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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
pool
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a pool of blood
▪ A dark pool of blood was spreading from his head.
a pool of talent (=lots of talented people)
▪ Employers can draw on an enormous pool of talent in this area.
a pool/circle of light (=an area of light)
▪ They stood in the pool of light cast by the streetlamp.
car pool
football pools
gene pool
infinity pool
motor pool
paddling pool
pool hall
pool your resources (=put together the resources that each of you have)
▪ They decided to pool their resources and buy a business together.
pool/card shark (=someone who uses their skill at pool or cards to cheat other players out of money)
rock pool
swimming pool
the gene pool (=all the genes in a particular species)
▪ It is hoped that these new wolves will mate with the native population and increase the wolves' gene pool.
tide pool
typing pool
wading pool
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
deep
▪ He paid, walked down a dark corridor and pushed through a curtain into a deep pool of sound and flickering light.
▪ She leaves the coach and wanders through fields for many miles until between trees she sees a deep black pool of water.
▪ His skin was translucent with age and he had dark brown eyes like two deep pools.
▪ In the dry season, the wonderfully cool river water is a stunning blue-green in the deep pools below the falls.
▪ Yanek fell into the deep pool and was drowned.
▪ During his walk Van Cheele came to a deep pool under some tall trees.
▪ He had large dark eyes, like pears set in port wine aspic, deep pools in a thin, delicate face.
heated
▪ The small heated swimming pool hidden from view near the rose walk was a wedding gift from the Army.
▪ Free indoor heated swimming pool with small bar.
▪ It includes a heated swimming pool for the 220 pupils.
▪ The gardens shelter a heated swimming pool and a private sun deck with panoramic views.
▪ Next to the lake is a heated outdoor swimming pool and children's pool.
▪ The indoor heated pool is free to guests, as is the sauna three times a week.
▪ There is a small cellar bar, a sun terrace, a large garden and small heated outdoor swimming pool.
▪ Leogang also has a super leisure and fitness centre, with a heated open-air swimming pool.
indoor
▪ Our hotel had an indoor pool, a nightclub and good food - notably, reindeer stew with cranberry sauce.
▪ Seven purpose-built conference suits, exclusive health club and heated indoor pool and gymnasium.
▪ The town of Andover had no legal requirement for a fence around the indoor pool.
▪ The hotel has a new indoor pool leading directly on to the well-kept gardens with table tennis and sun-bathing lawns.
▪ Within the park there is a large swimming pool, a separate children's pool, and an indoor pool.
▪ Gymnasium, sauna, steam room, beauty salon, indoor pool.
▪ Zell am See also has an excellent Sports Centre, with an indoor swimming pool and sauna.
large
▪ One of the keys to the success of software companies in Northern Ireland is the large local pool of talented labour.
▪ But many business groups and some unions would welcome the ability to tap a large pool of legal workers.
▪ Within the park there is a large swimming pool, a separate children's pool, and an indoor pool.
▪ Outside, a large swimming pool is surrounded by private cabanas.
▪ Between five and 15 consultants chosen from a large pool of employees are typically called upon to review any given idea memorandum.
▪ That means producing more work per worker as well as creating a larger pool of workers to exploit.
▪ He would make less stir in the larger Aintree pool.
▪ It formed urban areas, with their large pools of labour, shopping centres and transport networks.
outdoor
▪ Well recommended food. 2.5 acres of terraced lawns with 25 metre heated outdoor pool.
▪ The Form has a bar, sauna and massage rooms, an outdoor swimming pool as well as clock golf and a tennis court.
▪ Next to the lake is a heated outdoor swimming pool and children's pool.
▪ In addition there is a billiard room, solarium, cinema, indoor and outdoor pools, bowling alley and gym.
▪ Optimum Sports Centre: Indoor and outdoor pools, sauna, solarium, massage rooms and outside whirlpool.
▪ There is a small cellar bar, a sun terrace, a large garden and small heated outdoor swimming pool.
▪ There are indoor and outdoor pools, sauna, solarium, massage facilities and sunbathing lawns.
▪ In the resort itself are indoor and outdoor swimming pools.
shallow
▪ Mating takes place at night in shallow pools in dunes and other sandy areas.
▪ Picture a shallow pool with a glassy surface, and in the pool picture minnows fluttering their tail fins but otherwise stationary.
▪ And they mate, laying their eggs in the shallow tepid pools.
▪ The stomach is mostly empty-the whisky is lying in a shallow pool where it is now mixed with highly acidic gastric juices.
▪ She picked up the stick and hurled it, skimming it low over the shallow pools left by the tide.
