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Crossword clues for panic

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
panic
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a sense of relief/panic/guilt etc
▪ We reached the medical centre with a sense of relief.
a state of shock/confusion/panic etc
▪ Howard, still in a state of shock, stared at Newman.
a wave of panic/relief/sympathy
▪ A wave of relief washed over Harry.
mad dash/rush/panic etc
▪ We all made a mad dash for the door.
panic button
spread terror/panic
▪ The murders were clearly intended to spread terror.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
blind
▪ I grabbed a chair in a blind panic but heard Dad call out, telling me to put it down.
▪ Not like shooting Sweet in a moment of blind panic.
▪ The mist thickened and hid it, and I knew a moment's blind panic.
▪ In that moment of almost blind panic, she doubted it.
▪ Whoever was there was stalking her! Blind panic sent her off at a stumbling run.
▪ That relaxed, even jokey, presence we offer you is at times a front for blind panic.
▪ Even in a blind panic he knew better than to go for the tie.
financial
▪ A financial panic ensued, as frantic as the earlier boom.
▪ Lifeboats can contain a financial panic, but they can't solve this real-economy problem.
▪ There was a period of comparative stagnation in the nineties and a brief interruption following the financial panic in 1907.
▪ On Wednesday the authorities gave up the struggle against financial market panic and allowed the lira to find its own level.
▪ Who is the lender of last resort stopping financial panics and capital outflows from bringing the system down?
▪ They stopped coming sometime in 1857, after the financial panic.
▪ The last half of the twentieth century has also seen its share of small and large financial panics.
moral
▪ Acid House comes a close second to football fans in the tabloids' top ten of moral panics.
▪ This has led to the creation of a moral panic on campuses.
▪ Indeed notions of moral indignation, moral panic or moral conflict are not used in this perspective at all.
▪ Societies appear subject, every now and then, to periods of moral panic.
sheer
▪ Tales of bravery from the M-Four crash. Sheer panic: Accused describes the barn fire that killed twin sisters.
▪ Wild speculation, low margin requirements and sheer panic triggered the free fall that set off the Great Depression.
▪ She knew panic when she heard it, and sheer panic was in Philip Arbuthnot's voice.
sudden
▪ In a sudden panic he began to scramble down.
▪ He looked down in a sudden panic.
▪ Leonora fought down a sudden rush of panic.
■ NOUN
attack
▪ The panic attacks gave her the perfect excuse, as no blame could possibly be attributed to her.
▪ I must confess to the odd panic attack every so often, though ... Now when was this memoir supposed to be in by?
▪ Their recently acquired understanding very often prevents them from achieving a full-blown panic attack.
▪ From an assessment point of view this information establishes a baseline record of frequency of panic attacks or other physical symptoms.
▪ Hyperventilation and Anxiety Symptoms Symptoms of a panic attack initiated by adrenalin can never cause us to faint or be sick.
▪ As he became more able to communicate effectively non-verbally, we realised Brian was experiencing panic attacks combined with periods of hypertension.
▪ She's had the self-same panic attack before starting a one-woman show.
▪ As she finished, she had another panic attack.
button
▪ Derby County chairman Brian Fearn has refused to push the panic button after Tranmere's 2-1 win.
▪ She managed to push a silent panic button linked to the police station while doing so.
▪ His talk is all of pre-programmed key pads, panic buttons and radio relays.
▪ But when Tonia is due to jet in he hits the panic button and blitzes the housework.
▪ But the Mobbs had a panic button in the house, and Mrs Mobbs set off the alarm.
buying
▪ On the day before the price liberalization took effect there was a wave of panic buying.
▪ Housewives started panic buying of toilet rolls.
▪ There have also been several periods of panic buying triggered by rumours of taxation or currency reforms.
