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wine
Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
wine
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a wine bar (=a bar selling mostly wine, in contrast to a pub)
▪ He asked her to meet him in a trendy wine bar.
a wine list (=a list of wines available in a restaurant)
▪ a good wine list
a wine/coffee/blood etc stain
▪ How can I get coffee stains out of a cotton tablecloth?
a wine/milk/beer etc bottle
barley wine
coffee/wine/car etc producer
▪ leading oil producers
dessert wine
fine wines
▪ The restaurant was chosen for its good food and fine wines.
fortified wine
mulled wine
music/wine snob
table wine
tomato/cheese/wine etc sauce
▪ vanilla ice cream with chocolate sauce
wine bar
wine cellar
wine cooler
wine glass
wine tasting
wine vinegar
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
cheap
▪ It was a sawdust floor and red cheap wine.
▪ The fear of poverty and illness, brought on by a sudden craving for cheap wine.
▪ We ordered more supplies of the cheap red wine and decided that the 2.30 ferry would have to go without us.
▪ Follow the penny hustle, drink the cheap wine.
▪ Afterward, the newman were handed the cheap wine that had warmed near the fire for drinking races.
dry
▪ And every couple receives a case of Lygon Arms' dry white wine or claret as a parting gift.
▪ The good news is that there are more well-made dry kosher wines than ever before.
▪ But it may well appeal to those who like very dry wine.
▪ But no beverage on the planet so perfectly complements dinner as a well-matched, dry table wine.
▪ His 1991 vintage is an excellent clean, dry and flinty wine with a full-bodied richness characteristic of his style.
▪ If finishing with cream, use a dry white wine instead of a red wine.
▪ This crisp, dry wine is a steal at $ 9.
fine
▪ Enjoy with your Tandoori special fine wines, draught or bottled beer.
▪ He dines at the best restaurants, drinks fine wines and beds whomever attracts him.
▪ Kikkoman Soy Sauce takes a full 6 months to naturally ferment, just like a fine wine.
▪ This is an astonishingly fine wine with great concentration and wonderful flavors of black cherry, chocolate, black raspberry and herbs.
▪ The appreciation of fine wine and the appreciation of fine intellectual distinctions often go together.
▪ Goddard describes the nuances of some of these teas the way a wine connoisseur speaks of fine wines.
good
▪ The defensive instinct must be allowed to mature slowly, like a good wine.
▪ At their best, these wines rival anything produced in Bordeaux, Burgundy or the Napa Valley for complexity and sheer power.
▪ The best wines show much the same style as their more expensive Collio counterparts.
▪ Rest assured, there were good wines at all price ranges.
▪ A good bottle of wine to finish with is the reward!
▪ Kyoto serves its best rice wines chilled in a traditional wine glass.
▪ In the nineteenth century the wines of Pierry were considered on a par with the best wines of Aÿ.
Good soil ages just like good wine.
red
▪ Its particular flavour is achieved by the addition of red wine and rosemary to the brine in which it is cured.
▪ The clerk in the liquor store had recommended that she let this red wine breathe before serving it.
▪ Still red wines in Champagne are rare, however, and hardly ever exciting.
▪ Several other recent studies have shown that moderate consumption of red wine, in particular, is helpful for preventing heart disease.
▪ Auntie Muriel buys the cheapest gauze and spends the rest of the subsidy on red wine.
▪ If finishing with cream, use a dry white wine instead of a red wine.
▪ There were several plates of tap as on the table between them and Dale had a large glass of red wine.
▪ Strain into a large container, making sure to press all liquid free from solids; add red wine.
sparkling
▪ It was not until the eighteenth century that the word Champagne became synonymous with the sparkling wine of the region.
▪ For my tastebuds the best way to dilute sparkling wine is with fresh orange juice to make the traditional Bucks Fizz.
▪ Parc Hotel Flora Honeymoon and silver anniversary couples receive a bottle of sparkling wine and flowers or fruit.
▪ Sainsbury's Buck's Fizz is a light and very attractive sparkling blend of wine and orange juice.
▪ Try low-alcohol Bucks Fizz, a delicious mixture of orange juice and sparkling wine.
▪ Can you tell the difference between a sparkling wine and Champagne?
▪ All Champagne is sparkling wine but not all sparkling wine is Champagne.
sweet
▪ Full-bodied, sweet or sparkling wines can be drunk at a cooler temperature.
▪ Dip matzos in the sweet wine or brandy so they get wet, but are not so soaked they become flexible.
▪ Tie-breaker Describe in no more than 100 words how the production of sweet white wines varies from that of dry white wines.
▪ The men had drunk canned beer and the women sweet wine.
▪ The wafer was in his mouth and the sweet wine, but he wanted more.
▪ His kiss was as sensuous and seductive as black satin, sweeter than any wine.
▪ Take wine, any sweet wine you like.
▪ Ludovico called exuberantly for champagne but it was unobtainable, so he settled for a sweet fizzy wine instead.
white
▪ We sat at the upstairs bar with two tall glasses of iced white Eger wine, for which I paid.
▪ Then they disseminated research pointing to both red and white wine.
▪ Heat the soup and asparagus tips with the white wine in a saucepan.
▪ The capers are usually pickled in a white wine vinegar to preserve them.
▪ They all took it for white wine and discovered their mistake.
▪ Leaving white wines unfiltered is certainly far more revolutionary than a bit of oak.
▪ Add white wine, red wine vinegar, tomato purée and mustard to the pan with the garlic.
