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Crossword clues for pain

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
pain
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a chest pain
▪ There are a number of causes of chest pain.
a cry of pain/despair/delight etc
▪ A rock was loose and he fell with a sharp cry of surprise.
a pained expression (=one that shows you are in pain or feeling upset)
▪ A pained expression crossed Rory’s face when he saw them together.
a scream of pain/terror/agony
▪ My screams of terror awoke my parents.
aches and pains (=slight feelings of pain that are not considered to be serious)
▪ Apart from the usual aches and pains, she felt all right.
acute pain
acute pain
be doubled up/over with laughter/pain etc
▪ Both the girls were doubled up with laughter.
bear the pain
▪ He knew that he couldn’t bear the pain much longer.
bring sb pleasure/joy/pain/grief etc
▪ The decision brought him great relief.
cause pain
▪ The infection can cause severe pain.
crazed with grief/pain/fear etc
▪ He was crazed with grief after the death of his mother.
dull...pain
▪ He drank some alcohol to dull the pain.
ease the pain/stress/tension
▪ He’ll give you something to ease the pain.
give/let out a yelp of pain/dismay/surprise etc
▪ The water was hotter than she had expected, and she gave an involuntary yelp.
go through the pain barrier
▪ Iona reached the final, but she had to go through the pain barrier to get there.
growing pains
▪ the growing pains of a new republic
intense pain
▪ She felt an intense pain in her right shoulder.
nagging pain
▪ Lee had a nagging pain in her back.
pain and suffering
▪ the pain and suffering caused by road accidents
pain barrier
▪ Iona reached the final, but she had to go through the pain barrier to get there.
pain...unbearable
▪ The pain was almost unbearable.
period pain
physical pain
▪ She bravely endured great physical pain.
relieve pain
▪ What’s the best way of relieving back pain?
sb’s pain threshold (=your ability or inability to deal with pain)
▪ ‘Will it hurt?’ ‘That all depends on your pain threshold.’
scream in/with pain
▪ We could hear her screaming in pain.
severe pain
▪ He was in severe pain and unable to call for help.
shooting pains (=continuous short pains passing through your body)
stomach pains/cramps
▪ He complained of acute stomach pains.
writhe in pain/agony etc
▪ He lay writhing in pain.
yell (out) in surprise/pain etc
▪ Clare yelled in pain as she fell.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
abdominal
▪ There was a reduction in her stool frequency, an improvement in her abdominal pain, and a less productive cough.
▪ Some of them lost weight, but mainly because their abdominal pain was so intense they did not want to eat.
▪ During an ectopic pregnancy, the foetus damages or ruptures surrounding tissue as it grows, which causes abdominal pain.
▪ Doctors now routinely use super-sensitive blood and urine tests to screen women suffering from any lower abdominal pain.
▪ I had barely dropped off to sleep when I was suddenly awakened b sharp abdominal pains.
▪ There was abdominal pain without a doubt and that nagging temperature of 102.5° - that was damn like a wire.
▪ They were also asked if they had ever consulted a doctor about recurrent bowel symptoms or abdominal pain.
acute
▪ This was a drug that would ease the acute pain that crucifixion brought to the victim.
▪ Three fine calves had shown symptoms of acute gastric pain, I had treated them and they had died.
▪ One of the most promising areas to find answers is in the treatment of acute pain.
▪ They may suffer sickness, vomiting or acute pain, but they do not die.
▪ It is useful to distinguish acute from chronic pain.
▪ Chronic pain is continuous and unassociated with the physiological responses to acute pain such as sweating and tachycardia.
back
▪ Walking can improve your posture and may prevent lower back pain.
▪ One was written for a woman who said she suffered from insomnia and lower back pain.
▪ Read in studio Still to come on Central News, living with back pain.
▪ After the 1994 Olympics, Grinkov struggled with back pain, but the couple continued to skate as professionals.
▪ He is an engineer who came to study the spine because of his own back pains.
▪ Another side effect of flying in cramped quarters is back pain.
▪ Therefore they may believe that their back pain, for example, is physical rather than addictive in origin.
▪ And as Tavris has pointed out, chronic lower back pain can cause depression and irritability.
chronic
▪ They paint a dismal picture for patients suffering from chronic pain.
▪ I have had chronic low-back pain, with occasional flare-ups of worse pain, for at least five years.
