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Crossword clues for help

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
help
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
accept help
▪ Don’t be afraid to accept help if you need it.
an offer of help/support/friendship etc
▪ Any offers of help would be appreciated.
ask for help
▪ Don’t be afraid to ask for help.
begged for help
▪ She ran to the nearest house and begged for help.
couldn’t help overhearing
▪ I couldn’t help overhearing your argument.
domestic help (=help with cleaning, washing etc)
▪ People in well-paid jobs can afford domestic help.
emergency aid/relief/help (=things such as food and medicine that are given to people when they are in a very dangerous situation)
▪ The charity made a television appeal for emergency aid to the region.
enlist sb’s help/services etc
▪ He has enlisted the help of a sports psychologist for the team.
generous amount/helping/measure etc
▪ a generous helping of pasta
Heaven help...if
Heaven help him if he ever comes back here again!
help desk
help sb with their homework
▪ I often have to help her with her homework.
help screen
help with the chores
▪ All their children help with the chores.
help
▪ There can be no doubt that this sort of help is valuable for teachers.
home help
more of a hindrance than a help
▪ A degree is more of a hindrance than a help in British industry.
offer advice/help/support etc
▪ Your doctor should be able to offer advice on diet.
practical help/support (also practical assistanceformal)
▪ There will be trained people available to listen and to provide practical help.
professional help
▪ It is very important for parents to get professional help if this problem arises.
seek help
▪ He sought help from the police.
sent for help
▪ I’ve sent for help.
shout for help
▪ I opened my mouth to shout for help.
unfailing help/support etc
▪ I’d like to thank you all for your unfailing support.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
please
▪ Let me keep to it. Please help me to keep to it.
▪ To be eligible for these please help us by showing any appropriate identification when paying for tickets.
▪ If anyone can help please contact the Editorial office.
▪ Help me somebody, please help me.
▪ I am 11 years old so please help in any way you can.
▪ You make it possible. Please help us to make your money work even harder.
■ VERB
offer
▪ A number of local law societies had offered to help, she added, as had several Council members.
▪ He was very excited at the prospect of such unusual guests near his well and offered to help with everything.
▪ He believes that industrialists have a lot to offer academic institutions in helping them to manage their resources.
▪ Quinn would have liked to offer to help, but he could not budge.
▪ I promise I won't even offer to help.
▪ Then after class, he walked by as she tried to get it started and politely offered to help.
▪ The balloon's been stolen, and 10 crates of lager are being offered to anyone who helps locate it.
try
▪ They always appear to be happy and spend their lives trying to help others.
▪ Everything Hicks had worked for was falling neatly into place -- until he tried to help a wounded man.
▪ And she was only trying to help.
▪ Samper has claimed those accusations were a plot to remove him from power because he has tried to help the poor.
▪ She had tried to help him.
▪ The conflict and anxiety approach has worrying implications when it comes to trying to help people solve their problems.
▪ Simon House and the annex take in people from the street and try to help them sort out their lives.
▪ Barbara Timmer got her hand bitten all the way through to the bone trying to help.
want
▪ If you want to help contact during office hours.
▪ I want to help the team win and I still think I can do that.
▪ Your doctor wants to help you.
▪ Usually, I really believe in my clients and want to help them.
▪ If you want to help, perhaps you'd give Victorine a hand with washing up the breakfast things?
▪ She had badly wanted to help Glover arrange his furniture when the time came for him to move into his new quarters.
▪ She wanted me to help her.
▪ She seems to genuinely want to help Jim.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
God help us
God help us
God help you/him etc
God help you/him etc
cry for help
▪ Janie's suicide attempt was obviously a cry for help.
▪ A boy passing by homewards from the pictures heard his cries for help.
▪ I suppose underneath it was a cry for help.
▪ If anyone had been crying for help, the firemen must have responded by now.
▪ Meanwhile, another cry for help.
▪ Opening his mouth to cry for help, he -!
▪ Screams and desperate cries for help filled the streets.
▪ Without adequate built-in safeguards, there will be other Susan Allens who will pull the trigger before they cry for help.
heaven help sb
Heaven help us if it snows again.
pleased to help/assist
▪ If you do not understand the details enclosed please contact the Finance Department where the staff will be pleased to assist.
▪ NatWest understands your needs and is pleased to help.