▪ Shortly thereafter we enter a stretch of shallow pools and channels cut into the rock by a millennium of erosion.
▪ The resulting shallow pits and pools, often extending over many hectares, accumulate salts and nutrients from year to year.
▪ It grows in shallow water in pools and ponds, most frequently on substrates ranging from sand to fine silt.
small
▪ If you were to visit it you would be struck by the quietness of the small pool.
▪ They stood beside a small, gurgling pool at the foot of the altar and professed their faith.
▪ The small heated swimming pool hidden from view near the rose walk was a wedding gift from the Army.
▪ Water is using sparingly, not wasted on thirsty lawns but displayed in fountains and small pools.
▪ Start with a puddle and progress slowly to a small pool and shallow stream.
▪ That's enough to fill a small blow-up swimming pool in a couple of minutes.
▪ Outside, there is a sun terrace, small pool, children's pool and whirlpool with sea views.
▪ The hotel's extensive grounds include colourful gardens, a small swimming pool, and a short tennis court.
swimming
▪ There was a swimming pool and a distant view of the donkey field.
▪ More than 40 homes were flooded, valuable shop stocks were ruined, and the local theatre turned into a swimming pool.
▪ Hotel guests can use the swimming pool and pleasant garden of the nearby Hotel Imperial, under the same management.
▪ Sports facilities include a swimming pool and 4 tennis courts.
▪ Zell am See also has an excellent Sports Centre, with an indoor swimming pool and sauna.
▪ It includes a heated swimming pool for the 220 pupils.
▪ A swimming pool is available throughout the season.
▪ There's a swimming pool and large sun terrace and guests are welcome to use the facilities of the Montanamar hotel opposite.
■ NOUN
car
▪ The service operates rather like a car pool.
football
▪ With home shopping out of the way, Pitcher will be able to concentrate on the football pools and high street retailing.
▪ Stephano and Trinculo are the football pools.
▪ We will raise revenue for investment in safety by increasing levies on footballs pools and betting.
▪ But the great dream was winning the football pools.
▪ Winnings from betting, football pools, and premium bonds.
gene
▪ The gene pool of the resulting subgroups would be too small to ensure the viability of the population.
▪ Because the gene pool for a growing breed is slight, munchkins are generally bred with other cats.
▪ Even the gene pools in the South are drying up.
▪ People have to be executed, removed from the gene pool.
▪ The net result was a widening gene pool and an altogether hardier national herd.
▪ In the long term, the loss of genetic diversity will reduce the gene pool available for agricultural crops.
▪ A plague of uniformity is sweeping the world, numbing the taste buds and reducing the gene pool.
▪ The genes themselves don't evolve, they merely survive or fail to survive in the gene pool.
hall
▪ When they fished me out I made a few phone calls, fed a few meters, hung round the pool halls.
▪ Lawrence was a big fifteen-year-old, and sometimes made money playing for dances in the Strasburg pool hall.
▪ Seen through the lacy walls of the village pool hall the polystyrene floats of the fish farm bobbed busily.
rock
▪ Others crouched over rock pool, teasing out sea anemones.
▪ Explore perfectly recreated rock pools and enjoy daily talks and feeding displays.
▪ Bathing is safe and children can have lots of fun, paddling and shrimping in the rock pools and making sand castles.
▪ A bottle swept up to his feet and rolled in a rock pool.
table
▪ Recreation areas have telephones and pool tables.
▪ But the pool table proved to be a bigger bone of contention.
▪ The Tirajana has two pool tables, a bar and supermarket.
▪ I had met Evan in the basement near the pool table.
▪ For those who prefer something a little more energetic, there's also a darts board and a pool table.
▪ Two television sets and a pair of pool tables will be added to the setting.
▪ For the energetic there is snorkelling and fishing, tennis, table tennis and a pool table.
▪ There was a pool table in the cellar, a good big professional-size pool table.
water
▪ You can also relax on the terrace of the lovely fresh water pool sipping a cool drink form the bar.
▪ Hot water pools beneath these flanges, creating unique hazards for a pilot ascending the structure.
▪ There is a fresh water pool with bar, a panoramic sunbathing terrace and an airy, first-floor restaurant with sea views.
▪ First, they decreased the depth of the water pools.
▪ There is a fresh water pool, tennis court, peak season beach restaurant and sound proofed discotheque.
■ VERB
create
▪ Downlighters can also be recessed into ceilings, to create atmospheric pools of light on the surface below.
▪ Reaganomics created a pool of scabs as big as Lake Michigan.
▪ Floor lamps Use a floor lamp to create enticing pools of light.
▪ That means producing more work per worker as well as creating a larger pool of workers to exploit.
▪ Lamps glowed here and there in the room, creating pools of warm light.
