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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
vein
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
deep vein thrombosis
pulsing through...veins
▪ She felt the blood pulsing through her veins.
varicose veins
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
blue
▪ Through his translucent skin showed the blue veins, his insides as visible and vulnerable as a tiny transparent shrimp.
▪ I could see the violet veins in her eyelids and the blue vein throbbing at the side of her temples.
▪ He arched his instep, admiring a blue vein.
▪ Her face became blue, the veins in her neck swelled up and the pupils of her eyes were huge.
▪ All she found there were her hands, big blue veins on the backs of them, not pretty at all.
▪ Her flesh was so creamy-white and fine that he could trace the blue veins under it.
deep
▪ Anti-embolic stockings were fitted to help prevent deep vein thrombosis.
▪ This is the formation of a blood clot in a deep lying vein, which needs immediate medical treatment.
▪ The symptoms of a deep vein thrombosis are very clear.
▪ The pope has ordered the Roman Catholic archbishop of Cardiff to be replaced until he recovers from deep vein thrombosis.
different
▪ Bobby Hunt recalls that after seeing Fuseli's, he and Minton began inventing their own, each following a different vein.
▪ In a different vein, a half-hour drive will take you to the gardens and leisure park at Alton Towers.
▪ In a very different vein, Sellafield nuclear plant has a visitors' centre, which is surprisingly popular with tourists.
▪ In a totally different vein is Xerox's Ventura Publisher.
hepatic
▪ Furthermore the hepatic vein wedge pressure-inferior vena caval mean pressure gradient was normal.
▪ Portography was undertaken that showed hepatic vein stenosis.
▪ This was successfully treated by the insertion of a Palmaz stent within the hepatic vein.
jugular
▪ One blade speared his jugular vein.
▪ He was not aware of a jugular vein delicately connecting the forty billion of Trantor with the rest of the Galaxy.
▪ Perhaps he was only locating the jugular vein for future use.
▪ They ripped open the jugular vein, releasing an appalling rush of blood.
▪ Doctors told the 28-year-old that the five slashes were just millimetres away from cutting his jugular vein.
lateral
▪ These ribbon-like leaves are pale green, with a prominent midrib and usually two lateral veins on either side.
▪ The first pair of lateral veins issue from the central rib shortly above the base of the blade.
▪ The leaves are also fleshy with a prominent midrib, with five pairs of lateral veins.
▪ They are also translucent with a prominent midrib and many fine lateral veins.
▪ The leaf-blade bears circular dark patches, and has a prominent midrib and lateral veins.
▪ A prominent midrib and 4 to 6 lateral veins are present.
▪ The bold midrib and the 3-4 pairs of lateral veins are light purple or pink.
▪ Faint lateral veins spread from a somewhat prominent midrib.
light
▪ The surface is olive green with lighter colored veins.
rich
▪ They dug and blasted out the ores from thin, but rich, mineral veins.
▪ A rich vein of disagreement indeed, offered for eager exploitation by opponents!
▪ In the United States, what we now recognise as social psychology has always been a rich vein of thought.
▪ Some areas may provide a rich vein of local history which is also well related to a supplementary unit.
▪ The richer the vein was the less the tribute paid by the mine; the leaner the vein the greater the tribute.
serious
▪ In more serious vein, Daedalus suggests using breathable foam to ventilate coal mines.
▪ Voluminous diplomatic correspondence, in a serious but ridiculous vein, followed this episode.
similar
▪ The same dialogue continues in similar vein for shepherd and herdsman.
▪ Leapor's poems inviting friends to tea are written in a similar vein of pleasure or celebration.
▪ In similar vein, dare it be said that the charitable function of Age Concern serves this dual function?
▪ OSF/1.1 is essentially a modularised effort, in a similar vein to Unix System Labs's Destiny product.
▪ In similar vein, it could be that all the rules of development that apply to amphibians also apply precisely to mammals.
▪ These poems along with many others in a similar vein, show that working people were articulating aspects of their experience in verse.
varicose
▪ Relaxed tissues and blood vessels - varicose veins, piles etc. with burning in varicose veins.
▪ They cut off circulation, made it harder to breathe during altitude changes, and wreaked havoc on varicose veins.
▪ Relaxed tissues and blood vessels - varicose veins, piles etc. with burning in varicose veins.
