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Crossword clues for voice

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
voice
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a tone of voice
▪ Try talking to the child in a firm but soothing tone of voice.
at the top of...voice (=very loudly)
▪ He could hear Pete yelling at the top of his voice .
cheerful voice/smile/manner etc
▪ ‘I’m Robyn,’ she said with a cheerful smile.
▪ It does me good to see a cheerful face.
confident smile/voice/manner etc
▪ He began to read in a calm confident voice.
deadpan voice/expression etc
▪ deadpan humour
diffident manner/smile/voice etc
dissenting voices (=people who do not agree)
▪ There are some dissenting voices among the undergraduates.
earnest expression/look/voice etc
express/voice doubts (=say that you have doubts)
▪ Many people expressed doubts about the necessity of the war.
express/voice your disquiet
▪ The union has voiced its disquiet about the way the protest was handled.
express/voice your misgivings (=say what you are worried about)
▪ Only a few Senators voiced their misgivings about the war.
gentle voice/smile/touch
▪ ‘Where does it hurt?’ she asked in a gentle voice.
harsh voice/laugh/tone etc
▪ His voice was harsh and menacing.
hoarse voice/whisper/groan etc
hushed tones/voice/whispers etc (=quiet speech)
▪ They spoke in hushed tones at the table.
incredulous look/expression/voice etc
▪ She shot him an incredulous look.
Keep your voice down
Keep your voice down – she’ll hear you!
lone voice
▪ He was by no means a lone voice criticizing the government.
lose your sight/hearing/voice/balance etc
▪ Mr Eyer may lose the sight in one eye.
▪ The tour was postponed when the lead singer lost his voice.
▪ Julian lost his balance and fell.
lowered...voice (=made it quieter)
▪ Helen lowered her voice as they approached.
matter-of-fact voice/tone
▪ Use a matter-of-fact tone when disciplining your children.
passive voice
plaintive cry/voice/sound etc
▪ the plaintive cry of the seagull
querulous voice
▪ ‘But why can’t I go?’ he said in a querulous voice.
raise/voice an objection (=make an objection)
▪ His father raised no objections when John told him that he wanted to become a dancer.
shout of the top of your voice (=shout as loudly as possible)
▪ 'Watch out!' he shouted at the top of his voice.
soulful voice/vocals/melody etc
▪ his powerful, soulful voice
stern look/voice/expression etc
▪ ‘Wait!’ I shouted in my sternest voice.
talk in a low voice/a whisper etc
▪ They were talking in low voices, and I couldn’t catch what they were saying.
the voice of conscience (=something in your mind that tells you what is right and wrong)
▪ Other leaders urged him to listen to the voice of conscience and hold free elections.
voice box
voice concernformal (= express concern)
▪ Some people have voiced concern about the state of the president's health.
voice faltered
▪ Laurie’s voice faltered as she tried to thank him.
voice lowered (=became quieter)
▪ His voice lowered.
voice mail
voice print
voice wavered
▪ Her voice wavered uncertainly.
voice...muffled
▪ Her voice was muffled by the pillow in which she had hidden her face.
voices of dissent
▪ These voices of dissent grew louder.
voice/state an opinionwritten (= give your opinion, especially in a formal situation)
▪ She has every right to voice her opinion.
voice...unsteady
▪ Her voice was unsteady.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
deep
▪ That deep voice made her whole scalp prickle with reaction.
▪ Her laugh was a gleeful, exuberant shout, her deep voice making it almost masculine.
▪ In front of us on the path we heard scream after scream from Sir Henry, and the deep voice of the hound.
▪ I remember that she wore dark suits and talked slowly in a deep voice.
▪ Other details: Have the mouse talk in a squeaky mouse voice and the lion in a deep growling voice.
▪ Then he said, in his deep, warm voice, he would answer any questions we cared to ask.
▪ His deep radio voice inflated the little cottage.
▪ It was a gentle animal, and it spoke like a human in a deep soothing voice.
high
▪ During the last minutes she had been talking with extreme rapidity in a light high voice.
▪ A thin, elegant man with shifty eyes and a high, unpleasant voice, Wood exuded a restless, hurried air.
▪ Some people have low voices, others have high voices.
▪ He closed his eyes and chanted in a high, wavering voice.
▪ One of them, a handsome man scarcely more than an adolescent, shouted something in a high voice.
▪ Norm said in a high voice.
▪ Taking all her words and throwing them back at her in silly high voices.
▪ The high voice and long hair of Taylor is perfect for pop, where androgyny pays.
inner
▪ Of course he wasn't, an inner voice taunted.
▪ Cassius chanted to himself, his inner voice as mechanical as the movements of his body.
▪ It can't be, an inner voice shrieked in violent protest.
▪ Emerson talks about listening to that inner voice and going with it, all voices to the contrary.
▪ It can be used as an inner voice in the woodwind ensemble, but tends to be obtrusive.
▪ But an inner voice tells me that it is not yet the real thing.
▪ But not completely different, an inner voice amended doggedly.
loud
▪ So, once again, Anabelle was awakened in the middle of her sleep by the buzz of loud voices outside the nest.
▪ A sleeping person can usually be aroused to full alertness, just by a loud voice.
▪ From the next room came the thwack of darts and a louder hubbub of voices.
▪ He knew the words to every song, and he had a loud catchy voice Norm envied.
▪ Consequently, a combination of weak Chair and loud voice could result in one pet topic being debated all night long.
▪ The loudest voices say there is not much you can do in the inner cities.
▪ Some of the loudest voices there are not in the best tradition.
▪ Couples discussed cholesterol in loud voices.
low
▪ He and Rattling Hawk talk in low voices.
▪ Eddie and Sandie are talking to each other in low voices.
▪ The Brownies waited obediently, talking excitedly in low voices of what had happened.
▪ Connors's low voice came from the back of the crowd.
▪ A chair shifted, my heart raced, Conchis spoke a single indistinguishable word in a low voice.
▪ He gave evidence in a low, strained voice, often scratching vivid red scars on his face, chin and neck.
▪ He was behind her now at the greasy order window, speaking in a low voice to his cousin.
male
▪ A gruff male voice bade them enter.
▪ Like clockwork the three nurses and I followed along with the male radio voice and did a ten-minute exercise routine.
▪ She paused, hearing the low murmur of male voices, from the doorway just ahead of her.
