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Crossword clues for want

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
want
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
as long as...want
▪ You can stay for as long as you want.
be wanted on the phone
▪ Larry, tell Rosemary that she’s wanted on the phone.
desperately want/need
▪ The crops desperately need rain.
don’t want to pry
▪ I don’t want to pry, but I need to ask you one or two questions.
need/want company
▪ Children need the company of other kids their age.
satisfy sb's wants (=provide the things that someone wants)
▪ We work hard to satisfy customers' wants.
the last thing sb needs/wants
▪ The last thing she needed was for me to start crying too.
want a divorce
▪ She told him she wanted a divorce.
want ad
want nothing to do with (=do not want to be involved)
▪ I want nothing to do with the whole thing.
want revenge
▪ You broke her heart and now she wants revenge.
want sth badly
▪ Caroline wanted the job badly.
want to know
▪ I thought you’d want to know immediately.
want to laugh (=to feel like laughing, even though it might be more polite not to)
▪ He was so earnest that I wanted to laugh.
Who Wants to be a Millionaire?
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be/get/want shot of sb/sth
▪ Helen couldn't wait to get shot of me.
▪ If you want to get shot of it through DataEase, it depends on what version you're using.
have/hold/want no truck with sb/sth
▪ But it does lead inevitably to ignorance, for you can not understand what you deliberately chose to have no truck with.
▪ Its radicals, who dominate the leadership, want no truck with Mr Gorbachev.
▪ Then the people who get penalised are the majority who want no truck with him.
▪ We in the Conservative Party have no truck with that style of gutter journalism which we were forced to endure last Sunday.
how you like/want
▪ First decide how you want to set up your directories.
▪ Is this how we want to spend our dotage?
▪ It's how we like to see ourselves.
▪ Live your life how you want.
▪ Oh, how I wanted to win!
▪ Oh, how she wanted him to.
▪ Remember how he wanted us to think he was a good guy at heart?
▪ You try reading this with only one eye and see how you like it.
need/want sth like a hole in the head
the last thing sb wants/expects/needs etc
▪ I like going to bed with her when going to bed with me is the last thing she wants.
▪ To be slipshod is to be hounded, which is the last thing he wants.
▪ With household costs inevitably rising, the last thing he wants is a larger mortgage than he can reasonably afford.
want a word
▪ And you want word to spread about your success-not your anxiety.
▪ But first he wanted a word with Darren before the boy was driven home.
▪ He wanted words back; nothing else would do.
▪ I want a word with them fellows.
▪ I was hanging around at the back of the church because I wanted a word with the vicar.
▪ Russell happened to be in the office and sounded watchful when Dexter explained why Blanche wanted a word with him.
▪ Tell your father to come with you, I want a word with him too.
▪ Weenie and Co. might be at school then and he wanted a word with Sarah on her own.
want no part of sth
▪ But manatee revelers wanted no part of the little pine trees.
▪ He wanted no part of foreign soils.
▪ My Sam - he wanted no part of it.
▪ Otherwise, it wants no part of North Forest's manifold problems.
▪ They wanted no part of team systems.
▪ They wanted no part of the Clinton plan.
▪ You must accept that she wants no part of you.
want rid of sb/sth
▪ Fred and Louise want it that way too, they want rid of me.
▪ Is Wilko trying to prove a point or does he just want rid of Rocky???
▪ They wanted rid of me all the time.
whatever you say/think/want
▪ And she always did whatever she wanted, which was mostly enjoy herself and ignore her homework.
▪ Dare they call her bluff and just let her get on with whatever she thought she could do to inconvenience them?
▪ Eurydice said her daughter could do whatever she wanted to do.
▪ I eat whatever I want and run three miles a day.
▪ I know that I had no intention of stopping the procedure, whatever anyone said or did to influence me.
▪ In my stupidity-or whatever you want to call it-I tried to move around to his left.
▪ The hon. Gentleman can make whatever he wants of it, but it will still not save his seat.
▪ You think you should get whatever you want right away.
without wanting/wishing to do sth
Without wanting to, Rose was drawn to watch.
Without wishing to be demeaning, computer literacy and competence is not particularly high on the list of archival training.
Without wishing to scare you unduly, you should be aware that sharks do lurk out there.
Without wishing to tempt providence in any way, we appear to have got away lighting in so far as Winter is concerned.
▪ He had had enough experience of strangers probing his own hurts without wanting to pry into those of others.
▪ Lying in bed, she thought of him without wanting to hurt him at all.
▪ She sank deep down again, unable to stay alert, and saw without wanting to a giant Catherine-wheel in the sky.
▪ The expectation from government industrial ReD is one of reducing dependency on imports without wanting to achieve self-sufficiency.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "I want you," she whispered, "I want you now."
▪ Do you want milk in your coffee?
▪ Do you just want clothes for your birthday?
▪ He wants you in his office right away.
▪ He was obsessed with her and wanted her desperately.
▪ I want some coffee.
▪ I want to see life, to travel the world, and write about what I see.
▪ I never want to work in a factory, having seen the effect it had on my father.
▪ My parents moved out of London because they wanted a bigger house.
▪ She wants Tom to come to her party.
▪ Stacey wants to be a doctor.
▪ What do you want to be when you grow up, Clare?
▪ What do you want to do at the weekend?
▪ What we want is a car that's cheap and reliable.
▪ You can go back to bed for a while if you want.
▪ You don't really want to be a hairdresser, do you?