▪ Our group bookings specialists are always pleased to assist the discerning traveller who requires quality, service and value second to none.
▪ There will always be some one who will be only too pleased to help.
▪ They will be pleased to help and advise you.
▪ They will be pleased to help and so will the suppliers listed, including, of course, myself.
▪ They will be pleased to help you with specific questions and will give you as much general information as they can.
▪ Whatever the size of your kitchen, our talented designers will be pleased to help you plan it.
some friend you are/some help she was etc
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "Did you enjoy the trip?" asked Jack, helping her out of the boat.
Help me lift this, will you?
▪ All this arguing isn't going to help us win the election.
▪ Crying's not going to help.
▪ Dad, I don't understand my homework. Will you help me?
▪ Dan's mother has been great about helping with the kids.
▪ Do you want me to help you with those bags?
▪ Her uncle said he would help her to find a job.
▪ I'm ready to help. Is there something for me to do?
▪ I took a couple of aspirin for my headache, but they didn't help.
▪ It is hoped that the tax increases will help to stabilize the economy.
▪ Part of the assistant's job is to help to organize conferences and keep the director informed.
▪ Spending time in Spain should help improve her Spanish.
▪ The latest report should help us to evaluate the true benefits of the program.
▪ The money will be used to help starving children around the world.
▪ The plan was intended to help development in rural areas.
▪ The warm weather this spring has certainly helped the farmers.
▪ Warren offered to help clean up the house after the party.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And that could help to bring an early end to the recession for the traders.
▪ Another crew chief from the ship behind us helped Leese with his straps.
▪ But does Bush ever haul out the millionaire investment banker or oil baron to show whom he will be helping?
▪ He was banking on at least $ 675 million in savings initiated by New York state to help.
▪ She had helped to prepare the table.
▪ The company said it is holding shares to help finance possible acquisitions in the future.
▪ The union thus helps people develop a greater sense of money management.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
domestic
▪ Two other characteristics of the sample population require some comment: the incidence of employment, and of domestic help.
▪ Also patron of domestic help, housekeepers, and maids.
▪ Midwinter does not restrict his discussion of domestic help to private householders.
▪ Others were manned by his friends and the domestic help.
▪ When domestic help is employed it may be the case that she takes over the husband's responsibilities rather than the wife's.
▪ You may be looking for light domestic help one or two hours per week, or 24-hour a day care.
extra
▪ The changes included lowering taxes and giving extra help to the farming sector.
▪ There are a lot more extra help classes, too.
▪ But, as with others in society, there are times when extra help or advice is needed.
▪ One of the reasons I could justify putting them in there was the D block where I could give them extra help.
▪ Does she employ extra help if necessary?
▪ Give him extra help in being aware of his wishes and intentions.
▪ Peristaltic tights will appeal to sufferers from poor circulation and varicose veins, and those whose hearts need a bit of extra help.
▪ There are children who need extra help with components of reading.
financial
▪ Now, with the TECs, we intend to introduce new financial help for career and training guidance.
▪ His wife, Mary Barley, is reviving the petition drive with financial help from Jones.
▪ The scheme was intended to provide financial help to unemployed workers in depressed areas who were prepared to move to other areas.
▪ It is state officials who are responsible for finding victims and easing their pain with financial help.
▪ However, this financial help is too limited in relation to actual expenditure.
▪ No offer of financial help, no kind invitations to join them in club activities were forthcoming from Charles.
▪ Market-distorting activities arise from state aids such as subsidies, tax concessions, and other financial help given to domestic companies.
▪ In 1873, when Scott asked Carnegie for financial help, Carnegie turned down his former mentor.
great
▪ Thanks again for your very great help over the questionnaires.
▪ But Temin does not really claim that the Fed was of great help.
▪ Today he plays off a nine handicap, a great help when he is carrying the bag.
▪ They know Britain well, and will be of great help to you.
▪ In this chapter it has been argued that the uncertainty map can be of great help in managing such a portfolio.
▪ Our first holiday to the islands helped solve that problem, and provided great help in future years.
▪ It was a great help to us.
▪ Male speaker Ultrasound scanning is a great help.
little
▪ There was also very little demand for help on legal matters and employment issues.