▪ There is now a male voice, firm and authoritative, speaking on top of the music.
▪ She sang solo against the humming of the male voices behind her and against the organ counterpoint.
▪ With a table and a loud male voice he had rid 114 of its claim to local fame.
▪ He had a good tenor voice and he belonged to a male voice glee party.
▪ A MALE voice announces Dominic as he comes on to the set.
quiet
▪ A quiet clear voice should be used; false accents over the phone are a sign of inferiority and of inexperience.
▪ All this in a tight, quiet voice.
▪ The animals flinched as they felt it, but Isay held them firmly, talking to them in a quiet voice.
▪ And under the pressing fingers and the quiet instructive voice, she would.
▪ Nevertheless, she had a quiet voice, and Millie could put up with her.
▪ So once again, in the same quiet voice.
▪ Felt a hand on his back and a quiet voice telling Isay he'd be all right.
small
▪ But the small voice was drowned in the rush of sensations engulfing her.
▪ Altagracia says in a small voice.
▪ There is also a small voice of protest against the animals' fate.
▪ It would also entail another meeting between them, a small voice inside told her, shocking her with its message.
▪ But he kissed you, a small voice reminded her.
▪ But, a small voice whispered, that does not make Matthew Jenny's property.
▪ Share Tara? said a small treacherous voice he had not known he possessed.
▪ But where, a small, lost voice mourned inside, was that wonderful feeling now?
soft
▪ He scarcely heard her soft voice going on about paraffin heaters and electrical wall fans.
▪ He had a soft little voice.
▪ Jahsaxa's friends politely praised hir appearance, asking flattering questions in soft voices, always smiling.
▪ The check was being prepared, he said in a soft voice.
▪ And had she not felt elated when he praised her in that soft, beguiling voice?
▪ Katie Turner says in a soft, weak voice.
▪ There were soft voices coming from inside.
▪ Mrs Sano has a quiet, moonlike beauty and a soft voice that makes you want to listen.
■ NOUN
mail
▪ It should also enable the integration of electronic mail, voice mail and facsimile, as well as desktop audio and video conferencing.
▪ Hackers may call a company employee and reach their voice mail.
▪ In addition, users can access their voice mail remotely.
▪ Next, he updates his voice mail, letting callers know who they can reach as a back-up.
▪ Rambam printed business cards carrying a working telephone number complete with voice mail.
▪ One afternoon I got home from a business trip, and the first thing I did was check my voice mail.
▪ These include: Features like voice mail, call waiting and call forwarding.
▪ Both computers had a 28, 800-baud fax modem, 16 megabytes of random-access memory and voice mail / speakerphone capabilities.
■ VERB
add
▪ Chief Constable of Essex John Burrow added his voice yesterday when he warned that there was a connection between truancy and crime.
▪ Each of the prospective parliamentary candidates for Orkney and Shetland added their voices to the growing storm of unrest.
▪ The trusties of Internal Order had added their voices and they, too, were ignored.
▪ He says the council has added its voice to the lobby against hunting.
▪ He added his own voice as yet another narrator.
▪ Doctors, nurses, unions, patient groups and even local schoolchildren are adding their voices to the protest.
▪ In November 1911 Chapman added his own voice to many others suggesting plans for restructuring the entire league system.
ask
▪ It's sometimes worth asking that nagging little voice what is really the worst thing that can happen now?
▪ Janie asked in a tight voice, while Megan rustled the hair on my head.
▪ People are also being asked to make their voices heard expressing concern over the possible cut to aid to the third world.
▪ Which compels this scribe to ask when his voice changed into its deep baritone.
▪ She asked in a controlled voice if he were mad at her.
drop
▪ Remember that most people tend to drop their voices at the end of a sentence.
▪ She dropped her voice to a scratchy whisper.
▪ She dropped her voice to a harsh whisper. ` I don't want to hear anything!
hear
▪ What did he hear in her voice?
▪ It was then Gedanken realized that all along she had been hearing the voices of the beetles over a loudspeaker.
▪ I just heard her voice saying something over the machine.
▪ He heard many voices as people passed on the pathway from the bridge to the ramp.
▪ You can see it in their eyes and hear it in their voices.
▪ A bell rang, and for a moment they could hear two voices arguing.
▪ Like many bird experts, Moldenhauer hears familiar, identifiable voices when others hear just squawks.
keep
▪ And from here on keep your voice down.
▪ Cindy made another attempt, keeping her tone of voice light and animated.
▪ She tried to keep her voice light, ` Is it?
▪ I kept my voice soft, nice.
▪ Ted and I talk about this, keeping our voices low.
▪ She kept dreaming of a voice calling her.
lower
▪ No one else had come in, yet she automatically lowered her voice.
▪ She lowered her voice, leaning closer.
▪ He motioned for me to lower my voice.
raise
▪ Jackson raised his voice a notch.
▪ They have to raise their voices to be heard above the clam our of the world.
▪ Did he ever lose his temper, raise his voice?
▪ You raised your voice, okay, and that was wrong.
▪ He raised his voice even though the old man continued to indicate that he could not hear him.
▪ But within a couple months, he was raising his voice again.
▪ He seemed calm and thoughtful, and throughout his recent eloquent speeches had not raised his voice.
▪ I raised a dozen children, and not one of them ever dared raise their voice to me like you do.
say
▪ Downs says they lost their voices after that.
▪ Father said, but his voice was shaky, and Margaret guessed that he thought it was all too possible.
▪ Share Tara? said a small treacherous voice he had not known he possessed.
▪ Norm said in a high voice.
▪ Marie said, her low voice steady and sure like a dark path they were compelled to follow.
▪ Shorter said, his voice dancing with delight.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a catch in your voice/throat
▪ With a catch in his voice, Dan told her how proud he was.
a crack in sb's voice
▪ He noticed the crack in her voice as she tried to continue.
a voice like a foghorn
appealing look/expression/voice etc
deep-voiced/squeaky-voiced/husky-voiced etc
find your voice
▪ As a composer Gurney found his voice in 1913/14 with the composition of Five Elizabethan Songs.
▪ As he found his voice, I too found mine.
