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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
pill
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
morning-after pill
pep pill
poison pill
sleeping pill
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
bitter
▪ The traditionalist camp has had to swallow some bitter pills.
▪ Its failure to comfort is just another bitter pill.
▪ Lamb and Botham had to swallow the very bitter pill of being dropped.
▪ We were in such a state we decided to swallow what seemed the bitter pill of Thatcherism.
▪ And we can speak up to tell them that bitter pills are indigestible.
▪ It was a bitter pill for the 117 men listed to swallow with their Thanksgiving turkey yesterday.
▪ It was a bit of a blow, a bitter pill to swallow.
contraceptive
▪ Only women who are not breastfeeding and not taking the contraceptive pill are eligible.
▪ They also show a protective effect of pregnancy and current use of the contraceptive pill.
▪ There are several kinds of contraceptive pills available, and they act in slightly different ways.
▪ Use of the oral contraceptive pill was associated with a small increase in risk that was limited to current users.
▪ It's already known that women who take the contraceptive pill are much less likely to develop it.
▪ The contraceptive pill is also a contributing factor.
▪ At around the same time the advent of the contraceptive pill gave women freedom from the fear of pregnancy.
▪ It is therefore important that women of all ages who take the contraceptive pill should not smoke.
sleeping
▪ My Mom took a job as a nursing orderly in a mental hospital where sleeping pills and tranquillisers were easily obtainable.
▪ I tell her I am tired and giddy from last night's sleeping pill.
▪ She was unconscious because she had taken some sleeping pills.
▪ Maria Teresa: Don't forget the sleeping pills.
▪ Nigel was given a sleeping pill and some cocoa before he went to bed.
▪ After some weeks, instead of taking a sleeping pill she decided to lie awake and feel what her body was telling her.
▪ The jetset hostess was a hypochondriac who could not manage without sleeping pills.
▪ Claudia dived into her pocket, dropped the sleeping pills into the mug, stirred swiftly and rapidly switched the mugs round.
■ NOUN
abortion
▪ When Bush came to the Oval Office, the abortion pill had been approved for the market.
control
▪ No-one feels so strongly against abortion at any stage that they picket the factories where birth control pills are produced.
▪ They include birth control pills, other ovulation suppressors and long-acting hormones.
▪ Like clockwork, she goes to the local health clinic every third month for three new cycles of free birth control pills.
▪ Birth Control Pills and Headache Headaches may rarely occur as a side effect of birth control pills.
▪ Birth control pills may cause or aggravate vascular headaches as well as predispose the patient to cerebral venous or arterial occlusions.
diet
▪ Time to write a poem, go for a swim, take diet pills.
▪ Why is it being treated differently than diet pills?
▪ It was the last time she was going to take diet pills before a race, that was for sure.
▪ For many years, most respectable doctors shunned the use of diet pills.
▪ So far, clients at these programs seem pleased to be able to get prescriptions for diet pills at their local mall.
▪ Pamela Bradley had taken about six times the recommended dose of diet pills containing the herb ephedra.
poison
▪ And a firm's environmental history has emerged as another potential poison pill no-one wants to swallow.
▪ On Wednesday, they threatened to withdraw support for a minimum wage boost if the so-called poison pill amendment passed.
▪ There were white knights and poison pills, Pac-Man defences and unbundling.
▪ Most notably, it bans firms from frustrating a bidder by crippling themselves with debt or swallowing poison pills.
▪ Mackenzie put a poison pill into place, which gave the company 60 days to find another suitor.
vitamin
▪ There were Cotton clubs, Cotton gloves, even vitamin pills endorsed by Cotton.
▪ Hundreds of children are taken to hospital after swallowing vitamin pills, often because they mistake them for sweets.
▪ The sky is now spotted with a scattered selection of bright dots like children's vitamin pills.
▪ He and I used to sail together to the Spice Islands to trade in vitamin pills and conch shells.
■ VERB
give
▪ Nigel was given a sleeping pill and some cocoa before he went to bed.
▪ When the body develops tolerance to a prescribed pill, some people ask their physicians to give them a different pill.
▪ At the first hospital visit, the woman is given a mifepristone pill.
▪ To answer your question: yes, I gave Alistair the pills.
▪ The doctor had been in and given her some sleeping pills.
▪ But surely Ben could have given the child a pill?
▪ They gave her pills which kept the world at a distance, muted things, let her dream.
pop
▪ The producers must be popping pills too.