▪ Center Ray Ferraro made it 2-0 with a little help from Verbeek.
▪ And with a little help from its friends, the big multinational companies and landowning farmers, it is spreading its roots.
▪ At this point Katz would dearly love a little navigational help from above.
▪ Paul Reece keeping out Bobby Barnes, with a little help from the cross-bar.
▪ There are only challenged people, who with a little help can be just like everyone else.
▪ If Regazzoni was little help to Lauda within Ferrari, Reutemann was even less.
▪ With little help from her father, she raised the younger children and saw them all through college.
medical
▪ But it is very important to get medical help in the early stages.
▪ Three weeks later, the teacher added these observations: Harold needs medical help as well as much careful teaching.
▪ Charlton was picked up and carried to Hewett's house where medical help was soon to hand.
▪ Granato began experiencing headaches so severe, he sought medical help.
▪ Get any medical help available, then set about finding your own way to manage your disabilities.
▪ His offence against those who came to him for medical help was less easy to punish.
▪ Disturbed sleep patterns may also be one symptom of depression, which requires medical help.
▪ Finally, both staff and residents must be able to summon skilled medical and nursing help very quickly both day and night.
practical
▪ There were letters offering practical help.
▪ The social worker can give practical help and advice on all these tasks.
▪ Religion, combined with practical help, can be a powerful force in stabilizing a neighborhood and turning lives around.
▪ This scheme provides practical and financial help for would-be purchasers with existing homes still to sell.
▪ Use the expertise and facilities of your local authorities and voluntary services for practical help, advice and social activities.
▪ There seems to be a coldness at the heart of much hard-left philosophy, where theory takes precedent over practical help.
▪ Which is sweet and touching, as you can imagine, but not really much practical help.
professional
▪ But for many people, the best solution may be a combination of tax software and professional help.
▪ Name of Consortium - should we try to get professional help with this? 8.
▪ Your spouse might be able to help you, or you may need to seek professional help.
▪ Restoration often depends upon the willingness of both to communicate openly. Professional help may be needed.
▪ The extent to which bereavement is worked through depends on self-awareness, external support, professional help and general attitudes.
▪ After several weeks of sleepless nights, Walter sought professional help.
■ NOUN
desk
▪ Upon contacting the help desk, your call will be logged and you will be asked to provide information concerning the problem.
▪ By and large, Windows 95 fixes this problem, which is what your help desk is probably talking about.
▪ In any organisation the most active and critical area is the computer support help desk.
▪ A help desk provides immediate quotations and on the spot cover if required.
▪ CustomerQ integrates customer support, call tracking, help desk and product defect tracking in a single module that includes Informix.
▪ These include communication the corporate help desk, probably with the help of remote diagnostic probes.
home
▪ Developments in day care, the home help service and other domiciliary services were the currency of growth in these departments.
▪ We urge parents to plan ahead for postpartum home help.
▪ Even a weekly visit by a local authority home help - when it was finally arranged - was not enough.
▪ As a tertiary intervention, I offered to organise a home help or meals on wheels service if Mrs Allen wished.
▪ For example those over 75 are six times more likely to receive a home help than those aged 64-75.
▪ A full-time job, a small child, and no home help left her little energy for dinner parties anyway.
▪ Local information from user and carer groups had revealed a basic home help cleaning service was highly valued by many clients.
self
▪ A friend recently told me her man didn't indulge in self help.
▪ There is a strong element of self help in the programme.
▪ He helps to run Body Positive a self help group for sufferers like himself.He welcomes any scientific advance but remains cautious.
Self help Many community care schemes have elements of self help built into them.
▪ These will be grouped under four heads decentralisation, consumerism and participation, self help and joint action.
▪ Independence, self help and active citizenship have all been praised.
▪ Aims: to assist in the setting up of local self help groups and to provide information and counselling.
▪ This is yet another Northern Ireland example of self help in a very needy situation.
■ VERB
ask
▪ I ran out of the house immediately and came to London to ask for your help.
▪ They not only ask for help, they also seem to need more support and emotional nurturing than others.
▪ If in doubt, always ask for help from a solicitor, social worker or some other professional you know and trust.
▪ What a difference it makes to ask for help and actually get it.
