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Crossword clues for scare

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
scare
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bomb scare (=when people think there might be a bomb somewhere)
▪ The building was evacuated after a bomb scare.
a food scare (=when people are afraid to eat a particular food)
▪ The meat industry has been badly affected by recent food scares.
bomb scare
▪ a bomb scare in Central London
scare story
▪ Despite the scare stories in the media, no jobs will be lost at the factory.
scare tactics (=in which you deliberately try to frighten people)
▪ He accused the opposition of scare tactics.
scare tactics
▪ Employers used scare tactics to force a return to work.
scared of heights
▪ Rachel had always been scared of heights.
used scare tactics
▪ Employers used scare tactics to force a return to work.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
child
▪ His Halloween programme Ghostwatch so scared my children that I have had to sleep on a camp bed in their room.
▪ Threats and punishments very often succeed in scaring an aggressive child into changing his ways.
daylights
▪ I could not possibly tell him the truth, as that would scare the daylights out of him.
▪ He is capable of rages near to those on-screen moments when he can scare the living daylights out of a cinema audience.
death
▪ If he caught him up here again he'd see him off, scare him to death.
▪ But the first time I did it, I was scared half to death.
▪ The first time this had happened to her, she had been scared to death.
▪ They acted as if they knew what would happen if they lost, and they were scared to death of it.
▪ Then I looked up lymphoma in a medical book and almost scared myself to death!
▪ His bungalow had scared her to death.
▪ Then she'd jump out and scare them to death!
▪ You had us scared half to death.
hell
▪ Don't even glance at me, my proud beauties: you'd scare the hell out of me.
▪ Just to make the move scared the hell out of me.
▪ You know it too, and you're scared as hell.
▪ Today, he scares the hell out of a lot of Republicans.
▪ Statistics like that scare the hell out of me, and they must scare a lot of CEOs too.
▪ It scared the hell out of me.
▪ Tornadoes are not fascinating to me; they scare the hell out of me.
▪ There is no stopping planned randomness, and that scares the hell out of us.
kid
▪ Traffic is another worry-busier roads and faster cars make parents scared to let their kids walk to school alone.
▪ Is television scaring our kids, engendering violent behavior, skewing their morals and generally eroding the aesthetic standards of Western civilization?
life
▪ It scared the life out of me.
▪ He had never been so scared in his life.
▪ The idea might seem silly nowadays, but it scared the life out of even the most blood-thirsty Viking warrior.
▪ When, however-many years later-the script finally did arrive, two things scared the life out of me.
▪ I have never been in a situation where I was so scared in all my life.
people
▪ I know how to scare people and I know how to hurt them.
▪ This scares many people-but, proponents argue, why not?
▪ Schiavo certainly deserves no credit for scaring people needlessly just to settle a score.
▪ What she has got is a hunger so fierce it scares people away.
▪ John Smith doesn't scare people anything like as much.
wit
▪ Suddenly, I heard a loud crash near me, scaring me out of my wits.
▪ People especially like to pat foals, and unfortunately usually on their face or head, which scares the wits out of them.
▪ It also came with a neighbor who scared the wits out of me, but about whom I was curious.
▪ They had seen the knuckles come out of the silken wrapping and the force of it scared their wits back into good manners.
▪ The film has gotten good reviews, but it has scared the wits out of some male film critics.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
afraid/frightened/scared etc of your own shadow
be scared witless
beat/surprise/scare the hell out of sb
▪ And I said, beats the hell out of me.
▪ Eddie knows this, and it scares the hell out of her.
▪ It scared the hell out of me.
▪ Just to make the move scared the hell out of me.
▪ Statistics like that scare the hell out of me, and they must scare a lot of CEOs too.
▪ There is no stopping planned randomness, and that scares the hell out of us.
▪ Today, he scares the hell out of a lot of Republicans.
▪ Tornadoes are not fascinating to me; they scare the hell out of me.
bore/scare etc the pants off sb
▪ He wasn't interested in the heavy political stuff which bored the pants off most people.
▪ It took ten minutes to reach Honey Cottage, with Yanto trying his best to scare the pants off Mary.
▪ Lovely people who scared the pants off him.
▪ The tests scare the pants off many managers.
▪ Though, mind you, it scares the pants off poor old Crumwallis.
bored/scared/worried stiff
▪ And I was scared stiff about having lied to Mel about being single when he hired me.
▪ Cis, who knew about it, was scared stiff.
▪ He was scared stiff, thought a ghastly mistake had been made.
▪ He was very naturally scared stiff of using up all his remaining petrol and making a bad landing.
▪ Mabel was by now scared stiff and frozen cold.
▪ Poor kid, thought Alice, he's scared stiff.
▪ We looked at each other, scared stiff, but we followed Mrs Bullivant upstairs.
drink/laugh/scare etc yourself silly
▪ Well, I laughed myself silly.
frighten/scare the life out of sb
▪ When, however-many years later-the script finally did arrive, two things scared the life out of me.
frighten/scare/terrify sb out of their wits
scare sb shitless
scare/frighten the (living) daylights out of sb
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ All the stuff he said about spiders kind of scared me.
