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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
spit
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
spitting image
within spitting distanceinformal (= very near something)
▪ The ball passed within spitting distance of the goal.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
back
▪ He is almost certainly facing a suspension, having been fined Pounds 1,500 for spitting back at Oldham fans last season.
▪ If Mr Ramirez de la O is right, then foreign gluttons will soon be spitting back their government paper.
▪ Blanche did not care: she was angry with Christine Mills and would spit back.
on
▪ They pay thousands and thousands for the Van Goghs and Modiglianis they'd have spat on at the time they were painted.
▪ A pedestrian spits on the window of a driver he thinks cut him off.
▪ I got beat up, spit on, my stuff was thrown out the windows.
▪ Than they were choked, spat on, pulled by their hair across the floor.
out
▪ When at last he spoke, the words were spat out in sharp interrogation.
▪ A log fire roared in the open hearth, spitting out sparks.
▪ Jody is not so much yelling as she is spitting out the words.
▪ Baptiste spat out his bit of thread and laughed.
▪ It begins to spit out masses of bees, as if it were emptying not only its guts but its soul.
▪ But for the life of her she couldn't spit out what she wanted to say.
▪ A fifty-caliber machine gun spits out bullets a half inch in diameter and an inch long.
■ NOUN
face
▪ That Shatov spat in Verkhovensky's face is one.
▪ She would have spat in his face, but that struck her as being unladylike.
▪ I also hit him whenever I can and spit in his face.
▪ I nodded, and he spat in my face.
▪ I spit in my own face.
word
▪ The priest relayed the directions, spitting out the words as if they were poison.
▪ As spring training began, Alomar appeared to accept that spitting trumps ugly words on the bridge table of public opinion.
▪ McGowan spat bits of words through pointed teeth.
▪ Jody is not so much yelling as she is spitting out the words.
▪ He practically spit the words at his friend.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be the (very/living/spitting) image of sb
▪ All she had was the image of a woman lying on the ground and people desperate to help her.
▪ And just lagging it slightly was the image of the posed dancer.
▪ But we both agreed the little mite was the spitting image of the man.
▪ It was the image of returning once again to her empty maisonette in Ealing.
▪ My favorite is the image of an aproned cook in the rear of the open kitchen.
▪ Pressing upon the rest of us is the image of all those dormant scars in the crust potentially surging to life.
▪ This is the image of a successful couple.
▪ Throughout the show's history, for instance, Cleese was the very image of pompous, impatient rectitude.
be the spitting image of sb
▪ But we both agreed the little mite was the spitting image of the man.
▪ It was the spitting image of him.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "You're worthless!" Greg spat out.
▪ The volcano began rumbling and spitting ash on July 3.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He spat a bit as he spoke and Carrie dreaded the moment when she would have to shake hands and be spat at.
▪ He spat a mouthful back into the cup.
▪ He spat out enamel and blood.
▪ He spit a bone on to the floor and sent Goh to get another Tiger beer.
▪ He and Meg are now spitting bile at one another through the Press.
▪ He was so offended by my cover that he spat on me.
▪ I spat in my hand and gave Claude long, slipping strokes.
II.noun
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Elizabeth and Anne contrived a spit for Felix's chickens and set them to roast.
▪ Good food will be served from the spit.
▪ He freed a hand and wiped away the spit.
▪ He worked his way over to the window, opened it, and took a spit into the fresh biting coldness.
▪ Those first learning to water start or carve gybe are best off in the flat water to windward by the spit.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Spit

Spit \Spit\, v. i. To attend to a spit; to use a spit. [Obs.]

She's spitting in the kitchen.
--Old Play.

Spit

Spit \Spit\, n. [OE. spite, AS. spitu; akin to D. spit, G. spiess, OHG. spiz, Dan. spid. Sw. spett, and to G. spitz pointed. [root]170.]

  1. A long, slender, pointed rod, usually of iron, for holding meat while roasting.

  2. A small point of land running into the sea, or a long, narrow shoal extending from the shore into the sea; as, a spit of sand.
    --Cook.

  3. The depth to which a spade goes in digging; a spade; a spadeful. [Prov. Eng.]
    --Halliwell.

Spit

Spit \Spit\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Spitted; p. pr. & vb. n. Spitting.] [From Spit, n.; cf. Speet.]

  1. To thrust a spit through; to fix upon a spit; hence, to thrust through or impale; as, to spit a loin of veal. ``Infants spitted upon pikes.''
    --Shak.

  2. To spade; to dig. [Prov. Eng.]

Spit

Spit \Spit\, n. The secretion formed by the glands of the mouth; spitle; saliva; sputum.

