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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
wool
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a tweed/wool/sheepskin/leather coat
▪ I love her black leather coat.
cotton wool
▪ She put some disinfectant on a piece of cotton wool and dabbed it on her cheek.
steel wool
wire wool
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
black
▪ She showered, quickly slipped on her black wool frock, a string of pearls.
▪ He is wearing a wrinkled black wool suit and vest.
▪ Which left cash enough for a second-hand cloak in black wool and the button boots in the window - if they fitted.
▪ The rider wore a gilded Grecian helmet that was crested with black and red wool and plumed with a white tuft.
▪ Her frail hands picked at her dress of black, fluffy wool.
▪ Lumberjack checks reworked in black and white wool are everywhere.
blue
▪ She felt quite chic in this soft blue wool suit, despite the wartime restrictions.
▪ Tipper Gore will wear a Jennifer George blue wool dress and jacket set topped by a sapphire alpaca coat for day.
▪ She sighed as she inspected her one good dark blue wool dress, its seat shiny with wear.
brown
▪ Beneath the cloak was a kind of blouse, made from woven brown wool with long sleeves edged in red.
▪ She was wearing a brown wool suit and hat, under which could be seen the ends of her curly bobbed hair.
▪ Traditionally this was always natural brown or cream wool, but bright colours are sometimes used nowadays.
▪ She was wrapped in soft brown wool.
▪ Her soft brown wool suit and velvet Vandyke cap perfectly complemented her auburn hair.
▪ Eventually, as I was very blonde, I chose a soft brown wool material embroidered with chenille of the same colour.
fine
▪ Applied with fine steel wool, the wax can darken faded wood and provide a resistant finish.
▪ The quality of the wool was also superior: it was a fine wool with little evidence of kemps.
▪ She shifted her position and adjusted the fine wool of her skirt over her bony knees.
▪ There, 50 or so textile mills produce what is widely acknowledged to be the finest wool cloth in the world.
▪ For a natural worn look, lightly rub down the varnish when hard with fine steel wool.
▪ She was wearing a chestnut-brown sweater in fine wool belted into a black skirt which swung calf length above high-heeled boots.
▪ Then sand lightly with fine steel wool, and dust off thoroughly, finishing with a tacky rag.
green
▪ A ball of green wool was passed around and we used it to bind ourselves together as the singing continued.
▪ A thick new olive green wool blanket covered Mrs Saulitis's window at night.
▪ A square of thin green wool scattered with small paisley shapes in yellow and red.
▪ Pictured above, olive green wool coat, £218; mustard three-quarter length sweater, £107; leggings £108.
pure
▪ They made me wonder if I could use pure woven wool as a base for my own technique with the machine.
▪ The Essentials one is superbly tailored in pure new wool gaberdine.
▪ Daylight reveals pure new wool in its true to life colours.
▪ His grey cloak was of pure wool pushed back over his shoulders, yet it was his face which attracted me.
▪ I wanted the garment to seem feminine even though it is made out of a yarn as heavy and warm as pure wool.
▪ The pure wool comes in over 50 colours.
▪ Grey flannel women's suit down from £210 to £139. Pure new wool jacket £175 to £99.
▪ Women's birdseye wool jackets £190 to £95. Pure new wool suit for men £295 to £199.
raw
▪ They controlled this cottage industry by buying, selling, transporting and exchanging raw wool, spun yam and woven cloth.
▪ The values of the raw wool and the woollen cloth are included in the value of the coat.
▪ A sheep farmer produces raw wool and sells it to a mill for £10.
▪ The mill uses the raw wool to produce cloth which it sells to a coat factory for £21.
red
▪ I stare in horror at its bloody mouth, that vertical stitch of red wool now dribbling crimson.
▪ My teeth were chattering, and the juice from the pear was dripping over my red wool mittens.
▪ A bag of red wool was produced from a work basket and the looped baubles glittered on the tree.
▪ They were the Mien, whose blue-turbaned women were swathed in dark robes accented with red wool ruffs.
▪ His nostrils had been stuffed with red wool.
▪ The red wool clings to the needles, and I have to prise each stitch off.