▪ Former lorry driver Leonard Marder finds it difficult to walk because of an infected leg caused by varicose veins.
▪ Peristaltic tights will appeal to sufferers from poor circulation and varicose veins, and those whose hearts need a bit of extra help.
▪ Her legs began to hurt and she considered from time to time the possibility of varicose veins.
▪ Mrs Rundle had once had varicose veins but they had been cut out.
▪ You can brush where the skin is healthy, but avoid any areas where you have bad varicose veins.
■ NOUN
portal
▪ In these circumstances, the sensitivity of this method of detecting portal vein occlusion may be diminished.
▪ Another postmortem study of three patients showed portal vein thrombosis with fresh thrombus extending from recently injected varices.
▪ However spontaneous portal vein thrombus may occur in portal hypertension and the infusion of vasopressin may also play a part.
▪ The vascular effluent was collected in one minute fractions through the portal vein.
▪ The application of radionuclide angiography in assessing portal vein patency or occlusion has received limited attention.
▪ In four patients cannulation of the portal vein was impossible for anatomical reasons.
▪ The most time consuming part was related to transjugular cannulation of the portal vein.
quartz
▪ The shales are folded in an anticline and cleaved with development of cross cutting and saddle reef quartz veins.
▪ Gold is distributed throughout mineralised quartz veins, not just in sporadic shoots.
▪ Gold was also reported from minor quartz veins, with pyrite, chalcopyrite and galena, at Stronchullin in Strathclyde.
thrombosis
▪ Anti-embolic stockings were fitted to help prevent deep vein thrombosis.
▪ The symptoms of a deep vein thrombosis are very clear.
▪ Another postmortem study of three patients showed portal vein thrombosis with fresh thrombus extending from recently injected varices.
▪ The pope has ordered the Roman Catholic archbishop of Cardiff to be replaced until he recovers from deep vein thrombosis.
■ VERB
continue
▪ If evolution had continued in that vein, the elephants and the dormice might have crossed in the middle!
▪ We could continue in this vein, since pragmatism is a rich theory of knowledge and Quine an electrifying exponent of it.
▪ But it is impossible to continue writing in that vein without a feeling of disgust.
▪ The same dialogue continues in similar vein for shepherd and herdsman.
▪ Mr Brown will continue in the same vein on Wednesday.
▪ If the lads continue in the same vein, then we can climb out of trouble.
▪ He continued in this vein in his inaugural speech, promising dialogue with the opposition.
▪ He continued in this vein for a couple of minutes, tripping himself up several times.
course
▪ We can feel the blood coursing through our veins again.
▪ He could feel his strength returning; could feel the brandy coursing through his veins, filling him with a warm glow.
flow
▪ I strongly disapprove of needless bloodshed, be the blood flowing from human veins or otherwise.
▪ Enraged, he had her broken on a wheel, scourged and beheaded, at which milk flowed from her veins.
▪ Sometimes I could almost see her flowing through his veins.
▪ The sap flowed easily through her veins.
run
▪ Today I run until a vein in the back of my head feels ready to pop.
tap
▪ But whatever his motives, he soon realized that he had tapped a very useful vein of information in Ted Morgan.
▪ Perry taps the needle one last time, taps her arm for veins and injects the syringe into a bruise.
▪ The language also taps a Laurentian vein where mud, blood, heat and simmering violence are mashed together.
write
▪ But it is impossible to continue writing in that vein without a feeling of disgust.
▪ Leapor's poems inviting friends to tea are written in a similar vein of pleasure or celebration.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
jugular vein
▪ Doctors told the 28-year-old that the five slashes were just millimetres away from cutting his jugular vein.
▪ He was not aware of a jugular vein delicately connecting the forty billion of Trantor with the rest of the Galaxy.
▪ One blade speared his jugular vein.
▪ Perhaps he was only locating the jugular vein for future use.
▪ They ripped open the jugular vein, releasing an appalling rush of blood.
on a lighter note/in a lighter vein
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a vein of gold
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He turns red and his veins clog up at one end.
▪ The face was smooth, the yellow skin as translucent as waxed paper, the veins clearly visible.
▪ The upper leaf surface is smooth and grass-green; the lower surface is lighter, a yellow-green, with distinct veins.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Vein