▪ He fetched some chilled white wine from the fridge.
■ NOUN
bar
▪ Afterwards, I went to a wine bar with a couple of other crime writers.
▪ Keen on promoting venture capital, Viney owns a chain of wine bars as a sideline.
▪ Thurso has got a swimming pool and a wine bar.
▪ Our friendly wine bar is also there for your pre-show drink, your interval glass of wine or your after show socialising.
▪ The theatre's members only wine bar situated between the first and second floors.
▪ There are wine bars and pub sin every setting from a converted canalside warehouse to the ground floor of a theatre!
▪ A wine bar and a smart hairdresser marked the divide.
▪ Casinos are the wine bars of the gambling world.
bottle
▪ The heels of wine bottles were cold green moons she stroked as she slid past.
▪ As she stood up an empty wine bottle clattered off the bench and rolled down the pavement.
▪ Pieces of the globular bodies of eighteenth century wine bottles were unearthed.
▪ Paper streamers like coiled fuses were scattered between the plates and wine bottles.
▪ Among innumerable other tasks they are responsible for stamping the lead or paper seals which enclose wine bottle corks.
▪ He had languidly stretched one arm out and in doing so knocked over the wine bottle.
▪ Mrs Goodwin came in with the wine bottles.
▪ On the work surface she could see a bowl of salad, the wine bottle and a row of cutlery.
cellar
▪ I've seen strong men crying at the salmon mayonnaise, and the wine cellar would turn a camel off the water.
▪ O'Viv A complimentary evening excursion to a local wine cellar and wine tasting.
▪ The sixth-century papal sacristy used during Lent has been located in the former wine cellar of the convent.
▪ The mob destroyed his house, library, laboratory and notes, but they took advantage of his well-stocked wine cellar.
▪ The wine cellar presents a similar opportunity.
▪ Whighams Wine Cellars Old wine cellar dating from 1800.
▪ Noel keeps a small but interesting wine cellar.
▪ He had a justly celebrated wine cellar.
cup
▪ Cranston staggered behind him, holding a wine cup in one hand and the jug in the other.
▪ He sat, a wine cup clenched firmly in his hands, as he stared through a window into the gathering darkness.
▪ The coroner turned away to refill his wine cup.
▪ Father Crispin had unfortunately just knocked over a wine cup and was cleaning up the mess with a napkin.
dessert
▪ Only the glasses for the roast and dessert wine, of course.
▪ Aleatico: This red variety is often used to make dessert wines with a pink hue.
▪ Serve sliced, with jam and fresh coffee, or with a well-chilled dessert wine.
▪ Bual is a medium to dark dessert wine which is full-bodied and very fragrant.
▪ Malmsey is a medium-dark to dark full-bodied, very fruity, luscious and fragrant dessert wine.
▪ Serve dessert wines with a slice of Christmas cake, pudding, or my two desserts.
glass
▪ She twirled the stem of her wine glass thoughtfully, and didn't reply.
▪ The wine glasses, tumblers, pipes and so on were articles which each painter handled regularly in the course of day-to-day life.
▪ Elinor took another swig of sherry and Henry arranged wine glasses at each place.
▪ Her hand shook as she put her wine glass down.
▪ She focused on the rim of her wine glass as phrases from the story danced mockingly across her memory.
▪ Letters and numbers set at random around its perimeter and an upended wine glass in the centre.
▪ One of our wedding presents was an elegant set of tall, slender-stemmed wine glasses.
▪ Rain saw only that he got there first and Harbury was left holding out the wine glass.
house
▪ Extensive range of house wines and champagne, whiskies and draught beers.
▪ Hot and cold bar meals. House wines, good selection of whiskies.
▪ Expected demand in terms of our current Cheshire Restaurants menu is as follows: Currently house wine costs £1.88 and sells at £3.50.
▪ The university also has a good wine list to complement its food, from a reasonable house wine to more quality vintages.
▪ A house wine is on offer, or you can bring your own.
▪ Pancake Place Pancakes with sweet and savoury fillings. House wine by the glass or carafe.
▪ Dinner, cocktails and house wine came to £81 for four.
list
▪ To wash them down, the wine list includes Anjou rosé, Muscadet and sparkling Saumur.
▪ He has built up an extensive wine list in close co-operation with Peter Davenport, and is knowledgeable and enthusiastic about it.
▪ Good wine list, many excellent malt whiskies, real ale.
▪ Puds with flair include almond blancmange and bread-and-butter pudding; the long, shrewd wine list starts at £6.90.
▪ The wine list is equally select.
▪ Interesting and reasonable menu with good wine list.
▪ Excellent wine list, over 70 whiskies, real ale.
▪ The menu at Ayton Hall is based on fresh local produce and there is a comprehensive wine list.
merchant
▪ Whigham's Wine Cellar Attached to the famous wine merchants.
▪ Speak to my wine merchant, dear boy, he ought to have some of that left.
▪ Take time to shop around; get to know your local wine merchant or investigate your local supermarket.
▪ White splashes of paint on the bottles indicated which way up they should be binned after delivery from the wine merchant.
▪ Costs about £6 from high street and independent wine merchants, selected Asda stored or by mail order.
▪ The incident also offered us a glimpse of the glamorous, sometimes expensive, globe trotting lifestyle of a successful wine merchant.
rice
▪ Add ginger, shallots, the snow pea leaves, rice wine and salt.
▪ Add 1 tablespoon of broth from the chicken pot, the remaining 1 tablespoon of rice wine and the sesame oil.
▪ Kyoto serves its best rice wines chilled in a traditional wine glass.
