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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
oxygen
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
oxygen bar
oxygen debt
oxygen mask
oxygen tent
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
arterial
▪ Nineteen of the children who died were hypoxaemic on admission with arterial oxygen saturations ranging from 88% to 40%.
▪ Among children who survived for at least five days arterial oxygen saturation on admission ranged from 41% to 98%.
▪ The arterial oxygen saturation and pulse rate of all patients were monitored by pulse oximetry before and during the procedure.
▪ Comparison of mean arterial oxygen saturation between the groups showed significantly higher levels in the nasal oxygen group throughout the procedure.
▪ Directly measured tissue oxygen tension and arterial oxygen tension assess tissue perfusion.
atmospheric
▪ Animals and human volunteers will be maintained at various atmospheric pressures and oxygen concentrations while their biochemistry is monitored.
▪ Some 1800 million years ago atmospheric oxygen was fast approaching the present level of about 21 percent of the total.
▪ Carbon atoms can form bonds not only with themselves but with the atoms of important atmospheric gases, oxygen and nitrogen.
dissolved
▪ While you do this, monitor the water for ammonia, nitrite and dissolved oxygen.
▪ Was dissolved oxygen in the water greater than 80 percent of saturation?
▪ Of the three dissolved oxygen is the most important factor, but we can ignore none.
▪ But in doing so, they burn the water's dissolved oxygen.
extra
▪ Kelsey spent five weeks on a ventilator and still needed extra oxygen until last week.
▪ However, there is no source of extra oxygen to expend as rocket propellant.
▪ I have heard it said that when bream break surface it is simply to obtain the extra oxygen available there.
▪ But the extra oxygen he needed affected his eyes, leaving him nearly blind.
▪ Let your arms swing with you and feel the energy coming from the extra oxygen you are breathing.
▪ Therefore, as a reasonable approximation, you can neglect the extra oxygen that plants consume at night.
free
▪ For instance, there almost certainly was no free oxygen in the atmosphere.
▪ The ones of interest here are a highly reactive chemical species called free oxygen radicals.
▪ There would be no free oxygen in the atmosphere even today were it not for photosynthesis.
▪ So could malaria parasites be destroyed by assaulting them with free oxygen radicals?
high
▪ For that, you must do night jumps at altitudes so high oxygen is required.
▪ But the converted believe High Pressure oxygen stops the process.
▪ This nematode haemoglobin is chemically similar to myoglobin and has the highest affinity for oxygen of any known animal haemoglobin.
liquid
▪ Boiling the liquid oxygen was as good a way of getting it out of the tank.
▪ The engines of the Atlas burned a modified aviation fuel, similar to kerosene, with liquid oxygen.
▪ The two prototype pumps, installed in the eastern Paris suburbs of Colombes and Rueil-Malmaison, use liquid oxygen.
▪ Zubrin proposes burning methane with liquid oxygen for the return trip to Earth.
▪ By doing without liquid oxygen at take-off, the plane's total weight would be cut almost in half.
▪ In that case, we would think first of burning hydrocarbons with liquid oxygen, or even using the hydrogen-oxygen propellant combination.
▪ Driving these cells were the contents of two liquid oxygen tanks and two liquid hydrogen tanks.
▪ This removes half of the cryogenics problem but leaves us with liquid oxygen.
low
▪ Symptoms of ammonia poisoning are similar to those of low oxygen, although the fish objects.
▪ So at low temperatures, oxygen is absorbed more strongly by most species' haemoglobin, and released less easily.
▪ This enables them to survive in very polluted waters with low levels of oxygen.
▪ Most obviously, low levels of oxygen asphyxiate fish.
▪ It can also be brought on by incorrect or over-feeding, low oxygen levels or sudden temperature changes.
▪ It can also produce problems in hot weather, when your water is capable of holding only low amounts of oxygen.
▪ High temperatures can result in more problems for Orfe due to low oxygen levels.
▪ The lowest oxygen saturation recorded throughout the study was 86%.
pure
▪ He has spent four one-hour sessions in the hyperbaric therapy unit - a pressurised cabin into which pure oxygen is fed.
▪ The blessed torrent of cool, pure oxygen poured into his lungs.
▪ In a cabin soaked in pure oxygen at greater than atmospheric pressure for five hours, almost anything bums.
▪ The oxygen ion passes through the membrane and emerges on the other side as pure oxygen gas.
▪ There they breathe in pure oxygen at high pressure.
▪ A pure oxygen atmosphere was used with a pressure of 35 in flight5.
▪ After 20 sessions, 70 percent of those breathing pure oxygen tired less easily and became more mobile and co-ordinated.
▪ The only by-product is pure oxygen.
reactive
▪ Chemiluminescence is a reliable means of estimating reactive oxygen species in biological media.
▪ Increased reactive oxygen species values in the inflamed colonic mucosa in rats were seen by chemiluminescence.
▪ An outline of reactive oxygen metabolite chemistry in biological tissues is given in the Figure.
▪ These three reactive oxygen species are believed to be responsible for tissue injury.
▪ Chemiluminescence is a simple, sensitive, and reproducible technique that can be used to estimate reactive oxygen species in biological media.
