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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
toll
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bell tolls (=it slowly rings with a long low sound, when someone has died)
▪ The church bell was tolling mournfully as the carriage entered the cemetery gate.
a toll bridge (=one that you pay to go across)
death toll rose
▪ As the unrest continued, the death toll rose.
death toll stands at
▪ The official death toll stands at 53.
death toll
▪ As the unrest continued, the death toll rose.
(sound/strike/toll) the death knell for/of sth
▪ The loss of Georgia would sound the death knell of Republican hopes.
the death toll (=the number of people who die in an accident)
▪ Officials fear the death toll could be as high as 3000.
toll bridge
toll road
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
final
▪ Despite these grim warnings, the end of the season saw the final death toll down a little on last year.
▪ Officials estimate the final death toll could reach 35,000.
▪ Police say the final murder toll of the former doctor Harold Shipman may be 192.
▪ The final toll stands at over 237, 000.
▪ Perhaps 750 lives were lost there alone-or more than half the quake's likely final death toll.
▪ The final official death toll is 2, 388.
▪ Police said 21 bodies had been recovered as by last night and the final toll would not be clear until today.
▪ The final death toll remains to be tallied.
heavy
▪ The final quarter was an untidy affair on both sides with the conditions taking a heavy toll on concentration and stamina.
▪ But the assembly line claimed a heavy toll in their numbers and social relevance.
▪ Reproduction takes a heavy toll on mankind.
▪ Despite the heavy toll on the environment, it is the fire danger that worries rangers the most.
▪ This will take a heavy toll in the south in general, and in Arkansas, the president's home state, in particular.
▪ Analysts say the steep price markdowns that retailers took all month will exact a heavy toll on profits.
▪ The recession on the east coast has taken a heavy toll of banks there.
▪ Outsourcing and restructuring continue to exact a heavy toll even in the tight labor markets of the mid-1990s.
high
▪ Read in studio Heavy lorries trying to avoid higher tolls on the Severn Bridge are causing severe traffic problems on minor roads.
▪ But the high toll and the helicopters' plunging on to civilian areas made secrecy impossible.
▪ Fears of a higher death toll were compounded after reports indicated that up to 4,000,000 people risked death from starvation.
▪ The highest death toll was on the islands of Kutubdia, Maheshkali, Sandwip and Chakori in the south-east.
human
▪ Now, a simple mask gives hope of minimising the human toll.
▪ A human toll is also emerging.
official
▪ The official death toll was 42, most of them children; local officials and parents put it even higher.
▪ These figures are more than 200 times higher than the official toll of 31 deaths as claimed by the former Soviet government.
■ NOUN
bridge
▪ It would be preferable to the plans for an ugly toll bridge.
▪ The causeway near the mill, crossing the creek, is a toll bridge, with tollbooth intact.
▪ He says there shouldn't be toll bridges in this day and age.
▪ And for the toll bridge owners it could prove an expensive gamble.
▪ The tithe barns, the Rectory, the toll bridges no longer controlled daily life, but they still punctuated the landscape.
▪ This toll bridge was at Whitney suffered damage from the fast flowing flood, and parts of Hereford are already underwater.
death
▪ Many expressed disbelief that the death toll was not higher.
▪ The death toll is 2, 276, all by fire or drowning.
▪ There were suggestions that the death toll was up to five times higher than officially stated.
▪ The death toll from a single such explosion could easily be over 10 million people.
▪ The death toll in Punjab was almost 4,500 in 1990, the highest for any year.
▪ The book s authors arrive at the following death toll: U.S.S.R., 20 million.
▪ The civil war that followed claimed far more civilians than combatants; by some estimates the death toll exceeds 200,000.
▪ The actual death toll is much greater because thousands more turtles are caught in fishing nets and suffocate.
road
▪ Evan is seven, and only just now taking in the fact that we pay road tolls!
■ VERB
bring
▪ Their discovery brought the death toll in three days of fighting to 150.
▪ The human remains that would be discovered over the next fifty years brought the death toll to nearly five hundred.
exact
▪ The end might now be in sight, but the Eiger had exacted a grim toll for the right of passage.