▪ The underlying mechanisms may also be relevant to some chronic neuropathic pain states.
▪ Patients with muscle-contraction headaches often report chronic pain of long duration.
▪ Physiological addiction may occur after repeated use of analgesics for relief from chronic pain.
▪ And as Tavris has pointed out, chronic lower back pain can cause depression and irritability.
▪ Paradoxical pain Editor, - David Bowsher defines paradoxical pain as chronic nociceptive pain that does not respond to morphine.
▪ Ones that enhance the serotonin effects are often helpful in chronic pain disorders.
great
▪ The faces are horribly contorted as if suffocating or in great pain, and their eyes seem to follow anyone who passes.
▪ The enemy naturally realized this fully and took great pains to avoid the consequences.
▪ He was obviously ill and in great pain.
▪ Each additional acre, therefore, would be won at greater pain.
▪ The wounded Commando on the ground, obviously in great pain, is an incentive for us to kill them.
▪ Many Latina celebrities take great pains to appear as non-Latina as possible.
▪ Macmillan took great pains to husband his energies.
▪ But this was for Alvin a rare chance to see the child whose birth had caused him such great pain.
low
▪ Walking can improve your posture and may prevent lower back pain.
▪ One was written for a woman who said she suffered from insomnia and lower back pain.
▪ Doctors now routinely use super-sensitive blood and urine tests to screen women suffering from any lower abdominal pain.
▪ I have a very low threshold for pain.
▪ And as Tavris has pointed out, chronic lower back pain can cause depression and irritability.
▪ Examples are treating otitis media with antibiotics and treatments for lower back pain.
▪ But no one would think to call a sprained ankle or lower back pain a mental disorder.
physical
▪ He has endured mental anguish, mind-breaking guilts and lacerating physical pain.
▪ I eat faster, learn to go on less sleep, can endure more physical pain.
▪ It sort of goes in tandem with recovering from the physical pain.
▪ Painful emotion in the prosurvival chain can suppress physical pain in the contrasurvival engrams.
▪ After all, he detested physical pain and discomfort - and this excursion had promised both.
▪ All the conditions that made physical pain greatest applied to her.
▪ Now they were bloodcurdling as of an animal in intense physical pain.
▪ The engram bank becomes severely distorted by painful emotion and the areas of painful emotion be-come severely distorted by physical pain elsewhere.
real
▪ He took his left hand off the throttle and punched himself in the face. Real pain drove out fear.
▪ I could not believe it-he had inflicted real pain on himself.
▪ He's beginning to be a real pain.
▪ She was in no real pain or distress.
▪ The real pain is likely to be in the Midlands.
▪ It is all one thing, a ruined city of trivia where people feel real pain.
▪ Yet ... yet he hadn't felt any real pain, had he?
▪ This whole capital punishment thing is becoming a real pain in the neck for a civilized society.
severe
▪ This is a severe pleural pain of sudden onset, accompanied by fever and severe difficulty in breathing.
▪ A: It may take good detective skills to determine the cause of sudden severe ear pain in a healthy child.
▪ Afterwards he suffered severe stomach pains.
▪ Gastric or other visceral crises with severe pain are sometimes a part of the syndrome.
▪ Barbara Garnett, 74, was rushed in after complaining of severe stomach pains.
▪ Kumi was 29 days old when she was euthanized after it was found she had kidney failure and was in severe pain.
▪ Her main complaint was a severe pain which radiated to the left eyeball.
▪ In fact, an ear infection alone can cause sudden severe pain as fluid builds up in the middle ear.
sharp
▪ It was more than a headache; it was like a sharp pain right through the brain.
▪ A loud buzz erupted above his head, and sharp pains tore at his cheeks and scalp.
▪ A sharp pain twisted in Theda's guts.
▪ He was very agitated. Sharp pains racked his wasting body.
▪ The former Scarborough player felt a sharp pain in a knee against Scunthorpe United.
▪ According to court documents, Arlington was sleeping in her home when she was awakened by a sharp head pain.
▪ And suddenly a sharp pain as if stabbed in the gut.
▪ Then one day at school I got a sharp pain in my stomach.
terrible
▪ The pretty presenter was taken by ambulance to London's Charing Cross Hospital at 6 am with terrible stomach pains.
▪ It was five minutes before he stopped yelling, before he started to absorb the terrible pain that burnt through his flesh.