▪ And although Hill-Wood assures them the cash is there, he insists there will be no panic buying.
▪ There is panic buying of food, air tickets, train tickets, everything.
■ VERB
cause
▪ Excessive doses can cause panic, confusion, inability to sleep, hallucinations and paranoia.
▪ In addition a 25 second burst of delta activity was seen that did not cause panic or disturbed behaviour.
▪ The professionals involved were only too aware that in recalling women for further testing they were likely to cause a panic.
▪ It can also cause panic and despair.
▪ Those darts from midfield cause panic for defenders.
▪ Moreover, because it occurs unexpectedly it may well cause a temporary panic.
▪ The sudden and dramatic success of the London shop might have caused uproar and panic among the thirty-strong team in Carno.
▪ I couldn't give them the reason yet without causing a large-scale panic.
feel
▪ It's exactly at this moment that they feel panic and get into those messy situations with mistresses, divorces and remarriages.
▪ Stepping back from the pantry, I realized I had not binged with that feeling of panic in years.
▪ She was so powerfully aware of him that she could feel the ripples of panic beginning to spread.
▪ Now, you feel true panic.
▪ Liz replaced the receiver and tried to keep calm, but she could feel panic, fever, tears approaching.
▪ In the past she had only to think of being in an enclosed space and she would feel panic rising within her.
▪ For a moment she felt a surge of panic.
▪ Maura felt panic building inside her.
flee
▪ Then in a flash it dashes away as if fleeing in panic.
▪ The Snotling unit is immediately broken and treated just like a unit broken in combat or fleeing following a failed panic test.
send
▪ She turns to take the wine and William has a split second to send a message of panic to Bella.
▪ It also sent Smith into a panic.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
blind panic/rage
▪ I grabbed a chair in a blind panic but heard Dad call out, telling me to put it down.
▪ In that moment of almost blind panic, she doubted it.
▪ Not like shooting Sweet in a moment of blind panic.
▪ She bore him three children and he killed the children and her in a blind rage arranged by Hera.
▪ That relaxed, even jokey, presence we offer you is at times a front for blind panic.
▪ The mist thickened and hid it, and I knew a moment's blind panic.
dart of guilt/panic/pain etc
▪ She held her breath on another quick dart of guilt.
▪ The words echoed unspoken in her brain, sending tiny darts of pain through her veins.
fly into a rage/temper/panic etc
▪ He flew into a rage with him and brained him with his lute.
▪ I flew into a rage and quit.
▪ I was made to feel like a petulant child who has flown into a temper because his favorite toy was removed.
▪ Maclean immediately flew into a rage.
▪ Mary's natural tendency to fly into a temper probably did not increase their chances very much.
▪ Mitch was going to fly into a rage.
▪ The Collector had flown into a rage.
▪ Whenever Stewart showed signs of rejecting that outlook, Joe would fly into a rage.
moment of madness/weakness/panic etc
▪ He caught me in a moment of weakness.
▪ I had a moment of panic.
▪ In a moment of madness Rosenoir kicked Alan Kernaghan as he lay on the ground.
▪ In a moment of weakness the President had accepted the invitation.
▪ It was a moment of madness.
▪ She rang the doorbell, listened to the silence within and felt a moment of panic.
▪ What mattered was that one of the legs had been used by the gang in a moment of panic.
press/push the panic button
▪ And why have governments in the region not pressed the panic button?
▪ Derby County chairman Brian Fearn has refused to push the panic button after Tranmere's 2-1 win.
work yourself into a frenzy/panic/state etc
▪ A 16-year-old girl works herself into a frenzy of grief for a friend killed by right-wing vigilantes.
▪ I could see at once he was working himself into a panic about it all.
▪ I knew I was working myself into a state, but I kept on staring at the picture of the dead girl.
▪ It was silly to work himself into a state like this.
▪ Make sure that the horse stays calm and does not work himself into a frenzy.