▪ Using chemiluminescence produced by cells and extracts, several investigators have showed the role of reactive oxygen species in different disorders.
▪ In contrast, reports on the use of this technique for tissue reactive oxygen species are very limited.
▪ One potential source for the increased values of reactive oxygen species in inflammatory bowel disease is the neutrophil.
supplemental
▪ We therefore can not comment on the use of supplemental oxygen in these patients.
▪ The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of supplemental oxygen both during and after upper gastrointestinal endoscopy.
■ NOUN
atom
▪ Thus, in our example, no magnesium, carbon or oxygen atoms can be created or destroyed.
▪ In this group of ions the carbon atom is surrounded by three oxygen atoms in a planar triangle.
▪ The clays consist of silica tetrahedra and the octahedra contain magnesia surrounded by oxygen atoms and hydroxyl groups.
▪ Is there a molecule that weighs the same as an oxygen atom?
consumption
▪ It was known that stimulation caused the heart to increase its oxygen consumption.
▪ In this way heart rate, respiration rate, oxygen consumption, and muscle tension all reduce without conscious effort.
▪ Exercise capacity and oxygen consumption are reduced, and the response to physical activity is impaired.
▪ This, in addition to the continuing oxygen consumption of the fish, bacteria and other pond inhabitants can quickly cause oxygen depletion.
cylinder
▪ Cursing herself, she snaked a hand back inside for an oxygen cylinder.
▪ Soon she was barely able to walk and she had oxygen cylinders fitted in her bedroom.
▪ There were two explosions involving an oxygen cylinder, injuring both men.
gas
▪ This can lead to oxygen gas being released in blood vessels with potentially dangerous effects on the fish.
▪ The oxygen ion passes through the membrane and emerges on the other side as pure oxygen gas.
level
▪ Patrick was grey and blue about the mouth and he appeared to have stopped breathing and his oxygen level was low.
▪ Besides discussing ducks, the report also will look at reducing erosion, increasing oxygen levels and improving fishing.
▪ As the water becomes overloaded with nutrients, the algae spreads and oxygen levels fall.
▪ A few minutes of rest, and he recovered his oxygen level, although something within felt attenuated.
▪ Cause: Low oxygen levels - particularly after a humid summer night.
▪ Though not catastrophic, the drop in oxygen levels was bewildering.
▪ High oxygen levels are not important, for the fish has an air bladder with which it can breathe air.
▪ A separate oxygen analyser directly below screen checks oxygen levels and cuts off other gases if supply fails.
mask
▪ They placed an oxygen mask on my love and dared me to count up to ten.
▪ The shock was terrific, he gasped into his oxygen mask, his hands clenching involuntarily.
▪ He told me that the oxygen mask had pulled away from my face some, and that I was probably just blacking out.
▪ But he saw nothing, nothing but dark sky: The oxygen mask was filled with sweat.
▪ It felt good sitting there with the oxygen mask off and not having to worry about flak.
▪ They coaxed everything from pygmy mice to snakes to cheetahs into running on a treadmill while wearing an oxygen mask.
▪ He remembered his oxygen mask and placed it over his mouth after removing the smog mask.
▪ The car with its whirring air conditioning was like an oxygen mask.
radical
▪ Chloroplast membranes are very susceptible to attack by oxygen radicals which are generated as a by-product of photochemistry.
▪ The ones of interest here are a highly reactive chemical species called free oxygen radicals.
▪ So could malaria parasites be destroyed by assaulting them with free oxygen radicals?
▪ To confirm that it was due to free radical production he searched for a less complicated generator of oxygen radicals.
▪ The source of oxygen radicals in gastric mucosal injury induced by indomethacin in rats is not clear.
saturation
▪ Pulse oximetry was used to monitor oxygen saturation and heart rate.
▪ Hence, there is increased oxygen delivered to tissues for a given hemoglobin oxygen saturation.
▪ Another assessment was done after 5 min stable oxygen saturation.
▪ During the procedure pulse rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation were recorded every minute by the research nurse.
▪ There was no significant correlation between the frequency of extrasystoles, either supraventricular or ventricular, and oxygen saturation values.
▪ Among children who survived for at least five days arterial oxygen saturation on admission ranged from 41% to 98%.
▪ The arterial oxygen saturation and pulse rate of all patients were monitored by pulse oximetry before and during the procedure.
▪ Supplemental oxygen increases oxygen saturation but does not reduce the incidence of clinically important cardiac arrhythmias.
species
▪ Chemiluminescence is a reliable means of estimating reactive oxygen species in biological media.
▪ Increased reactive oxygen species values in the inflamed colonic mucosa in rats were seen by chemiluminescence.
▪ These three reactive oxygen species are believed to be responsible for tissue injury.
▪ Chemiluminescence is a simple, sensitive, and reproducible technique that can be used to estimate reactive oxygen species in biological media.
▪ Using chemiluminescence produced by cells and extracts, several investigators have showed the role of reactive oxygen species in different disorders.