▪ She looked into his eyes and saw terrible pain and inconsolable grief.
▪ In the terrible pain and surprise of the moment, both my pistols went off and fell from my hands.
▪ He wanted to, but to be so close would expose him to that terrible pain of loss.
▪ And after about three days, I was in terrible pain and started to bleed a lot.
■ NOUN
chest
▪ This patient had a history of chest pain, although a negative exercise test had been recorded 7.5 months before the episode.
▪ The patient may or may not have palpitations or chest pain associated with the attack.
▪ She returned to the hospital in the early hours of Saturday 4 July complaining of increased chest pains.
▪ I had the feeling I was disappointing him, and it filled me with a dull continuous inner chest pain.
▪ The patient should have had central chest pain in the classic distribution for at least 15 minutes.
▪ Was there any chest pain, palpitation, or shortness of breath just before consciousness was lost?
▪ The right kind of exercise can cure back pain, headaches and chest pain.
▪ Sore muscles are not the only possibility to explain cough and chest pain.
relief
▪ It takes about 20 minutes to work and can give almost total pain relief.
▪ The advantage of this approach is that pain relief may be obtained without causing disturbance of sensation over the face and cornea.
▪ Objective assessment of pain in necessary to ensure adequate pain relief.
▪ Give drugs regularly and let the doctor know if you think more pain relief would be helpful.
▪ Particular care needs to be taken over: i. accidents or surgical procedures where anaesthetics and appropriate pain relief must be given.
▪ Such forecasts are like aspirins: they have no long term effect but do bring immediate pain relief.
▪ So, next time these problems come along, you can be sure of fast, effective pain relief with Calpol.
▪ Guidelines are suggested for pain relief and should be tailored to the individual patient's needs.
stomach
▪ The pretty presenter was taken by ambulance to London's Charing Cross Hospital at 6 am with terrible stomach pains.
▪ Two days later, after refusing to eat and complaining of stomach pain, Jimmy was hospitalized.
▪ Afterwards he suffered severe stomach pains.
▪ This plant, he explained, cured stomach pains and promoted circulation of the blood.
▪ Barbara Garnett, 74, was rushed in after complaining of severe stomach pains.
▪ People eating contaminated whipped cream quickly become ill with stomach pains.
▪ Whilst in Fort William she was taken ill with stomach pains.
▪ Digestive system Stomach pain, bloating, belching, intermittent diarrhoea.
■ VERB
cause
▪ I hate that I cause her so much pain.
▪ I want my speeches to go from causing pain to feeling it.
▪ Although of course they still cause considerable pain to any animal caught in them wild or domestic.
▪ Rest: Stop the activity that caused the pain and lie down.
▪ A vet, may be able to suggest some treatment to help ease tight muscles causing the pain.
▪ Taking an extra dollar from a rich person would cause less pain than taking an extra dollar from a poor one.
▪ If an exercise ever causes you any pain you must stop immediately.
▪ You may experience sleep difficulties caused by pain associated with surgery or other medical conditions such as arthritis.
control
▪ Morphine and its related narcotics have proved extremely useful in their ability to control pain.
▪ All I could do was control the pain.
▪ Aside from purely humanitarian reasons, there are other more practical reasons for aiming to control pain.
▪ Our results show that poorly controlled surgical pain significantly reduces tissue-oxygen tension.
▪ Wounds healed with little fever or discharge and patients seldom needed opium to control post-operative pain.
▪ Doctors may prescribe anti-inflammatory drugs to control both inflammation and pain.
cry
▪ He cried out in pain and stumbled back against the wall.
▪ Weary was crying because of horrible pains in his feet.
▪ Sonny began to cry from pain and fear.
▪ Consequently, it produced more smoke than flames and Ridley cried out in pain.
▪ He held his stomach and cried out in pain.
▪ He increased the pressure on her wrist causing her to cry out in pain and to drop the glass.
▪ The boat seemed to be crying out in pain, like an arthritic suddenly called upon to use weak muscles.
ease
▪ It helps to ease my pain, even though you aren't hearing me.
▪ Knowing this should help to ease your pain and anguish.
▪ Global marketing; big drugs companies try to ease the pain of more competition by selling products worldwide.
▪ If illness or injury strikes, medical professionals are normally close by, ready to ease pain and begin treatment.
