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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
trout
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
salmon/trout/bass etc fishing
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
brown
▪ The first two are good brown trout waters.
▪ Richard Reinwald caught the California state record brown trout.
▪ The loch is full of wild brown trout; where a basket of thirty trout is the rule, rather than the exception.
▪ And the fishing for brown trout on the nearby lochs is equally excellent.
▪ These large fish are called ferox, a distinct species of brown trout that make their living by eating their smaller brethren.
▪ The best Scourie brown trout lochs require a fair degree of fitness to reach.
▪ Thousands of tiny salmon and brown trout died as slurry robbed the stream of oxygen.
good
▪ The first two are good brown trout waters.
▪ Winnisquam has some good lake trout, so the guys say, but this part of Winnipesaukee is prime.
▪ The best Scourie brown trout lochs require a fair degree of fitness to reach.
▪ He chanced a few casts and by the end of the season he had taken more than a dozen good trout.
old
▪ And she hadn't said when the disagreeable old trout was going to walk.
▪ Consequently, as older trout die they are not replaced and in time the trout population disappears.
▪ She had insisted on coming with me to refresh, so she said, her memory of that ghastly old trout.
wild
▪ The loch is full of wild brown trout; where a basket of thirty trout is the rule, rather than the exception.
▪ Before 1971, there was no management for wild trout in California.
▪ You can also fish for wild brown trout on one of the three hill lochs on the estate.
▪ Consequently, it hosts an excellent wild brown trout population and fish are pink-fleshed and fighting fit, averaging 10oz in weight.
▪ There is excellent salmon, sea-trout and wild brown trout fishing, the majority of which is readily available to visiting anglers.
■ NOUN
fishing
▪ Tuition in trout fishing is provided at no charge, along with waders and tackle.
▪ Sailing and trout fishing are available for the more active, and opportunities to study the wildlife are being developed.
▪ Such as brown trout fishing, which remains my greatest angling pleasure.
▪ Admission is free and advice will also be given on coarse fisheries and brown trout fishing.
▪ There is excellent salmon, sea-trout and wild brown trout fishing, the majority of which is readily available to visiting anglers.
▪ Local Activities: walks, riding, golf, salmon and trout fishing, swimming.
▪ Local Activities: walks, salmon and trout fishing, bowls, golf, sailing, tennis, wind-surfing, water-skiing.
rainbow
▪ Woodlands Pool which is a general coarse fishery; and two rainbow trout pools where fishing is restricted to fly-only.
▪ Chen succeeded in accelerating their growth by transferring genes from carp and rainbow trout to the tilapia.
▪ Nevertheless, he added, it had failed to take the necessary steps to prevent an escape of rainbow trout.
▪ Largemouth bass, yellow bass, channel catfish and rainbow trout accounted for about 5 percent of the total.
▪ They started by engineering a slow-growing wild strain of rainbow trout.
▪ He cloned the growth hormone of rainbow trout.
sea
▪ I can only presume that Lucker has failed in the macho stakes. Sea trout for supper.
▪ A lone fisherman up early looking for sea trout...?
▪ Lucker feels a tug, and reels in a beautiful sea trout, a bullet of solid silver muscle.
▪ The third drawer is for big fish; a decent sea trout, a hefty cod, a couple of salmon.
stream
▪ But the air has a taste to it, like wine, and there are small trout streams.
▪ The outflow of Lake Tahoe, the Truckee River, is a fine trout stream except for one thing.
▪ The trout stream, in particular, has a special significance for field staff and is a source of professional pride.
■ VERB
catch
▪ If you go fly fishing you are normally wanting to catch either trout or salmon.
▪ Loons raise their fluffy dark chicks there in the summer, and catch trout.
▪ I would like to see you catch one more trout.
▪ Neville Chamberlain was a regular visitor to Cirencester, where he caught trout on the River Churn.
▪ But the moment I started singing again, I caught another trout.
fish
▪ The Arundell Arms Hotel in Devon runs a variety of courses in wet and dry fly fishing for salmon and trout.
▪ You can also fish for wild brown trout on one of the three hill lochs on the estate.
▪ There is also a golf course five miles away, and if you have your own tackle you can fish for trout.
▪ People mainly fish for trout and salmon but other fish have been known to attract to the artificial flies.
take
▪ Whoever takes on the trout farm will have their work cut out.
▪ In 1954 twenty-two pounds were taken, and the trout fishery was dead.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Insects falling into the water during the summer provide a substantial proportion of the diet of trout.
▪ Providing fresh trout for dinner was rarely a problem.
▪ That includes eight lakes that will receive bonus trophy-size trout in the 5-to 12-pound class.
▪ The Arundell Arms Hotel in Devon runs a variety of courses in wet and dry fly fishing for salmon and trout.
▪ The loch is full of wild brown trout; where a basket of thirty trout is the rule, rather than the exception.
▪ Winnisquam has some good lake trout, so the guys say, but this part of Winnipesaukee is prime.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Trout

Trout \Trout\ (trout), n. [AS. truht, L. tructa, tructus; akin to Gr. trw`kths a sea fish with sharp teeth, fr. trw`gein to gnaw.]

  1. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous species of fishes belonging to Salmo, Salvelinus, and allied genera of the family Salmonid[ae]. They are highly esteemed as game fishes and for the quality of their flesh. All the species breed in fresh water, but after spawning many of them descend to the sea if they have an opportunity.

    Note: The most important European species are the river, or brown, trout ( Salmo fario), the salmon trout, and the sewen. The most important American species are the brook, speckled, or red-spotted, trout ( Salvelinus fontinalis) of the Northern United States and Canada; the red-spotted trout, or Dolly Varden (see Malma); the lake trout (see Namaycush); the black-spotted, mountain, or silver, trout ( Salmo purpuratus); the golden, or rainbow, trout (see under Rainbow); the blueback trout (see Oquassa); and the salmon trout (see under Salmon.) The European trout has been introduced into America.