▪ You're working yourself into a state.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A bomb exploded on the subway, causing panic among rush-hour commuters.
▪ Amid the panic and confusion, police somehow managed to maintain order.
▪ Baker had lost a lot of money during the last stock market panic.
▪ Every April 15th, there's the usual panic of people trying to file their taxes on time.
▪ I could see the look of panic on her face.
▪ She got into a real panic when she thought she'd lost the tickets.
▪ Shoppers fled the street in panic after two bombs exploded in central London.
▪ The panic-stricken crowd pushed through the exit, and 10 people were crushed to death.
▪ There was a sudden panic and everyone started rushing towards the door.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ At best, we'd be a laughing stock; at worst, there'd be panic throughout the country.
▪ I stared round at the dark unfamiliar buildings in panic.
▪ Now, the panic was rolling like a giant wave to the United States.
▪ Then there was panic that he'd be released today, when we have a life sentence to bare.
▪ There would be no panic while he was in charge.
▪ Though winded, the impact seemed to startle him into a state of panic.
▪ When Fred started there, however, with the economy reeling from the panic of 1873, the business was probably smaller.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ VERB
begin
▪ When it eventually dawned on Liza that she must be pregnant, she began to panic.
▪ For a minute everything went dead quiet and Henry began to panic.
▪ Now that she was forced to accept that she hadn't, Celia began to panic.
▪ Morenz began to panic almost at once.
start
▪ A friend of mine followed us round and he was starting to panic because he'd had a bet on the boss.
▪ With only a handful of days left for a search, she might well start to panic.
▪ As soon as the cold water hit my sinuses, I started to gag and panic.
▪ And he started to panic, like a stage actor who had forgotten his lines.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
blind panic/rage
▪ I grabbed a chair in a blind panic but heard Dad call out, telling me to put it down.
▪ In that moment of almost blind panic, she doubted it.
▪ Not like shooting Sweet in a moment of blind panic.
▪ She bore him three children and he killed the children and her in a blind rage arranged by Hera.
▪ That relaxed, even jokey, presence we offer you is at times a front for blind panic.
▪ The mist thickened and hid it, and I knew a moment's blind panic.
dart of guilt/panic/pain etc
▪ She held her breath on another quick dart of guilt.
▪ The words echoed unspoken in her brain, sending tiny darts of pain through her veins.
moment of madness/weakness/panic etc
▪ He caught me in a moment of weakness.
▪ I had a moment of panic.
▪ In a moment of madness Rosenoir kicked Alan Kernaghan as he lay on the ground.
▪ In a moment of weakness the President had accepted the invitation.
▪ It was a moment of madness.
▪ She rang the doorbell, listened to the silence within and felt a moment of panic.
▪ What mattered was that one of the legs had been used by the gang in a moment of panic.
press/push the panic button
▪ And why have governments in the region not pressed the panic button?
▪ Derby County chairman Brian Fearn has refused to push the panic button after Tranmere's 2-1 win.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Lisa panicked when she heard she might be fired.
▪ The driver apparently panicked and ran off the road.
▪ The soldiers panicked and opened fire on the raiders.
▪ When a plane gets into difficulty it is essential that the pilot does not panic.
▪ When the parachute didn't open I just panicked.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Almost invariably, it is the accused who, unhinged by stress, panics and does crazy, self-destructive things.
▪ Haminh didn't panic until she was past Corridor 12 and Fox drew close enough behind her to be heard.
▪ Hold on to that thought and try not to panic.
▪ The important thing is not to panic or become impatient because that way you could damage the document.
▪ Transvaal captain Jannie Breedt will resist the temptation to panic.
▪ Will they panic at the first sign of trouble?
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Panic