▪ But as soon as we had found our voice again, we were once more interrupted by visits from Berlin.
▪ But though he first reacted by withdrawing, ultimately Scott found his voice and became a conservative leader on the Columbia campus.
▪ For a moment she couldn't find her voice.
▪ In the persistent silence only Dada found his voice.
▪ My granda found his voice among the living.
hollow laugh/voice etc
level voice/look/gaze
▪ Her eyes were a washed-out blue with a level gaze.
pained expression/look/voice etc
▪ As you began again, all of us around you exchanged more pained looks.
▪ He assumed a pained expression and averted his eyes.
▪ He finally looked at Cantor, a pained expression on his face.
▪ His mouth was set in a prim, pained expression of disapproval.
▪ Larry, my stepfather, sits stiffly with a pained expression on his face.
▪ Rex made with the crossed eyes and suitably pained expression.
▪ The ubiquitous man with the pained expression vanishes.
▪ You noticed a vaguely pained expression enter Jackson's eyes, as if he was wondering why nothing ever proved simple.
project your voice
▪ Now DeCicco can project his voice, balance better and use his hands.
▪ The use of the microphone helped to project her voice.
▪ There are innumerable books on public speaking, dealing with everything from how to project your voice to what to wear.
raise your voice
▪ Don't you raise your voice at me!
▪ I never heard my father raise his voice in his life.
▪ Stop raising your voice, Amanda.
▪ We heard raised voices coming from the next room, and then a cry.
▪ Eventually, even Western governments began to raise their voices.
▪ He seemed calm and thoughtful, and throughout his recent eloquent speeches had not raised his voice.
▪ In my family nobody raised their voices and nobody fought with each other.
▪ Often it does not occur to them that they can speak up, raise their voices in front of people.
▪ Oliver raised his voice slightly to say, I may have to ask him not to come over here any more.
▪ So far neither of them had raised their voices, or only enough to be heard above Gordon's din.
▪ They have to raise their voices to be heard above the clam our of the world.
sb's inner voice
▪ My inner voice told me to be cautious.
▪ But an inner voice tells me that it is not yet the real thing.
▪ But not completely different, an inner voice amended doggedly.
▪ Cassius chanted to himself, his inner voice as mechanical as the movements of his body.
▪ Emerson talks about listening to that inner voice and going with it, all voices to the contrary.
▪ It can't be, an inner voice shrieked in violent protest.
▪ It can be used as an inner voice in the woodwind ensemble, but tends to be obtrusive.
▪ Of course he wasn't, an inner voice taunted.
sb's voice shakes
sing/shout at the top of your voice
siren voices/song/call
▪ Daniel Boone heard it: the siren song of the open road, beckoning him to pack up and go.
▪ Forty Niners president Carmen Policy called the lure of free agency a siren song.
▪ Mr. Sheerman Is not it time that the Minister ignored some of the siren voices behind her?
▪ The bottom line is that General Motors heeded the siren song of management Centralism in the mid-sixties.
▪ Then, unable to resist the telephonic siren song, she picked it up.
▪ They prepared their siren song for the early-evening crowd.
▪ This coalition must hold together in the post-war settlement and resist the siren voices calling for a huge re-arming of the region.
speak with one voice
▪ It became extraordinarily difficult for them to speak with one voice on critical issues.
▪ Salomon Brothers was speaking with one voice, and it was loud.
▪ This has already raised fears among foreign governments that the administration is not speaking with one voice on vital international issues.
▪ Where Clinton speaks with one voice, they speak with several, weakening their philosophical case.
strangled cry/gasp/voice etc
▪ After a few thrusting minutes Edward gave a strangled cry that seemed to come from deep in his throat and jerked out of her.
▪ But Gary in his slow strangled voice spoke a kind of poetry as he told me about his previous life.
▪ Gilbert uttered a strangled cry and leapt to his feet with shadow reflections of crawling rain on his spectrally white face.
▪ He thought he made some kind of strangled gasp; he knew his eyes would have expressed his emotions.
▪ Lorrimer gave a strangled cry and lunged out.
▪ Then a sixth man appeared at the door, a small strangled cry came from Miranda.
throw your voice
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ ''Sorry I'm late'', she said, in a low voice.
▪ "Wired" magazine quickly became the voice of the computer-generation.
▪ He has a beautiful tenor voice.
▪ I could hear Dan's angry voice shouting ''stupid idiot''.
▪ I thought I heard voices outside.
▪ She has a very high, squeaky voice.
▪ She was startled to hear voices coming from upstairs.
▪ The piece was written for six voices and piano.
▪ There was a note of irritation in her voice.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Blanche's voice suddenly became quiet and insinuating, without a trace of hostility.
▪ However, those same three astronauts, when coming down, gave voice to a couple of suggestions.
▪ Obviously I couldn't mime to a voice of seventeen years ago, no way on earth!
▪ The solo quartet was not always well balanced, but individually the two female voices were particularly striking.
▪ This is the voice of winter talking: Go for the Outback.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
complaint
▪ He is voicing the complaint of all old people about the closing down of their universe.
▪ The Herald published a letter by Owens that voiced her complaints about her interview with the board.
▪ Student protesters have voiced the same complaint.
▪ Gene Taylor, D-Miss., but it reflected concerns a number of lawmakers voiced Tuesday about constituent complaints.
concern
▪ Wail until you have calmed down enough so that you can voice your concerns and listen to his replies.
▪ Caen voiced concern at how minorities and immigrants are treated in the golden state.
▪ Campaigners against the arms trade also voiced concern that the Government is still refusing to allow Parliament proper scrutiny of exports.
▪ Many subject specialists have voiced concern about teaching bilingual students.
▪ Despite agreement on those provisions, the White House has voiced concern over several other sections of the measure.
▪ The major multiples have already voiced concerns over the system as refugees can not be given change when purchasing with vouchers.