▪ It shows that positive policies to ease the pain of job-loss are now the norm rather than the exception.
▪ It is state officials who are responsible for finding victims and easing their pain with financial help.
▪ Her one hope was an operation to ease the pain.
▪ On several occasions she was admitted to the hospital and spent several days there undergoing traction to ease the pain.
experience
▪ It is necessary to experience anxiety, pain, and death because we are alive.
▪ An involuntary action is set up which causes him to withdraw his hand even before he experiences any sensation of pain.
▪ As the Old Bailey Chronicle reported, Smith experienced excessive pain when first turned off, but that ceased almost immediately.
▪ Left fielder Billy Ashley experienced pain in his left hamstring Saturday while running out of the box.
▪ When the patient's spasticity is controlled, he will no longer experience any pain.
▪ But the company is experiencing growing pains as competition heats up.
▪ At some time in our lives most of us will experience back pain - for some the consequences can be devastating.
▪ Like them, she has experienced the pain of being fat, and can even joke about it.
feel
▪ It was feeling pain, like me.
▪ Shocked and feeling pain, I began to cry.
▪ He felt the pain of her parents.
▪ Don't feel the pain, the rust.
▪ As he stood, he felt an odd wobbling pain on his right side, just above the hip.
▪ Her hand came down on top of a large bunch of them and she felt a sudden stinging pain.
▪ Auto dealers also may feel some pain as car sales will slow after two strong years.
inflict
▪ And he was carrying no thunder-and-fire stick to inflict pain on them.
▪ The threat to inflict pain may trigger fears more damaging than the immediate sensation of pain.
▪ She looked into his eyes, into their endless blackness, seeking silent reassurance that he would inflict no more pain.
▪ You are just lying there with these people washing, dressing and at the same time inflicting pain on you.
▪ He had to inflict pain on people he was told were enemies.
▪ Bougies were inserted into the urethra, and these got bigger and bigger, inflicting great pain and considerable nausea.
▪ We all think it wrong to inflict pain gratuitously, but our reason for obeying this principle is not that others do.
relieve
▪ However, any treatment to relieve pain and suffering may well be justified even if this leads to an earlier death.
▪ Credited with everything from obliterating hot flashes to relieving pain, soy is one of the current health-media darlings.
▪ Oral aspirin is difficult if the patient is nauseated and vomiting and the opiate given to relieve pain may delay gastric motility.
▪ This doctor did not advise me of anything I could do to relieve the pain.
▪ Near the end Joey Beauchamp relieved the pain with his second goal of the season.
▪ Physiotherapy also helps prevent bed sores and relieves the pain that comes from staying in one position too long.
▪ This can be uncomfortable and requires plenty of gnawing to relieve the growing pain.
▪ Supporters called it an effort to help the ill obtain marijuana to relieve nausea, chronic pain and other maladies.
suffer
▪ The doctors said he suffered no pain and was very restful at the end.
▪ And that he suffered pain and injury should not be diminished.
▪ Miss Preston suffered muscle pain and stiffness after the attack.
▪ Sister, I am suffering so much pain.
▪ They suffered from pains in the head or indescribable sensations of uneasiness in the bowels.
▪ Pippen is suffering from pain in his back, knees and ankles.
▪ Afterwards he suffered severe stomach pains.
▪ Two people may suffer pain from the same apparent origin; and yet their pain will not yield to the same analgesic.
take
▪ Suddenly like Matisse in a three-piece suit and consultant's white coat, I take infinite pains to keep this model alive.
▪ But the Second Vatican Council had taken pains to correct this notion.
▪ Do you think I'd take you to pain?
▪ Roy Anderson took great pains to ensure there were no more surprises for any of the players in the unfolding drama.
▪ Klausner and Rimer both took pains Tuesday not to criticize the consensus panel report, which has not been finalized.
▪ Macmillan took great pains to husband his energies.
▪ Congress takes great pains to avoid reminding voters that they themselves finance such mailings.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
appetite/cough/pain etc suppressant
▪ It was designed for use as an appetite suppressant, to be taken along with a certain pill.
blind with tears/rage/pain etc
▪ She turned her back again, her shoulders heaving, her eyes blind with tears.
dart of guilt/panic/pain etc
▪ She held her breath on another quick dart of guilt.