▪ In contrast, reports on the use of this technique for tissue reactive oxygen species are very limited.
▪ One potential source for the increased values of reactive oxygen species in inflammatory bowel disease is the neutrophil.
▪ This superoxide could then be metabolised further to other reactive oxygen species either in colonocytes or in neutrophils.
supply
▪ The flame is very sooty when the oxygen supply is limited.
▪ And so some region of the brain might lose its oxygen supply.
▪ Even higher organisms resort to fermentation as an auxiliary process when the oxygen supply is insufficient.
▪ Is your oxygen supply at risk?
▪ Don't tread around bushes to firm them, this will cut off the oxygen supply to the roots.
▪ A forklift, a back-up generator, oxygen supplies, and a nurse and doctor were good to have along, too.
▪ Typical dives may last five minutes with a one to two minute interval at the surface when they recharge their oxygen supplies.
▪ Anaerobic activity does not require an oxygen supply to the muscles for a sudden, short burst of activity.
tank
▪ Then she groped at her shoulder to where the oxygen tank was moulded around her triceps.
▪ I ran my hand over the huge jars lined up like oxygen tanks on the kitchen counters against the walls.
▪ Unfortunately there was a problem with the oxygen tank that was not discovered until the countdown test.
▪ A close inspection reveals that in a past life they were oxygen tanks.
▪ The tiny oxygen tank on his back was uncomfortable but deemed necessary in case the mist became too choking.
▪ In the meantime, he wandered the streets, wheeling an oxygen tank he needed to treat his emphysema, Ewing said.
▪ But oxygen tanks fuelled the flames.
▪ The tank that eventually found itself as oxygen tank 2 on Apollo 13 started its life in Apollo 10.
tension
▪ Our results show that poorly controlled surgical pain significantly reduces tissue-oxygen tension.
▪ More effective lung perfusion and expansion may have contributed to the more favourable arterial-alveolar oxygen tension ratios in the regulated group.
▪ The arterial-alveolar oxygen tension ratio is a useful prognostic indicator.
▪ Tarnow-Mordi etal found the mean arterial-alveolar oxygen tension ratio more closely associated with death than the worst arterial-alveolar oxygen tension ratio.
▪ This accords with our finding that median arterial-alveolar oxygen tension ratio predicts respiratory outcome better than the minimum ratio.
▪ Median and minimum arterial-alveolar oxygen tension ratios for ventilated infants on the first day were significantly lower in the random group.
▪ Wound tissue oxygen tension predicts the risk of wound infection in surgical patients.
tent
▪ And the idea of this odd man, his chimpanzee and oxygen tent in tow, running a business is bizarre.
■ VERB
absorb
▪ This has walls thick with blood capillaries which absorb gaseous oxygen.
▪ The walls of these are thick with blood vessels which absorb gaseous oxygen.
▪ Fish have to absorb oxygen from water via their gills while whales absorb air via their lungs.
▪ Carbon monoxide Carbon monoxide is a poisonous gas which, when inhaled, limits the body's capacity to absorb oxygen.
breathe
▪ When we breathe we take oxygen into the body and expel the waste gas, carbon dioxide, or CO2.
▪ He starts at 8 a. m. with an hour in the hyperbaric oxygen unit, breathing 100 percent oxygen at two atmospheres.
▪ There they breathe in pure oxygen at high pressure.
▪ The faster the heart beats the more rapidly we may be inclined to breathe and the more oxygen we take in.
▪ This is the source of the oxygen which we all require and which we take in when we breathe.
▪ In contrast to most plants, they breathe in oxygen and give out carbon dioxide.
carry
▪ The blood test for anaemia checks the level of haemoglobin, which helps carry oxygen through the blood.
▪ Nitrite affects the fish by binding with the blood and preventing it carrying as much oxygen as normal.
▪ The fast-growing capillaries bring blood carrying oxygen and nutrients to the swelling tumour.
▪ Blood carries essential food and oxygen.
▪ Vitamin B12 helps to produce red blood cells which carry oxygen, and therefore prevents anaemia and tiredness.
▪ Eventually, animals may die because their respiratory pigment is no longer able to carry enough oxygen to support their metabolism.
▪ It binds to haemoglobin much more readily than oxygen, thus allowing the blood to carry less oxygen.
▪ But did you realise that smoking can impair the blood which carries oxygen to the brain and therefore decrease mental efficiency?
combine
▪ When they are burned, their carbon combines with oxygen from the atmosphere to form carbon dioxide gas.
▪ Steam will break down the methanol and extract hydrogen to be combined with oxygen from the air.
▪ Woodhead etal. combine such analyses with oxygen isotope analyses, and it is variations in the latter that are particularly significant.
▪ These then combine with other oxygen molecules to form three-atom ozone molecules, resistant to ultraviolet radiation and able to absorb it.
▪ Oxoanions are given the numerical value of the oxidation number of the element which combines with oxygen in the ion.
contain
▪ These are usually cyclic molecules, containing carbon-carbon bonds and oxygen atoms of general formula.
▪ Compounds containing oxygen, which enhances octane rating, have also been added.
▪ For example, one molecule of oxygen contains two atoms of oxygen.
▪ The clays consist of silica tetrahedra and the octahedra contain magnesia surrounded by oxygen atoms and hydroxyl groups.