▪ But when coach is a financial necessity, read a few books, enjoy the movies and pop some sleeping pills.
▪ But the judges must have been popping the same pills as Martin Fowler.
▪ The post-exposure prevention offered through the research protocol entails more than merely popping a few pills the morning after.
▪ Zen popped two motion-sickness pills out of their plastic nests and put them in his mouth.
prescribe
▪ The doctor advised rest and quiet and prescribed some red pills.
▪ When I continued to demur, he promised to prescribe only five pills, one for each of the next five nights.
▪ The doctors prescribed all kinds of pills.
▪ Next day the doctor prescribed small yellow pills for vertigo.
▪ When the morning after is Sunday: pharmacist prescribing of emergency contraceptive pills.
▪ When the body develops tolerance to a prescribed pill, some people ask their physicians to give them a different pill.
sleep
▪ I've got anti-depressants and some sleeping pills.
▪ Obviously, sleeping pills are not harmless; they are drugs that require caution and care in use.
▪ I took sleeping pills for the first month and then tried hypnotherapy to cure it.
▪ As the next section points out, sleeping pills never cure InsomnIa.
▪ Peter committed suicide the next day with an overdose of sleeping pills.
▪ You may wonder why sleeping pills and tranquilizers are on a list of drugs that can cause insomnia.
Sleep apnea and its effect on sleep are sometimes exacerbated by the use of alcohol, sleeping pills, and obesity.
▪ Not only do sleeping pills impair the function of sleep, they also affect the way you feel the next day.
stop
▪ I could just stop taking my pill and lot him think it was an accident.
▪ Once the transient sleep problem has passed, stop taking the sleeping pills.
▪ Reasons for stopping the pill seemed unremarkable.
▪ Even though the medication may have lost its initial beneficial effects, they believe they can not stop taking the pill.
swallow
▪ The traditionalist camp has had to swallow some bitter pills.
▪ The other half will swallow harmless sugar pills.
▪ Lamb and Botham had to swallow the very bitter pill of being dropped.
▪ Until then - don't swallow them pills.
▪ Hundreds of children are taken to hospital after swallowing vitamin pills, often because they mistake them for sweets.
▪ She watched him swallow a red pill and then a yellow and black one.
▪ Many users swallow the pills even before arriving.
take
▪ He took a pill from his pocket, and popped it into his mouth.
▪ Pretty soon you get patients who are no longer taking pills..
▪ Only women who are not breastfeeding and not taking the contraceptive pill are eligible.
▪ Once the transient sleep problem has passed, stop taking the sleeping pills.
▪ Joan wept and at first refused to take the pills, but after much persuasion and then pleading, she agreed.
▪ Q.. For several years my wife and I have been taking beta-carotene pills in an effort to prevent heart disease.
▪ Time to write a poem, go for a swim, take diet pills.
▪ Or do you go through a rigmarole of inserting diaphragms or taking pills?
use
▪ An audit of unplanned pregnancies seen in one practice also emphasised the need for great care in counselling people using the pill.
▪ He still is, except now he uses pills.
▪ Healers who use their hands rather than pills and potions are still treated with scepticism.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bitter pill (to swallow)
▪ Losing the business was a bitter pill to swallow.
▪ It was a bitter pill for the 117 men listed to swallow with their Thanksgiving turkey yesterday.
▪ It was a bit of a blow, a bitter pill to swallow.
knockout pills/drops etc
pop pills
▪ The producers must be popping pills too.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Hannah's being a real pill today.
▪ I took a couple of pills for my stuffy nose.
▪ sleeping pills
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Council officials had said earlier the pill would be on the market by mid-1997.
▪ Do not accept pills or medicines from anyone but your own doctor or the doctor at the clinic.
▪ Healers who use their hands rather than pills and potions are still treated with scepticism.
▪ Not only do sleeping pills impair the function of sleep, they also affect the way you feel the next day.
▪ Taking pills or powders for headaches and stomach upsets is only adding to your system's toxicity.
▪ The therapy requires dozens of pills a day and to stop even for a short time allows the virus to rebound.
▪ There are several kinds of contraceptive pills available, and they act in slightly different ways.
II.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bitter pill (to swallow)
▪ Losing the business was a bitter pill to swallow.
▪ It was a bitter pill for the 117 men listed to swallow with their Thanksgiving turkey yesterday.
▪ It was a bit of a blow, a bitter pill to swallow.
knockout pills/drops etc
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Pill