▪ The words echoed unspoken in her brain, sending tiny darts of pain through her veins.
pained expression/look/voice etc
▪ As you began again, all of us around you exchanged more pained looks.
▪ He assumed a pained expression and averted his eyes.
▪ He finally looked at Cantor, a pained expression on his face.
▪ His mouth was set in a prim, pained expression of disapproval.
▪ Larry, my stepfather, sits stiffly with a pained expression on his face.
▪ Rex made with the crossed eyes and suitably pained expression.
▪ The ubiquitous man with the pained expression vanishes.
▪ You noticed a vaguely pained expression enter Jackson's eyes, as if he was wondering why nothing ever proved simple.
shout in pain/anger/frustration etc
spare sb the trouble/difficulty/pain etc (of doing sth)
stab of pain/disappointment/fear etc
▪ As Grant hurried down the narrow concrete stairs, he felt the first warning stab of pain in his torn thigh muscle.
▪ I bit my arm and was grateful for the stab of pain, for the resistance of the bone beneath the skin.
▪ I felt a sharp stab of disappointment and was surprised and angry at myself.
▪ Instinctively he rolled in the saddle and felt the white-hot stab of pain as something sharp scored a line across his shoulders.
▪ She stretched, and little stabs of pain shot through her.
▪ Supposing, he thought, with a stab of fear, he was never going to have any friends?
▪ The policeman pinched his eyes as if overcome with a sudden stab of pain.
the pain barrier
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A slipped disc can cause severe back pain.
▪ He told the doctor he was suffering from chest pains.
▪ In college, Durban began to suffer from headches and pain in his arms and legs
▪ Kerry had to drive herself to the hospital when the labor pains began.
▪ The pain is getting worse.
▪ The drug is often used to ease the pain of dying cancer patients.
▪ the pleasures and pains of trying to earn money as a writer
▪ You won't feel any pain during the operation.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Dash put his head in his hands, as if in pain.
▪ If unusual pain or symptoms occur consult physician.
▪ It is state officials who are responsible for finding victims and easing their pain with financial help.
▪ Over time, the pain usually lessens and goes away, but this may take several months to several years.
▪ These are the truly intractable pains and they are called intractable because they respond to no known form of therapy.
▪ They simply tell us that some one has some very specific desires, aches and pains.
▪ Two days later, after refusing to eat and complaining of stomach pain, Jimmy was hospitalized.
II.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
appetite/cough/pain etc suppressant
▪ It was designed for use as an appetite suppressant, to be taken along with a certain pill.
blind with tears/rage/pain etc
▪ She turned her back again, her shoulders heaving, her eyes blind with tears.
dart of guilt/panic/pain etc
▪ She held her breath on another quick dart of guilt.
▪ The words echoed unspoken in her brain, sending tiny darts of pain through her veins.
pained expression/look/voice etc
▪ As you began again, all of us around you exchanged more pained looks.
▪ He assumed a pained expression and averted his eyes.
▪ He finally looked at Cantor, a pained expression on his face.
▪ His mouth was set in a prim, pained expression of disapproval.
▪ Larry, my stepfather, sits stiffly with a pained expression on his face.
▪ Rex made with the crossed eyes and suitably pained expression.
▪ The ubiquitous man with the pained expression vanishes.
▪ You noticed a vaguely pained expression enter Jackson's eyes, as if he was wondering why nothing ever proved simple.
stab of pain/disappointment/fear etc
▪ As Grant hurried down the narrow concrete stairs, he felt the first warning stab of pain in his torn thigh muscle.
▪ I bit my arm and was grateful for the stab of pain, for the resistance of the bone beneath the skin.
▪ I felt a sharp stab of disappointment and was surprised and angry at myself.
▪ Instinctively he rolled in the saddle and felt the white-hot stab of pain as something sharp scored a line across his shoulders.
▪ She stretched, and little stabs of pain shot through her.
▪ Supposing, he thought, with a stab of fear, he was never going to have any friends?
▪ The policeman pinched his eyes as if overcome with a sudden stab of pain.
the pain barrier
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ His war wound which had pained him earlier was now turning to agony.
▪ She is pained that he can exclude her from his life.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
pain