▪ As water contains oxygen, it does not in fact prevent the paint from drying anyway!
generate
▪ That released the firing pin, which in turn fired the percussion cap and triggered a chemical reaction that generated oxygen.
increase
▪ It was known that stimulation caused the heart to increase its oxygen consumption.
▪ The temporary rise in blood pressure increases the oxygen requirements and creates an extra burden on the heart.
▪ Leave pumped water to run night and day to increase oxygen content; add more water if needed.
▪ Besides discussing ducks, the report also will look at reducing erosion, increasing oxygen levels and improving fishing.
▪ Supplemental oxygen increases oxygen saturation but does not reduce the incidence of clinically important cardiac arrhythmias.
▪ Hence, there is increased oxygen delivered to tissues for a given hemoglobin oxygen saturation.
▪ This shift results in increased oxygen delivery to the tissue.
need
▪ This leads to the heart needing more oxygen.
▪ But like the brain, a tumor needs oxygen.
▪ She still needs oxygen for her underdeveloped lungs and needs several different drugs every day.
▪ When neurons become active, they need more oxygen and glucose.
▪ Your brain needs oxygen and that means you should breathe plenty of fresh air.
▪ Secondly, most of these microorganisms need oxygen.
▪ The plants would then only need to provide his oxygen.
produce
▪ Rainforests absorb carbon dioxide and produce the oxygen essential for all life, including our own.
▪ The accumulation of lactate in the blood results from any mechanism that produces oxygen deprivation of tissues and thereby anaerobic metabolism.
▪ And they produce oxygen which animals need to breathe, and which helps to replace that lost by burning fossil fuels.
▪ They produced stable oxygen levels slightly higher than on Earth.
▪ The submerged plants produce oxygen which dissolves in the water, keeping it well aerated.
▪ They produce oxygen as a waste product, a normally lethal poison to the plant cell.
▪ The antennae-trap web is now ready to catch more photons and produce more oxygen and electrons to continue the cycle.
receive
▪ After this blinded choice, patients were randomised again to receive air or oxygen.
▪ The patient is receiving nasal oxygen.
▪ Gavin however recovered after receiving oxygen and was able to drive home.
▪ All contact lenses must be very carefully fitted to allow the cornea to receive enough oxygen.
reduce
▪ Our results show that poorly controlled surgical pain significantly reduces tissue-oxygen tension.
▪ It has been shown that an accumulation of carbon dioxide in the water reduces the amount of oxygen carried in the blood.
▪ This reduces the amount of oxygen available to the tissues.
▪ Besides discussing ducks, the report also will look at reducing erosion, increasing oxygen levels and improving fishing.
▪ Plant growth also surges in the sunlight, reducing available oxygen.
release
▪ These are now increasing needs for detergents to release oxygen at lower temperatures for modern fabrics.
▪ Another dissolves ilmenite or some other iron mineral in sulfuric acid to release oxygen.
▪ They then combine the hydrogen with carbon dioxide to form sugars and release the oxygen into the atmosphere.
require
▪ This would require oxygen at a rate of 0.025 cubic centimetres per hour or 0.6 cubic centimetres per day.
▪ Beneficial anaerobic filter bacteria require oxygen to oxidise nitrites to safer nitrates.
▪ Anaerobic activity does not require an oxygen supply to the muscles for a sudden, short burst of activity.
▪ Such control requires that the oxygen concentration in the blood be accurately measured, and that breathing rate be adjusted accordingly.
starve
▪ Sealing food in an airtight jar starves the bacteria of oxygen and they are unable to reproduce.
▪ Medical theorists suggest that these experiences are actually hallucinations caused by the brain's mood-controlling limbic system being starved of oxygen.
use
▪ Pulse oximetry was used to monitor oxygen saturation and heart rate.
▪ A fish, like any other animal, uses oxygen and gives off carbon dioxide.
▪ The advantage lay in their using less oxygen, being less tired and being able to carry more samples and equipment about.
▪ The ethanol will then be trucked to a Total refinery to be used to add oxygen to gasoline.
▪ When they eventually start decaying, they use up oxygen dissolved in the water.
▪ Both missions depart from the space station using hydrogen-oxygen chemical propulsion.
▪ Only instead of extracting oxygen from water, they use rock.
▪ The two prototype pumps, installed in the eastern Paris suburbs of Colombes and Rueil-Malmaison, use liquid oxygen.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Besides discussing ducks, the report also will look at reducing erosion, increasing oxygen levels and improving fishing.
▪ In a similar way, sheets of octahedra are formed from aluminium, oxygen and hydroxyl groups.
▪ Is your oxygen supply at risk?
▪ Like yeast, the cells in our bodies usually burn glucose with oxygen because it releases so much energy.
▪ Soon she was barely able to walk and she had oxygen cylinders fitted in her bedroom.
▪ The relief of pain by oxygen inhalations, which reduce cerebral blood flow, also suggests that this is a factor.
▪ This increases your heart rate and encourages more oxygen into the body as you breathe more quickly.
▪ Tired, tired, lungs aching for oxygen.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Oxygen