▪ Rocky and shallow coastlines create the most spectacular pools, where small seaside animals become temporarily trapped in these natural aquariums.
▪ The countenances of all three were radiant, which created a special pool of light on the gospel side.
▪ When the filthy yellow flow reached the desk-top, it created a pool about the size of a Kennedy half-dollar.
lie
▪ It was a dead Hearthware, lying in a dark pool of blood.
▪ A guard found him lying in a pool of blood, and a doctor saved him.
▪ Behind a grey stone wall lay a little pool.
▪ The stomach is mostly empty-the whisky is lying in a shallow pool where it is now mixed with highly acidic gastric juices.
▪ Even after they have dropped, they are valuable, lying in a blood-red pool under the dense thicket of branches.
▪ Some people will always want to lie around the pool.
▪ She found him lying in a pool of blood in his cot.
▪ The Elle-men are stooped and old, and are happiest when lying in a pool of sunlight to warm their withered limbs.
play
▪ I play pool, but I am really brutal.
▪ There is a games room where you can play pool or table-tennis, and live music is planned for the summer.
▪ There were sewer backups in both cities, which added to the odor; children played in stagnant pools.
▪ She reported that when members play pool they pay 10p.
▪ I have fond memories of Sussex-#playing pool and, much more to the point, the excellent discussions on science.
▪ He left the house less and less frequently and spent more and more time in the cellar playing pool.
win
▪ Therefore, finding a job is akin to winning the pools.
▪ So will all of us trying to win Oscar party pools.
▪ For shareholders, it must have been like winning the pools.
▪ Maybe she'd win the pools or walk off with first prize in the national lottery!
▪ New member Peter Lambert won the match and pool with three good dabs.
▪ Now when you've done that, it's almost like winning the pools.
▪ But the great dream was winning the football pools.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
shoot pool
▪ The place is empty but for the bar and three or four slightly-built lads shooting pool without words.
▪ They went out, he in a white suit, and he told her they were going to shoot pool.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A pool of oil had collected under the car.
▪ a pool of volunteers for community projects
▪ a secretarial pool
▪ He won $50,000 from the pool.
▪ I spent the entire afternoon relaxing by the pool.
▪ Kids were looking at the starfish and anemones in the tide pools.
▪ Most countries have a pool of surplus labour.
▪ The Kohlers' have a pool in their backyard.
▪ There is a much smaller pool of houses to rent than there used to be.
▪ Trautman was lying in a pool of blood.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Anna was gazing at the pool of fluid, and the corners of her mouth began to droop.
▪ Below us in the center of the compound there was a swimming pool, set amidst flower beds and rows of palms.
▪ But even more intriguing was the third pool, Heart pool.
▪ Going too fast would result in his jumping over the pool and crashing into the far end.
▪ Huge pools of eyes stared back at her from the dead white planes of the face.
▪ Littlewoods, the pools promoter, calculates each punter has a 1:39 chance of a win.
▪ There had been the world, with the pool in the middle and the petals round the edge.
▪ What Mr Milken did was to make huge pools of capital available to finance takeovers.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
money
▪ It seemed that the men pooled their money to help survive.
▪ Partners can pool their money capital and are usually somewhat better risks in the eyes of bankers.
▪ The idea was to give small investors the chance to pool their money and so spread their risk and get better returns.
water
▪ The front door stood open, water pooling in the hallway.
▪ The trapped water pools and backs up under the shingles, where it can leak into the house.
▪ She saw the water pooling in the kitchen sink.
■ VERB
swimming
▪ She has a picture of herself and the boy by a swimming pool at the Fountainebleu Hotel in Miami.
▪ Those of us with tadpoles for children have made local swimming pools our summer homes.
▪ Approved a measure requiring electrical wiring in older swimming pools to be retrofitted.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ If we all pool our money I'm sure we'll have enough to buy her a present.
▪ Why don't we get together and pool our ideas?
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ All information can be pooled at the report session, and problems discussed and clarified.
▪ If constitutional independence is what sovereignty is, I do not know how one can reduce it by pooling it.
▪ Other voluntary hospitals with such funds lost them to the Exchequer, which pooled them in a central fund.
▪ Usually they pool their financial resources and their business acumen.
▪ We will be pooling our sovereignty, not losing it.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Pool