▪ The rider wore a gilded Grecian helmet that was crested with black and red wool and plumed with a white tuft.
soft
▪ She leaned lightly against the soft wool of his dark cashmere coat.
▪ She was wrapped in soft brown wool.
▪ Ashley drew the soft wool of her serape closer around her neck.
▪ Her soft brown wool suit and velvet Vandyke cap perfectly complemented her auburn hair.
▪ She felt quite chic in this soft blue wool suit, despite the wartime restrictions.
▪ Eventually, as I was very blonde, I chose a soft brown wool material embroidered with chenille of the same colour.
white
▪ It was white wool with a band of red figures waltzing round the welt.
▪ With a brisk motion, she brushes at the stains on her white wool dress.
▪ A plump woman in a white wool suit and dark glasses bought it and tried to pay for it by cheque.
▪ Lumberjack checks reworked in black and white wool are everywhere.
■ NOUN
coat
▪ Cocteau with a dark wool coat flung over his shoulders.
▪ M &038; S leads the field with an ankle-length wool coat at £99, while Top Shop's fitted version is £79.
▪ Pictured above, olive green wool coat, £218; mustard three-quarter length sweater, £107; leggings £108.
cotton
▪ You're like a sea of cotton wool.
▪ Not tranquillisers - no one benefits from making their life into a cotton wool ball.
▪ Sometimes people would wince more from the coldness of the alcohol on the cotton wool than they would from the needle.
▪ On the other hand you don't wrap things up in cotton wool.
▪ The silence was like wet cotton wool pressed into their ears.
▪ The ears can be made out of felt and a small tail can be made of cotton wool.
▪ She used to carry pads of cotton wool to dress the wounds from the chafing.
▪ The intertwining of the thin, twisted worms produces an appearance similar to that of cotton wool.
dress
▪ Nan wore the smart navy coat she had worn yesterday, but this time over a pale yellow wool dress.
▪ Tipper Gore will wear a Jennifer George blue wool dress and jacket set topped by a sapphire alpaca coat for day.
▪ It was a grey wool dress to-day, well cut, correct, but severe.
▪ With a brisk motion, she brushes at the stains on her white wool dress.
▪ A wool dress sculpted her slender figure and ended at mid-thigh.
▪ She sighed as she inspected her one good dark blue wool dress, its seat shiny with wear.
▪ Jane saw Gabby quietly standing in a corner in a beautiful gray wool dress Francois Brac had designed for her.
merchant
▪ It was built originally by one of the old wool merchants, who wanted to establish his family as landed gentry.
▪ They became weavers, or tailors, or wool merchants.
▪ Crosby Hall was built by Sir John Crosby, a wealthy grocer and wool merchant, and was completed in 1475.
▪ Being solid wool merchants at heart, they are not sure what to make of an engine that runs on paper.
▪ She was the daughter of Robert Keown, a London wool merchant.
shop
▪ She was still working in the wool shop by day and driving an ambulance at night.
steel
▪ Applied with fine steel wool, the wax can darken faded wood and provide a resistant finish.
▪ After the second with grade 0000 steel wool 8 Any finish can then be applied.
▪ For a natural worn look, lightly rub down the varnish when hard with fine steel wool.
▪ Then sand lightly with fine steel wool, and dust off thoroughly, finishing with a tacky rag.
suit
▪ Centre Pinstripe wool suit, £399, Daks at Simpsons.
▪ She does not succeed in persuasively outing the Don Juan / Superman with his diabolical red beard and Jaeger wool suits.
▪ As a result, the traditional party outfit of flamboyant cravat and tweed jacket has been replaced by the ninety-nine-pound wool suit.
▪ She was wearing a brown wool suit and hat, under which could be seen the ends of her curly bobbed hair.
▪ Right Pinstripe wool suit, £650, Burberry.
▪ He is wearing a wrinkled black wool suit and vest.
▪ She selected a £225 grey-green wool suit, £23 shirt and £20 silk tie.
▪ And yet his wool suit scrapes through the layer of eiderdown.
sweater
▪ Winter collection reductions include half-price wool sweaters, suits down from £79.99 to Pounds 40.
▪ This page Simon Godfrey, left, wears Aran wool sweater from Principles.
▪ Lisa B wears Aran wool sweater from Kent &038; Curwen.
▪ Graham Fink, right, wears Aran wool sweater by Austin Reed.
▪ I sniffed the lanolin of his rough wool sweater and the slaughtered smell of his jacket.