pain \pain\ (p[=a]n), n. [OE. peine, F. peine, fr. L. poena, penalty, punishment, torment, pain; akin to Gr. poinh` penalty. Cf. Penal, Pine to languish, Punish.]

  1. Punishment suffered or denounced; suffering or evil inflicted as a punishment for crime, or connected with the commission of a crime; penalty.
    --Chaucer.

    We will, by way of mulct or pain, lay it upon him.
    --Bacon.

    Interpose, on pain of my displeasure.
    --Dryden.

    None shall presume to fly, under pain of death.
    --Addison.

  2. Any uneasy sensation in animal bodies, from slight uneasiness to extreme distress or torture, proceeding from a derangement of functions, disease, or injury by violence; bodily distress; bodily suffering; an ache; a smart. ``The pain of Jesus Christ.''
    --Chaucer.

    Note: Pain may occur in any part of the body where sensory nerves are distributed, and it is always due to some kind of stimulation of them. The sensation is generally interpreted as originating at the peripheral end of the nerve.

  3. pl. Specifically, the throes or travail of childbirth.

    She bowed herself and travailed, for her pains came upon her.
    --1 Sam. iv. 19.

  4. Uneasiness of mind; mental distress; disquietude; anxiety; grief; solicitude; anguish. Also called mental pain.
    --Chaucer.

    In rapture as in pain.
    --Keble.

  5. See Pains, labor, effort.

    Bill of pains and penalties. See under Bill.

    To die in the pain, to be tortured to death. [Obs.]
    --Chaucer.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
pain

late 13c., "punishment," especially for a crime; also "condition one feels when hurt, opposite of pleasure," from Old French peine "difficulty, woe, suffering, punishment, Hell's torments" (11c.), from Latin poena "punishment, penalty, retribution, indemnification" (in Late Latin also "torment, hardship, suffering"), from Greek poine "retribution, penalty, quit-money for spilled blood," from PIE *kwei- "to pay, atone, compensate" (see penal). The earliest sense in English survives in phrase on pain of death.\n

\nPhrase to give (someone) a pain "be annoying and irritating" is from 1908; localized as pain in the neck (1924) and pain in the ass (1934), though this last might have gone long unrecorded and be the original sense and the others euphemisms. Pains "great care taken (for some purpose)" is first recorded 1520s (in the singular in this sense, it is attested from c.1300). First record of pain-killer is from 1853.

pain

c.1300, "to exert or strain oneself, strive; endeavor," from Old French pener (v.) "to hurt, cause pain," from peine, and from Middle English peine (n.); see pain (n.). Transitive meaning "cause pain; inflict pain" is from late 14c. That of "to cause sorrow, grief, or unhappiness" also is from late 14c. Related: Pained; paining.

Wiktionary
pain

n. 1 (context countable and uncountable English) An ache or bodily suffering, or an instance of this; an unpleasant sensation, resulting from a derangement of functions, disease, or injury by violence; hurt. 2 (context uncountable English) The condition or fact of suffering or anguish especially mental, as opposed to pleasure; torment; distress; sadness; grief; solicitude; disquietude. 3 (context countable English) An annoying person or thing. 4 (context uncountable obsolete English) Suffering inflicted as punishment or penalty. 5 Labour; effort; pains. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To hurt; to put to bodily uneasiness or anguish; to afflict with uneasy sensations of any degree of intensity; to torment; to torture. 2 (context transitive English) To render uneasy in mind; to disquiet; to distress; to grieve. 3 (context transitive obsolete English) To inflict suffering upon as a penalty; to punish.

WordNet
pain
  1. n. a symptom of some physical hurt or disorder; "the patient developed severe pain and distension" [syn: hurting]

  2. emotional distress; a fundamental feeling that people try to avoid; "the pain of loneliness" [syn: painfulness] [ant: pleasure]

  3. a somatic sensation of acute discomfort; "as the intensity increased the sensation changed from tickle to pain" [syn: painful sensation]

  4. a bothersome annoying person; "that kid is a terrible pain" [syn: pain in the neck, nuisance]

  5. something or someone that causes trouble; a source of unhappiness; "washing dishes was a nuisance before we got a dish washer"; "a bit of a bother"; "he's not a friend, he's an infliction" [syn: annoyance, bother, botheration, infliction, pain in the neck, pain in the ass]

pain
  1. v. cause bodily suffering to [syn: afflict, trouble, ail]

  2. cause emotional anguish or make miserable; "It pains me to see my children not being taught well in school" [syn: anguish, hurt]

Wikipedia
Pain (philosophy)

Philosophy of pain may be about suffering in general or more specifically about physical pain. The experience of pain is, due to its seeming universality, a very good portal through which to view various aspects of human life. Discussions in philosophy of mind concerning qualia has given rise to a body of knowledge called philosophy of pain, which is about pain in the narrow sense of physical pain, and which must be distinguished from philosophical works concerning pain in the broad sense of suffering. This article covers both topics.