Pool \Pool\, n. [AS. p[=o]l; akin to LG. pool, pohl, D. poel, G. pfuhl; cf. Icel. pollr, also W. pwll, Gael. poll.]

  1. A small and rather deep collection of (usually) fresh water, as one supplied by a spring, or occurring in the course of a stream; a reservoir for water; as, the pools of Solomon.
    --Wyclif.

    Charity will hardly water the ground where it must first fill a pool.
    --Bacon.

    The sleepy pool above the dam.
    --Tennyson.

  2. A small body of standing or stagnant water; a puddle. ``The filthy mantled pool beyond your cell.''
    --Shak.

Pool

Pool \Pool\, n. [F. poule, properly, a hen. See Pullet.]

  1. The stake played for in certain games of cards, billiards, etc.; an aggregated stake to which each player has contributed a snare; also, the receptacle for the stakes.

  2. A game at billiards, in which each of the players stakes a certain sum, the winner taking the whole; also, in public billiard rooms, a game in which the loser pays the entrance fee for all who engage in the game; a game of skill in pocketing the balls on a pool table.

    Note: This game is played variously, but commonly with fifteen balls, besides one cue ball, the contest being to drive the most balls into the pockets.

    He plays pool at the billiard houses.
    --Thackeray.

  3. In rifle shooting, a contest in which each competitor pays a certain sum for every shot he makes, the net proceeds being divided among the winners.

  4. Any gambling or commercial venture in which several persons join.

  5. A combination of persons contributing money to be used for the purpose of increasing or depressing the market price of stocks, grain, or other commodities; also, the aggregate of the sums so contributed; as, the pool took all the wheat offered below the limit; he put $10,000 into the pool.

  6. (Railroads) A mutual arrangement between competing lines, by which the receipts of all are aggregated, and then distributed pro rata according to agreement.

  7. (Law) An aggregation of properties or rights, belonging to different people in a community, in a common fund, to be charged with common liabilities.