sauce
▪ A few berries in a rich wine sauce for goose or chicken adds a delicious note.
▪ Sea bream, with shallot and red wine sauce, comes a close second in the restaurant.
▪ Salmon Parisienne with a delicious white wine sauce.
▪ One recipe suggested the cook should prepare a dish of snails in wine sauce.
▪ Jugged beer in stout and port wine sauce specialities of the house.
▪ The remaining marinade forms the base of a red wine sauce with cranberries, redcurrants and slices of lime.
stain
▪ Port wine stains are heterogeneous, and responses to different lasers vary considerably.
▪ She looked at the red wine stain on his trousers and felt tears pricking her eyes.
table
▪ Growers can get around the ban by planting vines for quality wines rather than table wines.
▪ But no beverage on the planet so perfectly complements dinner as a well-matched, dry table wine.
▪ It wants Brussels to consider bringing some table wine vines into its quality wine scheme.
▪ Premiumpriced wines have also gained share, while the generic table wines have grown much more slowly.
▪ Like Jefferson, he pursued the dream of producing sound table wine from Eastern soil at affordable prices for the masses.
tasting
▪ A seven-course dinner and wine tasting are part of the programme.
▪ The fun includes wine tasting, vintage car display, bouncy castles, pony rides, music and sumo wrestling.
▪ O'Viv A complimentary evening excursion to a local wine cellar and wine tasting.
▪ Her favourite hobby is of particular interest as she studies wine and treats her guests to informal wine tastings.
vinegar
▪ White wine vinegar should be used for mayonnaise, Hollandaise and Bearnaise sauces.
▪ The capers are usually pickled in a white wine vinegar to preserve them.
▪ Salt, a sprinkling of olive oil and wine vinegar were the only seasonings.
▪ Tenderise the meat of older hare and develop its flavour by marinating it in oil, wine and wine vinegar.
▪ Add white wine, red wine vinegar, tomato purée and mustard to the pan with the garlic.
▪ Just cover with fresh cold water and add a tablespoon of wine vinegar.
▪ And they would never use anything other than olive oil from the nearest olive tree, and red wine vinegar.
■ VERB
bring
▪ She would get some Dublin Bay prawns and tons of garlic, if he could bring some great wine or other?
▪ I also brought some wine and cheese in a basket to say that I really appreciated the welcoming that I received.
▪ The first woman to reply told me to bring a bottle of wine.
▪ A practical nurse brought old red wine, a silver tray of smoked salmon, crumbled hard-boiled egg, capers and lemon.
▪ The slaves were bringing cups of chilled wine to the long table.
▪ Sometime before the guests were due to arrive, Mark went down to the cellar to bring up the wine.
▪ Sergio had brought a bottle of wine.
▪ It wants Brussels to consider bringing some table wine vines into its quality wine scheme.
buy
▪ It was like giving myself a little treat, like say buying a bottle of wine.
▪ They bought the wine, then drove on, the time passing swiftly in a blur of easy laughter and pleasant conversation.
▪ You should arrive around 9.45am, giving you a chance to buy some local wines before your 11.45 sailing for Koblenz.
▪ She bought sherry and white wine and whisky.
▪ The court held that had the customers known of the fraud they would not have bought the wine.
▪ Farmers complain about no-one buying their wine and cheap imports flooding the markets.
▪ But he had small taste for the bagging beer and wished to have bought himself a wine.
drink
▪ Next evening, I was drinking his wine.
▪ I drink red wine and heat a pita bread on the gas burner and wrap it around alfalfa sprouts or green linguine.
▪ Outside on the terrace, Karen and Eduardo drank wine and took the last of the day's sun.
▪ Follow the penny hustle, drink the cheap wine.
▪ They spoke quietly, deliberated over the menu and drank their wine in sips, like dipping birds.
▪ To see a starvIng man eating lobster salad and drinking Rhine wine, barefooted and in tatters, was curious.
▪ She ate the contents of the saucepan and some bread and cheese and an apple, and drank most of the wine.
▪ She drank a lot of wine for a small girl, and enjoyed it.
pour
▪ Sauté chicken, pour on stock &038; wine.
▪ Then pour in the cup wine and roast for 1 hour longer.
▪ They helped themselves to salad and Sara poured the wine.
▪ Klein was already in the living room, pouring wine.
▪ She poured the wine then backed away, her head bowed, her throat suddenly dry, her heart pounding.
▪ Robyn remembered his free and easy hand as he had poured her wine.
▪ He took glasses from a cupboard, poured some wine for Rosa, and brought Fabio a glass in the sitting-room.
▪ When the chicken is browned, drain off the oil and pour in the wine and stock.
produce
▪ These sweeter grapes produce rich, fruity wines with a potentially higher level of alcohol.
▪ It still amazes me that this winery can produce such good wines in such massive quantities.
▪ Our modern winery produces wines which have won international Gold Awards.
▪ Like Jefferson, he pursued the dream of producing sound table wine from Eastern soil at affordable prices for the masses.
▪ The vines from these slopes produce wine of an extremely dependable quality.
▪ This village produces strong wines of good varietal character well deserving premier cru status.
▪ Yet beer - good beer - is a highly complex product and one that arguably needs greater skill to produce than wine.
▪ Pinot Blanc is one of the less complicated Alsace grapes, producing good, refreshing wines.
serve
▪ Or have you tried serving red wine with salmon?
▪ She serves complementary wine and great conversation for those who wish and is willing to accommodate a family.