Panic \Pan"ic\, n. [Gr. to~ paniko`n (with or without dei^ma fear): cf. F. panique. See Panic, a.]

  1. A sudden, overpowering fright; esp., a sudden and groundless fright; terror inspired by a trifling cause or a misapprehension of danger; as, the troops were seized with a panic; they fled in a panic.

  2. By extension: A sudden widespread fright or apprehension concerning financial affairs.

Panic

Panic \Pan"ic\, n. [L. panicum.] (Bot.) A plant of the genus Panicum; panic grass; also, the edible grain of some species of panic grass.

Panic grass (Bot.), any grass of the genus Panicum.

Panic

Panic \Pan"ic\, a. [Gr. paniko`s of or pertaining to Pa`n Pan, to whom the causing of sudden fright was ascribed: cf. F. panique.] Extreme or sudden and causeless; unreasonable; -- said of fear or fright; as, panic fear, terror, alarm. ``A panic fright.''
--Dryden.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
panic

1827, "to afflict with panic," from panic (n.). Intransitive sense of "to lose one's head, get into a panic" is from 1902. Related: Panicked; panicking.

panic

"mass terror," 1708, from earlier adjective (c.1600, modifying fear, terror, etc.), from French panique (15c.), from Greek panikon, literally "pertaining to Pan," the god of woods and fields, who was the source of mysterious sounds that caused contagious, groundless fear in herds and crowds, or in people in lonely spots.\n

\nIn the sense of "panic, fright" the Greek word is short for panikon deima "panic fright," from neuter of Panikos "of Pan." Meaning "widespread apprehension about financial matters" is first recorded 1757. Panic button in figurative sense is first recorded 1955, the literal sense apparently is from parachuting. Panic attack attested by 1970.

panic

type of grass, early 15c., from Old French panic "Italian millet," from Latin panicum "panic grass, kind of millet," from panus "ear of millet, a swelling" (compare panocha).

Wiktionary
panic

Etymology 1

  1. 1 (context now rare English) Pertaining to the god Pan. 2 Of fear, fright etc: sudden or overwhelming (attributed by the ancient Greeks to the influence of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pan). alt. 1 (context now rare English) Pertaining to the god Pan. 2 Of fear, fright etc: sudden or overwhelming (attributed by the ancient Greeks to the influence of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pan). n. overpowering fright, often affecting groups of people or animals. v

  2. To feel overwhelming fear. Etymology 2

    n. (context botany English) A plant of the genus ''Panicum''.

WordNet
panic
  1. n. an overwhelming feeling of fear and anxiety [syn: terror]

  2. sudden mass fear and anxiety over anticipated events; "panic in the stock market"; "a war scare"; "a bomb scare led them to evacuate the building" [syn: scare]

  3. [also: panicking, panicked]

panic
  1. v. be overcome by a sudden fear; "The students panicked when told that final exams were less than a week away"

  2. cause sudden fear in or fill with sudden panic; "The mere thought of an isolation cell panicked the prisoners"

  3. [also: panicking, panicked]

Wikipedia
Panić

Panić ( Cyrillic script: Панић) is an ethnic Serbian surname, also found in Croatia and may refer to:

  • Bojana Panić (born 1985), Serbian actress and fashion model
  • Branko Panić (born 1977), Croatian football player
  • Milan Panić (born 1929), American and Serbian multimillionaire, Prime Minister of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia from 1992-1993
  • Života Panić (1933–2003), Colonel General of Yugoslav People's Army
  • Željko Panić (born 1976), Bosnian Serb swimmer
  • Romana Panić (born 1975), a Serbian singer
Panic (2000 film)

Panic is a 2000 American movie, starring William H. Macy, Neve Campbell, Donald Sutherland and John Ritter.

Panic (disambiguation)

Panic is a sudden, overwhelming fear.

Panic may also refer to:

Panic (MxPx album)

Panic is the seventh full-length album by punk rock band MxPx It was released on June 6, 2005- internationally and a day later in the United States. This was a breakthrough album when the single "Heard That Sound" proved a minor radio hit. It also featured the Blink-182/ +44 singer-bassist Mark Hoppus on "Wrecking Hotel Rooms." Two B-sides (an unreleased track called "Arrest Me" and a live/acoustic version of "Waiting for the World to End") were released on a SideOneDummy sampler in 2005.

Panic (1963 film)

Panic is a 1963 British crime film directed by John Gilling and starring Dyson Lovell, Janine Gray and Glyn Houston. A young Swiss woman becomes mixed up with a gang planning a diamond heist.

Panic (Sublime with Rome song)

"Panic" is the debut single from Sublime with Rome's debut studio album, Yours Truly. It was first premiered by the Los Angeles radio station KROQ on May 6, 2011.

Panic (1982 film)

Panic (Originally Bakterion, also released as Zombi 4 in Greece) is a 1982 Italian / Spanish film directed by Tonino Ricci.