    Pin pool, a variety of the game of billiards in which small wooden pins are set up to be knocked down by the balls.

    Pool ball, one of the colored ivory balls used in playing the game at billiards called pool.

    Pool snipe (Zo["o]l.), the European redshank. [Prov. Eng.]

    Pool table, a billiard table with pockets.

Pool

Pool \Pool\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Pooled; p. pr. & vb. n. Pooling.] To put together; to contribute to a common fund, on the basis of a mutual division of profits or losses; to make a common interest of; as, the companies pooled their traffic.

Finally, it favors the poolingof all issues.
--U. S. Grant.

Pool

Pool \Pool\, v. i. To combine or contribute with others, as for a commercial, speculative, or gambling transaction.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
pool

"small body of water," Old English pol "small body of water; deep, still place in a river," from West Germanic *pol- (cognates: Old Frisian and Middle Low German pol, Dutch poel, Old High German pfuol, German Pfuhl). As a short form of swimming pool it is recorded from 1901. Pool party is from 1965.

pool

"to make a common interest, put things into a pool," 1871, from pool (n.2). Related: Pooled; pooling.

pool

of liquid, "to form a pool or pools," 1620s, from pool (n.1).

pool

game similar to billiards, 1848, originally (1690s) a card game played for collective stakes (a "pool"), from French poule "stakes, booty, plunder," literally "hen," from Old French poille "hen, young fowl" (see foal (n.)).\n

\nPerhaps the original notion is from jeu de la poule, supposedly a game in which people threw things at a chicken and the player who hit it, won it, which speaks volumes about life in the Middle Ages. The notion behind the word, then, is "playing for money." The connection of "hen" and "stakes" is also present in Spanish polla and Walloon paie.\n

\nMeaning "collective stakes" in betting first recorded 1869; sense of "common reservoir of resources" is from 1917. Meaning "group of persons who share duties or skills" is from 1928. From 1933 as short for football pool in wagering. Pool shark is from 1898. The phrase dirty pool "underhanded or unsportsmanlike conduct," especially in politics (1951), seems to belong here now, but the phrase dirty pool of politics, with an image of pool (n.1) is recorded from 1871 and was in use early 20c.

Wiktionary
pool

Etymology 1 n. 1 A small and rather deep collection of (usually) fresh water, as one supplied by a spring, or occurring in the course of a stream; a reservoir for water. 2 A small body of standing or stagnant water; a puddle. 3 A swimming pool. 4 A supply of resources. vb. (context intransitive of a liquid English) to form a pool Etymology 2

n. 1 (context uncountable English) A game at billiards, in which each of the players stakes a certain sum, the winner taking the whole; also, in public billiard rooms, a game in which the loser pays the entrance fee for all who engage in the game; a game of skill in pocketing the balls on a pool table. 2 In rifle shooting, a contest in which each competitor pays a certain sum for every shot he makes, the net proceeds being divided among the winners. 3 Any gambling or commercial venture in which several persons join. 4 The stake played for in certain games of cards, billiards, etc.; an aggregated stake to which each player has contributed a share; also, the receptacle for the stakes. 5 A combination of persons contributing money to be used for the purpose of increasing or depressing the market price of stocks, grain, or other commodities; also, the aggregate of the sums so contributed. 6 (context rail transport English) A mutual arrangement between competing lines, by which the receipts of all are aggregated, and then distributed pro rata according to agreement. 7 (context legal English) An aggregation of properties or rights, belonging to different people in a community, in a common fund, to be charged with common liabilities. vb. 1 (context transitive English) to put together; contribute to a common fund, on the basis of a mutual division of profits or losses; to make a common interest of; as, the companies pooled their traffic 2 (context intransitive English) to combine or contribute with others, as for a commercial, speculative, or gambling transaction

WordNet
pool
  1. v. combine into a common fund; "We pooled resources"

  2. join or form a pool of people

pool
  1. n. an excavation that is (usually) filled with water

  2. a small lake; "the pond was too small for sailing" [syn: pond]

