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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
yeast
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
yeast extract
yeast infection
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
active
▪ Proof active dry yeast first in 4 tablespoons lukewarm water.
▪ Add small quantities of water as needed. 1 Proof active dry yeast first in 4 tablespoons lukewarm water.
▪ So, for this one bread, we use active dry yeast and have had great success.
dry
▪ It is a difficult date to establish and is not frequently used, although it appears on packaged dry yeast. 4.
▪ It was thought that dry granulated yeast imparted an inferior flavor.
▪ Proof active dry yeast first in 4 tablespoons lukewarm water.
▪ Add small quantities of water as needed. 1 Proof active dry yeast first in 4 tablespoons lukewarm water.
▪ So, for this one bread, we use active dry yeast and have had great success.
■ NOUN
cell
▪ This idea is supported by the potential similarity of two other DNA-binding proteins that regulate transcription during the yeast cell cycle.
▪ Like humans, yeast cells prefer to burn their glucose with oxygen to produce energy.
▪ Despite the similarities between yeast cells and human cells, the viruses would not grow.
▪ Pharmaceutical companies are undergoing a revolution as bioengineered yeast cells replace toxic, solvent-intense chemicals to create medicinal drugs.
extract
▪ So much yeast is produced during fermentation that large amounts are sold to companies such as Marmite to be turned into yeast extract.
infection
▪ Recurrent oral and vaginal yeast infections occurred in two patients receiving cyclosporin and oral thrush occurred in one patient receiving placebo.
▪ Well, there are jokes about yeast infections, frostbite, liver transplants and cereal variety packs.
▪ Thrush Thrush is caused by a yeast infection.
▪ For example, yogurt has been shown to reduce yeast infections in women.
■ VERB
add
▪ We added yeast and laughed out loud.
Add dry ingredients alternating with milk. Add yeast and nuts.
Add some boiling water to fill up to just below neck or demijohn. Add the previously activated yeast.
use
▪ Sue Cale demonstrated the art of making hot cross buns using fast action dried yeast.
▪ So, for this one bread, we use active dry yeast and have had great success.
▪ A piece of dough was kept back after using the yeast and this is called leaven.
▪ I do not feel diminished nor is my finished loaf diminished because I use instant yeast and a regular oven.
▪ The brew is still fermented for days, using the same yeast which has been working for years and years.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A sweet tooth One of the most curious symptoms of candidiasis is a craving for sugary foods or for foods containing yeast.
▪ Another, newer type of yeast is gaining in popularity.
▪ Assuming the same thing happens in the gut, then a vitamin deficiency might make the yeast convert to the hyphal form.
▪ Everything they needed was already in the cupboard: flour, sugar, shortening, yeast, and other ordinary ingredients.
▪ Hybrigenics relies on a combination of souped-up yeast and powerful computing techniques to get the job done.
▪ Producing appreciable quantities demands somewhat laborious and delicate manipulations of yeast.
▪ The yeast must be pure, or the stars would be poisoned.
▪ Well, there are jokes about yeast infections, frostbite, liver transplants and cereal variety packs.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Yeast

Yeast \Yeast\, n. [OE. [yogh]eest, [yogh]est, AS. gist; akin to D. gest, gist, G. gischt, g["a]scht, OHG. jesan, jerian, to ferment, G. gischen, g["a]schen, g["a]hren, Gr. ? boiled, zei^n to boil, Skr. yas. [root]11

  1. ] 1. The foam, or troth (top yeast), or the sediment (bottom yeast), of beer or other in fermentation, which contains the yeast plant or its spores, and under certain conditions produces fermentation in saccharine or farinaceous substances; a preparation used for raising dough for bread or cakes, and making it light and puffy; barm; ferment.

  2. Spume, or foam, of water.

    They melt thy yeast of waves, which mar Alike the Armada's pride, or spoils of Trafalgar.
    --Byron.

    Yeast cake, a mealy cake impregnated with the live germs of the yeast plant, and used as a conveniently transportable substitute for yeast.

    Yeast plant (Bot.), the vegetable organism, or fungus, of which beer yeast consists. The yeast plant is composed of simple cells, or granules, about one three-thousandth of an inch in diameter, often united into filaments which reproduce by budding, and under certain circumstances by the formation of spores. The name is extended to other ferments of the same genus. See Saccharomyces.

    Yeast powder, a baling powder, -- used instead of yeast in leavening bread.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
yeast

Old English gist "yeast, froth," from Proto-Germanic *jest- (cognates: Old Norse jastr, Swedish jäst, Middle High German gest, German Gischt "foam, froth," Old High German jesan, German gären "to ferment"), from PIE root *yes- "to boil, foam, froth" (cognates: Sanskrit yasyati "boils, seethes," Greek zein "to boil," Welsh ias "seething, foaming").