▪ But officers have voiced concern about road safety, particularly when picking children up from Victoria Road and Waverley Terrace.
criticism
▪ Doyle voiced his criticisms at a board meeting in Stoke 10 days ago.
▪ However the author has written a strong letter to Britt Allcroft voicing his criticisms.
▪ They voice real criticism of the way things are managed both artistically and in terms of employment.
fear
▪ He voiced the fear of other Right-wingers that the sacking of Norman Lamont had left Left-wingers in key jobs.
▪ Interviewees also voiced fears that the price of goods and services, like childcare, would rise.
▪ She said residents within walking distance of the new ballpark have voiced fears of seeing their neighborhoods overrun by spectators' cars.
▪ They had always voiced their fears and thoughts - or Vita had.
opinion
▪ It had once even gone so far as to empty him on to the floor for voicing an intolerant opinion on the Jesuits.
▪ The idea is to prevent what happened Tuesday: the nominations being locked up before California voters voiced their opinions.
▪ It was good to see those there voicing their opinions strongly about various aspects of parish life.
▪ Also, being elderly, they were very ready to voice their opinions and denounce the ideas of their fellows.
▪ But you have to remember that when moat people voice an opinion they do it from their own perspective.
▪ He has spoken up for them when their homes have been threatened with closure and voiced their opinions on Radio Cleveland.
▪ And voice your own opinions on afterlife chit-chat by joining in the debate below.
opposition
▪ As citizens we can oppose unfair trade and voice that opposition to our political leaders.
▪ Baxter shareholders have voiced vigorous opposition to an acquisition of National Medical.
▪ Neighbours arrive to talk to officialdom; they voice strong opposition but are careful not to provoke trouble.
sentiment
▪ There is evidence, from a variety of sources, that ordinary people voicing anti-black sentiments typically deny their own prejudices.
support
▪ Trish voiced her support for the vice-presidential campaign of Gerlandine Ferraro.
▪ Fox has voiced support for President Bush's call for a regional energy policy.
▪ Anyone who voices support for a banned organisation is liable to be jailed.
▪ So only half of these experts voiced support for the Baldrige as it is.
▪ But when they were assured that the cull was carried out humanely, almost 70 % voiced support.
▪ Bob Dole, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, last month voiced support for the same amendment, sponsored by Sen.
▪ True, railway workers in Moscow and air-traffic controllers have voiced support.
thought
▪ Indeed, Percy Lovitch voiced the thought to Rev. Levitt as he strode past the minister and his wife.
▪ Other manufacturers have voiced the thought that these constant transmissions could swamp the mains.
▪ They had always voiced their fears and thoughts - or Vita had.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a catch in your voice/throat
▪ With a catch in his voice, Dan told her how proud he was.
a crack in sb's voice
▪ He noticed the crack in her voice as she tried to continue.
a voice like a foghorn
appealing look/expression/voice etc
deep-voiced/squeaky-voiced/husky-voiced etc
hollow laugh/voice etc
level voice/look/gaze
▪ Her eyes were a washed-out blue with a level gaze.
pained expression/look/voice etc
▪ As you began again, all of us around you exchanged more pained looks.
▪ He assumed a pained expression and averted his eyes.
▪ He finally looked at Cantor, a pained expression on his face.
▪ His mouth was set in a prim, pained expression of disapproval.
▪ Larry, my stepfather, sits stiffly with a pained expression on his face.
▪ Rex made with the crossed eyes and suitably pained expression.
▪ The ubiquitous man with the pained expression vanishes.
▪ You noticed a vaguely pained expression enter Jackson's eyes, as if he was wondering why nothing ever proved simple.
sb's inner voice
▪ My inner voice told me to be cautious.
▪ But an inner voice tells me that it is not yet the real thing.
▪ But not completely different, an inner voice amended doggedly.
▪ Cassius chanted to himself, his inner voice as mechanical as the movements of his body.
▪ Emerson talks about listening to that inner voice and going with it, all voices to the contrary.
▪ It can't be, an inner voice shrieked in violent protest.
▪ It can be used as an inner voice in the woodwind ensemble, but tends to be obtrusive.
▪ Of course he wasn't, an inner voice taunted.
sing/shout at the top of your voice
siren voices/song/call
▪ Daniel Boone heard it: the siren song of the open road, beckoning him to pack up and go.
▪ Forty Niners president Carmen Policy called the lure of free agency a siren song.
▪ Mr. Sheerman Is not it time that the Minister ignored some of the siren voices behind her?
▪ The bottom line is that General Motors heeded the siren song of management Centralism in the mid-sixties.
▪ Then, unable to resist the telephonic siren song, she picked it up.
▪ They prepared their siren song for the early-evening crowd.
▪ This coalition must hold together in the post-war settlement and resist the siren voices calling for a huge re-arming of the region.
strangled cry/gasp/voice etc
▪ After a few thrusting minutes Edward gave a strangled cry that seemed to come from deep in his throat and jerked out of her.
▪ But Gary in his slow strangled voice spoke a kind of poetry as he told me about his previous life.
▪ Gilbert uttered a strangled cry and leapt to his feet with shadow reflections of crawling rain on his spectrally white face.
▪ He thought he made some kind of strangled gasp; he knew his eyes would have expressed his emotions.
▪ Lorrimer gave a strangled cry and lunged out.
▪ Then a sixth man appeared at the door, a small strangled cry came from Miranda.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Before hearing the poll results, Mr Major and Mr Kinnock voiced their confidence that they would win with an overall majority.
▪ He voiced his desire to take on a local ownership partner to help fund it all.
▪ He added the scheme contravened existing structure plans and traffic risk fears had been voiced by local residents.
▪ In this list, the first sound of the pair is unvoiced, the second is voiced.
▪ Some patients had voiced initial apprehension about their continuing to receive medication, but most were thought to be neutral about fundholding.
▪ The other two excuses are regularly voiced by Kevin McNamara.
▪ Young women are already voicing discontent with their lives.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Voice