Vein \Vein\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Veined; p. pr. & vb. n. Veining.] To form or mark with veins; to fill or cover with veins.
--Tennyson.

Vein

Vein \Vein\, n. [OE. veine, F. veine, L. vena.]

  1. (Anat.) One of the vessels which carry blood, either venous or arterial, to the heart. See Artery,

  2. 2. (Bot.) One of the similar branches of the framework of a leaf.

  3. (Zo["o]l.) One of the ribs or nervures of the wings of insects. See Venation.

  4. (Geol. or Mining) A narrow mass of rock intersecting other rocks, and filling inclined or vertical fissures not corresponding with the stratification; a lode; a dike; -- often limited, in the language of miners, to a mineral vein or lode, that is, to a vein which contains useful minerals or ores.

  5. A fissure, cleft, or cavity, as in the earth or other substance. ``Down to the veins of earth.''
    --Milton.

    Let the glass of the prisms be free from veins.
    --Sir I. Newton.

  6. A streak or wave of different color, appearing in wood, and in marble and other stones; variegation.

  7. A train of association, thoughts, emotions, or the like; a current; a course.

    He can open a vein of true and noble thinking.
    --Swift.

  8. Peculiar temper or temperament; tendency or turn of mind; a particular disposition or cast of genius; humor; strain; quality; also, manner of speech or action; as, a rich vein of humor; a satirical vein.
    --Shak.

    Certain discoursing wits which are of the same veins.
    --Bacon.

    Invoke the Muses, and improve my vein.
    --Waller.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
vein

c.1300, from Old French veine "vein, artery, pulse" (12c.), from Latin vena "a blood vessel," also "a water course, a vein of metal, a person's natural ability or interest," of unknown origin. The mining sense is attested in English from late 14c. (Greek phleps "vein" had the same secondary sense). Figurative sense of "strain or intermixture" (of some quality) is recorded from 1560s; that of "a humor or mood, natural tendency" is first recorded 1570s.

Wiktionary
vein

n. 1 (context anatomy English) A blood vessel that transports blood from the capillary back to the heart 2 (''used in plural'' '''veins''') The entrails of a shrimp 3 (context botany English) In leaves, a thickened portion of the leaf containing the vascular bundle 4 (context zoology English) The nervure of an insect’s wing 5 A stripe or streak of a different colour or composition in materials such as wood, cheese, marble or other rocks 6 A topic of discussion; a train of association, thoughts, emotions, etc. 7 A style, tendency, or quality. 8 A fissure, cleft, or cavity, as in the earth or other substance.

WordNet
vein

v. make a veinlike pattern

vein
  1. n. a blood vessel that carries blood from the capillaries toward the heart; all veins except the pulmonary carry unaerated blood [syn: vena, venous blood vessel]

  2. a distinctive style or manner; "he continued in this vein for several minutes"

  3. any of the vascular bundles or ribs that form the branching framework of conducting and supporting tissues in a leaf or other plant organ [syn: nervure]

  4. a layer of ore between layers of rock [syn: mineral vein]

  5. one of the horny ribs that stiffen and support the wing of an insect [syn: nervure]

Wikipedia
Vein

Veins are blood vessels that carry blood toward the heart. Most veins carry deoxygenated blood from the tissues back to the heart; exceptions are the pulmonary and umbilical veins, both of which carry oxygenated blood to the heart. In contrast to veins, arteries carry blood away from the heart.

Veins are less muscular than arteries and are often closer to the skin. There are valves in most veins to prevent backflow.

Vein (geology)

In geology, a vein is a distinct sheetlike body of crystallized minerals within a rock. Veins form when mineral constituents carried by an aqueous solution within the rock mass are deposited through precipitation. The hydraulic flow involved is usually due to hydrothermal circulation.

Veins are classically thought of as being the result of growth of crystals on the walls of planar fractures in rocks, with the crystal growth occurring normal to the walls of the cavity, and the crystal protruding into open space. This certainly is the method for the formation of some veins. However, it is rare in geology for significant open space to remain open in large volumes of rock, especially several kilometers below the surface. Thus, there are two main mechanisms considered likely for the formation of veins: open-space filling and crack-seal growth.