▪ He wore an anorak over a wool sweater with a polo neck and he wore tough cord jeans and walking boots.
trade
▪ By 1839, only fifteen of Chalford's mills remained in the wool trade.
▪ A modern statue of a shepherd carrying a ram on his shoulders symbolizes the place's dependence on the wool trade.
▪ It has remained a corn mill throughout its working life, having had no known connection with the wool trade.
▪ The Cistercian monks with their lay brothers administered the abbey wool trade.
▪ In the fourteenth century the village played a major role in the wool trade.
▪ The Furness monks conducted the local wool trade, administering the Grange at Hawkshead.
▪ A large proportion of the local population was actively employed in the wool trade, although it had certainly decreased.
wire
▪ They are looking at some wire wool that has rusted.
▪ She felt a wire wool of beard on her chin, and realised she was seeing the world two-dimensionally.
▪ The more stubborn food particles can be removed by gentle scrubbing with wire wool.
▪ Before you replace it, clean the two pipe ends thoroughly with wire wool, then brush on flux.
▪ She chose the cooker and began to scrape its insides with wire wool.
▪ The inside of the fitting should be brushed out with a special wire brush and rubbed with wire wool.
■ VERB
produce
▪ Recipes for plant dyes tested and tried over generations have produced distinctive colours for wool, tweed and tartan.
▪ A sheep farmer produces raw wool and sells it to a mill for £10.
▪ Qashqar produced textiles: wool or felt and carpets.
▪ The unit included a spinning mill within its plant, producing one hundred percent wool yarn.
pull
▪ You can not pull the wool over Hooper's eyes.
▪ But it's not easy to pull the wool over our eyes.
▪ He found out we had been pulling the wool over his eyes for quite some time.
▪ And to think she'd pulled the wool over Miss Phoebe's eyes!
▪ Then put the wool around the needle and pull the wool through both of the stitches.
▪ You can't pull the wool over my eyes like that.
▪ There are people who can pull the wool over peoples' eyes.
use
▪ They made me wonder if I could use pure woven wool as a base for my own technique with the machine.
▪ They are generally well made, using good quality wool, and based on a limited number of the older Caucasian designs.
▪ On several of the islands the entire plant, boiled in water, was used for dying wool a greenish-yellow colour.
▪ To soften around the eyes, blend the edges of the eye shadow. Use a cotton wool bud for this.
▪ The mill uses the raw wool to produce cloth which it sells to a coat factory for £21.
▪ In those days we had to use an oil wool, which was all right after you washed it, if somewhat coarse.
▪ Considerable work has also been undertaken to develop new blends using wool and experimenting with new man made fibres and dyestuffs.
wear
▪ This page Simon Godfrey, left, wears Aran wool sweater from Principles.
▪ Everyone else in the camp wore much-darned wool and cotton stockings.
▪ Lisa B wears Aran wool sweater from Kent &038; Curwen.
▪ She was wearing a brown wool suit and hat, under which could be seen the ends of her curly bobbed hair.
▪ Graham Fink, right, wears Aran wool sweater by Austin Reed.
▪ He is wearing a wrinkled black wool suit and vest.
▪ Opposite page Lisa B wears men's wool cardigan by Joseph.
▪ Unfortunately, this news will probably not encourage consumers to eat more lamb or wear more wool.
wrap
▪ She was wrapped in soft brown wool.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
corn/wool/cotton etc exchange
▪ It's a long time since you could go to your local corn exchange and see international artists for ten bob.
▪ March cotton rose 2. 04 cents to 84. 50 cents a pound on the New York Cotton Exchange.
▪ Numerous former corn exchanges have been converted into shopping arcades accordingly.
wrap sb (up) in cotton wool
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Is this coat wool?
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Boil eggs and decorate them with paints and put tufts of wool on for hair.
▪ Everyone else in the camp wore much-darned wool and cotton stockings.
▪ Intense heat and charcoal fumes from their stoves ensured that few wool combers reached the age of fifty.
▪ Sheep smell, too-of lanolin, the fatty exudate that waterproofs their wool.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Wool