Panic (Caravan Palace album)

Panic is the second studio album by electro swing group Caravan Palace, released on 5 March 2012.

Panic (Alexei Sayle album)

Panic is Alexei Sayle's third album, released in 1985. This was his final album; he would later record some audiobooks in the late 1990s.

Panic spawned the singles " Didn't You Kill My Brother?" and "Meanwhile". The former was later featured in The Comic Strip Presents 1988 film of the same name written by Sayle. "Didn't You Kill My Brother?" is also a phrase Sayle has used often in his works, such as in an episode of The Young Ones. A version of the song "Panic" appears in a second series episode of Alexei Sayle's Stuff.

Panic (The Smiths song)

"Panic" is a song by the British indie rock band The Smiths, released in 1986 and written by singer Morrissey and guitarist Johnny Marr. The first recording to feature new member Craig Gannon, "Panic" bemoans the state of contemporary pop music which "says nothing to me about my life", and ironically implores its listeners to "burn down the disco" and "hang the blessed DJ" in retaliation. The song was released by Rough Trade Records as a single and reached number 11 in the UK Chart. It was later released on the compilation albums The World Won't Listen and Louder Than Bombs. The song "...extended The Smiths' unorthodox tradition of releasing a non-album A-side" of a single.

Panic (company)

Panic Inc. is an Oregon-based software company that specializes in applications for Mac OS X and iOS. It was founded by Steven Frank and Cabel Sasser.

Their flagship program is Transmit, an FTP client, first released in 1998. The program currently competes with Fetch, Interarchy and Cyberduck, the other popular FTP clients for Mac OS X. Transmit has won a number of design awards, including Macworld Best of Show in 2005 and a 2005 Apple Design Award, for the Best Use of Mac OS X Tiger Technologies.

Audion, released in 1999, was a skinnable MP3 media player that competed with MacAMP and SoundJam MP, which were the only other Mac OS MP3 players at the time. Apple's iTunes was released in 2001, and in 2004 Panic retired Audion's development and began releasing it free of charge.

In 2004, Panic released their third major program, Unison, a Usenet reader. Unison also won an 2004 Apple Design Award, for Best Mac OS X User Experience, and was runner-up for Best Mac OS X Product of the year.

In 2005, Panic expanded their offerings to include T-shirts.

In 2007, the company released their fourth major program, Coda, a web development application for which Panic was awarded the 2007 Apple Design Award for Best User Experience, taking the award for a 2nd time.

The company's first published video game, Firewatch, was released on February 9, 2016.

Panic (novel)

Panic is a 2005 thriller by Jeff Abbott about an unsuspecting young documentary film maker, Evan, whose life is turned upside down when he realizes that his parents have been working as spies throughout their lives. One morning his mother phones him and asks him to come to her urgently, but when he arrives at her home she has just been murdered and he barely manages to escape with his life. Evan is suspected of having received from his mother a copy of a list of members and clients of a secret organisation called "The Deeps" and the chase is on. Evan must struggle through his mother's death and meets C.I.A. agents, cold-hearted killers, and double-crossers, and friends - trying to find his father, get his revenge on the people who murdered his mother, and uncover all the secrets about the lie he believed was his life. He also tries to save a lovely girl named Carrie whom he has recently met and fallen in love with, but doesn't know whose side she is on, "The Deeps" or the C.I.A.

Panic is due to be made into a film in 2011.

Panic (comics)

Panic was part of the EC Comics line during the mid-1950s. The bi-monthly humor comic was published by Bill Gaines as a companion to Harvey Kurtzman's Mad, which was being heavily imitated by other comic publishers.

Panic was edited by Al Feldstein (who became the editor of Mad a few years later). Beginning with its first issue (February–March 1954), Panic had a 12-issue run over two years. Feldstein was the primary cover artist, with stories illustrated by Jack Davis, Will Elder, Jack Kamen, Joe Orlando, Basil Wolverton and Wally Wood. Some story ideas were by Nick Meglin, later the co-editor of Mad. Scripts were by Feldstein, Elder and Jack Mendelsohn, later a co-screenwriter of Yellow Submarine (1968) and an Emmy-nominated TV comedy writer.