Pain (disambiguation)

Pain is an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage.

Pain may also refer to:

Pain (U.S. band)

Pain was an American rock band from Mobile and Tuscaloosa, Alabama that was active between 1994 and 1999.

Pain (Three Days Grace song)

"Pain" is the second single from rock band Three Days Grace's 2006 album, One-X.

According to vocalist Adam Gontier, "It's a song about feeling like you're constantly numb to things around you, thanks to your own actions, and it's about being sick of that feeling."

Pain

Pain is a distressing feeling often caused by intense or damaging stimuli, such as stubbing a toe, burning a finger or putting alcohol on a cut. The examples represent respectively the three classes of nociceptive pain - mechanical, thermal and chemical - and neuropathic pain. Because it is a complex, subjective phenomenon, defining pain has been a challenge. The International Association for the Study of Pain's widely used definition states: "Pain is an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage." In medical diagnosis, pain is a symptom.

Pain motivates the individual to withdraw from damaging situations, to protect a damaged body part while it heals, and to avoid similar experiences in the future. Most pain resolves once the noxious stimulus is removed and the body has healed, but it may persist despite removal of the stimulus and apparent healing of the body. Sometimes pain arises in the absence of any detectable stimulus, damage or disease. Simple pain medications are useful in 20% to 70% of cases.

Pain is the most common reason for physician consultation in most developed countries. It is a major symptom in many medical conditions, and can interfere with a person's quality of life and general functioning. Psychological factors such as social support, hypnotic suggestion, excitement, or distraction can significantly affect pain's intensity or unpleasantness. In some arguments put forth in physician-assisted suicide or euthanasia debates, pain has been used as an argument to permit terminally ill patients to end their lives.

Pain (Jimmy Eat World song)

"Pain" is a song by the American rock band Jimmy Eat World. It was released as the first single from their 2004 album Futures and became their second #1 hit on the Billboard Modern Rock Tracks chart. The song was featured on video games Tony Hawk's Underground 2, Midnight Club 3: DUB Edition, Guitar Hero: Van Halen, Karaoke Revolution Party and the Rock Band series. It was also featured on the Smallville episode "Transference." The 7" was pressed on clear vinyl. Although its album is not their most successful and "Pain" is not the highest charting single, the single has received Gold status by the RIAA, making "Pain" Jimmy Eat World's best-selling single.

Pain (musical project)

Pain (typeset as PAIN) is a musical project from Sweden that mix heavy metal with influences from electronic music and techno. The project started out as a hobby project for front man Peter Tägtgren, whose idea was to fuse heavy metal with 1980s-inspired electro-industrial and techno influences. Tägtgren, who is also the vocalist/guitarist of Hypocrisy and producer of his own The Abyss studios, is the only current member.

Pain's self-titled debut was released in 1997, and since then Pain has released six more albums and a DVD. Starting with their second, all of Pain's albums have made the Swedish charts, thanks in large part to hit singles such as "End of the Line", "Shut Your Mouth", and "Same Old Song". In early February 2006, Blabbermouth.net reported that Pain had signed with Roadrunner Records. Currently, Pain is under the Nuclear Blast Records banner.

In 2008, Pain was on tour as a supporting performer for the Finnish symphonic power metal band Nightwish. During this tour singer Peter Tägtgren, drummer David Wallin, and bassist Johan Husgafvel were assaulted by a gang in Leipzig. Tägtgren received 10 stitches in his face, Wallin suffered a concussion and stitches to his head, and Husgafvel had his nose broken.

Pain supported Nightwish on the second half of their Dark Passion Play World Tour, along with Finnish pop rock band Indica, beginning with the first show in London, UK on 11 March 2009. Pain released their seventh album, You Only Live Twice, on 3 June 2011 via Nuclear Blast. They are due to release their eighth studio album entitled Coming Home on September 9, 2016.

