills of £30,000, as yet unpaid.
▪ If my neighbours ran up a bill and refused to pay we would not be expected to pay it.
▪ It became a more serious potential debt trap than running up bills at retailers.
▪ Model customers run up bills and pay in installments, with the high interest that makes the business so lucrative.
▪ The problem of running up debts to pay for the elderly is straight-forward.
▪ They continue to run up bills and never build equity in their house.
sign a bill/legislation/agreement into law
table a bill/measure/proposal etc
▪ At that time, Dole voted to table a measure that would have negated the Supreme Court ruling.
▪ Baldwin tabled proposals which involved payments of £34 million a year.
▪ For example, by the drinks table Bill Muggeridge seemed to be trying to make up to Mrs Crumwallis.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Can I have the bill, please?
▪ Monday's debate on the defense bill lasted all night.
▪ The bill for the meal came to $75, including wine.
▪ The garage sent me a bill for £400.
▪ The House of Representatives passed a new gun-control bill.
▪ The president signed a bill that will help more families move from welfare to work.
▪ They left the hotel without paying the bill.
▪ We've just had a huge telephone bill.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ After all of the bills are paid, about $ 6.2 million should remain, he said.
▪ But before work can start they need the money, and the final bill could come to several million pounds.
▪ But it could land them with a court bill of up to £200 if they're stopped by the police.
▪ Sewer rates, which are included on water bills, would not be affected.
▪ The influential Bell study gave them largely a clean bill of health as a model for determining disputes concerning entitlement to benefit.
▪ The public has purchased only half as many as needed to cover the bill.
▪ To keep rate bills to a minimum, action needs to be taken.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
customer
▪ For example, telephone charges are normally billed to customers every quarter in retrospect.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a clean bill of health
▪ Three months after the operation, the doctors gave her a clean bill of health.
▪ And with a clean bill of health, Granato is promising to be same kind of performer he always was.
▪ Charles ended up with a clean bill of health and a parking ticket.
▪ If the ship was given a clean bill of health, Customs Officials went on board.
▪ The influential Bell study gave them largely a clean bill of health as a model for determining disputes concerning entitlement to benefit.
▪ They gave it a clean bill of health.
give sb top/star billing
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ One lobbyist billed the environmental group $20,000 for nine-months' work.
▪ Some lawyers bill clients up to $300 an hour.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But Marsha is billed $ 578 a month for his bed, board and treatment.
▪ Despite being billed as the next big thing, huge contracts and catwalk shows failed to materialise.
▪ In New York, my pharmacist bills Medicaid directly.
▪ Some consumers are offered one-year subscriptions and then are billed for two years.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Bill

Bill \Bill\, n. [OE. bile, bille, AS. bile beak of a bird, proboscis; cf. Ir. & Gael. bil, bile, mouth, lip, bird's bill. Cf. Bill a weapon.] A beak, as of a bird, or sometimes of a turtle or other animal.
--Milton.

Bill

Bill \Bill\, v. t. To work upon ( as to dig, hoe, hack, or chop anything) with a bill.

Bill

Bill \Bill\, n. The bell, or boom, of the bittern

The bittern's hollow bill was heard.
--Wordsworth.

Bill

Bill \Bill\, n. [OE. bil, AS. bill, bil; akin to OS. bil sword, OHG. bill pickax, G. bille. Cf. Bill bea?.]

  1. A cutting instrument, with hook-shaped point, and fitted with a handle; -- used in pruning, etc.; a billhook. When short, called a hand bill, when long, a hedge bill.

  2. A weapon of infantry, in the 14th and 15th centuries. A common form of bill consisted of a broad, heavy, double-edged, hook-shaped blade, having a short pike at the back and another at the top, and attached to the end of a long staff.

    France had no infantry that dared to face the English bows end bills.
    --Macaulay.

  3. One who wields a bill; a billman.
    --Strype.

  4. A pickax, or mattock. [Obs.]

  5. (Naut.) The extremity of the arm of an anchor; the point of or beyond the fluke.

Bill

Bill \Bill\, v. t.