Oxygen \Ox"y*gen\, n. [F. oxyg[`e]ne, from Gr. 'oxy`s sharp, acid + root of gi`gnesqai to be born. So called because originally supposed to be an essential part of every acid.]

  1. (Chem.) A colorless, tasteless, odorless, gaseous element of atomic number 8, occurring in the free state in the atmosphere, of which it forms about 23 per cent by weight and about 21 per cent by volume, being slightly heavier than nitrogen. Symbol O. Atomic weight 15.9994.

    Note: It occurs combined in immense quantities, forming eight ninths by weight of water, and probably one half by weight of the entire solid crust of the globe, being an ingredient of silica, the silicates, sulphates, carbonates, nitrates, etc. Oxygen combines with all elements (except fluorine), forming oxides, bases, oxyacid anhydrides, etc., the process in general being called oxidation, of which combustion is only an intense modification. At ordinary temperatures with most substances it is moderately active, but at higher temperatures it is one of the most violent and powerful chemical agents known. It is indispensable in respiration, and in general is the most universally active and efficient element. It may be prepared in the pure state by heating potassium chlorate. [1913 Webster] This element (called dephlogisticated air by Priestley) was named oxygen by Lavoisier because he supposed it to be a constituent of all acids. This is not so in the case of a very few acids (as hydrochloric, hydrobromic, hydric sulphide, etc.), but these do contain elements analogous to oxygen in property and action. Moreover, the fact that most elements approach the nearer to acid qualities in proportion as they are combined with more oxygen, shows the great accuracy and breadth of Lavoisier's conception of its nature.