  2. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of marine fishes more or less resembling a trout in appearance or habits, but not belonging to the same family, especially the California rock trouts, the common squeteague, and the southern, or spotted, squeteague; -- called also salt-water trout, sea trout, shad trout, and gray trout. See Squeteague, and Rock trout under Rock.

    Trout perch (Zo["o]l.), a small fresh-water American fish ( Percopsis guttatus), allied to the trout, but resembling a perch in its scales and mouth.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
trout

Old English truht "trout," in part from Old French truite, both from Late Latin tructa, perhaps from Greek troktes "a kind of sea fish," literally "nibbler," from trogein "to gnaw," from PIE *tro-, from root *tere- (1) (see throw (v.)). In late 17c. slang, trusty trout was used in a sense of "confidential friend."

Wiktionary
trout

n. Any of several species of fish in Salmonidae, closely related to salmon, and distinguished by spawning more than once. vb. (context Internet chat English) To (figuratively) slap someone with a slimy, stinky, wet '''trout'''; to admonish jocularly.

WordNet
trout
  1. n. flesh of any of several primarily freshwater game and food fishes

  2. any of various game and food fishes of cool fresh waters mostly smaller than typical salmons

Gazetteer
Wikipedia
Trout

Trout is the common name for a number of species of freshwater fish belonging to the genera Oncorhynchus, Salmo and Salvelinus, all of the subfamily Salmoninae of the family Salmonidae. The word trout is also used as part of the name of some non-salmonid fish such as Cynoscion nebulosus, the spotted seatrout or speckled trout.

Trout are closely related to salmon and char (or charr): species termed salmon and char occur in the same genera as do trout (Oncorhynchus - Pacific salmon and trout, Salmo - Atlantic salmon and various trout, Salvelinus - char and trout).

Most trout such as lake trout live in freshwater lakes and/or rivers exclusively, while there are others such as the rainbow trout which may either live out their lives in fresh water, or spend two or three years at sea before returning to fresh water to spawn, a habit more typical of salmon. A rainbow trout that spends time in the ocean is called a steelhead. Arctic char and brook trout are part of the char family.

Trout are an important food source for humans and wildlife including brown bears, birds of prey such as eagles, and other animals. They are classified as oily fish.

Trout (disambiguation)

Trout is the common name given to a number of species of freshwater fish.

Trout may also refer to:

Trout (film)
Trout (surname)

Trout is the surname of:

People:

  • Dizzy Trout (1915–1972), American baseball player
  • G. Malcolm Trout (1896–1990), American food science professor, Michigan State University
  • Jack Trout, Founder and pioneer of positioning theory
  • Jennie Kidd Trout (1841–1921), Canadian, first female licensed physician in Canada
  • J.D. Trout (born 1959), American philosopher and cognitive scientist
  • Mike Trout (born 1991), American baseball player
  • Robert Trout (1909–2000), American journalist
  • Robert O. Trout (1904–1995), American sociologist
  • Steve Trout (born 1957), American retired baseball player; son of Dizzy Trout
  • Walter Trout (born 1951), American blues musician

Fictional characters:

  • Kilgore Trout, created by writer Kurt Vonnegut

Usage examples of "trout".

He threaded a Green Caddis Fly onto his line and fished for two hours, catching a rainbow trout and two small striped bass on barbless hooks.

Ned Hinkley could also fancy the contemplations of such a trout as he witnessed the efforts made to beguile him out of the water.

Other hooks supported a hare, a heavy trout, and many gourd-like salamis, mortadellas and wursts.

A shaft of sun from between the willow branches pierced a pool below her and she could see a long, speckled trout resting in its warmth and puffs of sediment as a powter moved along the sludge of the river bottom.

Sir Quinte said as he plucked out the eyeball of a trout and popped it into his mouth.

Danglars, therefore, concluded that such luxuries were common at the table of the illustrious descendant of the Cavalcanti, who most likely in Lucca fed upon trout brought from Switzerland, and lobsters sent from England, by the same means used by the count to bring the lampreys from Lake Fusaro, and the sterlet from the Volga.

There was trout from the hills--honest, speckled trout--and a pie of partridges slain prematurely--and what Archie pronounced to be the best beef he had eaten outside England--and an omelet of kidneys and mushrooms--and little tartlets of young raspberries.

There were no trout, to be sure, within a hundred miles, and there was no way of getting to any trouty realm of delight.

Streams ran through stands of old forest into an unfished river stocked with trout and perch and chub.

IV A-HUNTING OF THE DEER If civilization owes a debt of gratitude to the self-sacrificing sportsmen who have cleared the Adirondack regions of catamounts and savage trout, what shall be said of the army which has so nobly relieved them of the terror of the deer?

You even dangled those little tidbits about Bandora in front of me and I snapped at the bait like a hungry trout.

In his youth his father and uncles had gone on fishing expeditions up in Michigan returning severely hung over but with coolers full of bluegills, bass and trout.

Another accident occurred when Flossie Devine, in a Dancing Trout station wagon late at night on her way back from a Capital City dentist, swerved to avoid a mammoth tumbleweed loping across the highway and wound up in a ditch with her new bridgework in her lap.

I hooked and landed one fair brookie in a stretch of rapid water at the head of a small pool, failed to set the hook when a big one, probably a rainbow, made a vicious lunge as the fly floated down the smooth water of a pool, edging in toward a cutbank where the big trout waited.

Llandovery, from which place you may visit the scenes of this legend, is a charming little town in East Carmarthenshire, situated in glorious surroundings of mountains, vale, and moorland, where some of the finest salmon and trout fishing in South Wales may be enjoyed.