Voice \Voice\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Voiced; p. pr. & vb. n. Voicing.]

  1. To give utterance or expression to; to utter; to publish; to announce; to divulge; as, to voice the sentiments of the nation. ``Rather assume thy right in silence and . . . then voice it with claims and challenges.''
    --Bacon.

    It was voiced that the king purposed to put to death Edward Plantagenet.
    --Bacon.

  2. (Phon.) To utter with sonant or vocal tone; to pronounce with a narrowed glottis and rapid vibrations of the vocal cords; to speak above a whisper.

  3. To fit for producing the proper sounds; to regulate the tone of; as, to voice the pipes of an organ.

  4. To vote; to elect; to appoint. [Obs.]
    --Shak.

Voice

Voice \Voice\, n. [OE. vois, voys, OF. vois, voiz, F. voix, L. vox, vocis, akin to Gr. ? a word, ? a voice, Skr. vac to say, to speak, G. erw["a]hnen to mention. Cf. Advocate, Advowson, Avouch, Convoke, Epic, Vocal, Vouch, Vowel.]

  1. Sound uttered by the mouth, especially that uttered by human beings in speech or song; sound thus uttered considered as possessing some special quality or character; as, the human voice; a pleasant voice; a low voice.

    He with a manly voice saith his message.
    --Chaucer.

    Her voice was ever soft, Gentle, and low; an excellent thing in woman.
    --Shak.

    Thy voice is music.
    --Shak.

    Join thy voice unto the angel choir.
    --Milton.

  2. (Phon.) Sound of the kind or quality heard in speech or song in the consonants b, v, d, etc., and in the vowels; sonant, or intonated, utterance; tone; -- distinguished from mere breath sound as heard in f, s, sh, etc., and also whisper.

    Note: Voice, in this sense, is produced by vibration of the so-called vocal cords in the larynx (see Illust. of Larynx) which act upon the air, not in the manner of the strings of a stringed instrument, but as a pair of membranous tongues, or reeds, which, being continually forced apart by the outgoing current of breath, and continually brought together again by their own elasticity and muscular tension, break the breath current into a series of puffs, or pulses, sufficiently rapid to cause the sensation of tone. The power, or loudness, of such a tone depends on the force of the separate pulses, and this is determined by the pressure of the expired air, together with the resistance on the part of the vocal cords which is continually overcome. Its pitch depends on the number of a["e]rial pulses within a given time, that is, on the rapidity of their succession. See Guide to Pronunciation, [sect][sect] 5, 146, 155.

  3. The tone or sound emitted by anything.

    After the fire a still small voice.
    --1 Kings xix. 12.