EC dubbed Panic the "only authorized imitation" of Mad, but Mad's creator didn't enjoy the joke. Almost thirty years later, Harvey Kurtzman told an interviewer, "Panic was another sore point. Gaines, by some convoluted reasoning, decided to double the profit of Mad by doing a Feldstein version of Mad and he just plundered all of my techniques and artists. For this there was a real conflict of interests."

Panic (1928 film)

Panic'' (German:Panik'') is a 1928 German silent crime film directed by Harry Piel and starring Piel, Dary Holm and Eugen Burg. It premiered in on 23 February 1928.

Panic (Circle album)

Panic is the twenty-sixth album by the Finnish experimental rock band Circle.

It is one of the most idiosyncratic albums of Circle's long and varied career. It comprises eleven tracks. The first three are synthesizer-based ambient music pieces. These are followed by six short punk songs. Finally, the last two tracks are the almost silent "Tunnel" and the 15-minute drone piece "And Far Away". A sticker on the CD case describes the band as "Finland Speed-Kraut Pioneers" and refers to a list of obscure Finnish bands. Rather than their real names, the band are credited in the sleevenotes under pseudonyms: Jussi Lehtisalo is Junttura; Janne Westerlund is Sikiö; Tomi Leppänen is Mätky; and Mika Rättö is Klinga Präpierde. These alter-egos were used again for the 2011 EP Mylläri, which comprises four short punk songs in the style of the middle section of Panic.

Panic (1935 play)

Panic is a 1935 verse play by Archibald MacLeish. A tragedy that is one of the author's least-known works, it was written during the sixth year of the Great Depression. The drama is set during the bank panic of 1933 and concerns the fall of the world's richest man, a banker named McGafferty. First presented March 14–16, 1935, at the Imperial Theatre in Manhattan, the production featured Orson Welles's first leading performance on the American stage. Panic was produced by John Houseman and Nathan Zarkin as the first project of their new Phoenix Theatre. Sets and lighting were designed by Jo Mielziner; Martha Graham directed the movements of the chorus.

Usage examples of "panic".

He had looked out at the quizzical faces, listened to the frantic scrawling of the panicking students, and realized that with a mind that ran and tripped and hurled itself down the corridors of theory in anarchic fashion, he could learn himself, in haphazard lurches, but he could not impart the understanding he so loved.

Three times the height of a man, the baluchitherium rose in panic and pain.

For just an instant, in profile, Barin saw a flicker that might have been panic, but her calm returned.

She knew a moment of panic standing there, realizing she had not thought of how she might bring the beastie down, but thought that as she had come this far, she would simply have to figure that out when the time came.

There was no reason why he should associate three nondescript, bedraggled travelers with a notorious case of murderand yet I had felt panic well up under my diaphragm when he glanced at me.

Men trying to fight back could not hang on or even get in a good blow, but it was the betrayal of their mounts that panicked them most.

Adam wondered if Billie saw how her mouth quivered at the corner and the panic in her eyes.

That warning had blunted, however slightly, the surge of panic which even the most experienced armsmen must feel under totally unexpected attack.

Your puissant knights did hurtle to the attack, did brast their spears on the oafish defenders who didst flee in panic, did thus free the prisoners.

And while Bee sat and stared at the Ashby tablets in the church at Clare, Brat Farrar was standing in the back room in Pimlico in a brand-new suit and a state of panic.

The boy froze, sweat bursting on his forehead, his neck bristling with panic.

The eyes of every viewer panicked by retrovirus homophobic hysteria would be glued to the set, ready to see if the Democrats would endorse the pollution of their bodily fluids by lurking sodomites and junkies drooling contamination from every orifice.

Flame tongues licked the panicked face of an autist near Danlo, and passed to a horologe, whose red robe was suddenly a shroud of fire burning around him.

Since she did not plan to panic and hyperventilate, she was sure she could swim to the beach.

Hyperventilation: anxiety causes some people to hyperventilate, which, in turn, leads perhaps to too much carbon dioxide, dizziness and panic.