  2. Chlorine used in bleaching. [Manufacturing name]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
oxygen

gaseous chemical element, 1790, from French oxygène, coined in 1777 by French chemist Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (1743-1794), from Greek oxys "sharp, acid" (see acrid) + French -gène "something that produces" (from Greek -genes "formation, creation;" see -gen).\n

\nIntended to mean "acidifying (principle)," it was a Greeking of French principe acidifiant. So called because oxygen was then considered essential in the formation of acids (it is now known not to be). The element was isolated by Priestley (1774), who, using the old model of chemistry, called it dephlogisticated air. The downfall of the phlogiston theory required a new name, which Lavoisier provided.

Wiktionary
oxygen

n. 1 A chemical element (''symbol'' O) with an atomic number of 8 and relative atomic mass of 15.9994. 2 Molecular oxygen (O2), a colorless, odorless gas at room temperature.

WordNet
oxygen

n. a nonmetallic bivalent element that is normally a colorless odorless tasteless nonflammable diatomic gas; constitutes 21 percent of the atmosphere by volume; the most abundant element in the earth's crust [syn: O, atomic number 8]

Wikipedia
Oxygen (Wild Orchid album)

Oxygen is the second album by American group Wild Orchid, released in 1998 (see 1998 in music). The album was the group's first commercial failure, only selling 200,000 copies worldwide.

Oxygen (disambiguation)

Oxygen is a chemical element. (O: Oxygen | O: Ozone)

Oxygen may also refer to:

Oxygen (1999 film)

Oxygen is a 1999 film, directed and written by Richard Shepard. The film follows a troubled cop, Madeline Foster (played by Maura Tierney) as she pursues a kidnapper who calls himself Harry Houdini ( Adrien Brody). The film was shot on location in New York City.

Oxygen (Olson and Ingermanson novel)

Oxygen is a futuristic Christian novel by John B. Olson and Randall S. Ingermanson.

Oxygen (TV channel)

Oxygen is an American digital cable and satellite television channel that is owned by Oxygen Media, LLC, a subsidiary of the NBCUniversal Cable division of NBCUniversal. Similar to Lifetime and WE tv, the channel features programming targeted at women, including original reality television series, acquired scripted series and feature films.

As of February 2015, approximately 77.5 million American households (66.5% of households with television) receive Oxygen.