    Canst thou thunder with a voice like him?
    --Job xl. 9.

    The floods have lifted up their voice.
    --Ps. xciii. 3.

    O Marcus, I am warm'd; my heart Leaps at the trumpet's voice.
    --Addison.

  4. The faculty or power of utterance; as, to cultivate the voice.

  5. Language; words; speech; expression; signification of feeling or opinion.

    I desire to be present with you now, and to change my voice; for I stand in doubt of you.
    --Gal. iv. 20.

    My voice is in my sword.
    --Shak.

    Let us call on God in the voice of his church.
    --Bp. Fell.

  6. Opinion or choice expressed; judgment; a vote.

    Sic. How now, my masters! have you chose this man? 1 Cit. He has our voices, sir.
    --Shak.

    Some laws ordain, and some attend the choice Of holy senates, and elect by voice.
    --Dryden.

  7. Command; precept; -- now chiefly used in scriptural language.

    So shall ye perish; because ye would not be obedient unto the voice of the Lord your God.
    --Deut. viii. 20.

  8. One who speaks; a speaker. ``A potent voice of Parliament.''
    --Tennyson.

  9. (Gram.) A particular mode of inflecting or conjugating verbs, or a particular form of a verb, by means of which is indicated the relation of the subject of the verb to the action which the verb expresses.

    Active voice (Gram.), that form of the verb by which its subject is represented as the agent or doer of the action expressed by it.

    Chest voice (Phon.), a kind of voice of a medium or low pitch and of a sonorous quality ascribed to resonance in the chest, or thorax; voice of the thick register. It is produced by vibration of the vocal cords through their entire width and thickness, and with convex surfaces presented to each other.

    Head voice (Phon.), a kind of voice of high pitch and of a thin quality ascribed to resonance in the head; voice of the thin register; falsetto. In producing it, the vibration of the cords is limited to their thin edges in the upper part, which are then presented to each other.

    Middle voice (Gram.), that form of the verb by which its subject is represented as both the agent, or doer, and the object of the action, that is, as performing some act to or upon himself, or for his own advantage.

    Passive voice. (Gram.) See under Passive, a.

    Voice glide (Pron.), the brief and obscure neutral vowel sound that sometimes occurs between two consonants in an unaccented syllable (represented by the apostrophe), as in able (a"b'l). See Glide, n., 2.

    Voice stop. See Voiced stop, under Voiced, a.

    With one voice, unanimously. ``All with one voice . . . cried out, Great is Diana of the Ephesians.''
    --Acts xix. 34.

Voice

Voice \Voice\, v. i. To clamor; to cry out. [Obs.]
--South.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
voice

late 13c., "sound made by the human mouth," from Old French voiz "voice, speech; word, saying, rumor, report" (Modern French voix), from Latin vocem (nominative vox) "voice, sound, utterance, cry, call, speech, sentence, language, word" (source also of Italian voce, Spanish voz), related to vocare "to call," from PIE root *wekw- "give vocal utterance, speak" (cognates: Sanskrit vakti "speaks, says," vacas- "word;" Avestan vac- "speak, say;" Greek eipon (aorist) "spoke, said," epos "word;" Old Prussian wackis "cry;" German er-wähnen "to mention").\n

\nReplaced Old English stefn. Meaning "ability in a singer" is first attested c.1600. Meaning "expression of feeling, etc." (in reference to groups of people, etc., such as Voice of America) is recorded from late 14c. Meaning "invisible spirit or force that directs or suggests" (especially in the context of insanity, as in hear voices in (one's) head) is from 1911.

voice

mid-15c., "to be commonly said," from voice (n.). From c.1600 as "to express, give utterance to" (a feeling, opinion, etc.); from 1867 as "utter (a letter-sound) with the vocal cords." Related: Voiced; voicing.

Wiktionary
voice

n. Sound uttered by the mouth, especially by human beings in speech or song; sound thus uttered considered as possessing some special quality or character; as, vb. 1 (context transitive English) To give utterance or expression to; to utter; to publish; to announce; to divulge; as, to '''voice''' the sentiments of the nation. 2 (context transitive phonology English) To utter with sonant or vocal tone; to pronounce with a narrowed glottis and rapid vibrations of the vocal cords; to speak above a whisper. 3 (context transitive English) To fit for producing the proper sounds; to regulate the tone of; as, to '''voice''' the pipes of an organ. 4 (context transitive obsolete English) To vote; to elect; to appoint 5 (context intransitive obsolete English) To clamor; to cry out, to steven 6 (context transitive Internet English) To assign the voice flag to a user on IRC, permitting them to send messages to the channel. 7 (context television film English) To act as a voice actor to portray a character.