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And Lockheed Martin now wants clearance to export the new F-22 stealth fighter.
▪ But you might also want to be bumped.
▪ Does he want to commit his whole life to her happiness?
▪ He looked so cautious it made me want to cry.
▪ I want to stay here, with him, for ever.
▪ Major wanted chartered citizens to call Whitehall and get cones on clogged motorways removed.
▪ Was it affection that made him want to agree, or guilt?
▪ Wiggins wanted his charges to prepare for the world of work.
II.noun
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(do you) want to bet?/wanna bet?
be found wanting
▪ The policy has been severely tested over the last 16 months and has been found wanting.
▪ Both were confidently given and both were found wanting.
▪ Faced with these twin assaults on his ego it was hardly surprising that many players were found wanting.
▪ Improvements can be made in the light of performance and composers may discard or destroy compositions which are found wanting.
▪ It's a long time since Donegal were found wanting in so many key areas.
▪ The toilets were found wanting as well.
▪ Until Nikos was found wanting Owen would continue to trust him.
▪ When the match was found wanting, he was able to proceed to non-spherical planets, and so on.
▪ With the result that pure deduction is found wanting.
be/get/want shot of sb/sth
▪ Helen couldn't wait to get shot of me.
▪ If you want to get shot of it through DataEase, it depends on what version you're using.
have/hold/want no truck with sb/sth
▪ But it does lead inevitably to ignorance, for you can not understand what you deliberately chose to have no truck with.
▪ Its radicals, who dominate the leadership, want no truck with Mr Gorbachev.
▪ Then the people who get penalised are the majority who want no truck with him.
▪ We in the Conservative Party have no truck with that style of gutter journalism which we were forced to endure last Sunday.
how you like/want
▪ First decide how you want to set up your directories.
▪ Is this how we want to spend our dotage?
▪ It's how we like to see ourselves.
▪ Live your life how you want.
▪ Oh, how I wanted to win!
▪ Oh, how she wanted him to.
▪ Remember how he wanted us to think he was a good guy at heart?
▪ You try reading this with only one eye and see how you like it.
make you (want to) puke
▪ It made me want to puke.
▪ It makes me want to puke, except I did enough of that last Saturday night!
▪ It makes you want to puke.
▪ Orange juice is acidic, that made me puke.
▪ The stuff was either rubbish, or twee, or so boring it made you want to puke.
need/want sth like a hole in the head
not want to know
▪ If you're going to start an argument with Alex I don't want to know about it.
▪ You'd think the government would be concerned about people sleeping rough, but they just don't want to know.
▪ And accustomed now to not knowing why, did not want to know it.
▪ Holmes did not want to know too much about the people in his cases.
▪ I did not want to know what was going on in the world.
▪ I did not want to know.
▪ She never asked because she did not want to know if they all had to be burned.
▪ The employers, although they are expected to contribute, do not want to know.
▪ Whatever it was, Lisa did not want to know.
the last thing sb wants/expects/needs etc
▪ I like going to bed with her when going to bed with me is the last thing she wants.
▪ To be slipshod is to be hounded, which is the last thing he wants.
▪ With household costs inevitably rising, the last thing he wants is a larger mortgage than he can reasonably afford.
want no part of sth
▪ But manatee revelers wanted no part of the little pine trees.
▪ He wanted no part of foreign soils.
▪ My Sam - he wanted no part of it.
▪ Otherwise, it wants no part of North Forest's manifold problems.
▪ They wanted no part of team systems.
▪ They wanted no part of the Clinton plan.
▪ You must accept that she wants no part of you.
want rid of sb/sth
▪ Fred and Louise want it that way too, they want rid of me.
▪ Is Wilko trying to prove a point or does he just want rid of Rocky???
▪ They wanted rid of me all the time.
waste not, want not
whatever you say/think/want
▪ And she always did whatever she wanted, which was mostly enjoy herself and ignore her homework.
▪ Dare they call her bluff and just let her get on with whatever she thought she could do to inconvenience them?
▪ Eurydice said her daughter could do whatever she wanted to do.
▪ I eat whatever I want and run three miles a day.
▪ I know that I had no intention of stopping the procedure, whatever anyone said or did to influence me.
▪ In my stupidity-or whatever you want to call it-I tried to move around to his left.
▪ The hon. Gentleman can make whatever he wants of it, but it will still not save his seat.
▪ You think you should get whatever you want right away.
without wanting/wishing to do sth
Without wanting to, Rose was drawn to watch.
Without wishing to be demeaning, computer literacy and competence is not particularly high on the list of archival training.
Without wishing to scare you unduly, you should be aware that sharks do lurk out there.
Without wishing to tempt providence in any way, we appear to have got away lighting in so far as Winter is concerned.
▪ He had had enough experience of strangers probing his own hurts without wanting to pry into those of others.
▪ Lying in bed, she thought of him without wanting to hurt him at all.
▪ She sank deep down again, unable to stay alert, and saw without wanting to a giant Catherine-wheel in the sky.
▪ The expectation from government industrial ReD is one of reducing dependency on imports without wanting to achieve self-sufficiency.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ People need to have freedom from want.
▪ The expansion of the bus system satisfies a want in the community.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ If taken without pay... the owners will be left in want and to suffer.
▪ Yet it was hardly for want of trying.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Want