Pill \Pill\, n. [F. pilute, L. pilula a pill, little ball, dim. of L. pila a ball. Cf. Piles.]

  1. A medicine in the form of a little ball, or small round mass, to be swallowed whole.

  2. Figuratively, something offensive or nauseous which must be accepted or endured.
    --Udall.

    Pill beetle (Zo["o]l.), any small beetle of the genus Byrrhus, having a rounded body, with the head concealed beneath the thorax.

    Pill bug (Zo["o]l.), any terrestrial isopod of the genus Armadillo, having the habit of rolling itself into a ball when disturbed. Called also pill wood louse.

Pill

Pill \Pill\, n. [Cf. Peel skin, or Pillion.] The peel or skin. [Obs.] ``Some be covered over with crusts, or hard pills, as the locusts.''
--Holland.

Pill

Pill \Pill\, v. i. To be peeled; to peel off in flakes.

Pill

Pill \Pill\, v. t. [Cf. L. pilare to deprive of hair, and E. pill, n. (above).]

  1. To deprive of hair; to make bald. [Obs.]

  2. To peel; to make by removing the skin.

    [Jacob] pilled white streaks . . . in the rods.
    --Gen. xxx. 37.

Pill

Pill \Pill\, v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p. Pilled; p. pr. & vb. n. Pilling.] [F. piller, L. pilare; cf. It. pigliare to take. Cf. Peel to plunder.] To rob; to plunder; to pillage; to peel. See Peel, to plunder. [Obs.]
--Spenser.

Pillers and robbers were come in to the field to pill and to rob.
--Sir T. Malroy.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
pill

"small ball or round mass of medicine," c.1400, from Middle Dutch or Middle Low German pille and Middle French pile, all from Latin pilula "pill," literally "little ball," diminutive of pila "a ball, playing ball," said to be related to pilus "hair" if the original notion was "hairball." Figurative sense "something disagreeable that must be swallowed" is from 1540s; slang meaning "boring person" is recorded from 1871. The pill "contraceptive pill" is from 1957.

pill

1736, "to dose on pills," from pill (n.). From 1882 as "to form into pills." Related: Pilled; pilling.

Wiktionary
pill

Etymology 1 n. 1 A small, usually cylindrical object designed for easy swallowing, usually containing some sort of medication. 2 (senseid en contraceptive) (context informal uncountable definite i.e. used with "the" English) contraceptive medication, usually in the form of a pill to be taken by a woman; an oral contraceptive pill. 3 (context slang English) A comical or entertaining person. 4 (context slang English) A contemptible, annoying, or unpleasant person. vb. 1 (context intransitive textiles English) Of a woven fabric surface, to form small matted balls of fiber. 2 To form into the shape of a pill. 3 To medicate with pills. Etymology 2

n. The peel or skin. vb. 1 (label en obsolete) To peel; to remove the outer layer of hair, skin, or bark. 2 To peel; to make by removing the skin. 3 To be peeled; to peel off in flakes. 4 (label en obsolete) To pillage; to despoil or impoverish. Etymology 3

n. (context now UK regional English) An inlet on the coast; a small tidal pool or bay.

WordNet
pill
  1. n. something that resembles a pill in shape or size

  2. a dose of medicine in the form of a small pellet [syn: lozenge, tablet, tab]

  3. a unpleasant or tiresome person

  4. something unpleasant or offensive that must be tolerated or endured; "his competitor's success was a bitter pill to take"

  5. a contraceptive in the form of a pill containing estrogen and progestin to inhibit ovulation and so prevent conception [syn: birth control pill, contraceptive pill, oral contraceptive pill, oral contraceptive, anovulatory drug, anovulant]

Wikipedia
Pill

Pill or The Pill may refer to:

Drug-related:

  • Pill (pharmacy), referring to anything small and round for a specific dose of medicine
  • "The Pill", a general nickname for the combined oral contraceptive pill
Pill (rapper)

Tyrone Rivers, better known by his stage name Pill, is an American rapper from Atlanta, Georgia.

Pill (pharmacy)

A pill was originally defined as a small, round, solid pharmaceutical oral dosage form of medication that was in use before the advent of tablets and capsules. Pills were made by mixing the active ingredients with an excipient such as glucose syrup in a mortar and pestle to form a paste, then rolling the mass into a long cylindrical shape (called a "pipe"), and dividing it into equal portions, which were then rolled into balls, and often coated with sugar to make them more palatable.

Today, pills include tablets, capsules, and variants thereof like caplets—essentially anything with medication that can be digested, minus the liquid forms, colloquially falls into the pill category.

Some pills are designed to contain sensory and communication elements that collect and wirelessly transmit physiological information after being swallowed.

The oldest known pills were made of the zinc carbonates hydrozincite and smithsonite. The pills were used for sore eyes, and were found aboard a Roman ship Relitto del Pozzino which wrecked in 140 BC.

Pill (textile)

A pill, colloquially known as a bobble, is a small ball of fibers that forms on a piece of cloth. 'Pill' is also a verb for the formation of such balls.

Pilling is a surface defect of textiles caused by wear, and is considered unsightly. It happens when washing and wearing of fabrics causes loose fibers to begin to push out from the surface of the cloth, and, over time, abrasion causes the fibers to develop into small spherical bundles, anchored to the surface of the fabric by protruding fibers that haven't broken. The textile industry divides pilling into four stages: fuzz formation, entanglement, growth, and wear-off. Pilling normally happens on the parts of clothing that receive the most abrasion in day-to-day wear, such as the collar, cuffs, and around the thighs and rear on trousers.