WordNet
voice
  1. n. the distinctive quality or pitch or condition of a person's speech; "A shrill voice sounded behind us"

  2. the sound made by the vibration of vocal folds modified by the resonance of the vocal tract; "a singer takes good care of his voice"; "the giraffe cannot make any vocalizations" [syn: vocalization, vocalisation, phonation, vox]

  3. a sound suggestive of a vocal utterance; "the noisy voice of the waterfall"; "the incessant voices of the artillery"

  4. expressing in coherent verbal form; "the articulation of my feelings"; "I gave voice to my feelings" [syn: articulation]

  5. a means or agency by which something is expressed or communicated; "the voice of the law"; "the Times is not the voice of New York"; "conservatism has many voices"

  6. something suggestive of speech in being a medium of expression; "the wee small voice of conscience"; "the voice of experience"; "he said his voices told him to do it"

  7. (metonymy) a singer; "he wanted to hear trained voices sing it"

  8. an advocate who represents someone else's policy or purpose; "the meeting was attended by spokespersons for all the major organs of government" [syn: spokesperson, interpreter, representative]

  9. the ability to speak; "he lost his voice"

  10. (linguistics) the grammatical relation (active or passive) of the grammatical subject of a verb to the action that the verb denotes

  11. the melody carried by a particular voice or instrument in polyphonic music; "he tried to sing the tenor part" [syn: part]

voice
  1. v. give voice to; "He voiced his concern"

  2. utter with vibrating vocal chords [syn: sound, vocalize, vocalise] [ant: devoice]

Wikipedia
Voice (phonetics)

Voice or voicing is a term used in phonetics and phonology to characterise speech sounds (usually consonants), with sounds described as either voiceless (also called unvoiced) or voiced.

The term, however, is used to refer to two separate concepts:

  • Voicing can refer to the articulatory process in which the vocal cords vibrate, its primary use in phonetics to describe phones, which are particular speech sounds.
  • It can also refer to a classification of speech sounds that tend to be associated with vocal cord vibration but may not actually be voiced at the articulatory level. That is the term's primary use in phonology to describe phonemes or in phonetics to describe phones.

At the articulatory level, a voiced sound is one in which the vocal cords vibrate, and a voiceless sound is one in which they do not.

For example, voicing accounts for the difference between the pair of sounds associated with the English letters "s" and "z". The two sounds are transcribed as and to distinguish them from the English letters, which have several possible pronunciations, depending on the context. If one places the fingers on the voice box (i.e. the location of the Adam's apple in the upper throat), one can feel a vibration while zzzz is pronounced but not with ssss. (For a more detailed, technical explanation, see modal voice and phonation.) In most European languages, with a notable exception being Icelandic, vowels and other sonorants (consonants such as m, n, l, and r) are modally voiced.

When used to classify speech sounds, voiced and unvoiced are merely labels used to group phones and phonemes together for the purposes of classification.

Voice (disambiguation)

The voice consists of sound made by a human being using the vocal folds for talking, singing, laughing, crying, screaming, etc.

Voice or The Voice or The Voices may refer to:

Voice (film)

Voice ( also known as Whispering Corridors 4: Voice and Voice Letter) is a 2005 South Korean horror film, and the fourth installment of the Whispering Corridors film series. This film was the debut film for its three young actresses, as well as director Choi Ik-hwan, who had served as an assistant director on the first film.

It was screened at the 2006 San Francisco Korean American Film Festival.

Voice (Alison Moyet album)

Voice is the sixth solo music recording/ album of singer/songwriter Alison Moyet. It is a covers album, though not a typical one for a singer such as Moyet; the tracks chosen are slow-tempo, classic songs from a number of different genres, designed to showcase the singer's voice.

Voice (jazz)

Voice is a jazz quintet from South Africa.

Voice has released two recordings on Sheer Sound. Their second album, Songs for Our Grandchildren, was nominated for Best Traditional Jazz Release for the 2003-2004 South African Music Awards. They played as a featured group at the 2005 Cape Town International Jazz Festival.

Voice (comics)

Voice is a Marvel Comics supervillain. Jason Cragg is not to be confused with David Angar, alias Angar the Screamer, who once used the alias of the Voice.

Voice (trade union)

Voice 'The union for education professionals' (formerly The Professional Association of Teachers) is an independent British trade union for teachers, lecturers and other education and childcare workers in British education. The union is committed to the principle of not striking or engaging in "any kind of industrial action" "in any circumstances."

Voice (Barratt Band album)

Voice is the title of the second and last album by the Barratt Band.

Voice (Neal Schon album)

Voice is a 2001 solo album by Journey guitarist Neal Schon. The album features instrumental versions of popular songs. It peaked at number 15 on Billboard's Top New Age album chart in the same year. In 2002, Voice was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Pop Instrumental Album.

Voice (Mika Nakashima album)

Voice is the ninth album (sixth studio album) by Mika Nakashima, released on November 26, 2008. It contains all of her singles from " Life" up to " Orion". The album had two releases: a CD-only and CD+DVD format. The CD+DVD version comes in a deluxe box.

Voice, on its release, provided Nakashima with her first #1 album on the Oricon 200 Album Chart since Best in 2005. It has been certified Platinum by RIAJ for shipment of 250,000 copies in Japan, and has amassed sales of over 450,000 copies since its release in 2008.

Voice (Indiana)

Voice is the youth led anti-tobacco movement in Indiana. Started in 2001, Voice youth utilize guerrilla marketing to fight back against the tobacco industry’s youth-targeted marketing tactics. Voice is represented by youth from across Indiana who strive to educate and prevent young Hoosiers from becoming replacement smokers for the more than 10,000 people who die each year from tobacco use in Indiana.

Voice (grammar)

In grammar, the voice (also called diathesis and (rarely) gender (of verbs)) of a verb describes the relationship between the action (or state) that the verb expresses and the participants identified by its arguments (subject, object, etc.). When the subject is the agent or doer of the action, the verb is in the active voice. When the subject is the patient, target or undergoer of the action, the verb is said to be in the passive voice.