Want \Want\, v. i. [Icel. vanta to be wanting. See Want to lack.]

  1. To be absent; to be deficient or lacking; to fail; not to be sufficient; to fall or come short; to lack; -- often used impersonally with of; as, it wants ten minutes of four.

    The disposition, the manners, and the thoughts are all before it; where any of those are wanting or imperfect, so much wants or is imperfect in the imitation of human life.
    --Dryden.

  2. To be in a state of destitution; to be needy; to lack.

    You have a gift, sir (thank your education), Will never let you want.
    --B. Jonson.

    For as in bodies, thus in souls, we find What wants in blood and spirits, swelled with wind.
    --Pope.

    Note: Want was formerly used impersonally with an indirect object. ``Him wanted audience.''
    --Chaucer.

Want

Want \Want\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Wanted; p. pr. & vb. n. Wanting.]

  1. To be without; to be destitute of, or deficient in; not to have; to lack; as, to want knowledge; to want judgment; to want learning; to want food and clothing.

    They that want honesty, want anything.
    --Beau. & Fl.

    Nor think, though men were none, That heaven would want spectators, God want praise.
    --Milton.

    The unhappy never want enemies.
    --Richardson.

  2. To have occasion for, as useful, proper, or requisite; to require; to need; as, in winter we want a fire; in summer we want cooling breezes.

  3. To feel need of; to wish or long for; to desire; to crave. `` What wants my son?''
    --Addison.

    I want to speak to you about something.
    --A. Trollope.

Want

Want \Want\ (277), n. [Originally an adj., from Icel. vant, neuter of vanr lacking, deficient. [root]139. See Wane, v. i.]

  1. The state of not having; the condition of being without anything; absence or scarcity of what is needed or desired; deficiency; lack; as, a want of power or knowledge for any purpose; want of food and clothing.

    And me, his parent, would full soon devour For want of other prey.
    --Milton.

    From having wishes in consequence of our wants, we often feel wants in consequence of our wishes.
    --Rambler.

    Pride is as loud a beggar as want, and more saucy.
    --Franklin.

  2. Specifically, absence or lack of necessaries; destitution; poverty; penury; indigence; need.

    Nothing is so hard for those who abound in riches, as to conceive how others can be in want.
    --Swift.

  3. That which is needed or desired; a thing of which the loss is felt; what is not possessed, and is necessary for use or pleasure.

    Habitual superfluities become actual wants.
    --Paley.

  4. (Mining) A depression in coal strata, hollowed out before the subsequent deposition took place. [Eng.]

    Syn: Indigence; deficiency; defect; destitution; lack; failure; dearth; scarceness.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
want

c.1200, "to be lacking," from Old Norse vanta "to lack, want," earlier *wanaton, from Proto-Germanic *wanen, from PIE *we-no-, from root *eue- "to leave, abandon, give out" (see vain). The meaning "desire, wish for, feel the need of" is recorded by 1706.

want

c.1200, "deficiency, insufficiency, shortage," from want (v.) and from Old Norse vant, neuter of vanr "wanting, deficient;" related to Old English wanian "to diminish" (see wane). Meaning "state of destitution, poverty" is recorded from early 14c. Meaning "thing desired, that which is lacking but needed" is from 1560s. Phrase for want of is recorded from c.1400. Newspaper want ad is recorded from 1897. Middle English had wantsum (c.1200) "in want, deprived of," literally "want-some."

Wiktionary
want

n. 1 (context countable English) A desire, wish, longing. 2 {{context|countable|often|followed by (term of English)|lang=en}} lack, absence. 3 (context uncountable English) poverty. 4 Something needed or desired; a thing of which the loss is felt. 5 (context UK mining English) A depression in coal strata, hollowed out before the subsequent deposition took place. vb. (context transitive English) To wish for or to desire (something). (from 18th c.)