All fabrics pill to some extent, although fibers such as linen and silk pill less than most. The primary drivers of pilling are the physical characteristics of the textile (including both the initial fibre, and the way in which it is processed during manufacturing), the personal habits of the textile's wearer, and the environment in which the textile is used. Fibers such as wool, cotton, polyester, nylon and acrylic have a tendency to pill the most, but wool pilling diminishes over time as non-tenacious wool fibers work themselves free of the fabric and break away, whereas pilling of synthetic textiles is a more serious problem, because the stronger fibers hold on to the pills and don't allow pills to fall off.

In general longer fibers pill less than short ones because there are fewer ends of fibers, and because it is harder for the longer fibers to work themselves out of the cloth. Fabrics with a large number of loose fibers have a higher tendency to pill. Also, knitted fabrics tend to pill more than woven fabrics, because of the greater distance between yarn crossings in knitted fabrics than in woven ones. For the same reason, a tightly knitted object will pill less than a loosely knitted one. When a fabric is made of a blend of fibers where one fibre is significantly stronger than the other, pills tend to form as the weaker fibre wears and breaks, and the stronger fibre holds the pills onto the cloth.

Techniques used by the textile industry to avoid pilling include singeing the loose fibers protruding on the surface of textile, and spinning the yarn with a high number of twists per inch. Some fabrics are chemically treated during the manufacturing process in order to reduce their propensity to pill. Polymeric coatings are sometimes applied, to bind fibers into the fabric surface and prevent initial fuzz from forming. Polyester and cotton fibers are sometimes modified to be of lower-than-normal strength, which results in pills detaching easily from fabrics, once they are formed. Cellulase enzymes are sometimes used on cotton fabrics during wet processing, which removes loose fibers.

Textile authorities say consumers can prevent or postpone pilling of their fabrics by treating them with chemical soil release treatments that make the surface of the fabric more hydrophilic, and by turning clothes inside out before washing them. Washing in laundry detergent containing enzymes will get rid of pills on cotton clothing.

Pills do not interfere with the functionality of the textile, unless a spot with a lot of pills turns into a hole in the fabric. This is because both pills and holes are caused by the fabric wearing—a pill is fibre that was in the cloth. After the pill forms the fabric is thinner there, increasing the likelihood that a hole will form.

Pilling can seriously compromise a textile's acceptability for consumers, and is the focus of significant industry research. In the textile industry, severity of pilling is objectively evaluated using five parameters: pill number, the mean area of pilling; the total area of pilling; contrast, and density.

Usage examples of "pill".

Why did you wish information about this box of aconitine pills prescribed for Mrs.

The box bearing the aconitine label and the pills had all rolled out of the china umbrella stand, and he had taken it for granted that the pills belonged in the box.

Turnbull put down his pill box before getting a glass of water, and in his attack of giddiness accidentally opened your box of aconitine pills, Mrs.

He was, however, a morphine addict, so seriously addicted that by the time he stood trial atNuremberghe was dosing himself with up to a hundred pills of paracodeine a day.

The outlets I depend on, use for survival and have become addicted to are gone, replaced by Doctors and Nurses and Counselors and Rules and Regulations and Pills and Lectures and Mandatory Meals and Jobs in the morning and none of them do a fucking thing for me.

Pakistan has been producing and testing, on an experimental basis, a wide range of odd drugs, both amphetamines and narcotics, in pill, liquid, and aerosol form.

Show me where the label for the aerosol version is different from the label for the pills.

He opened and cleaned the wounds with something that felt like a wire brush, stitched them up neatly, covered them all with aluminium foil and bandage, fed me a variety of pills then, for good measure, jabbed me a couple of times with a hypodermic syringe.

What if Tessa had had a husband who failed to understand her anorexia and addiction to diet pills?

One endearing charm is the way these yellow fellows take their atabrine tablets, pills which are so vile tasting that our men even wash them down with GI lemonade.

After an early breakfast, the 505th lined up to draw ammunition and field rations, along with atabrine pills to prevent malaria, pills to purify water, and anti-fatigue pills.

And a barbiturate, something called zolpidem, which is a sleeping pill also known by the brand name Ambien.

Oscar -- at which point he would reach out and grab any pills, powders, shivs or other evidence he was handed, then sprint like a human bazooka for the nearest exit.

Horace, giving the poets a pill, but our fellow Shakespeare hath given him a purge that made him bewray his credit.

Which translated to read: Pill Popping Dope Smoking Pussy Eating Mother Fucken Outlaw Brothers Biken Together.