Spit

Spit \Spit\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Spit ( Spat, archaic); p. pr. & vb. n. Spitting.] [AS. spittan; akin to G. sp["u]tzen, Dan. spytte, Sw. spotta,Icel. sp?ta, and prob. E. spew. The past tense spat is due to AS. sp?tte, from sp?tan to spit. Cf. Spat, n., Spew, Spawl, Spot, n.]

  1. To eject from the mouth; to throw out, as saliva or other matter, from the mouth. ``Thus spit I out my venom.''
    --Chaucer.

  2. To eject; to throw out; to belch.

    Note: Spitted was sometimes used as the preterit and the past participle. ``He . . . shall be mocked, and spitefully entreated, and spitted on.''
    --Luke xviii. 32.

Spit

Spit \Spit\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Spit ( Spat, archaic); p. pr. & vb. n. Spitting.] [AS. spittan; akin to G. sp["u]tzen, Dan. spytte, Sw. spotta,Icel. sp?ta, and prob. E. spew. The past tense spat is due to AS. sp?tte, from sp?tan to spit. Cf. Spat, n., Spew, Spawl, Spot, n.]

  1. To eject from the mouth; to throw out, as saliva or other matter, from the mouth. ``Thus spit I out my venom.''
    --Chaucer.

  2. To eject; to throw out; to belch.

    Note: Spitted was sometimes used as the preterit and the past participle. ``He . . . shall be mocked, and spitefully entreated, and spitted on.''
    --Luke xviii. 32.

Spit

Spit \Spit\, v. i.

  1. To throw out saliva from the mouth.

  2. To rain or snow slightly, or with sprinkles.

    It had been spitting with rain.
    --Dickens.

    To spit on or To spit upon, to insult grossly; to treat with contempt. ``Spitting upon all antiquity.''
    --South.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
spit

"expel saliva," Old English spittan (Anglian), spætan (West Saxon), transitive and intransitive, past tense *spytte, from Proto-Germanic *spitjan, from PIE *sp(y)eu-, of imitative origin (see spew (v.)). Not the usual Old English word for this; spætlan (see spittle) and spiwan are more common; all are from the same root. To spit as a gesture of contempt (especially at someone) is in Old English. Related: Spat; spitting.

spit

"saliva," early 14c., from spit (v.1). Meaning "the very likeness" in modern use is attested from 1825 (as in spitting image, attested from 1887); compare French craché in same sense. Spit-curl (1831) was originally considered colloquial or vulgar. Military phrase spit and polish first recorded 1895.

spit

"sharp-pointed rod for roasting meat," late Old English spitu "a spit," from Proto-Germanic *spituz (cognates: Middle Dutch and Dutch spit, Swedish spett (which perhaps is from Low German), Old High German spiz, German Spieß "roasting spit," German spitz "pointed"), from PIE *spei- "sharp point" (see spike (n.1)). This is also the source of the word meaning "sandy point" (1670s). Old French espois, Spanish espeto "spit" are Germanic loan-words. The verb meaning "to put on a spit" is recorded from c.1200.

spit

c.1200, "put on a spit, thrust with a spit," from late Old English sputtian "to spit" (for cooking), from spit (n.2). Meaning "pierce with a weapon, transfix, impale" is from early 15c. Related: Spitted; spitting. Nares' Glossary has spit-frog "a small sword."

Wiktionary
spit

Etymology 1 n. 1 A rod on which meat is grilled (UK English) or broiled (US English). 2 A narrow, pointed, usually sandy peninsul

  1. 3 The depth to which a spade goes in digging; a spade; a spadeful. v

  2. 1 To impale on a spit. 2 To attend to a spit; to use a spit. 3 To spade; to dig. Etymology 2

    n. 1 (context uncountable English) saliva, especially when expectorate. 2 (context countable English) An instance of spitting. vb. 1 (context intransitive transitive English) To evacuate (saliva or another substance) from the mouth. 2 To rain or snow slightly, or with sprinkles. 3 (context transitive English) To utter violently. 4 (context transitive slang hip-hop English) To utter.

WordNet
spit
  1. v. expel or eject (saliva or phlegm or sputum) from the mouth; "The father of the victim spat at the alleged murderer" [syn: ptyalize, ptyalise, spew, spue]

  2. utter with anger or contempt [syn: spit out]

  3. rain gently; "It has only sprinkled, but the roads are slick" [syn: sprinkle, spatter, patter, pitter-patter]

  4. drive a skewer through; "skewer the meat for the BBQ" [syn: skewer]

  5. [also: spitting, spitted, spat]

spit
  1. n. a narrow strip of land that juts out into the sea [syn: tongue]

  2. a clear liquid secreted into the mouth by the salivary glands and mucous glands of the mouth; moistens the mouth and starts the digestion of starches [syn: saliva, spittle]

  3. a skewer for holding meat over a fire

  4. the act of spitting (forcefully expelling saliva) [syn: spitting, expectoration]

  5. [also: spitting, spitted, spat]

Wikipedia
Spit (card game)

Spit, also referred to as Slam or Speed, is a game of the shedding family of card games for two players. The game is played until all of someone's cards are gone; at which time, the game has finished.