  1. To advertise by a bill or public notice.

  2. To charge or enter in a bill; as, to bill goods.

Bill

Bill \Bill\, n. [OE. bill, bille, fr. LL. billa (or OF. bille), for L. bulla anything rounded, LL., seal, stamp, letter, edict, roll; cf. F. bille a ball, prob. fr. Ger.; cf. MHG. bickel, D. bikkel, dice. Cf. Bull papal edict, Billet a paper.]

  1. (Law) A declaration made in writing, stating some wrong the complainant has suffered from the defendant, or a fault committed by some person against a law.

  2. A writing binding the signer or signers to pay a certain sum at a future day or on demand, with or without interest, as may be stated in the document. [Eng.]

    Note: In the United States, it is usually called a note, a note of hand, or a promissory note.

  3. A form or draft of a law, presented to a legislature for enactment; a proposed or projected law.

  4. A paper, written or printed, and posted up or given away, to advertise something, as a lecture, a play, or the sale of goods; a placard; a poster; a handbill.

    She put up the bill in her parlor window.
    --Dickens.

  5. An account of goods sold, services rendered, or work done, with the price or charge; a statement of a creditor's claim, in gross or by items; as, a grocer's bill.

  6. Any paper, containing a statement of particulars; as, a bill of charges or expenditures; a weekly bill of mortality; a bill of fare, etc. Bill of adventure. See under Adventure. Bill of costs, a statement of the items which form the total amount of the costs of a party to a suit or action. Bill of credit.

    1. Within the constitution of the United States, a paper issued by a State, on the mere faith and credit of the State, and designed to circulate as money. No State shall ``emit bills of credit.''
      --U. S. Const.
      --Peters.
      --Wharton.
      --Bouvier

    2. Among merchants, a letter sent by an agent or other person to a merchant, desiring him to give credit to the bearer for goods or money.

      Bill of divorce, in the Jewish law, a writing given by the husband to the wife, by which the marriage relation was dissolved.
      --Jer. iii. 8.

      Bill of entry, a written account of goods entered at the customhouse, whether imported or intended for exportation.

      Bill of exceptions. See under Exception.

      Bill of exchange (Com.), a written order or request from one person or house to another, desiring the latter to pay to some person designated a certain sum of money therein generally is, and, to be negotiable, must be, made payable to order or to bearer. So also the order generally expresses a specified time of payment, and that it is drawn for value. The person who draws the bill is called the drawer, the person on whom it is drawn is, before acceptance, called the drawee, -- after acceptance, the acceptor; the person to whom the money is directed to be paid is called the payee. The person making the order may himself be the payee. The bill itself is frequently called a draft. See Exchange.
      --Chitty.

      Bill of fare, a written or printed enumeration of the dishes served at a public table, or of the dishes (with prices annexed) which may be ordered at a restaurant, etc.

      Bill of health, a certificate from the proper authorities as to the state of health of a ship's company at the time of her leaving port.

      Bill of indictment, a written accusation lawfully presented to a grand jury. If the jury consider the evidence sufficient to support the accusation, they indorse it ``A true bill,'' otherwise they write upon it ``Not a true bill,'' or ``Not found,'' or ``Ignoramus'', or ``Ignored.''

      Bill of lading, a written account of goods shipped by any person, signed by the agent of the owner of the vessel, or by its master, acknowledging the receipt of the goods, and promising to deliver them safe at the place directed, dangers of the sea excepted. It is usual for the master to sign two, three, or four copies of the bill; one of which he keeps in possession, one is kept by the shipper, and one is sent to the consignee of the goods.

      Bill of mortality, an official statement of the number of deaths in a place or district within a given time; also, a district required to be covered by such statement; as, a place within the bills of mortality of London.

      Bill of pains and penalties, a special act of a legislature which inflicts a punishment less than death upon persons supposed to be guilty of treason or felony, without any conviction in the ordinary course of judicial proceedings.
      --Bouvier.
      --Wharton.

      Bill of parcels, an account given by the seller to the buyer of the several articles purchased, with the price of each.

      Bill of particulars (Law), a detailed statement of the items of a plaintiff's demand in an action, or of the defendant's set-off.

      Bill of rights, a summary of rights and privileges claimed by a people. Such was the declaration presented by the Lords and Commons of England to the Prince and Princess of Orange in 1688, and enacted in Parliament after they became king and queen. In America, a bill or declaration of rights is prefixed to most of the constitutions of the several States.