▪ Also in my job I learn to attractively set out different types of food and serve wine and champagne.
▪ Kyoto serves its best rice wines chilled in a traditional wine glass.
▪ At five past two Franco took the unprecedented step of refusing to serve him any more wine.
▪ You can serve drinks, even wines and spirits, to people who aren't eating.
▪ He started to shout and scream, demanding that he be served with wine.
▪ It serves s Moravian wines and is closed on Sundays.
sip
▪ But tonight she was going to Le Club Zodiaque, tonight she wanted to sip wine until her feet were flying.
▪ Weaver said Tuesday night while sipping wine and brandishing various medieval weapons for sale in his little shop of horrors.
▪ She sipped the wine, picked at the first course and let James Hamilton carry the conversation.
▪ She stood smoking, sipping wine.
▪ Mr Brown might have been expected to roll each pledge around his mouth like a connoisseur sipping a fine wine.
▪ She sat down and sipped the wine and contemplated what she had done.
▪ Riven saw Bragad gesticulating at Bicker, who sipped wine reflectively.
▪ Maggie sipped cautiously at the wine, aware all the time of dark, sardonic eyes watching her.
taste
▪ He had kissed her and she had tasted the red wine on his lips.
▪ He tasted of wine, of coffee.
▪ When was the last time you tasted a wine that you thought was really strange?
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a wine/coffee/snack etc bar
▪ Afterwards, I went to a wine bar with a couple of other crime writers.
▪ Complimentary coffee and tea; also has a coffee bar for espresso and biscotti.! end! &.
▪ If he was lucky he might start a wine bar when he left.
▪ The bakery has a coffee bar, and cappuccino is sixty cents!
▪ The other times he had sat in a coffee bar with her and listened to the juke box.
▪ There is a snack bar by the pool, a taverna in the grounds and an excellent restaurant in the Atlantis itself.
▪ Thurso has got a swimming pool and a wine bar.
▪ We went to a coffee bar.
book/record/wine etc club
▪ Bristol brought on record club buy Ray Atteveld for the injured Martin Scott after 16 minutes.
▪ Four were circulars - two were reminders that his subscriptions to a book club and the golf club were overdue.
▪ I think we all know that the book clubs are not naive.
▪ Last fall, Winfrey decided to give fiction a boost by creating her on-air book club.
▪ The kids belong to a book club.
▪ The recently reestablished library club was described and the possibility of a book club considered.
coffee/wine/champagne etc drinker
▪ A table of coffee drinkers in a Colorado cafe.
▪ Founded in 1900, Beaulieu Vineyard is trying to lure younger wine drinkers.
▪ Good news for the champagne drinker?
▪ However, more wine drinkers are consuming Pinot Noir these days, and the biggest reason is sheer pleasure.
▪ If you are a regular coffee drinker, the aroma of freshly brewed coffee really does set the taste buds tingling.
▪ Keep the computer in a clean, vibration-free place away from smokers and coffee drinkers.
▪ Such findings suggest that famous coffee drinkers such as Bach and Kant may have derived little help from their caffeine habits.
▪ The increased healing rate in wine drinkers is consistent with other reports that moderate alcohol intake may be harmless or beneficial.
dry wine/sherry etc
▪ A separate sauce is made by sauteing the duck liver with shallots, carrots, herbs, and dry sherry.
▪ A wonderful pale gold colour we felt it tasted a bit like a dry sherry.
▪ In dry wines no sugar is left after fermentation.
▪ Lindauer Brut £7.49 Made from the Pinot and Chardonnay grape this dry wine had a light golden colour.
▪ Order large glass of dry sherry and feel its warmth penetrate toes, making up for rather painful new shoes.
▪ The flavour should be almost viscous for a white wine, rich and succulent for a supposedly dry wine.
▪ This crisp, dry wine is a steal at $ 9.
▪ This is the dry sherry end of the appointments business.
house wine
▪ A house wine is on offer, or you can bring your own.
▪ As the economy boomed, champagne boomed with it, becoming the house wine of the upwardly mobile.
▪ Dinner, cocktails and house wine came to £81 for four.
▪ Expected demand in terms of our current Cheshire Restaurants menu is as follows: Currently house wine costs £1.88 and sells at £3.50.
▪ Extensive range of house wines and champagne, whiskies and draught beers.
▪ For five nights the hotel also offer a bottle of house wine per couple.
▪ The university also has a good wine list to complement its food, from a reasonable house wine to more quality vintages.
kill a beer/bottle of wine etc
wine/coal/timber etc merchant
▪ Branches of timber merchants, such as W H Newson, stock a range of hardwood mouldings for you to put up yourself.
▪ Consumers should go there only with guidance from a capable wine merchant or reviewer.
▪ Other services provided by Co-operative societies include undertakers, coal merchants and opticians.
▪ Take time to shop around; get to know your local wine merchant or investigate your local supermarket.
▪ The 13 coal merchants and some of the 12 corn and seed merchants no doubt operated from the wharf.
▪ The worst was a coal merchant.
▪ Whigham's Wine Cellar Attached to the famous wine merchants.
wine/film/opera etc buff
▪ Alas, even the most well-meaning opera buffs have an unfortunate habit of making their favorite indoor sport sound impossibly complicated.
▪ For the real film buff, however, the place to be has to be BlackStar.
▪ Inside, bartenders wearing leather harnesses serve beer in cans to an assortment of brutes, heathens, and opera buffs.
▪ It all started when wine buff Liz entered another competition in the Express.