  3. an organization of people or resources that can be shared; "a car pool"; "a secretarial pool"; "when he was first hired he was assigned to the pool"

  4. an association of companies for some definite purpose [syn: consortium, syndicate]

  5. any communal combination of funds; "everyone contributed to the pool"

  6. a small body of standing water (rainwater) or other liquid; "there were puddles of muddy water in the road after the rain"; "the body lay in a pool of blood" [syn: puddle]

  7. the combined stakes of the betters [syn: kitty]

  8. something resembling a pool of liquid; "he stood in a pool of light"; "his chair sat in a puddle of books and magazines" [syn: puddle]

  9. any of various games played on a pool table having 6 pockets [syn: pocket billiards]

Wikipedia
Pool

Pool may refer to:

Pool (album)

Pool is an album by John Zorn featuring his early "game piece" composition of the same name which was first released on vinyl on Parachute Records in 1980 as a double album including the composition "Hockey". The album was released on CD on Tzadik Records with an additional bonus track featuring a test recording of Archery as part of The Parachute Years Box Set in 1997 and as a single CD in 2000. The album was the first released solely under Zorn's name following his collaboration with Eugene Chadbourne, School (1978).

Pool (Porches album)

Pool is the second studio album by New York-based musician Aaron Maine's Porches project. The album was recorded in Maine's New York City apartment, and released on February 5, 2016 on Domino Records.

Pool (cue sports)

Pool, also more formally known as pocket billiards (mostly in North America) or pool billiards (mostly in Europe and Australia), is the family of cue sports and games played on a pool table having six receptacles called pockets along the , into which balls are deposited as the main goal of play. An obsolete term for pool is six-pocket.

There are hundreds of pool games. Some of the more well known include eight-ball (and the variant blackball), nine-ball (with variants ten-ball and seven-ball), straight pool (14.1 continuous), one-pocket, and bank pool.

There are also hybrid games combining aspects of both pool and carom billiards, such as American four-ball billiards, cowboy pool, and bottle pool.

Pool (surname)

Pool is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

  • Albert-Jan Pool (born 1960), Dutch type designer
  • Andre Pool, member of the National Assembly of Seychelles
  • Cord Pool, guitarist for American red dirt metal band Texas Hippie Coalition
  • David de Sola Pool (1885–1970), spiritual leader of the Sephardic Congregation Shearith Israel in New York City; father of Ithiel
  • E. Ion Pool (1858–1939), British marathon runner and Olympics critic
  • Ithiel de Sola Pool (1917–1984), pioneer in the development of social science; son of David
  • Hamp Pool (1915–2000), US player of American football
  • Hugh Pool (born 1964), New York guitarist
  • Joe R. Pool (1911–1968), US Representative from Texas
  • John Pool (1826–1884), US Senator from North Carolina
  • Jonathan Pool (born 1942), US political scientist
  • Judith Graham Pool (1919–1975), American scientist, discoverer of cryoprecipitation
  • Léa Pool (born 1950), Swiss filmmaker, and film instructor in Quebec, Canada
  • Malcolm Pool (born 1943), British bass player with The Artwoods and other bands
  • Maria Louise Pool (1841–1898), US writer, best known for A Vacation in a Buggy
  • Robert Roy Pool (born 1953), an American screenwriter, best known for Outbreak (1995), The Big Town (1987) and Armageddon (1998)
  • Solomon Pool (1832–1901), fourth president of the University of North Carolina
  • Steve Pool (born 1955), weather anchor for KOMO-TV in Seattle, Washington
  • Ted Pool (1906–1975), Australian rules football player, with the Hawthorn Hawks in the VFL
  • Walter F. Pool (1850–1883), US Congressman from North Carolina
  • Wim Pool (born 1927), former Dutch Olympic sprint canoer
Pool (website)

ABC Pool was a website housed within the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) as part of ABC Radio National's Multi-platform and Content Development department. The site was launched as a public beta in August 2008 and is a space where people can upload, share, collaborate and communicate with other members of the 'Pool' community. Some of the best work on the site has resulted in on-air outcomes through programs on ABC Radio National and ABC Open network. ABC Pool was a project that explores the space between broadcast and participatory media.