▪ We ask for help in our task of calling for an end to the executions and the release of all political prisoners.
▪ Second, can the professionals whom people ask for help in changing actually provide that help?
▪ Geoffrey decided he would have to wake Deborah and ask for her help.
▪ When they ask a teacher for help, they get help.
beg
▪ And anyway I don't want to beg for Edgar's help, or make trouble for him.
▪ Cupid had told him the whole Story and had begged for his help.
▪ I suppose I should have just gone and begged for help but Shallot has his pride.
▪ Rescued by human teens and taken to the vet, Keelk recovers and begs for help to rescue her family.
▪ I hate the sound of people crying in pain, begging for help.
▪ Like his people, the Somalian President can only beg for help.
▪ SHe'd never begged help off anyone before - hadn't needed to.
call
▪ My wife went down the fellside to a cottage and the lady kindly called 999 for help.
▪ She continued to call for help every minute or so but, as time passed, her hopes diminished.
▪ Messengers ran out to call for help in men and gear and food.
▪ She tried to speak, to call for help, to explain herself, to scream, but no words would come.
▪ Theatre administrator Patricia McBride is calling on expert help to get the boy's drawl exactly right.
▪ Callers are given appropriate phone numbers to call for help, and perhaps an explanation of Medicaid or Medicare.
▪ She was murdered before she could call for help.
▪ Kaiser called for help on the emergency channel when we were hit.
cry
▪ Without adequate built-in safeguards, there will be other Susan Allens who will pull the trigger before they cry for help.
▪ The women began to cry when help arrived.
▪ Opening his mouth to cry for help, he -!
▪ The former cried out for help.
▪ The voice she was hearing was surely crying out for help.
▪ It turned out that the radio was keyed continuously, and the only voice was a single trooper crying for help.
▪ If anyone had been crying for help, the firemen must have responded by now.
▪ She cried for help and the pair ran out of the shop.
enlist
▪ Warn the shop owner in advance and enlist his help.
▪ She enlists the help of psychiatrist / author Sigourney Weaver, an expert on serial killers.
▪ For practical reasons, she enlisted the help of the air force.
▪ Next he enlisted the help of his wife and two friends to remind him to say no more often and pace himself.
▪ In turn, Cassidy enlisted the help of the Mail on Sunday to justify his behaviour.
▪ He said he learned Pond was also in the country and enlisted his help in dealing with the player.
▪ You may also need to enlist the help of a friend.
▪ He has even enlisted the help of Cy Avara, the barber for Sen.
get
▪ The manual can be read on screen so getting help is a key press away!
▪ Or, he could do the tough thing, which is admit to a problem and get some help.
▪ Please could you tell me how to get some help?
▪ We got some help from international labor organizations.
▪ In addition, local authorities may have difficulty in knowing which old people need help and of getting help to them in time.
▪ In answering such life-and-death questions, he gets no help from electronics.
▪ Then after a long time I got up with the help of a friend.
▪ Perhaps twice that many are not getting help, Kalemkiarian said.
give
▪ Can you give me some help with keeping Kribs?
▪ Interest rates continue to fall, giving crucial help to debtors, most of whose loans have variable rates.
▪ I appreciate all you can do for him, in giving him very special help.
▪ Our colleague Mark Wheadon has also given valuable help.
▪ If voters need help to properly complete the voting process, they should be given help when requested.
▪ And the descriptions of the two men have been too varied to give much help to detectives.
▪ In my case, for example, my husband gives me every help.
need
▪ This means that there are more old people needing special help and proportionately fewer people of working age to provide for them.
▪ But he emphasizes that not all attorneys will need his help.
▪ She needed the help Harvey had promised.
▪ They need your help about everything from prospecting to how to get along with their administrative assistant.
▪ Sometimes she wished somebody would ask if she needed help, but that was the way it was.
▪ Three weeks later, the teacher added these observations: Harold needs medical help as well as much careful teaching.
▪ They can not speak the language, so they can not get work and they need help.
▪ We need all the help we can get.
offer
▪ She had offered practical help as well as tough-minded advice.
▪ Consultants now offer help to companies when assessing their knowledge resources and learning capabilities.
▪ That Nancy Bigears is a gem, lecturing me before I could offer my help.
▪ Do any offer help to the project manager in motivating the team?
▪ I am worried about her, and my husband and I offer help.
▪ Many of these patients will be offered further help of one kind or another.
▪ Many women have serious problems and deserve to be treated with respect and offered help that is to the point.