▪ Rubbish, I hear all you wine buffs out there say.
wine/milk etc lake
▪ The food is dumpling-based, substantial, and it would be kinder to draw a veil over the indigenous wine lake.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a new Australian wine
▪ elderberry wine
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Anybody who reveres wine has got it all wrong.
▪ Excellent lunch with fine wines and liqueurs.
▪ It was a wine that they paid about a penny or twopence a glass for.
▪ It was like giving myself a little treat, like say buying a bottle of wine.
▪ It was the beginning of a passion for Bordeaux wines and a key experience that shaped his adult life.
▪ Meanwhile, other researchers were focusing on red wine, rather than on all alcoholic beverages.
▪ Reduce heat to medium and simmer approximately 15 minutes, until wine evaporates to a thin layer.
▪ Which brings us back to red wine.
II.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a wine/coffee/snack etc bar
▪ Afterwards, I went to a wine bar with a couple of other crime writers.
▪ Complimentary coffee and tea; also has a coffee bar for espresso and biscotti.! end! &.
▪ If he was lucky he might start a wine bar when he left.
▪ The bakery has a coffee bar, and cappuccino is sixty cents!
▪ The other times he had sat in a coffee bar with her and listened to the juke box.
▪ There is a snack bar by the pool, a taverna in the grounds and an excellent restaurant in the Atlantis itself.
▪ Thurso has got a swimming pool and a wine bar.
▪ We went to a coffee bar.
book/record/wine etc club
▪ Bristol brought on record club buy Ray Atteveld for the injured Martin Scott after 16 minutes.
▪ Four were circulars - two were reminders that his subscriptions to a book club and the golf club were overdue.
▪ I think we all know that the book clubs are not naive.
▪ Last fall, Winfrey decided to give fiction a boost by creating her on-air book club.
▪ The kids belong to a book club.
▪ The recently reestablished library club was described and the possibility of a book club considered.
coffee/wine/champagne etc drinker
▪ A table of coffee drinkers in a Colorado cafe.
▪ Founded in 1900, Beaulieu Vineyard is trying to lure younger wine drinkers.
▪ Good news for the champagne drinker?
▪ However, more wine drinkers are consuming Pinot Noir these days, and the biggest reason is sheer pleasure.
▪ If you are a regular coffee drinker, the aroma of freshly brewed coffee really does set the taste buds tingling.
▪ Keep the computer in a clean, vibration-free place away from smokers and coffee drinkers.
▪ Such findings suggest that famous coffee drinkers such as Bach and Kant may have derived little help from their caffeine habits.
▪ The increased healing rate in wine drinkers is consistent with other reports that moderate alcohol intake may be harmless or beneficial.
dry wine/sherry etc
▪ A separate sauce is made by sauteing the duck liver with shallots, carrots, herbs, and dry sherry.
▪ A wonderful pale gold colour we felt it tasted a bit like a dry sherry.
▪ In dry wines no sugar is left after fermentation.
▪ Lindauer Brut £7.49 Made from the Pinot and Chardonnay grape this dry wine had a light golden colour.
▪ Order large glass of dry sherry and feel its warmth penetrate toes, making up for rather painful new shoes.
▪ The flavour should be almost viscous for a white wine, rich and succulent for a supposedly dry wine.
▪ This crisp, dry wine is a steal at $ 9.
▪ This is the dry sherry end of the appointments business.
house wine
▪ A house wine is on offer, or you can bring your own.
▪ As the economy boomed, champagne boomed with it, becoming the house wine of the upwardly mobile.
▪ Dinner, cocktails and house wine came to £81 for four.
▪ Expected demand in terms of our current Cheshire Restaurants menu is as follows: Currently house wine costs £1.88 and sells at £3.50.
▪ Extensive range of house wines and champagne, whiskies and draught beers.
▪ For five nights the hotel also offer a bottle of house wine per couple.
▪ The university also has a good wine list to complement its food, from a reasonable house wine to more quality vintages.
wine/coal/timber etc merchant
▪ Branches of timber merchants, such as W H Newson, stock a range of hardwood mouldings for you to put up yourself.
▪ Consumers should go there only with guidance from a capable wine merchant or reviewer.
▪ Other services provided by Co-operative societies include undertakers, coal merchants and opticians.
▪ Take time to shop around; get to know your local wine merchant or investigate your local supermarket.
▪ The 13 coal merchants and some of the 12 corn and seed merchants no doubt operated from the wharf.
▪ The worst was a coal merchant.
▪ Whigham's Wine Cellar Attached to the famous wine merchants.
wine/film/opera etc buff
▪ Alas, even the most well-meaning opera buffs have an unfortunate habit of making their favorite indoor sport sound impossibly complicated.
▪ For the real film buff, however, the place to be has to be BlackStar.
▪ Inside, bartenders wearing leather harnesses serve beer in cans to an assortment of brutes, heathens, and opera buffs.
▪ It all started when wine buff Liz entered another competition in the Express.
▪ Rubbish, I hear all you wine buffs out there say.
wine/milk etc lake
▪ The food is dumpling-based, substantial, and it would be kinder to draw a veil over the indigenous wine lake.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Did he tell you to plant this here while he wined and dined me?
▪ He wined and dined Princess Diana after supporting her favourite ballet school show.
▪ He could have been anyone or anything stepping out after a night's wining and dining.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Wine