▪ Among the jazz artists, drugs and liquor have exacted a terrible toll.
▪ But this case appears to be exacting a greater toll.
▪ Analysts say the steep price markdowns that retailers took all month will exact a heavy toll on profits.
▪ Outsourcing and restructuring continue to exact a heavy toll even in the tight labor markets of the mid-1990s.
▪ Fulfilling some aspects of the accord is exacting a heavier toll on the United States than many expected.
pay
▪ We drove until we reached St Michael where we paid a hefty toll of £30 to use the next stretch of road.
▪ As soon as you paid your toll, you left the world of commerce behind.
▪ The plaintiff objected to paying the tolls, and on the first occasion when he did so the owner seized his goods.
▪ You crossed an endless, rickety cantilever bridge after pausing on the Virginia bank to pay a one-dollar toll.
▪ They shouldn't have to pay a toll.
▪ Evan is seven, and only just now taking in the fact that we pay road tolls!
▪ They had refused to pay the toll as they were delivering humanitarian aid.
▪ Others pay a heavy toll in different ways.
put
▪ The government's latest figures put the death toll at 1,216 but most people believe that the figure is more than 3,000.
▪ Official Florida statistics put the death toll at six blacks and two whites killed.
▪ It is unclear exactly how many died in subsequent riots, but police sources put the toll at 30.
▪ Official figures put the death toll at 19, with 91 wounded, including some soldiers.
▪ The government put the death toll at 17.
take
▪ Living in a hot place like Miami takes its toll.
▪ All the long seasons ending with championship series, all the tough games, it takes a toll.
▪ In towns, the ever-increasing motor traffic takes its toll of crumbling sewers.
▪ It was great for about an hour or so and then the effort of keeping warm began to take its toll.
▪ And Katherine could do with all the comfort she could get for the illness was slowly and inexorably taking its toll.
▪ But things went downhill as the days went by-and the drudgery in much of the work took its toll.
▪ Furthermore, twelve months of fencing with Malcolm McLaren had taken a toll on Branson's nerves.
▪ This naturally takes a toll on intellectual honesty.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ In 1871 they built a toll bridge from the mainland to the island.
▪ The death toll from the earthquake has risen still further in the worst disaster since 1952.
▪ The final toll was 83 dead and more than 100 injured.
▪ You have to pay tolls on many of the major roads in France.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Balancing the dual roles of minister to the world and shepherd to his own flock has taken its toll.
▪ Furthermore, twelve months of fencing with Malcolm McLaren had taken a toll on Branson's nerves.
▪ However, other fires burning in the state have taken a toll on efforts to fight the Lone fire.
▪ It was great for about an hour or so and then the effort of keeping warm began to take its toll.
▪ The final quarter was an untidy affair on both sides with the conditions taking a heavy toll on concentration and stamina.
▪ The four years had taken some physical toll.
▪ There were suggestions that the death toll was up to five times higher than officially stated.
▪ This naturally takes a toll on intellectual honesty.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
bell
▪ The church bell was tolling mournfully as the carriage entered the cemetery gate.
▪ A bell buoy tolled from across the fiat stretch of gray water beyond.
▪ It was as if a harvest festival were enacted daily, for throughout the hours of market the church bell tolled quietly.
▪ Sunday morning, the opening bell tolled for Lennox Lewis.
▪ Wedding bells will toll in June.
▪ Like a bell tolling, news arrived every few months of relatives and friends.
▪ Cecilia Darne, who lived round the corner, said she heard a bell toll once at about eight in the morning.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ The funeral procession left the church as the bells began to toll.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Ask not for whom the Bell's tolls, it tolls for you.
▪ Cecilia Darne, who lived round the corner, said she heard a bell toll once at about eight in the morning.
▪ Like a bell tolling, news arrived every few months of relatives and friends.
▪ Sunday morning, the opening bell tolled for Lennox Lewis.
▪ The church bell was tolling mournfully as the carriage entered the cemetery gate.
▪ Whichever corporate lackey wins doesn't matter-the bell's already tolling.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
toll