provide
▪ In 1981 the Conservative government introduced the Assisted Places Scheme which provides help with tuition fees and certain other incidental expenses.
▪ A student of Plato, Xenocrates, does provide invaluable help.
▪ The scheme was intended to provide financial help to unemployed workers in depressed areas who were prepared to move to other areas.
▪ Bruce should provide help as a run defender while Wallace would be used as a designated pass rusher.
▪ The briefing sheet also provides help in interpreting the data.
▪ Corporations such as Citibank provide in-service literacy help for some of their employees.
▪ This scheme provides practical and financial help for would-be purchasers with existing homes still to sell.
▪ Others fret that the system might not provide enough help in times of rural economic crisis.
seek
▪ Unless the job stretches subordinates there is no reason why they should need, or seek, your help.
▪ Although Sheila finds them a handful and is known to shout at them, she has always sought appropriate help.
▪ Two other climbers were unhurt and went back to the bottom of the Tuckerman bowl seeking help.
▪ They had sought help from the marriage counsellor a little late in the day.
▪ Granato began experiencing headaches so severe, he sought medical help.
▪ A patient seeks help and is therefore vulnerable.
▪ For depressions that are more severe, you should seek help.
turn
▪ Lykophron turned to Sparta for help.
▪ She was the goddess married women turned to for help.
▪ It was returned to the company but when they needed Mrs Dibble's carriage as well, she turned to Lena for help.
▪ Therefore we turn to you for help in ways to make lightweight canoes in a cheap but very safe manner.
▪ I had virtually no one to turn to for help.
▪ There are many people to whom you can turn for help.
▪ He turned for help to hawks and owls.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
God help us
God help us
God help you/him etc
God help you/him etc
cry for help
▪ Janie's suicide attempt was obviously a cry for help.
▪ A boy passing by homewards from the pictures heard his cries for help.
▪ I suppose underneath it was a cry for help.
▪ If anyone had been crying for help, the firemen must have responded by now.
▪ Meanwhile, another cry for help.
▪ Opening his mouth to cry for help, he -!
▪ Screams and desperate cries for help filled the streets.
▪ Without adequate built-in safeguards, there will be other Susan Allens who will pull the trigger before they cry for help.
pleased to help/assist
▪ If you do not understand the details enclosed please contact the Finance Department where the staff will be pleased to assist.
▪ NatWest understands your needs and is pleased to help.
▪ Our group bookings specialists are always pleased to assist the discerning traveller who requires quality, service and value second to none.
▪ There will always be some one who will be only too pleased to help.
▪ They will be pleased to help and advise you.
▪ They will be pleased to help and so will the suppliers listed, including, of course, myself.
▪ They will be pleased to help you with specific questions and will give you as much general information as they can.
▪ Whatever the size of your kitchen, our talented designers will be pleased to help you plan it.
sb can't help noticing sth
seek (sb's) advice/help/assistance etc
▪ Abdominal complaints Abdomen: When to seek advice Urgently, Right now!
▪ Almost three years since she sought help for the severe seizures, Harlan had her surgery.
▪ It will normally be necessary to seek expert advice on the realisable values of all the major assets.
▪ She can walk into a family planning clinic and seek assistance.
▪ The more Marcus thought about it, the more he realized that he would have to seek help from Fanshawe.
▪ They had sought my advice, and I had recommended this machine.
some friend you are/some help she was etc
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a plea for help
▪ I'm having trouble paying the rent, but I don't want to ask my parents for help.
▪ I really want to thank you for all your help.
▪ If I need any help I'll call you.
▪ It's hard to get good help these days.
▪ Kelly hasn't been much help either.
▪ We managed to buy the house with a little help from Dave's parents.
▪ With the help of a nicotine patch she was able to quit smoking.
▪ Would you like some help with those suitcases?
▪ You go get help - I'll wait here with the car.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And the descriptions of the two men have been too varied to give much help to detectives.
▪ Children can compete for the parent's favour and help, which obscures the real cause of the argument.
▪ Henry went to see if help was needed.
▪ I don't think I can be much help to you, to be honest.
▪ Nestor made them heartily welcome, but about the object of their coming he could give them little help.
▪ She enlists the help of psychiatrist / author Sigourney Weaver, an expert on serial killers.
▪ Then, with the right attitude and a little help from your friends you are ready.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Help