Wine \Wine\, n. [OE. win, AS. win, fr. L. vinum (cf. Icel. v[=i]n; all from the Latin); akin to Gr. o'i^nos, ?, and E. withy. Cf. Vine, Vineyard, Vinous, Withy.]

  1. The expressed juice of grapes, esp. when fermented; a beverage or liquor prepared from grapes by squeezing out their juice, and (usually) allowing it to ferment. ``Red wine of Gascoigne.''
    --Piers Plowman.

    Wine is a mocker, strong drink is raging, and whosoever is deceived thereby is not wise.
    --Prov. xx. 1.

    Bacchus, that first from out the purple grape Crushed the sweet poison of misused wine.
    --Milton.

    Note: Wine is essentially a dilute solution of ethyl alcohol, containing also certain small quantities of ethers and ethereal salts which give character and bouquet. According to their color, strength, taste, etc., wines are called red, white, spirituous, dry, light, still, etc.

  2. A liquor or beverage prepared from the juice of any fruit or plant by a process similar to that for grape wine; as, currant wine; gooseberry wine; palm wine.

  3. The effect of drinking wine in excess; intoxication.

    Noah awoke from his wine.
    --Gen. ix. 2

  4. Birch wine, Cape wine, etc. See under Birch, Cape, etc. Spirit of wine. See under Spirit. To have drunk wine of ape or To have drunk wine ape, to be so drunk as to be foolish. [Obs.] --Chaucer. Wine acid. (Chem.) See Tartaric acid, under Tartaric. Wine apple (Bot.), a large red apple, with firm flesh and a rich, vinous flavor. Wine fly (Zo["o]l.), small two-winged fly of the genus Piophila, whose larva lives in wine, cider, and other fermented liquors. Wine grower, one who cultivates a vineyard and makes wine. Wine measure, the measure by which wines and other spirits are sold, smaller than beer measure. Wine merchant, a merchant who deals in wines. Wine of opium (Pharm.), a solution of opium in aromatized sherry wine, having the same strength as ordinary laudanum; -- also Sydenham's laudanum. Wine press, a machine or apparatus in which grapes are pressed to extract their juice. Wine skin, a bottle or bag of skin, used, in various countries, for carrying wine. Wine stone, a kind of crust deposited in wine casks. See 1st Tartar, 1. Wine vault.

    1. A vault where wine is stored.

    2. A place where wine is served at the bar, or at tables; a dramshop.
      --Dickens.

      Wine vinegar, vinegar made from wine.

      Wine whey, whey made from milk coagulated by the use of wine.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
wine

Old English win "wine," from Proto-Germanic *winam (cognates: Old Saxon, Old Frisian, Old High German win, Old Norse vin, Dutch wijn, German Wein), an early borrowing from Latin vinum "wine," from PIE *win-o-, an Italic noun related to words for "wine" in Greek (oinos), Armenian, Hittite, and non-Indo-European Georgian and West Semitic (Arabic wain, Hebrew yayin), probably from a lost Mediterranean language word *win-/*woin- "wine."\n

\nAlso from Latin vinum are Old Church Slavonic vino, Polish wino, Russian vino, Lithuanian vynas, Welsh gwin, Old Irish fin, Gaelic fion. Essentially the same word as vine (q.v.). Wine snob is recorded from 1951. Wine cellar is from late 14c. Wine-cooler is 1815 as "vessel in which bottled wine is kept cool;" by 1977 as a type of wine-based beverage.

wine

"entertain with wine," 1862, from wine (n.). Earlier "expend in drinking wine" (1620s). Related: Wined; wining.