Wool \Wool\ (w[oo^]l), n. [OE. wolle, wulle, AS. wull; akin to D. wol, OHG. wolla, G. wolle, Icel. & Sw. ull, Dan. uld, Goth, wulla, Lith. vilna, Russ. volna, L. vellus, Skr. [=u]r[.n][=a] wool, v[.r] to cover. [root]146, 287. Cf. Flannel, Velvet.]

  1. The soft and curled, or crisped, species of hair which grows on sheep and some other animals, and which in fineness sometimes approaches to fur; -- chiefly applied to the fleecy coat of the sheep, which constitutes a most essential material of clothing in all cold and temperate climates.

    Note: Wool consists essentially of keratin.

  2. Short, thick hair, especially when crisped or curled.

    Wool of bat and tongue of dog.
    --Shak.

  3. (Bot.) A sort of pubescence, or a clothing of dense, curling hairs on the surface of certain plants. Dead pulled wool, wool pulled from a carcass. Mineral wool. See under Mineral. Philosopher's wool. (Chem.) See Zinc oxide, under Zinc. Pulled wool, wool pulled from a pelt, or undressed hide. Slag wool. Same as Mineral wool, under Mineral. Wool ball, a ball or mass of wool. Wool burler, one who removes little burs, knots, or extraneous matter, from wool, or the surface of woolen cloth. Wool comber.

    1. One whose occupation is to comb wool.

    2. A machine for combing wool. Wool grass (Bot.), a kind of bulrush ( Scirpus Eriophorum) with numerous clustered woolly spikes. Wool scribbler. See Woolen scribbler, under Woolen, a. Wool sorter's disease (Med.), a disease, resembling malignant pustule, occurring among those who handle the wool of goats and sheep. Wool staple, a city or town where wool used to be brought to the king's staple for sale. [Eng.] Wool stapler.

      1. One who deals in wool.

      2. One who sorts wool according to its staple, or its adaptation to different manufacturing purposes.

        Wool winder, a person employed to wind, or make up, wool into bundles to be packed for sale.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
wool

Old English wull "wool, fine soft hair which forms the coat of some animals," from Proto-Germanic *wulno (cognates: Old Norse ull, Old Frisian wolle, Middle Dutch wolle, Dutch wol, Old High German wolla, German wolle, Gothic wulla), from PIE *wele- (1) "wool" (cognates: Sanskrit urna; Avestan varena; Greek lenos "wool;" Latin lana "wool," vellus "fleece;" Old Church Slavonic vluna, Russian vulna, Lithuanian vilna "wool;" Middle Irish olann, Welsh gwlan "wool").\n

\nFigurative expression pull the wool over (someone's) eyes is recorded from 1838, American English. To be literally dyed in the wool (1725, as opposed to dyed in the piece) is to be so before spinning, while the material is in its raw state, which has a more durable effect; hence the figurative sense "from the beginning; most thoroughly," attested from 1809, and especially, in U.S. politics, from 1830.

Wiktionary
wool

n. 1 The hair of the sheep, llama and some other ruminants. 2 A cloth or yarn made from the wool of sheep.

WordNet
wool
  1. n. a fabric made from the hair of sheep [syn: woolen, woollen]

  2. fiber sheared from animals (such as sheep) and twisted into yarn for weaving

  3. outer coat of especially sheep and yaks [syn: fleece]

Wikipedia
Wool

Wool is the textile fiber obtained from sheep and certain other animals, including cashmere from goats, mohair from goats, qiviut from muskoxen, angora from rabbits, and other types of wool from camelids.

Wool has several qualities that distinguish it from hair or fur: it is crimped, it is elastic, and it grows in staples (clusters).