For example, in the sentence:

The cat ate the mouse.

the verb "ate" is in the active voice. However, in the sentence:

The mouse was eaten by the cat.

the verbal phrase "was eaten" is passive.

In the sentence:

The hunter killed the bear.

the verb "killed" is in the active voice, and the doer of the action is the "hunter". A passive version of the sentence is:

The bear was killed by the hunter.

where the verbal phrase "was killed" is followed by the word "by" and then by the doer "hunter".

In a transformation from an active-voice clause to an equivalent passive-voice construction, the subject and the direct object switch grammatical roles. The direct object gets promoted to subject, and the subject demoted to an (optional) complement. In the examples above, the mouse serves as the direct object in the active-voice version, but becomes the subject in the passive version. The subject of the active-voice version, the cat, becomes part of a prepositional phrase in the passive version of the sentence, and can be left out entirely.

Voice (Perfume song)

"Voice" (stylized as "VOICE") is the sixteenth overall single of electropop girl group Perfume. It was released on August 11, 2010 as a CD-only version and CD+DVD version. "Voice" was used in the commercial of "Nissan no Omise de!" Campaign and "575" was used in the Light Pool phone commercial by KDDI iida.

Voice (Hiromi album)

Voice is an album from Hiromi Uehara Trio Project featuring bassist Anthony Jackson and drummer Simon Phillips.

Voice (Emi Hinouchi album)

VOICE is the first mini album released by the J-Urban artist Emi Hinouchi.

Voice (Porno Graffitti song)

Voice is the seventh single released by the Japanese pop-rock band Porno Graffitti. It was released on October 17, 2001. It was certified as platinum single by the Recording Industry Association of Japan.

Voice (An Acoustic Collection)

Voice (An Acoustic Collection) is a 2010 acoustic album from Delerium's past singles and tracks from previous albums.

The album also includes three new tracks: "Send Me An Angel", "Too Late, Farewell" and "Vienna".

"Voice" was also released as an EP included for free and exclusively with the Sonic Seducer magazine issue 10 of 2010 in Germany.

Voice (CNBLUE album)

Voice is CNBLUE's second Japanese mini-album. Y, Why is the only song which is not English. Y, Why is a Japanese song which was released as a Korean song in their first Korean mini-album, Bluetory.

Voice (2AM album)

Voice (stylized as VOICE in Japan) is a Japanese studio album by South Korean boy band 2AM. This is their first full length Japanese album.

The new album contains twelve songs including a song, 無邪気な笑顔で, self-composed by its member Chang Min. Originally in Korean lyrics but for the Japanese album release, the lyrics had been changed to Japanese.

The other 3 new songs are First Love, Pretty Girl and 愛の歌がRadioから.

The rest are songs from their 1st to 4th Japanese singles releases in the year 2012:

  1. Never Let You Go: Shindemo Hanasanai
  2. Denwa ni Denai Kimi ni
  3. For You: Kimi no Tame ni Dekiru Koto
  4. Darenimo Watasenai Yo
Voice (duo)

Voice also known as Alexandros and Christina was a Cypriot musical duo made up of Christina Argyri and Alexandros Panayi. The duo represented Cyprus in 2000 Eurovision Song Contest with the song " Nomiza" ( Greek script: Νόμιζα, English translation: "I Believed").

Category:Musical duos

Usage examples of "voice".

At the same time, the desperation I heard in some voices made me wonder if Natch had been right to question our ability to make changes.

He had given the name of Stanley Adams, and had had such a queerly thick droning voice, that it made the clerk abnormally dizzy and sleepy to listen to him.

The musty auditorium was a dimly lit torture chamber, filled with the droning dull voice punctuated by the sharp screams of the electrified, the sea of nodding heads abob here and there with painfully leaping figures.

So they abode a little, and the more part of what talk there was came from the Lady, and she was chiefly asking Ralph of his home in Upmeads, and his brethren and kindred, and he told her all openly, and hid naught, while her voice ravished his very soul from him, and it seemed strange to him, that such an one should hold him in talk concerning these simple matters and familiar haps, and look on him so kindly and simply.

And to rage was added fear: fear that once on her own she might complain that he had sexually abused her as a child, and, worse still, that she might voice her suspicions about the fate of some of the young women she had seen in Cromwell Street.

My voice had an accent of forced bravery in it, and I was ashamed of my paltry stratagem.

Good gracious, but his deep masculine voice was rich, with a thick, lilting accent that could only be described as musical.

She had the careful almost accentless voice of the language student, and her phrases seemed to have been adopted whole from the speech of the grownups around her.

The Acceptor could tell the Tandu so much about that angry voice, but they were only interested in shutting it out.

The Acceptor was enthralled by the angry voices that churned below, and listened with all its might.

Monk paused, his voice acknowledging her worry and, perhaps, his own misgivings about Fleet.

These words are read out by the priest in a deep voice to all who are about to observe the Holy Supper, and are listened to by them in full acknowledgment that they are true.

I could hear their voices, full of excitement -- but the acoustics of the place made it impossible to get a good fix on the cries that were bounding back and forth across the lobby.

I could almost hear his voice, insinuating, dry, full of cold humor, an actorish voice.

Never was an actress found who could replace her, and to find one it would be necessary that she should unite in herself all the perfections which Silvia possessed for the difficult profession of the stage: action, voice, intelligence, wit, countenance, manners, and a deep knowledge of the human heart.