      Bill of sale, a formal instrument for the conveyance or transfer of goods and chattels.

      Bill of sight, a form of entry at the customhouse, by which goods, respecting which the importer is not possessed of full information, may be provisionally landed for examination.

      Bill of store, a license granted at the customhouse to merchants, to carry such stores and provisions as are necessary for a voyage, custom free.
      --Wharton.

      Bills payable (pl.), the outstanding unpaid notes or acceptances made and issued by an individual or firm.

      Bills receivable (pl.), the unpaid promissory notes or acceptances held by an individual or firm.
      --McElrath.

      A true bill, a bill of indictment sanctioned by a grand jury.

Bill

Bill \Bill\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Billed; p. pr. & vb. n. Billing.]

  1. To strike; to peck. [Obs.]

  2. To join bills, as doves; to caress in fondness. ``As pigeons bill.''
    --Shak.

    To bill and coo, to interchange caresses; -- said of doves; also of demonstrative lovers.
    --Thackeray.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
bill

"written statement," mid-14c., from Anglo-French bille, Anglo-Latin billa "list," from Medieval Latin bulla "decree, seal, sealed document," in classical Latin "bubble, boss, stud, amulet for the neck" (hence "seal;" see bull (n.2)). Sense of "account, invoice" first recorded c.1400; that of "order to pay" (technically bill of exchange) is from 1570s; that of "paper money" is from 1660s. Meaning "draft of an act of Parliament" is from 1510s.

bill

"bird's beak," Old English bill "bill, bird's beak," related to bill, a poetic word for a kind of sword (especially one with a hooked blade), from a common Germanic word for cutting or chopping weapons (compare Old High German bihal, Old Norse bilda "hatchet," Old Saxon bil "sword"), from PIE root *bheie- "to cut, to strike" (cognates: Armenian bir "cudgel," Greek phitos "block of wood," Old Church Slavonic biti "to strike," Old Irish biail "ax"). Used also in Middle English of beak-like projections of land (such as Portland Bill).

bill

"to send someone a bill of charge," 1864, from bill (n.1). Related: Billed; billing.

bill

ancient weapon, Old English bill "sword (especially one with a hooked blade), chopping tool," common Germanic (compare Old Saxon bil "sword," Middle Dutch bile, Dutch bijl, Old High German bihal, German Beil, Old Norse bilda "hatchet." See bill (n.2).

Wiktionary
bill

Etymology 1 n. 1 Any of various bladed or pointed hand weapons, originally designating an Anglo-Saxon sword, and later a weapon of infantry, especially in the 14th and 15th centuries, commonly consisting of a broad, heavy, double-edged, hook-shaped blade, with a short pike at the back and another at the top, attached to the end of a long staff. 2 A cutting instrument, with hook-shaped point, and fitted with a handle, used in pruning, etc.; a billhook. 3 Somebody armed with a bill; a billman. 4 A pickaxe, or mattock. 5 (context nautical English) The extremity of the arm of an anchor; the point of or beyond the fluke. vb. (context transitive English) To dig, chop, etc., with a bill. Etymology 2

n. 1 The beak of a bird, especially when small or flattish; sometimes also used with reference to a turtle, platypus, or other animal. 2 A beak-like projection, especially a promontory. vb. 1 (context obsolete English) To peck. 2 To stroke bill against bill, with reference to doves; to caress in fondness. Etymology 3

n. 1 A written list or inventory. (''Now obsolete except in specific senses or set phrases; bill of lading, bill of goods, etc.'') 2 A document, originally sealed; a formal statement or official memorandum. (''Now obsolete except with certain qualifying words; bill of health, bill of sale etc.'') 3 A draft of a law, presented to a legislature for enactment; a proposed or projected law. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To advertise by a bill or public notice. 2 (context transitive English) To charge; to send a bill to. Etymology 4

n. The bell, or boom, of the bittern.