WordNet
want
  1. n. a state of extreme poverty [syn: privation, deprivation]

  2. the state of needing something that is absent or unavailable; "there is a serious lack of insight into the problem"; "water is the critical deficiency in desert regions"; "for want of a nail the shoe was lost" [syn: lack, deficiency]

  3. anything that is necessary but lacking; "he had sufficient means to meet his simple needs"; "I tried to supply his wants" [syn: need]

  4. a specific feeling of desire; "he got his wish"; "he was above all wishing and desire" [syn: wish, wishing]

want
  1. v. feel or have a desire for; want strongly; "I want to go home now"; "I want my own room" [syn: desire]

  2. have need of; "This piano wants the attention of a competent tuner" [syn: need, require]

  3. wish or demand the presence of; "I want you here at noon!"

  4. hunt or look for; want for a particular reason; "Your former neighbor is wanted by the FBI"; "Uncle Sam wants you"

  5. be without, lack; be deficient in; "want courtesy"; "want the strength to go on living"; "flood victims wanting food and shelter"

Wikipedia
WANT

WANT is an FM radio station licensed to Lebanon, Tennessee, broadcasting at 98.9 MHz. Most of WANT's broadcast day is simulcast over 1490 AM WCOR, with some exceptions.

Want (disambiguation)

Want, in economics, is something that is desired.

Want or The Want may also refer to:

Want (Rufus Wainwright album)

Want is a repackaged double album by Canadian-American singer-songwriter Rufus Wainwright, released in the United Kingdom on November 28, 2005. It contains all the tracks from both Want One and Want Two, along with two bonus tracks: a cover of Leonard Cohen's "Chelsea Hotel No. 2" along with "In with the Ladies".

Want (3OH!3 album)

Want is the second studio album by Colorado electronic duo 3OH!3. It is their first album with record label Photo Finish. The album was produced by Matt Squire and 3OH!3. The track "Punkbitch" was included on the Warped Tour 2008 Tour Compilation.

Want (Natalie Imbruglia song)

"Want" is the first single taken from the Australian singer-songwriter Natalie Imbruglia's fourth studio album, Come to Life (2009). The single was released on 28 September 2009, two weeks before the release of the album in Europe and Australia. The track was written by Natalie Imbruglia, Daniel Johns under the pseudonym of Kat Kourtney, Gary Clark and Chris Martin and is one of three songs on the album co-written by Martin.

Usage examples of "want".

Full of this affair, the importance of which I exaggerated in proportion to my inexperience, I told Silvia that I wanted to accompany some English friends as far as Calais, and that she would oblige me by getting me a passport from the Duc de Gesvres.

The Charpillon wanted to accompany them, but it was judged best that she should remain at liberty, in order to try and set them free.

All I wanted was clearness, so difficult to obtain in poetry, while a little doubtful darkness would have been accounted sublime by my new Midas.

Enron wanted to finance gas producers through off-books entities but needed outside money to meet the accounting rules.

Bass refused, usually because Enron wanted accounting results divorced from economics.

A great mass of it has been accumulated in the progress of mankind, and, fortunately for different wants and temperaments, it is as varied as the various minds that produced it.

But after the dread feeling of worry and want was finally eradicated from his mind by the abolition of the individual accumulative system, he then began to apply himself carefully to physical development, and as running, jumping and acrobatic work have the best symmetrical effects upon the human form, this kind of exercise was extensively followed, and as each generation succeeded in outdoing the feats of the preceding one, the entire nation finally evolved into one of extraordinary springing propensities.

In addition I wanted to canvass his views on what sort of human society, if any, could have had the technological know-how, such a very long while ago, to measure accurately the altitudes of the stars and to devise a plan as mathematical and ambitious as that of the Giza necropolis.

The Christians sometimes supplied by their voluntary declaration the want of an accuser, rudely disturbed the public service of paganism, and rushing in crowds round the tribunal of the magistrates, called upon them to pronounce and to inflict the sentence of the law.

And remember, when a magistrate has been proved to have falsely accused an innocent person, the law will mete out to the accuser the punishment he wanted to give to the accused.

I cannot follow your advice, as by doing so I should be wanting in politeness to Nina, who likes to see me and gives me a warm welcome.

She wanted to protect her against herself and questioned the advisability of printing some of her replies.

Corporation does not want to be judged by their corrections affiliate only.

At Amsterdam, a letter from Guetzlaff introduced them to the priest of the Greek church in that city, Helanios Paschalides, a man of child-like spirit, and long schooled in affliction, who had become awakened to his own religious wants, and who believed himself called to return to Greece and instruct his countrymen.

If I had elsewhere witnessed the painful contrast between affluence and want, here I had found the true union of riches and poverty.