In early 2014, it was announced that Oxygen would rebrand on October 7, 2014 alongside a new logo in an effort to target young female viewers.

Oxygen (Avalon album)

Oxygen is Avalon's fifth studio album, released on May 22, 2001, and produced by Brown Bannister and Grant Cunningham. The project was strongly supported by Christian radio, containing six No. 1 radio singles—the most of any Avalon album to date. Oxygen is the first (and so far, only) album by the group to release alongside a Collector's Edition, which features a hidden bonus track, "Beyond the Clouds".

Oxygen (Marie Serneholt song)

"Oxygen" is the third single by the Swedish pop music singer Marie Serneholt, released from her first album Enjoy the Ride in 2006.

After so much speculation about Marie's third single, promotional copies of the song were sent to Swedish radios in the second week of October. The video was premiered on 26 October on Swedish Music Channels. The song had already been released for digital download on 9 October. No physical release was made for this single. The song peaked at number seventy-six, failing to chart inside the Top 60.

Oxygen (Varga album)

Oxygen is the second album from Canadian industrial/metal band Varga.

Oxygen (Hadouken! song)

"Oxygen" is a song by British new rave band Hadouken!. It was released as the second single from their third studio album Every Weekend on 7 November 2010. The EP was released later on 18 January 2011.

Oxygen

Oxygen is a chemical element with symbol O and atomic number 8. It is a member of the chalcogen group on the periodic table and is a highly reactive nonmetal and oxidizing agent that readily forms oxides with most elements as well as other compounds. By mass, oxygen is the third- most abundant element in the universe, after hydrogen and helium. At standard temperature and pressure, two atoms of the element bind to form dioxygen, a colorless and odorless diatomic gas with the formula . This is an important part of the atmosphere and diatomic oxygen gas constitutes 20.8% of the Earth's atmosphere. Additionally, as oxides the element also makes up almost half of the Earth's crust.

Oxygen is necessary to sustain most terrestrial life. Oxygen is used in cellular respiration and many major classes of organic molecules in living organisms contain oxygen, such as proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and fats, as do the major constituent inorganic compounds of animal shells, teeth, and bone. Most of the mass of living organisms is oxygen as a component of water, the major constituent of lifeforms. Conversely, oxygen is continuously replenished by photosynthesis, which uses the energy of sunlight to produce oxygen from water and carbon dioxide. Oxygen is too chemically reactive to remain a free element in air without being continuously replenished by the photosynthetic action of living organisms. Another form ( allotrope) of oxygen, ozone , strongly absorbs ultraviolet UVB radiation and the high-altitude ozone layer helps protect the biosphere from ultraviolet radiation. But ozone is a pollutant near the surface where it is a by-product of smog. At low earth orbit altitudes, sufficient atomic oxygen is present to cause corrosion of spacecraft.

Oxygen was discovered independently by Carl Wilhelm Scheele, in Uppsala, in 1773 or earlier, and Joseph Priestley in Wiltshire, in 1774, but Priestley is often given priority because his work was published first. The name oxygen was coined in 1777 by Antoine Lavoisier, whose experiments with oxygen helped to discredit the then-popular phlogiston theory of combustion and corrosion. Its name derives from the Greek roots ὀξύς oxys, "acid", literally "sharp", referring to the sour taste of acids and -γενής -genes, "producer", literally "begetter", because at the time of naming, it was mistakenly thought that all acids required oxygen in their composition.

Common use of oxygen includes residential heating, internal combustion engines, production of steel, plastics and textiles, brazing, welding and cutting of steels and other metals, rocket propellant, oxygen therapy, and life support systems in aircraft, submarines, spaceflight and diving.

Oxygen (Miller novel)

Oxygen is the third novel by English author, Andrew Miller, released on 6 September 2001 through Sceptre. Although the novel received mixed reviews, it was shortlisted for both a Man Booker Prize and a Whitbread Award in 2001.