WordNet
bill
  1. v. demand payment; "Will I get charged for this service?"; "We were billed for 4 nights in the hotel, although we stayed only 3 nights" [syn: charge]

  2. advertise especially by posters or placards; "He was billed as the greatest tenor since Caruso"

  3. publicize or announce by placards [syn: placard]

bill
  1. n. a statute in draft before it becomes law; "they held a public hearing on the bill" [syn: measure]

  2. an itemized statement of money owed for goods shipped or services rendered; "he paid his bill and left"; "send me an account of what I owe" [syn: account, invoice]

  3. a piece of paper money (especially one issued by a central bank); "he peeled off five one-thousand-zloty notes" [syn: note, government note, bank bill, banker's bill, bank note, banknote, Federal Reserve note, greenback]

  4. the entertainment offered at a public presentation

  5. a list of particulars (as a playbill or bill of fare)

  6. an advertisement (usually printed on a page or in a leaflet) intended for wide distribution; "he mailed the circular to all subscribers" [syn: circular, handbill, broadside, broadsheet, flier, flyer, throwaway]

  7. horny projecting mouth of a bird [syn: beak, neb, nib, pecker]

  8. a sign posted in a public place as an advertisement; "a poster advertised the coming attractions" [syn: poster, posting, placard, notice, card]

  9. a long-handled saw with a curved blade; "he used a bill to prune branches off of the tree" [syn: billhook]

  10. a brim that projects to the front to shade the eyes; "he pulled down the bill of his cap and trudged ahead" [syn: peak, eyeshade, visor, vizor]

Wikipedia
Bill

Bill may refer to:

Bill (weapon)

The bill is a polearm weapon used by infantry in medieval Europe. The bill is similar in size, function and appearance to the halberd, differing mainly in the hooked blade form. Other terms for the bill include English bill, bill hook or bill- guisarme.

Bill (law)

A bill is proposed legislation under consideration by a legislature. A bill does not become law until it is passed by the legislature and, in most cases, approved by the executive. Once a bill has been enacted into law, it is called an Act or a statute.

Bill (Tripping Daisy album)

Bill is the first full-length album by Tripping Daisy. It was released in 1992 on the Dragon Street label, and then re-released on July 22, 1993 on Island Records. On the re-release, the track "Green Tambourine" was removed, and the two unlisted tracks were appended to the final track.

Tripping Daisy had a sound of their own within the grunge-pop genre, characterized by bursts of punk energy, bouncy bass riffs, and short break-downs of Pixies-ish picking, and incorporating different aspects of psychedelia. Tim DeLaughter's vocals are extremely processed throughout the album.

Bill (1981 film)

Bill is a 1981 CBS TV movie starring Mickey Rooney and Dennis Quaid. The film is based on the life of Bill Sackter. A sequel, Bill: On His Own, was released in 1983.

Bill (Bill Cosby album)

Bill (1973) is a compilation album of previously released material by Bill Cosby. All the routines are edited down compared to their original appearances on previous albums, some slightly, some considerably.

Bill (song)

"Bill" is a song heard in Act II of Kern and Hammerstein's classic 1927 musical Show Boat. The song was written by Kern and P.G. Wodehouse for their 1917 musical Oh, Lady! Lady!! for Vivienne Segal to perform, but withdrawn because it was considered too melancholy for that show. However, when Kern and Hammerstein were at work on the serious and somewhat tragic Show Boat, they decided that the song would be perfect for a nightclub scene in the show. Hammerstein revised Wodehouse's original lyrics somewhat (though he would always give full credit to Wodehouse for the song and take none for himself), and the song was given to real-life nightclub singer Helen Morgan, who portrayed the mulatto Julie in Show Boat, to sing.

The song is sung only once in the show and is highly emotional, with the singer supposedly on the verge of tears. It is sung in an audition scene in Act II. At the Trocadero, a local Chicago night club, Julie LaVerne, the former leading lady of the show boat, is the featured singer. Julie, who is of mixed blood, has been permanently abandoned by her white husband, Steve Baker, years after the two were forced to leave the show boat because of their interracial (and therefore illegal) marriage. Despondent, Julie has taken to drink and is quickly becoming an alcoholic. At the urging of Jim Green, the nightclub manager, Julie rehearses the song "Bill", which is a woman's confession of deep love for a less-than-perfect man named Bill, and it is clear that the emotion that Julie puts into the song comes from the fact that she is really thinking about her husband as she sings.