Wiktionary
wine

Etymology 1 n. 1 An alcoholic beverage made by fermenting juice of grapes. 2 An alcoholic beverage made by fermenting juice of fruits or vegetables other than grapes, usually preceded by the type of the fruit or vegetable; for example, "dandelion wine". 3 (context countable English) A serving of wine. 4 (context uncountable English) A dark purplish red colour; the colour of red wine. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To entertain with wine. 2 (context intransitive English) To drink wine. Etymology 2

n. (context nonstandard British English) wind

WordNet
wine
  1. v. drink wine

  2. treat to wine; "Our relatives in Italy wined and dined us for a week"

wine
  1. n. fermented juice (of grapes especially) [syn: vino]

  2. a red as dark as red wine [syn: wine-colored]

Wikipedia
Wine (disambiguation)

Wine is an alcoholic beverage.

Wine may also refer to:

Wine (1913 film)

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Wine is a 1913 short comedy film featuring Fatty Arbuckle.

Wine (color)

The color wine is a dark shade of red. It is a representation of the average color of red wine.

The first recorded use of wine as a color name in English was in 1705.

The source of this color is: ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955)--Color Sample of Wine (color sample #16).

Wine (surname)

Wine or Wines is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

  • Bobby Wine (born 1938), American baseball player, coach and manager; father of Robbie
  • Ollie Wines (born 1994), Australian Rules Football player
  • Robbie Wine (born 1962), American baseball player and coach; son of Bobby
  • Sherwin Wine (1928–2007), American rabbi
  • Toni Wine (born 1947), American songwriter
Wine (1924 film)

Wine was a 1924 American silent melodrama directed by Louis J. Gasnier, produced and released by Universal Pictures under their 'Jewel' banner. The film featured Clara Bow in her first starring role. The film is now presumed lost.

Wine

Wine (from Latinvinum) is an alcoholic beverage made from fermented grapes, generally Vitis vinifera or its hybrids with Vitis labrusca or Vitis rupestris. Grapes ferment without the addition of sugars, acids, enzymes, water, or other nutrients, as yeast consumes the sugar in the grapes and converts it to ethanol and carbon dioxide. Different varieties of grapes and strains of yeasts produce different styles of wine. These variations result from the complex interactions between the biochemical development of the grape, the reactions involved in fermentation, the terroir (the special characteristics imparted by geography, geology, climate and plant genetics), and the production process. Many countries define legal appellations intended to define styles and qualities of wine; these typically restrict the geographical origin and permitted varieties of grapes, as well as other aspects of wine production.

There are also wines made from fermenting other fruits or cereals, whose names generally specify their base: fruit wine, rice wine, with some having specific names, e.g. cider for apple wine.

Wine has been produced for thousands of years. The earliest known evidence of wine comes from Georgia (Caucasus), where 8000-year-old wine jars were found. Traces of wine have also been found in Iran with 7000-year-old wine jars and in Armenia, in the 6100-year old Areni-1 winery, the earliest known winery. Wine had reached the Balkans by  BC and was consumed and celebrated in ancient Greece, Thrace and Rome. Throughout history, wine has been consumed for its intoxicating effects, which are evident at normal serving sizes.

Wines made from plants other than grapes include rice wine (such as sake) and various fruit wines made from other fruits such as plums or cherries; some well known ones are hard cider from apples, perry from pears, pomegranate wine, and elderberry wine.

Wine has long played an important role in religion. Red wine was associated with blood by the ancient Egyptians and was used by both the Greek cult of Dionysus and the Romans in their Bacchanalia; Judaism also incorporates it in the Kiddush and Christianity in the Eucharist.

Wine (software)

Wine ( recursive acronym for Wine Is Not an Emulator) is a free and open source compatibility layer software application that aims to allow applications designed for Microsoft Windows to run on Unix-like operating systems. Wine also provides a software library, known as Winelib, against which developers can compile Windows applications to help port them to Unix-like systems.

It duplicates functions of Windows by providing alternative implementations of the DLLs that Windows programs call, and a process to substitute for the Windows NT kernel. This method of duplication differs from other methods that might also be considered emulation, where Windows programs run in a virtual machine. Wine is predominantly written using black-box testing reverse-engineering, to avoid copyright issues.

The name Wine initially was an abbreviation for Windows emulator. Its meaning later shifted to the recursive acronym, Wine is not an emulator in order to differentiate the software from CPU emulators. While the name sometimes appears in the forms WINE and wine, the project developers have agreed to standardize on the form Wine.

The phrase "wine is not an emulator" is a reference to the fact that no processor code execution emulation occurs when running a Windows application under Wine. "Emulation" usually refers to the execution of compiled code intended for one processor (such as x86) by interpreting/recompiling software running on a different processor (such as PowerPC). Such emulation is almost always much slower than execution of the same code by the processor for which the code was compiled. In Wine, the Windows application's compiled x86 code runs at near native speed on the computer's x86 processor, just as it does when running under Windows. Windows system services are also supplied by Wine, in the form of wineserver.