Pain (Puff Daddy song)

"Pain" is a song on Puff Daddy's 1997 album No Way Out.

The song is about tragedies from Puff Daddy's life, including the murder of his father Melvin Combs in 1972, the New York City College Stampede of 1991 and the death of his label-mate and friend Notorious BIG in 1997.

The song features audio from Notorious BIG which was recorded before his death when the song was made.

There is a completely different song also entitled Pain on the follow-up album Forever.

Pain (Ohio Players album)

Pain is the second studio album by The Ohio Players, and their debut for the Westbound label.

Pain (Rhino Bucket album)

PAIN is the third studio album released by the hard rock band Rhino Bucket. It was released on June 1, 1994 by Moonstone Records. The album was their first release with Simon Wright (formerly of AC/DC) as drummer.

Pain (journal)

Pain is a monthly peer-reviewed medical journal published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins on behalf of the International Association for the Study of Pain. The journal was established in 1975 and covers research and reviews in the fields of anesthesiology and clinical neurology. The editor-in-chief is Francis J. Keefe ( Duke University).

Pain (film)

Pain or Oh Pain, Little Pain, Pain (Spanish: ¡Ay, pena, penita, pena!) is a 1953 Mexican-Spanish musical comedy film directed by Miguel Morayta and starring Lola Flores, Luis Aguilar and Antonio Badú.

Pain (video game)

Pain is a 2007 action video game for PlayStation 3, developed by Idol Minds. It was originally released as a downloadable title available from the PlayStation Store and was first released in North America on November 29, 2007 and in Europe on March 20, 2008 and became the most popular downloadable game on the PlayStation Store. In June 2009, SCEE announced that the game was to be released on Blu-ray Disc. It was launched in Europe on June 24, 2009, in Australia on June 25, 2009 and in the UK on June 26, 2009. The Blu-ray version includes the original game as well as several other levels and features released as downloadable content for the PSN version. It is now available in a collection which is available to download from the PlayStation Store called the 3D Collection. On November 26, 2013, the game's online features were disabled.

A free-to-play version was announced at E3 in 2014 for a summer release exclusively for PlayStation 3, however it's yet to be released as of March 2016.

Usage examples of "pain".

Gritting her teeth against the pain, Abigail rolled to the side that Jane was directing her.

The ability to sense pain and discomfort in others, Will realized, was something he had always had and assumed others did as well.

Judge must sentence her to an abjuration of all heresy, on pain of the punishment for backsliders, together with the perpetual penance, in the following manner.

Gate again, but that memory was literally ablaze with pain and he swiftly banished it.

With this fellowship they came safely and with little pain unto Chestnut Vale, where they abode but one night, though to Ralph and Ursula the place was sweet for the memory of their loving sojourn there.

NARAL Pro-Choice America even decided not to oppose a bill that would require doctors to anesthetize babies being aborted after the twentieth week of pregnancy, called the Unborn Child Pain Awareness Act.

Her bare foot dragged across it, abrading the skin and producing a burning pain that somehow seemed far worse than any of the aches and stings emanating from the other injuries Mrs.

There was a pain as of abrading flesh, and it came up: a fishlike creature with a disk for a head, myriad tiny teeth projecting.

Spasming, Acies moaned in pain as broken bones knit themselves together and bruises faded.

He looked down on her still, white face and bright hair, and he felt his heart contract with pain to see them darken ever so faintly and beautifully under the brilliant operating light, rich in actinic rays.

Ashurst remarks that while the cutaneous surface of the stump was acutely sensitive to the touch, there was no manifestation of pain evinced upon handling the exposed nerve.

The hair was so acutely sensitive that the slightest touch occasioned severe pain at the roots.

The cuts and bruises I had received from the jagged sides of the rock shaft were paining me woefully, their soreness enhanced to a stinging or burning acuteness by some pungent quality in the faint draft, and the mere act of rolling over was enough to set my whole frame throbbing with untold agony.

Dazed from the dreamlike state, I was quickly brought back to reality when Adeem started screaming in pain.

I am quite transported at the thought that ere long, perhaps very soon, I shall bid an eternal adieu to all the pains and uneasinesses, and disquietudes of this weary life.