▪ Don't creep up on me like that! You scared the living daylights out of me!
▪ He was driving fast just to scare us.
▪ It scared him to think that his mother might never recover.
▪ She scared the hell out of me when she said she had to go into hospital.
▪ We're not really going to get arrested - I think the police are trying to scare us.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Dad stormed out and I was so scared he was blaming me that I started crying.
▪ He remembered the menacing phone-calls to Nicola and wondered aloud whether some one from a drugs syndicate had been trying to scare her.
▪ He was scared to death, and his head was almost shaved like new recruits in armies the world over.
▪ The procedure is an effective means of scaring off applicants.
▪ They were sexually inexperienced at marriage, and scared of babies.
▪ Today, he scares the hell out of a lot of Republicans.
▪ Tracks can hardly afford to scare away the best horses now that rich races are plentiful and horse transportation is routine.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
bomb
▪ She says that they were told that it was a bomb scare.
▪ No, not the usual boring bomb scare, but a cultural occasion of enormous significance.
▪ The previous day also the factory was evacuated after a bomb scare.
▪ Cross-channel ferries held up by a bomb scare ....
▪ Apparently there had been a bomb scare recently.
▪ Following the find, the centre was evacuated again because of a bomb scare which police believe was a hoax.
food
▪ However there has never been a food scare with lamb.
▪ Instead. these people only refer to farmers when there is news like a food scare to react to.
▪ I always seem to be reading about a new food scare.
story
▪ I don't want to start any scare stories, but it just illustrates our ignorance.
▪ The media buy into the scam because such scare stories about unseen threats make good headlines.
▪ Reports measuring the effect of lower radiation dosages conflict with these scare stories, sometimes drastically.
tactic
▪ This claim has never been proved and it may have been part of the Securitate's scare tactics.
▪ Republicans have complained that Democrats are using Social Security scare tactics to incite seniors groups and others to oppose the constitutional amendment.
▪ Whatever you may think about the morality of abortion, these are the most deplorable scare tactics.
▪ You also wrongly stated that we use scare tactics such as hostile looks or suggestive comments to keep women away.
▪ Then they used scare tactics, telling the audience that fat people were apt to succumb to something called Sudden Death syndrome.
■ VERB
give
▪ I only meant to give her a scare.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
afraid/frightened/scared etc of your own shadow
be running scared
▪ Their new software has the competition running scared.
▪ Then why is it that Chretien appears to be running scared?
▪ To me, ti just looks like the fools are running scared.
▪ Whenever managers were laid off, he sensed in the ranks ever-higher levels of anxiety Even those who remained were running scared.
be scared witless
beat/surprise/scare the hell out of sb
▪ And I said, beats the hell out of me.
▪ Eddie knows this, and it scares the hell out of her.
▪ It scared the hell out of me.
▪ Just to make the move scared the hell out of me.
▪ Statistics like that scare the hell out of me, and they must scare a lot of CEOs too.
▪ There is no stopping planned randomness, and that scares the hell out of us.
▪ Today, he scares the hell out of a lot of Republicans.
▪ Tornadoes are not fascinating to me; they scare the hell out of me.
bore/scare etc the pants off sb
▪ He wasn't interested in the heavy political stuff which bored the pants off most people.
▪ It took ten minutes to reach Honey Cottage, with Yanto trying his best to scare the pants off Mary.
▪ Lovely people who scared the pants off him.
▪ The tests scare the pants off many managers.
▪ Though, mind you, it scares the pants off poor old Crumwallis.
bored/scared/worried stiff
▪ And I was scared stiff about having lied to Mel about being single when he hired me.
▪ Cis, who knew about it, was scared stiff.
▪ He was scared stiff, thought a ghastly mistake had been made.
▪ He was very naturally scared stiff of using up all his remaining petrol and making a bad landing.
▪ Mabel was by now scared stiff and frozen cold.
▪ Poor kid, thought Alice, he's scared stiff.
▪ We looked at each other, scared stiff, but we followed Mrs Bullivant upstairs.
drink/laugh/scare etc yourself silly
▪ Well, I laughed myself silly.
frighten/scare the life out of sb
▪ When, however-many years later-the script finally did arrive, two things scared the life out of me.
frighten/scare/terrify sb out of their wits
scare sb shitless
scare/frighten the (living) daylights out of sb
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a health scare
▪ A year after Chernobyl the scare about radioactive food had died down.
▪ Aids has caused such a scare that fewer and fewer people are giving blood.
▪ Retail sales were down due to a spate of bomb scares before Christmas.
▪ Some people, nervous about the health scare over cellular phones, have started using hands-free apparatus.
▪ The game was delayed due to a bomb scare.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And behind bars ... puppy is seized in rabies scare.
▪ If she wishes to attach herself to the scare, I am delighted.
▪ That said, I think most virus scares are overblown.
▪ The scare has been blown out of proportion, said John Marchello, professor of animal science at the University of Arizona.
▪ The media buy into the scam because such scare stories about unseen threats make good headlines.
▪ Whatever you may think about the morality of abortion, these are the most deplorable scare tactics.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Scare