Tole \Tole\ (t[=o]l), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Toled; p. pr. & vb. n. Toling.] [OE. tollen to draw, to entice; of uncertain origin. Cf. Toll to ring a bell.] To draw, or cause to follow, by displaying something pleasing or desirable; to allure by some bait. [Written also toll.]

Whatever you observe him to be more frighted at then he should, tole him on to by insensible degrees, till at last he masters the difficulty.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
toll

"tax, fee," Old English toll "impost, tribute, passage-money, rent," variant of toln, cognate with Old Norse tollr, Old Frisian tolen, Old High German zol, German Zoll, probably representing an early Germanic borrowing from Late Latin tolonium "custom house," from Latin telonium "tollhouse," from Greek teloneion "tollhouse," from telones "tax-collector," from telos "tax" (see tele-; for sense, compare finance). On the other theory it is native Germanic and related to tell (v.) on the notion of "that which is counted." Originally in a general sense of "payment exacted by an authority;" meaning "charge for right of passage along a road" is from late 15c.

toll

"to sound with slow single strokes" (intransitive), mid-15c., probably a special use of tollen "to draw, lure," early 13c. variant of Old English -tyllan in betyllan "to lure, decoy," and fortyllan "draw away, seduce," of obscure origin. The notion is perhaps of "luring" people to church with the sound of the bells, or of "drawing" on the bell rope. Transitive sense from late 15c. Related: Tolled; tolling. The noun meaning "a stroke of a bell" is from mid-15c.

Wiktionary
toll

Etymology 1 n. 1 Loss or damage incurred through a disaster. 2 A fee paid for some liberty or privilege, particularly for the privilege of passing over a bridge or on a highway, or for that of vending goods in a fair, market, etc. 3 (label en business) A fee for using any kind of material processing service. 4 (label en US) A tollbooth. 5 (label en UK legal obsolete) A liberty to buy and sell within the bounds of a manor. 6 A portion of grain taken by a miller as a compensation for grinding. vb. 1 (label en transitive) To impose a fee for the use of. 2 (label en ambitransitive) To levy a toll on (someone or something). 3 (label en transitive) To take as a toll. 4 To pay a toll or tallage. Etymology 2

n. The act or sound of tolling vb. 1 (label en ergative) To ring (a bell) slowly and repeatedly. 2 (label en transitive) To summon by ringing a bell. 3 (label en transitive) To announce by tolling. Etymology 3

alt. 1 (label en transitive obsolete) To draw; pull; tug; drag. 2 (label en transitive) To tear in pieces. 3 (label en transitive) To draw; entice; invite; allure. 4 (label en transitive) To lure with bait (especially, fish and animals). vb. 1 (label en transitive obsolete) To draw; pull; tug; drag. 2 (label en transitive) To tear in pieces. 3 (label en transitive) To draw; entice; invite; allure. 4 (label en transitive) To lure with bait (especially, fish and animals). Etymology 4

vb. 1 (label en legal obsolete) To take away; to vacate; to annul. 2 (label en legal) To suspend.

WordNet
toll
  1. v. ring slowly; "For whom the bell tolls"

  2. charge a fee for using; "Toll the bridges into New York City"

toll
  1. n. a fee levied for the use of roads or bridges (used for maintenance)

  2. value measured by what must be given or done or undergone to obtain something; "the cost in human life was enormous"; "the price of success is hard work"; "what price glory?" [syn: price, cost]

  3. the sound of a bell being struck; "saved by the bell"; "she heard the distant toll of church bells" [syn: bell]

Wikipedia
Toll

The word toll has several meanings.