Wool (disambiguation)

Wool is the fibre commonly produced from sheep

Wool (the fiber) refers to one of the following:

  • Alpaca wool, derived from fur of alpacas
  • Angora wool, derived from fur of rabbits
  • Cashmere wool, derived from fur of goats
  • Llama wool, derived from fur of llamas
  • Wool, the commonly used term in the UK for yarn
  • Cotton wool, the UK term for cotton linters
  • Steel wool, an abrasive derived from steel
  • Bronze wool, an abrasive derived from bronze
  • Glass wool, an insulating material derived from fiberglass
  • Mineral wool, an insulating material derived from minerals or metal oxides
  • High temperature insulation wool, an insulating material derived from ceramic fibers
Wool (band)

Wool was a rock band from Washington, D.C. (but based in Los Angeles), specialising in a rough hewn but melodic brand of punk-based hard rock from 1990-1996.

WOOL (FM)

WOOL (91.5 FM, "Black Sheep Radio") is a radio station broadcasting a Freeform music and talk format. Licensed to Bellows Falls, Vermont, USA, the station is currently owned by Great Falls Community Broadcasting Company. It is a community radio station. WOOL began broadcast on March 9, 2014, implementing a Class A noncommercial educational license granted by the Federal Communications Commission as a successor station to WOOL-LP (100.1 FM).

Wool (surname)

Wool is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

  • Dan Wool, Canadian comedian
  • Glenn Wool, American musician
  • John E. Wool, United States Army general

Usage examples of "wool".

Wool dyes best in a slightly acid bath, and this may be taken advantage of in dyeing the yellows and blues of this group by adding a small quantity of acetic acid.

Granny Aching had been wrapped in a woollen blanket, with a tuft of raw wool pinned to it.

Conversely, the hetmans of the mountain tribes and the landowners of the region who wish to ship their wool and corn to the southern towns bring them to take boat at Thrax, below the cataract that roars through the arched spillway of Acies Castle.

Then there was a small library of other books, including a medical lexicon published in London and an almanac beginning at the year 1731, the Holy Bible, ink, pens and writing paper, a box of watercolours and brushes, reams of fine-quality drawing paper, knitting needles and wool, a roll of soft tanned leather from which to make the uppers for footwear- the soles would be cut from buffalo rawhide.

The young Arend had changed out of his garish clothing and now wore brown hose, a green tunic, and a dark-brown wool cape.

In 1948, Herbert Levine developed an inexpensive, lightweight, spray-on insulation composed of asbestos and rock wool, which played a key part in the postwar office-tower construction boom.

With cotton, wool, wheat and mountains rich in minerals, Shensi should have been prosperous but was not, owing to opium-smoking and banditry, but fundamentally to lack of good communications.

He hired land also of a tenant of the Basha, and sent wool and milk by the hand of a neighbour to the market at Tetuan.

The saddening may be and is commonly done in the same bath, that is, after the wool has been stuffed it is lifted, the mordant--copperas, bluestone, bichrome, or alum--is added, and the wool is re-entered into the bath.

In some cases the methods of mordanting, dyeing and saddening are combined together in the dyeing of wool, thus, for instance, a brown can be dyed by first mordanting with bichrome, then dyeing with camwood and saddening in the same bath with copperas.

When sulphuric acid is used as the assistant along with the bichrome, then there is formed on the wool fibre a deposit of chromic acid and chromium oxide, and this exerts an oxidising effect on the colouring matter or dye-stuff, which in some cases, as the Alizarine Blue, Alizarine Yellow, etc.

The Naphthol Blacks have long been used in wool dyeing, and give excellent results, the 3 B brand dyeing much bluer shades than the B brand.

The Wool Guild had chosen Bocca, a brute of a man, hairy from his skull to his toes, because of his reputation for pushing through contracts in record time.

Kenneth was wearing a sumptuous cloak of fine black wool lined with sable, the edges gold-embroidered with a double bordure of flory-counterflory, and had a velvet cap well pulled down on his sandy hair.

Black wool striped boucle jacket with lace inset, black lace chiffon skirt.