Help \Help\ (h[e^]lp), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Helped (h[e^]lpt) (Obs. imp. Holp (h[=o]lp), p. p. Holpen (h[=o]l"p'n)); p. pr. & vb. n. Helping.] [AS. helpan; akin to OS. helpan, D. helpen, G. helfen, OHG. helfan, Icel. hj[=a]lpa, Sw. hjelpa, Dan. hielpe, Goth. hilpan; cf. Lith. szelpti, and Skr. klp to be fitting.]

  1. To furnish with strength or means for the successful performance of any action or the attainment of any object; to aid; to assist; as, to help a man in his work; to help one to remember; -- the following infinitive is commonly used without to; as, ``Help me scale yon balcony.''
    --Longfellow.

  2. To furnish with the means of deliverance from trouble; as, to help one in distress; to help one out of prison. ``God help, poor souls, how idly do they talk!''
    --Shak.

  3. To furnish with relief, as in pain or disease; to be of avail against; -- sometimes with of before a word designating the pain or disease, and sometimes having such a word for the direct object. ``To help him of his blindness.''
    --Shak.

    The true calamus helps coughs.
    --Gerarde.

  4. To change for the better; to remedy.

    Cease to lament for what thou canst not help.
    --Shak.

  5. To prevent; to hinder; as, the evil approaches, and who can help it?
    --Swift.

  6. To forbear; to avoid.

    I can not help remarking the resemblance betwixt him and our author.
    --Pope.

  7. To wait upon, as the guests at table, by carving and passing food.

    To help forward, to assist in advancing.

    To help off, to help to go or pass away, as time; to assist in removing.
    --Locke.

    To help on, to forward; to promote by aid.

    To help out, to aid, as in delivering from a difficulty, or to aid in completing a design or task.

    The god of learning and of light Would want a god himself to help him out.
    --Swift.

    To help over, to enable to surmount; as, to help one over an obstacle.

    To help to, to supply with; to furnish with; as, to help one to soup.

    To help up, to help (one) to get up; to assist in rising, as after a fall, and the like. ``A man is well holp up that trusts to you.''
    --Shak.

    Syn: To aid; assist; succor; relieve; serve; support; sustain; befriend.

    Usage: To Help, Aid, Assist. These words all agree in the idea of affording relief or support to a person under difficulties. Help turns attention especially to the source of relief. If I fall into a pit, I call for help; and he who helps me out does it by an act of his own. Aid turns attention to the other side, and supposes co["o]peration on the part of him who is relieved; as, he aided me in getting out of the pit; I got out by the aid of a ladder which he brought. Assist has a primary reference to relief afforded by a person who ``stands by'' in order to relieve. It denotes both help and aid. Thus, we say of a person who is weak, I assisted him upstairs, or, he mounted the stairs by my assistance. When help is used as a noun, it points less distinctively and exclusively to the source of relief, or, in other words, agrees more closely with aid. Thus we say, I got out of a pit by the help of my friend.

Help

Help \Help\, n. [AS. help; akin to D. hulp, G. h["u]lfe, hilfe, Icel. hj[=a]lp, Sw. hjelp, Dan. hielp. See Help, v. t.]

  1. Strength or means furnished toward promoting an object, or deliverance from difficulty or distress; aid; ^; also, the person or thing furnishing the aid; as, he gave me a help of fifty dollars.

    Give us help from trouble, for vain is the help of man.
    --Ps. lx. 11.

    God is . . . a very present help in trouble.
    --Ps. xlvi. 1.

    Virtue is a friend and a help to nature.
    --South.

  2. Remedy; relief; as, there is no help for it.

  3. A helper; one hired to help another; also, thew hole force of hired helpers in any business.

  4. Specifically, a domestic servant, man or woman. [Local, U. S.]

Help

Help \Help\, v. i. To lend aid or assistance; to contribute strength or means; to avail or be of use; to assist.

A generous present helps to persuade, as well as an agreeable person.
--Garth.