Toll (gene family)

The toll genes encode members of the toll-like receptor class of proteins. Mutants in the toll gene were originally identified by 1995 Nobel Laureates Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard and Eric Wieschaus and colleagues in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster in 1985, and cloned by the laboratory of Kathryn Anderson in 1988. Since then, thirteen mammalian toll genes have been identified.

In flies, toll was first identified as a gene important in embryogenesis in establishing the dorsal- ventral axis. In 1996, toll was found to have a role in the fly's immunity to fungal infections. Both mammalian and invertebrate toll genes are required for innate immunity.

Toll-like receptors in mammals were identified in 1997 at Yale University by Ruslan Medzhitov and Charles Janeway. Concurrently, two separate studies, led by Shizuo Akira, Bruce A. Beutler and their respective colleagues discovered that the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) act as the principal sensors of infection in mammals.

The name of the gene family derives from Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard's 1985 exclamation, "" The exclamation, which translates as "That's amazing!" was in reference to the underdeveloped ventral portion of a fruit fly larva. The adjective "toll" is German for "amazing" or "great".

Toll (telecommunications)

Toll, in the telecom industry, refers to a charge collected by either an Incumbent Local Exchange Carrier, or a Competitive Local Exchange Carrier on a telephone call.

Toll is one class of charges in telecom. Typically, it is charged for crossing a boundary, whether the boundary is a Local access and transport area (LATA), a Number Portability Administration Center (NPAC) region, or an international border.

Usage examples of "toll".

The tolling of a distant clock absently spoke the midnight hour, but Cassandra was wide awake as she dreamed, consumed by better days.

Although Diomedes leads the counterattack, followed closely by the Atrides, Agamemnon and Menelaus, followed in turn by Big Ajax and Little Ajax, and although these heroes take their toll on the Trojans in spearcasts and shortsword clashes, the fighting now is centered around the Achaean archer Teucer, bastard son of Telamon and half-brother to Big Ajax.

Die Zunge hing ihm aus dem Maul, seine Augen waren toll vor Angst, und die fremden Hunde rannten dicht hinter ihm drein!

The English were howling, the French were shouting, a trumpet was calling from the barbican and every church bell on the Ile Saint Jean was tolling the alarm.

He ate blackberries along the hedges, minded the geese with a long switch, went haymaking during harvest, ran about in the woods, played hop-scotch under the church porch on rainy days, and at great fetes begged the beadle to let him toll the bells, that he might hang all his weight on the long rope and feel himself borne upward by it in its swing.

The death toll was up to eight, not counting the two pilots who ejected over Iraq.

That very bridge we heerd of at Windsor is owned in New Brunswick, and will pay toll to that province.

Perhaps the sunshine of some one single Sabbath of more exceeding holiness comes first glimmering, and then brightening upon us, with the very same sanctity that filled all the air at the tolling of the kirk-bell, when all the parish was hushed, and the voice of streams heard more distinctly among the banks and braes.

The pickup process was getting more and more iffy, since not only was Jane in her fifties, but lack of regular sleep and proper nutrition had been taking a toll for the past ten years.

The iron bell that tolled for inbound and outbound convoys began to ring again, distraction to horse and rider senses.

Methydist bell begun to ring and then the upper house bell, and Charles Tolls horses came galoping down to the fountain ingine house with Mat Sleeper driving.

The electronic toll records show that his Audi saloon entered the autostrada system at Ancona Nord shortly before seven that evening and exited at Bologna San Lazzaro just over ninety minutes later, very shortly before he was killed.

The insidious distortions of drake-dreams and the rip currents of primal chaos left a toll of leaching damage.

No country is arterialized by such a vast system of navigable streams, to have constructed which as canals of equal capacity would have cost more than ten billions of dollars, and then these canals would have been subjected to large tolls, the cost of their annual repairs would have been enormous, and the interruption by lockage a serious obstacle.

By his thinking, if Elbryan and Pony, their little unseen friend Juraviel and Roger Lockless, could exact such a toll, then he and his warriors could finish the task.