"Bill" became one of Helen Morgan's signature songs, and onstage she sang it in her trademark style sitting atop a piano. Although the song is sung only once in Show Boat and never reprised, it has become one of the musical's most famous.

On film, Helen Morgan sang "Bill" both in the prologue to the 1929 part-talkie film version of Show Boat and in the classic 1936 film version. Lena Horne was filmed singing it for the Jerome Kern biopic Till the Clouds Roll By, but the scene was eventually cut, and Ava Gardner, using the dubbed-in voice of Annette Warren, sang it in the 1951 Technicolor remake of Show Boat. Gardner's own voice can be heard on the soundtrack record.

Shirley Bassey recorded the song for the 1959 Studio Cast Album of " Show Boat".

The song was a regular part of Dorothy Lamour's repertoire. Lamour frequently sang it on radio and in concert and recorded it in 1958.

Bill (footballer)

Rosimar Amâncio (born 2 July 1984), better known as Bill, is a Brazilian footballer who plays for Ceará, as a striker.

Bill (surname)

Bill is a surname, and may refer to:

  • Alfred H. Bill (1879-1964), American writer
  • Charles Bill (1843–1915), British politician
  • Edward Lyman Bill (1862-1916), founder and editor of the magazine Talking Machine World
  • Max Bill (1908–1994), Swiss architect, artist and designer
  • William Bill (c. 1505–1561), English churchman and academic
Bill (2015 film)

Bill is a 2015 British family adventure comedy film from the principal performers behind children's TV series Horrible Histories and Yonderland. It was produced by Punk Cinema, Cowboy Films and BBC Films and was released in the UK on 18 September 2015 by Vertigo Films. The film is a fictional take on the young William Shakespeare's search for fame and fortune, as written by Laurence Rickard and Ben Willbond and directed by Richard Bracewell who co-produced with Tony Bracewell, Alasdair Flind and Charles Steel. It features the six lead performers playing several different roles each including Mathew Baynton, Martha Howe-Douglas, Ben Willbond, Simon Farnaby, Jim Howick and Laurence Rickard. Bill has received mostly positive reviews from critics and grossed $968,534 worldwide. The film also received nominations for the Evening Standard British Film Award for Award for Comedy and the Into Film Award for Family Film of the Year.

Usage examples of "bill".

Bill had spent a lot of his childhood in country towns, I think that moulded his attitudes to Aboriginal people.

NARAL Pro-Choice America even decided not to oppose a bill that would require doctors to anesthetize babies being aborted after the twentieth week of pregnancy, called the Unborn Child Pain Awareness Act.

Bill of Rights uncoupled religion from the state, in part because so many religions were steeped in an absolutist frame of mind, each convinced that it alone had a monopoly on the truth and therefore eager for the state to impose this truth on others.

What would happen if she finally confessed to him that Bill had been an abusive husband?

An Englishman took the bill, and after a careful examination said he neither knew the drawer, the accepter, nor the backer.

He held a number of bills, many of which were suspected by him to be forged--that is to say, that the figures had been altered after the signature of the acceptor had been written.

This bill which had received the reluctant acquiescence of his majesty, was read a first time on the 5th of March, and was ordered to be read on the twelfth of the same month.

The bill came before the house of lords on the 2nd of February, when it was opposed by Lord Brougham, in a speech of great length, and in an acrimonious spirit.

A bill, therefore, was immediately passed, allowing the sign-manual to be adhibited by a stamp.

Under these circumstances, his grace moved that the debate be adjourned, as the house had not sufficient notice of the contents of the bill, and as the title of it did not state anything respecting the precedence of the prince.

The debate having been adjourned, was resumed by the Earls of Hardwick and Carnarvon, who supported the bill.

Accordingly, on the 12th of February, on the proposal of the second reading, government opposition was offered: the debate, after an adjournment, was resumed on the 15th, and continued through that day and the next, when the bill was thrown out by an overwhelming majority.

Two bills founded upon these propositions were introduced, and both sides of the house admitting the justice of the measures seemed to agree in the propriety of adopting them.

The bargello asked me to give him the bill of exchange and all the effects of the adventurer, including the letters.

In short, religious notices were sprinkled in among the theater bills, and the highest church dignitaries were advertised side by side with actors, singers, and clowns.