Scare \Scare\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scared; p. pr. & vb. n. Scaring.] [OE. skerren, skeren, Icel. skirra to bar, prevent, skirrask to shun, shrink from; or fr. OE. skerre, adj., scared, Icel. skjarr; both perhaps akin to E. sheer to turn.] To frighten; to strike with sudden fear; to alarm.

The noise of thy crossbow Will scare the herd, and so my shoot is lost.
--Shak.

To scare away, to drive away by frightening.

To scare up, to find by search, as if by beating for game.

Syn: To alarm; frighten; startle; affright; terrify.

Scare

Scare \Scare\, n. Fright; esp., sudden fright produced by a trifling cause, or originating in mistake. [Colloq.]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
scare

1590s, alteration of Middle English skerren (c.1200), from Old Norse skirra "to frighten; to shrink from, shun; to prevent, avert," related to skjarr "timid, shy, afraid of," of unknown origin. In Scottish also skair, skar, and in dialectal English skeer, skear, which seems to preserve the older pronunciation. To scare up "procure, obtain" is first recorded 1846, American English, from notion of rousing game from cover. Related: Scared; scaring.

scare

"something that frightens; sudden panic, sudden terror inspired by a trifling cause, false alarm," 1520s, alteration of Middle English sker "fear, dread" (c.1400), from scare (v.). Scare tactic attested from 1948.

Wiktionary
scare

Etymology 1 n. A minor fright. Etymology 2

vb. To frighten, terrify, startle, especially in a minor way.

WordNet
scare
  1. n. sudden mass fear and anxiety over anticipated events; "panic in the stock market"; "a war scare"; "a bomb scare led them to evacuate the building" [syn: panic]

  2. a sudden attack of fear [syn: panic attack]

scare
  1. v. cause fear in; "The stranger who hangs around the building frightens me" [syn: frighten, fright, affright]

  2. cause to lose courage; "dashed by the refusal" [syn: daunt, dash, scare off, pall, frighten off, scare away, frighten away]

Wikipedia

Usage examples of "scare".

He was like an acrophobe edging along a precipitous path, scared to look down, afraid of losing his balance and falling accidentally, afraid too of the impulse that might lead him to plunge purposefully into the void.

I have also with soberness considered since, did so offend the Lord, that even in my childhood he did scare and affrighten me with fearful dreams, and did terrify me with fearful visions.

As we all witnessed during the anthrax scare last fall, we must improve and streamline our methods of communicating with the public.

Had Rossi actually looked through them himself, or had he merely had time to list the possibilities in that archive before being scared away from it?

He had scared Bester the moment they met, when he had fixed him with those cold, dark eyes.

Harry nodded, with no hint of his usual braggadocio, looking like nothing more than a scared little boy.

He was surprised that anything in this life could still scare him, but as he looked at this twist of wreckage and bodies, a cluttered sacrifice, he understood that he was just a common brawler, incapable of anything close to this display.

He preached, favoring Moses and Abraham, and Burnside scared himself half to death.

Fortunately, Dum-Dum said he had just the thing for them, a special concoction of his own devising, consisting of an astringent compounded of alum, sharkskin oil, hydrocortisone and a butylated cream to hold the ingredients into a semi-solid mass, guaranteed to either scare hemorrhoids back where they came from or simply dry the whole mess up into something that could be snipped off with a pair of surgical scissors.

When I was a litigator, I actually saw lawyers who were scared of stepping into court.

Musgrave and Lawley were both confidingly asleep, while he sat up alert and vigilant maturing a mischievous plot that had for its object the awakening and scaring of both the innocent sleepers.

Coker Minimus, whose round scared eyes looked out over the top of the sheet.

He wanted so desperately to believe it that he imagined himself shouting at the mongrel for scaring him half out of his mind.

Tell them part of the deal Newsome made was that he was to scare his own men into quitting.

He acted scared, but back of all that nigra shout was something cunning.