Wiktionary
yeast

n. 1 An often humid, yellowish froth produced by fermenting malt worts, and used to brew beer, leaven bread, and also used in certain medicines. 2 A single-celled fungus of a wide variety of taxonomic families. 3 # A true yeast or budding yeast in order Saccharomycetales. 4 ## (vern baker's yeast pedia=1), ''Saccharomyces cerevisiae'' 5 ### A compressed cake or dried granules of this substance used for mixing with flour to make bread dough rise. 6 ## brewer's yeast, certain species of ''Saccharomyces'', principally ''Saccharomyces cerevisiae'' and (taxlink Saccharomyces carlsbergensis species noshow=1). 7 # ''Candida'', a ubiquitous fungus that can cause various kinds of infections in humans. 8 ## The resulting infection, candidiasis. 9 (context figuratively English) A frothy foam. vb. 1 To ferment. 2 (context of something prepared with a yeasted dough English) To rise. 3 (context African American Vernacular English slang English) To exaggeratehttp://www.probertencyclopaedi

  1. com/cgi-bin/res.pl?keyword=Yeasting&offset=0

WordNet
yeast
  1. n. a commercial leavening agent containing yeast cells; used to raise the dough in making bread and for fermenting beer or whiskey [syn: barm]

  2. any of various single-celled fungi that reproduce asexually by budding or division

Wikipedia
Yeast (novel)

Yeast: A Problem (1848) was the first novel by the Victorian social and religious controversialist Charles Kingsley.

Yeast

Yeasts are eukaryotic, single- celled microorganisms classified as members of the fungus kingdom. The yeast lineage originated hundreds of million years ago, and 1,500 species are currently identified. They are estimated to constitute 1% of all described fungal species. Yeasts are unicellular organisms which evolved from multicellular ancestors, with some species having the ability to develop multicellular characteristics by forming strings of connected budding cells known as pseudohyphae or false hyphae. Yeast sizes vary greatly, depending on species and environment, typically measuring 3–4  µm in diameter, although some yeasts can grow to 40 µm in size. Most yeasts reproduce asexually by mitosis, and many do so by the asymmetric division process known as budding.

Yeasts, with their single-celled growth habit, can be contrasted with molds, which grow hyphae. Fungal species that can take both forms (depending on temperature or other conditions) are called dimorphic fungi ("dimorphic" means "having two forms").

By fermentation, the yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae converts carbohydrates to carbon dioxide and alcohols – for thousands of years the carbon dioxide has been used in baking and the alcohol in alcoholic beverages. It is also a centrally important model organism in modern cell biology research, and is one of the most thoroughly researched eukaryotic microorganisms. Researchers have used it to gather information about the biology of the eukaryotic cell and ultimately human biology. Other species of yeasts, such as Candida albicans, are opportunistic pathogens and can cause infections in humans. Yeasts have recently been used to generate electricity in microbial fuel cells, and produce ethanol for the biofuel industry.

Yeasts do not form a single taxonomic or phylogenetic grouping. The term "yeast" is often taken as a synonym for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but the phylogenetic diversity of yeasts is shown by their placement in two separate phyla: the Ascomycota and the Basidiomycota. The budding yeasts ("true yeasts") are classified in the order Saccharomycetales.

Yeast (journal)

Yeast is a monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Wiley-Blackwell. It publishes original research articles, reviews, and short communications on all aspects of Saccharomyces and other clinically important yeasts. The journal focuses on the most significant developments of research with unicellular fungi, including innovative methods of broad applicability. The editors-in-chief are John Armstrong, Dana Davis, Gianni Liti, Steve Oliver. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2011 impact factor of 1.895.

Usage examples of "yeast".

These are fitted with attemperators, and parachutes for the removal of yeast, in much the same way as in the skimming system.

Any scab worth his yeast knew that those insect vectors were stuffed to bursting with swift and ghastly illnesses, pneumonic plague and necrotizing fasciitis among the friendlier ones.

At this time Koch knew little or nothing about the yeast soups and flasks of Pasteur, and the experiments he fussed with had the crude originality of the first cave man trying to make fire.

Fan Importer, a Glass Beveller, a Hotel Broker, an Insect Exterminator, a Junk Dealer, a Kalsomine Manufacturer, a Laundryman, a Mausoleum Architect, a Nurse, an Oculist, a Paper-Hanger, a Quilt Designer, a Roofer, a Ship Plumber, a Tinsmith, an Undertaker, a Veterinarian, a Wig Maker, an X-ray apparatus manufacturer, a Yeast producer, or a Zinc Spelter.

Normally quiescent organisms, such as staphylococcus, yeast, pseudomonas, or escherichia, can become deadly when they colonize the surface of some foreign object implanted inside the body.

The yeast colony gorges itself on saccharides until it dies poisoned by its own excretion.

Mix in one quart of sifted bread flour, one-quarter cup of sugar, a saltspoon of salt and one-half yeast cake dissolved in one-half cup of lukewarm water.

The first sloggy grain ferments needed a purifying spice, since they were without the benefit of reliable yeasts.

They hypothesized through the study of yeast that prions may hold the key to genetic mutations, even play a role in evolution.

It replaces the diastase of malted grain and also the yeast of a European brewery.

One of the aims of the maltster is, therefore, to break down the protein substances present in barley to such a degree that the wort has a maximum nutritive value for the yeast.

I am making a sarcastic observation that Pickwick has less brain power than yeast.

If they are left standing in their solutions of proteinoid, they will, like yeast cells, form small buds which enlarge, split off from their parent, and grow by absorbing proteinoid from the solution.

Aunt Tildy was so interested in the project of the heaven-born inventor to raise featherless turkeys that she forgot the yeast cake she had put to soak until it had been boiling merrily for some time.

Normally quiescent organisms, such as staphylococcus, yeast, pseudomonas, or escherichia, can become deadly when they colonize the surface of some foreign object implanted inside the body.