To help out, to lend aid; to bring a supply.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
help

Old English help (m.), helpe (f.) "assistance, succor;" see help (v.). Most Germanic languages also have the noun form, such as Old Norse hjalp, Swedish hjälp, Old Frisian helpe, Dutch hulp, Old High German helfa, German Hilfe. Use of help as euphemism for "servant" is American English, 1640s, tied up in notions of class and race.A domestic servant of American birth, and without negro blood in his or her veins ... is not a servant, but a 'help.' 'Help wanted,' is the common heading of advertisements in the North, when servants are required. [Chas. Mackay, "Life and Liberty in America," 1859].\nThough help also meant "assistant, helper, supporter" in Middle English (c.1200).\n

help

Old English helpan (class III strong verb; past tense healp, past participle holpen) "help, support, succor; benefit, do good to; cure, amend," from Proto-Germanic *helpan (cognates: Old Norse hjalpa, Old Frisian helpa, Middle Dutch and Dutch helpen, Old High German helfan, German helfen), from PIE root *kelb- "to help" (cognates: Lithuanian selpiu "to support, help").\n

\nRecorded as a cry of distress from late 14c. Sense of "serve someone with food at table" (1680s) is translated from French servir "to help, stead, avail," and led to helping "portion of food." Related: Helped (c.1300). The Middle English past participle holpen survives in biblical and U.S. dialectal use.

Wiktionary
help

Etymology 1 n. 1 (context uncountable English) Action given to provide assistance; aid. 2 (context usually uncountable English) Something or someone which provides assistance with a task. 3 documentation provided with computer software, etc. and accessed using the computer. 4 (context usually uncountable English) One or more people employed to help in the maintenance of a house or the operation of a farm or enterprise. 5 (context uncountable euphemistic English) Correction of deficits, as by psychological counseling or medication or social support or remedial training. Etymology 2

interj. A cry of distress or an urgent request for assistance vb. (context transitive English) To provide assistance to (someone or something).

WordNet
help
  1. n. the activity of contributing to the fulfillment of a need or furtherance of an effort or purpose; "he gave me an assist with the housework"; "could not walk without assistance"; "rescue party went to their aid"; "offered his help in unloading" [syn: aid, assist, assistance]

  2. a resource; "visual aids in teaching"; "economic assistance to depressed areas" [syn: aid, assistance]

  3. a means of serving; "of no avail"; "there's no help for it" [syn: avail, service]

  4. a person who contributes to the fulfillment of a need or furtherance of an effort or purpose; "my invaluable assistant"; "they hired additional help to finish the work" [syn: assistant, helper, supporter]

help
  1. v. give help or assistance; be of service; "Everyone helped out during the earthquake"; "Can you help me carry this table?"; "She never helps around the house" [syn: assist, aid]

  2. be of use; "This will help to prevent accidents" [syn: facilitate]

  3. improve the condition of; "These pills will help the patient" [syn: aid]

  4. abstain from doing; always used with a negative; "I can't help myself--I have to smoke"; "She could not help watching the sad spectacle" [syn: help oneself]

  5. contribute to the furtherance of; "This money will help the development of literacy in developing countries"

  6. improve; change for the better; "New slipcovers will help the old living room furniture"

  7. help to some food; help with food or drink; "I served him three times, and after that he helped himself" [syn: serve]

  8. take or use; "She helped herself to some of the office supplies" [syn: avail]

Wikipedia
Help (Buffy the Vampire Slayer)

"Help" is the fourth episode of the seventh and final season of the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

Help

Help is any form of assisting others.

Help may also refer to:

Help (Dutch TV series)

Help is a Dutch television drama series first broadcast by the NCRV in the early 1990s.

Help (UK TV series)

Help is a BBC television comedy series first screened on BBC Two in 2005. Written by and starring Paul Whitehouse and Chris Langham, it concerns a psychotherapist (Langham) and his therapy sessions with a variety of patients, almost all of whom are played by Whitehouse.

Peter Strong, the diffident psychologist, has an obsession with his receptionist Rebecca (played by Alison King) and also has regular appointments with his own therapist (who is also played by Whitehouse), which is the only time when the scene leaves Peter's office. Other performers were Mark Williams and Olivia Colman in cameos as patients, Alison Senior as a patient's wife, and Langham's real-life daughter Emily as a patient's precocious daughter. Two of the most frequent patients were Gary (the only role Whitehouse plays with no make-up), who initially uses his therapy sessions to escape from his wife; and Monty, an elderly Jewish taxi-driver whose wife is suffering from Alzheimer's disease. Others include an Eastern European father, a magician and a TV presenter. The show was released on Region 4 DVD, but has so far remained unreleased in the UK. Since August 2014 all episodes have been available on YouTube.

In 2007 the development of Pedro, a character in the proposed second series - which was never made - became a focal point of Langham's trial.