In a 2007 survey by desktoplinux.com of 38,500 Linux desktop users, 31.5% of respondents reported using Wine to run Windows applications. This plurality was larger than all x86 virtualization programs combined, as well as larger than the 27.9% who reported not running Windows applications.

Wine (bishop)

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Wine (or Wini; died before 672) was a medieval Bishop of London and the first Bishop of Winchester.

Wine was consecrated the first bishop of Winchester in 660 and possibly translated to Dorchester around 663. In 666, he was translated from Dorchester to London.

Bede tells us that Wine was ordained bishop in the Frankish kingdom and that King Cenwalh of Wessex installed him after disagreements with the previous Frankish bishop, Agilbert. Wine too was forced to leave after a few years and took refuge with Wulfhere, king of Mercia, who installed him in London, after a payment to Wulfhere.

In 665, while in Wessex, Wine took part with two Welsh or British bishops in the ordination of Chad as bishop of the Northumbrians, an act that was uncanonical because the other two bishops' ordination was not recognised by Rome. This would have resulted in his being disciplined, along with Chad, by Theodore of Tarsus, the new archbishop of Canterbury, who arrived in 669. Since Bede does not list him among the miscreants at this point, it is possible he had died by this date.

Wine died sometime before 672.

WINE (AM)

WINE (940 AM) is a radio station broadcasting a sports format. Licensed to Brookfield, Connecticut, USA, it serves the Danbury, Connecticut. The station is owned by Townsquare Media. In the 1970s and early 1980s WINE was a Top 40 station. As the audience migrated to the FM band, WINE became a full-service adult contemporary station.

In the 1990s WINE became part of an all-news network that included WNLK, which both became newstalk a few years later. After being sold to Cumulus, WINE spent a few years as a nostalgia station, along with its now sister station, WPUT Brewster, New York. Both became part of ESPN Radio 24/7 but switched to CBS Sports Radio on January 2, 2013. WINE's nighttime signal is very weak at 4 watts. WPUT airs daytime only.

WINE's longtime competitor is 800 AM WLAD in Danbury, Connecticut. WLAD is now a newstalk station. WINE's FM sister station is rock station, WRKI, as well as Patterson, New York WDBY, which has a booster station in Danbury, Connecticut.

In December 2012, WPUT and WINE became CBS Sports Radio's 940SportsRadio

On August 30, 2013, a deal was announced in which Townsquare Media would acquire 53 Cumulus stations, including WINE, for $238 million. The deal is part of Cumulus' acquisition of Dial Global; Townsquare and Dial Global are both controlled by Oaktree Capital Management. The sale to Townsquare was completed on November 14, 2013.

Usage examples of "wine".

Instead they laboured to bring aboard water, firewood, hogsheads of beer, rum, and lime juice, and cases of wine.

I mind was inside the bar of San Lucar, and he and I were boys about a ten year old, aboord of a Dartmouth ship, and went for wine, and there come in over the bar he that was the beginning of it all.

It is certainly not there as the wine is in the wine jar, or as the jar in the jar, or as some absolute is self-present.

I did not dare to light my lamp before this creature, and as night drew on he decided on accepting some bread and Cyprus wine, and he was afterwards obliged to do as best he could with my mattress, which was now the common bed of all new-comers.

Thus, all the while that Galileo was inventing modern physics, teaching mathematics to princes, discovering new phenomena among the planets, publishing science books for the general public, and defending his bold theories against establishment enemies, he was also buying thread for Suor Luisa, choosing organ music for Mother Achillea, shipping gifts of food, and supplying his homegrown citrus fruits, wine, and rosemary leaves for the kitchen and apothecary at San Matteo.

In the left-hand column is a list of diseases beginning with acidosis and running through neurosis and on to ulcers, and in the right-hand column are lists of wines that will remedy the diseases on the left.

As I was bidding him adieu, he gave me an order on his house at Naples for a barrel of muscatel wine, and he presented me with a splendid box containing twelve razors with silver handles, manufactured in the Tour-du-Grec.

Frequent mention is made of sour galls, aleppo galls, green and blue vitriol, the lees of wine, black amber, sugar, fish-glue and a host of unimportant materials as being employed in the admixture of black inks.

He vaguely remembered that Clodius Afer had said something about wine as the Main Gallery lowered itself after the assembly, and then the two of them had gone off after a bead of orange light.

Blaye with a cargo of wine, and had taken our discharge, and were now bound for Agen to see our families, before joining the force that the Viscount de Rouillac, under whom our father held a farm, would no doubt be putting in the field.

Selecting a long-stemmed goblet of greenish wine and a stylish little Perkup nasal inhaler, Alacrity sighed.

He thought it went a long way towards nullifying the effects of aldehyde loaded Vietnamese wine and beer in some fashion known only to extinct alchemists or Dupont scientists, perhaps.

Dropping unceremoniously onto the bench beside Alec, he unhooked a cup from his belt and helped himself to the wine.

Someone turned too abruptly, and a glass of red wine sloshed all over her white gown.

Marianna had given a big party with wine from her cellars and many different kinds of fish: from mackerel and amberjack roasted over the embers to small boiled squid, from stuffed sardines to baked sole.