Spit

Spit may refer to:

  • Spit, another word for saliva
    • Spitting, the act of forcibly expelling from the mouth
  • Spit (archaeology), a term for a unit of archaeological excavation
  • Spit (landform), a section of land that extends into a body of water
  • Spit (cooking aide), a rotating device used for cooking by roasting over an open fire (rotisserie)
Spit (landform)

A spit or sandspit is a deposition bar or beach landform found off coasts. It develops in places where re-entrance occurs, such as at a cove's headlands, by the process of longshore drift and longshore currents. The drift occurs due to waves meeting the beach at an oblique angle, moving sediment down the beach in a zigzag pattern. This is complemented by longshore currents, which further transport sediment through the water alongside the beach. These currents are caused by the same waves that cause the drift.

Spit (album)

Spit is the debut album by the heavy metal band Kittie. Produced by Garth Richardson, the album was released on January 11, 2000 by Artemis Records.

Spit (archaeology)

In the field of archaeology, a spit is a unit of archaeological excavation with an arbitrarily assigned measurement of depth and extent. It is a method of excavation employed without regard to the archaeological stratigraphy that may (or may not) be identifiable at the archaeological site under investigation. The method of excavating in arbitrary spits is most frequently encountered at site excavations which lack any visible or reconstructable stratigraphy in the archaeological context, or when excavating through intrusive or fill deposits.

Sometimes the term is used to refer to any archaeological unit.

Spit (nightclub)

Spit (alternately known as Uncle Sam's) was a nightclub and music venue located at Hempstead Turnpike in Levittown, New York. The club opened in 1978 and closed in 1992. Some well-known bands performed at the club including Madonna, Blue Öyster Cult and Duran Duran. Some performances were broadcast on WLIR radio. The building was set fire in 1994 by the owners in attempt to collect insurance. They were charged and convicted of arson.

Usage examples of "spit".

Sure enough, this was the case inNogales: within spitting distance of the border a chemist was advertising amoxycillin and ampicillin at 35 per cent discount.

Mistress Anan was death on anybody spitting on her floors, or tossing bones, or even tapping out a pipe.

No longer protected by anthropocentric gods and goddesses, reason gone flat in its happy capacity to explain away the Mystery, not yet delivered into the hands of the superconsciouswe stare out blankly into that dark and gloomy night, which will very shortly swallow us up as surely as it once spat us forth.

The Collectivist who drove it on his suicide mission, brave with drink and the assuredness of death, had rammed the blockade at Sly Station and powered on toward Spit Bazaar, but the militia had detonated the train as it approached, tearing a hole in the stitching of arches that went the length of New Crobuzon.

For the meat eaters, a number of giant baloneys were set to roasting whole on spits, to be turned and attentively basted with a grape-jelly glaze by once-quarrelsome kitchen staff while others made croutons from old bread, bustling about while the spinach thawed, singing along with the radio, which someone had mercifully re-tuned to a rock and roll station.

By the time Yama had climbed into a crotch of the banyan, hidden amongst rustling leaves high above the spit, the skiff was edging through the slick of feeder roots that ringed the banyan.

On the kitchen floor, amid a litter of empty champagne fifths, were Sandor Rojas and three friends, playing spit in the ocean and staying awake on Heidseck and benzedrine pills.

He is chewing besil root and turns to spit over the edge as we step up to the clip-on line.

Barbarians were confounded by the image of their own patience and the masculine females, spitting in the faces of their sons and husbands, most bitterly reproached them for betraying their dominion and freedom to these pygmies of the south, contemptible in their numbers, diminutive in their stature.

There was silence again, except for a remark that he could spit all the blanky rain they had had in the last nine months.

American blurted passionately, spitting a mouthful of blood and broken enamel onto the floor.

Ossory spits in the teeth of the rules Brian Boru laid down for warfare.

The brasses had disgusted him because the musicians were, he thought, always shaking spit out of them.

But, as she spoke, a black-jowled fellow laughed, And, spitting, tripped her with out-thrust pike-shaft, That down she fell and wailed most piteously, Whereat the brawny fellows laughed all three.

Though Bray had practiced many times the act of spitting it out, he still gagged as he belched it forth.