The site made use of Creative Commons licenses, both releasing limited ABC archival material as CC and allowing users to licence their work as CC.Pool has been one of the ABC's first websites to take advantage of Creative Commons Licensing, enabling Pool's online community to share content within a safe legal framework, allowing for pastiche and adaptation.

The Pool website went offline in June 2013,.

Pool (computer science)

In computer science, a pool is a set of resources that are kept ready to use, rather than acquired on use and released afterwards. In this context, resources can refer to system resources such as file handles, which are external to a process, or internal resources such as objects. A pool client requests a resource from the pool and performs desired operations on the returned resource. When the client finishes its use of the resource, it is returned to the pool rather than released and lost.

The pooling of resources can offer a significant performance boost in situations that have high cost associated with resource acquiring, high rate of the requests for resources, and a low overall count of simultaneously used resources. Pooling is also useful when the latency is a concern, because a pool offers predictable times required to obtain resources since they have already been acquired. These benefits are mostly true for system resources that require a system call, or remote resources that require a network communication, such as database connections, socket connections, threads, and memory allocation. Pooling is also useful for expensive-to-compute data, notably large graphic objects like fonts or bitmaps, acting essentially as a data cache or a memoization technique.

Special cases of pools are connection pools, thread pools, and memory pools.

Pool (London cricketer)

Pool (first name and dates unknown) was an English cricketer who had amateur status. He played in first-class cricket for London Cricket Club during the 1730s and is recorded taking part in a major single wicket match at Kennington Common on Monday, 11 August 1735. Others involved in the fixture were Dunn, Ellis, Marshall and Wakeland.

As Pool had established his reputation by 1735, he must have been active for some years previously and his career probably began in the 1720s. Very few players were mentioned by name in contemporary reports and there are no other references to Pool.

Usage examples of "pool".

And because of the aberration of the Dutch and Belgians for neutrality there had been no staff consultations by which the defenders could pool their plans and resources to the best advantage.

The third and fourth humans on the island had tried to find their privacy as far from the abo village and the tunnel pool as possible.

The three of us went first to check on the pool, and found it gratifying abrim with repulsive brown water, wide and deep enough to have submerged our truck.

Right now the only one of us tars actually working was Halle, who was chasing down a pool of vomit sicked up by Pael, the Academician, the only non-Navy personnel on the bridge.

Then I wondered whether the pool before me had been the haunt of the afanc, considered both as crocodile and beaver.

Out front on the green cement lawn a tiptoed Cupid, wings aflutter, squirted from pouty lips an eternal stream of blue-colored water into a marble pool deep in good-luck coins and casino chips.

The glass wall surrounded a huge shallow pool filled with polished agate gravel.

Lelila and Rillao reached the center of the agate pool, directly beneath the highest point of the glass webwork.

Anger and impatience trickled across her like the water in the agate pool.

The fountain erupted from the agate pool and splashed Lelila from the top of her head to the ends of her hair.

A number of other, similar beings moved leisurely in the pools, splashing the shallow water on their skins or burrowing down into the agates till only their eyes and trunk-ends showed.

There the true gods led him to the subterranean pool where eyeless, albescent fish swam around the clutch of huge eggs, as hard as the finest armor, left there countless centuries past.

A rough-clad stranger was standing with his back to Alec, looking out over the pool.

Dubious but not wanting to appear ungrateful, Alec picked up a blanket and went to the pool.

To his considerable dissurprise, Alec stared at him for a moment, then turned on his heel and stalked abruptly away to stare out over the central pool, his back rigid as a blade.