Interviewed by Ben Thompson for The Guardian in 2005, Langham said, of his writing partnership with Whitehouse:

The way Paul works is to try and come up with a phrase that suits a particular voice ... That's the grain of sand around which the pearl of a character forms. Once he's found that voice, he's volcanic - it all comes out of him in a stream of consciousness which I can't type fast enough to keep up with. Then my rather less glamorous and exciting job would be to take that stuff and shape it, which was fine by me, as I'm kind of obsessed with structure.

Help (Thee Oh Sees album)

Help is the eighth studio album by the American garage rock band Thee Oh Sees, released on April 28, 2009 on In the Red Records. The album is the band's second to be released under the name, Thee Oh Sees.

Help (film)

Help is a 2010 Bollywood horror film directed by Rajeev Virani in his directional debut. It stars Bobby Deol and Mugdha Godse in the lead roles and marks the debut of Sophia Handa in a supporting role. Shreyas Talpade also has a special role in the film although it was not marketed as his film. It released on 13 August 2010, making it the first Bollywood horror film to release on Friday the 13th, the day of bad luck. The film was shot in Mauritius.

Help (Australian TV series)

Help (styled as HELP) is a six-part Australian documentary series is broadcast on SBS One that takes you inside the real-life events that Ambulance officers and paramedics face every day while on the job. Since 2010, the program is currently airing on Wednesday afternoons at 3pm.

Help (band)

Help were a 1970s psychedelic, acid, hard rock power trio from California.

The band comprised Jack Merrill (vocals, guitar), Ron Rochan (vocals, bass guitar, percussion), and Chet McCracken (vocals, drums, percussion, formerly of the Evergreen Blueshoes).

They released two albums on Decca Records in 1970 and 1971.

McCracken went on to drum with The Doobie Brothers.

Help (command)

In computing, help is a command in various command line shells such as [[COMMAND.COM]], [[cmd.exe]], Bash, 4DOS/ 4NT, Windows PowerShell, Singularity shell, Python and GNU Octave. It provides online information about available commands and the shell environment. The command is also available in the DEC RT-11 operating system. On Unix, the command is part of the Source Code Control System and prints help information for the SCCS commands.

Help (Erica Campbell album)

Help is the debut studio album by Mary Mary recording artist Erica Campbell and was released on March 25, 2014 by eOne. This is Erica Campbell's debut studio album without her sister Tina Campbell. The album's release was preceded by the singles "A Little More Jesus", the title track "Help" and "You Are". The album debuted at number 1 on the US Billboard Gospel Albums chart and number 6 on the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 23,000 copies. The album also won the Grammy Award for Best Gospel Album at the 57th Grammy Awards.

Usage examples of "help".

Joining in the conversation also helped to take her mind off the nightmarish phantasm that was now abiding somewhere within her unsettled self.

As he helped the woman to the stage Abie realized they all knew he would choose one of them as a partner.

Henry helped her up the steps, through the door and into the foyer, and Abigail gasped in admiration.

Thinking about him interfered with her ability to concentrate on helping him.

He was a loathsome, gorilla-like thing, with abnormally long arms which I could not help calling fore legs, and a face that conjured up thoughts of unspeakable Congo secrets and tom-tom poundings under an eerie moon.

It was Sandy Wan, the woman who would later help me track down the truth about the abortus vendors.

Or can we, by examining his case with intelligence and with charity, and then by acting with charity too, begin to help all abused children, including his own, to free themselves from the burden of their childhood?

The workbooks help you become aware of your abusive history and find ways to get rid of the anger.

Then someone was helping her, telling her in some strange accent to bring him in here, hands guiding her shoulders, leading her into a tent with a soft glow of lamplight.

Swearing under his breath, Ace hurried to help the abused woman to her feet.

Swearing under his breath, Ace hurried to help the young wife to her feet.

The German victories in Europe, including the fall of France in June 1940, buoyed the Japanese into believing that alliance with Germany could help in achieving their goals in East Asia, and in September of that year Japan signed a tripartite pact with the Axis powers.

This will not only assist in neutralizing the acidity of the stomach, but will help to allay the thirst and accompanying fever.

Even if the acriflavine treatment sounded worse than the disease it was supposed to help, at least it would be over pretty soon.

You needed someone with experience in Rauta Sheraa paper to do a minesweep help you bury incriminating Service documents Acton re-coded as private paper.