Oxygen (Baptiste Giabiconi album)

Oxygen is the debut album from French male model and singer Baptiste Giabiconi. It was released on 24 September 2012 on the My Major Company fan-supported record label. The album is in English except for the track "Speed of Light (L'amour et les étoiles)", which is bilingual with some additional French lyrics. It was produced by Pete Boxta Martin and recorded in London. It went straight into #1 on the SNEP official French Albums Chart dated 30 September 2012.

Oxygen (Lincoln Brewster album)

Oxygen: A Worship Album is the ninth studio album by Lincoln Brewster on Integrity Music.

Oxygen (EP)

Oxygen is an EP by American band Swans. It was released digitally on November 25, 2014, through Swans' official Bandcamp page.

Oxygen (2016 film)

Oxygen is a 2016 upcoming Telugu action film produced by S. Aishwarya on Sri Sai Raam Creations banner and directed by Jyothi Krishna. Starring Gopichand, Raashi Khanna, Anu Emmanuel in the lead roles while Jagapati Babu in crucial supporting role and music composed by Yuvan Shankar Raja. The film has formally been launched on 17 December 2015 with Pooja ceremony at Sri Vishwaroopa Sai Baba Temple, Chennai.

Oxygen (horse)

Oxygen (foaled 1828, died in winter 1854–1855) was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and broodmare who won the classic Oaks Stakes at Epsom Downs Racecourse in 1831. In a racing career which lasted from July 1830 until April 1833 she won eight of her fifteen races and finished second on five occasions. Oxygen's Oaks was the last of twenty classic wins for her owner George FitzRoy, 4th Duke of Grafton.

Oxygen was regarded the leading two-year-old filly in the South of England in 1830, when she won two of her three races. At three she was beaten in a controversial race when odds-on favourite for the 1000 Guineas but returned to form to win the Oaks a month later. In the following year she won an important handicap race at Newmarket and defeated the leading stayer Lucetta in a King's Plate over three and a half miles. She was retired from racing after a single unsuccessful race as a five-year-old and was retired to stud, where she had some success as a broodmare.

Usage examples of "oxygen".

A man on Venus, unless equipped with special breathing apparatus and oxygen tanks, would die of acidosis within a few minutes.

Virtually all the food and oxygen you take into your body are delivered, after processing, to the mitochondria, where they are converted into a molecule called adenosine triphosphate, or ATP.

The tidal regularity of cerebral chemical flows, the cyclonic violence latent in the adrenergic current of the autonomic nervous system, the delicate mysteries of the sweep of oxygen atoms from pneumonic membrane into the bloodstream.

The aeronaut carried a gun firing explosive bullets loaded with oxygen, and in addition, and true to the best tradition of Japan, a sword.

Animal matter enters into combination with oxygen in precisely the same way as vegetable matter, but as, in addition to carbon and hydrogen, it contains nitrogen, the products of the eremacausis are more numerous, being carbon and nitrate of ammonia, carburetted and sulphuretted hydrogen, and water, and these ammoniacal salts greatly favor the growth of fungi.

Inhaled sodium azide goes into the lungs and directly into the blood, where its molecules bond with oxygen molecules and render the oxygen unusable.

His eyes sharpened by the fresh increase in the oxygen flow provided by his mask Cal watched that slow climb almost with amazement carefully taking in the rope and belaying it as the other approached.

Measuring concentrations of oxygen isotopes trapped in belemnite guard shell fossils, scientists have determined that the seas of that time were warmer than today.

Kerri and Bender alone with only the hissing of the oxygen to mar the silence.

The bombardier of each aircraft had to go down into the bomb bay and, walking along the narrow catwalk between the bombs and holding his portable oxygen bottle in one hand, pull out the arming pins of his bombs.

I have none too many chlorate cubes either, and must try to cut down my oxygen consumption as much as I can.

Must save chlorate cubes, so am nearly suffocating for lack of oxygen.

They could not be plants, or green, without their chloroplasts, which run the photosynthetic enterprise and generate oxygen for the rest of us.

The chloroplasts of a plant cell-small green particles containing chlorophyll-absorb the energy of sunlight to split water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen atoms.

Oxygen, combining with starch in a slow, fermentative combustion, could produce heat to ward off the cold that would otherwise stop growth.