Vein (character)
  1. redirect List_of_The_Demonata_characters#Named_demons
Vein (Foetus album)

Damp is a remix album Foetus, released on October 22, 2007 by Ectopic Ents. It contains remixes of songs from the studio album Love, including a b-side from the (not adam) EP.

Vein (disambiguation)

Vein may refer to:

People in the surname
  • Ellen Goldsmith-Vein, American businesswoman and producer.
  • Jon F. Vein, American lawyer and businessman.
Biology
  • vein, a blood vessel which carries blood toward the heart
  • leaf vein, vascular tissue in the leaves
  • vein, a supporting structure in insect wings
Other sciences
  • vein (geology), a tabular body of minerals distinct from the surrounding rock
  • vein (metallurgy), a casting defect
Media
  • "Vein," a song by Cannibal Ox from their 2001 album The Cold Vein
  • Vein, a demon in The Demonata
  • Vein (album), a 2006 album by the Japanese rock band Boris
Vein (album)

Vein is the thirteenth album by Japanese experimental band Boris. The album was released on vinyl on October 2006 through Important Records and was limited to 1500 copies only. Vein became somewhat controversial for the long delays prior to the release but most importantly for presenting two different albums under the album's title. As the label in charge of the release explained, "Every aspect of this beautiful release was planned and designed by Boris and they have stated that it has very special meaning for them".

In 2013, the band announced that the album would be released as a 2-CD set but that this was not a reissue of the album, but rather a re-arrangement of both albums combined. The label in charge of this release explained that this release sounds different from the previous versions. The album was packaged in two 3" CDs with the same printed outer edge as the vinyl release to make them appear to be traditional 5" CDs.

Part of track A7 of the hardcore vinyl version is used in the untitled final track of Smile. It is present unadulterated, but as an alternate, bass-heavy mix, on the Southern Lord US vinyl pressing of Smile as "VEIN;" it is thus removed from the untitled song. The 2013 CD pressing of Vein moves this to track 11 and is yet another mix, this one even incorporating the backwards guitar melody from the untitled Smile track. This creates a circle of sampling that intermingles the two albums.

Usage examples of "vein".

On examination, we found a very varicose or enlarged condition of the left spermatic veins, and gave it as our opinion that the seminal loss was wholly due to this abnormal condition and could only be cured by an operation that would remove the varicocele.

Sheets of immeasurable fire, and veins Of gold and stone, and adamantine iron.

Father and daughter would survive, albeit cut off forever from the land that nurtured us, whose glory ran in our veins like blood.

He tasted passion, heard alow murmur in her throat that made the blood in his veins run hot.

The old theory was that oxytocin caused the uterus to contract so violently that the amniotic fluid was forced out of the water bag and into the veins of the womb.

But for the local aneurysmal thrill at the point of the scar the condition would have been diagnosed as angioma, but as a bruit could be heard over the entire mass it was called an aneurysmal varix, because it was believed there was a connection between a rather large artery and a vein close to the mass.

Yet Arain and Mera belonged to me as they did to no one else, for the blood of their veins ran in mine.

The sight of his giant cockhead was intoxicating, and the arousing sight of the veins pulsing along his massive shaft made Hannah whimper as lust raced through her veins.

The atrabilious face, the bitter, thin lips, and grey eyes veined with yellow, reminded him indefinably of a wild beast.

Listeners could picture the years wherein Chardon and Dokey had worked underground from the old shack to tap the real vein of the Aureole Mine.

The original is composed of finely veined azurite or carbonate of copper, which, although specked with harder serpentinous nodules, is almost entirely blue.

It is a fragment from a thin vein of malachite and azurite, or green and blue carbonate of copper, and has been but little changed from its original condition.

It ran like fire through my veins, my brain began to whirl, and I saw that unless I took to a speedy flight I should lose all her confidence.

Her cheek fit like a puzzle piece between his jaw and shoulder and, at her damp breath against his skin, Benedict felt an unusual heat sizzle through his veins.

The ground was carpeted with luxuriant mosses and graceful ferns, and the continual appearance of brown hematite wherever there was a rise in the soil, betokened the existence of a rich vein of metal beneath.