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Crossword clues for egg

egg
Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
egg
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bird lays its eggs
▪ The bird lays a single egg on the ground.
a sperm/egg donor (=a man who gives sperm or a woman who gives eggs to help someone else have a baby)
▪ Her husband was infertile so they conceived using a sperm donor.
Easter egg
egg roll
insect eggs
▪ The leaves were covered in insect eggs.
lay...eggs
▪ The flies lay their eggs on decaying meat.
nest egg
▪ They had to use part of their retirement nest egg to pay for their son’s college fees.
Scotch egg
scrambled egg
separate...eggs (=divide the white part from the yellow part)
▪ First, separate the eggs.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
beaten
▪ Slowly pour on to the beaten eggs and stir in the butter and rum.
▪ Then whisk in the beaten egg gradually, adding a teaspoon of flour with each addition to stop curdling.
▪ Brush each bun with a little beaten egg, then place in the pre-heated oven.
▪ Gradually whisk in beaten egg and vanilla essence.
▪ Add the beaten egg and syrup mixture.
▪ Use any pastry scraps to decorate the pies and glaze with beaten egg if required. 6.
▪ Add the sifted flour and lightly beaten eggs in alternate spoonfuls, mixing well.
▪ Brush the potato with a little beaten egg and brown under a grill.
boiled
▪ Don't forget to bring a hard boiled egg to decorate, Billingham Beck Country Park, 10am.
▪ The next morning Mollie and I resumed the polishing and dusting after eating our muesli and boiled eggs.
▪ A boiled egg and two slices of buttered bread had been laid out at his place at the table.
▪ Creamy onion sauce slathered over lightly boiled eggs.
▪ They breakfasted on sugared porridge, boiled eggs, bread and butter, and a pot of tea.
▪ On it there was boiled eggs and things.
▪ Chocolate eggs are good to eat and you can decorate boiled eggs too.
fertilized
▪ There is a special kind of cytoplasm, called the pole plasm, already present at one end of the fertilized egg.
▪ The elephant not only has its beginning in a single cell, a fertilized egg.
▪ Its end, meaning its goal or end-product, is the production of single cells, fertilized eggs of the next generation.
▪ If implantation of a fertilized egg does not occur, this lining breaks down and is expelled from the uterus.
▪ Development begins with the fertilized egg, which is a single cell, giving rise to a number of smaller cells.
fresh
▪ Dinner makes excellent use of fresh locally grown and home produce; fresh eggs, fruit and meat all feature.
▪ I knew then from their behavior that their nest was near, and that it would now or soon have fresh eggs.
▪ Hard boil the fresh quails' eggs for 3min, cool slightly and shell. 2.
▪ This extends to not allowing your children to lick the egg beaters after making a cake if you used fresh eggs.
▪ This morning I boiled her a nice fresh egg, and she ate the lot.
▪ Three fresh eggs lay in a small bowl on the top shelf in Freda's kitchen.
▪ From hand-churned butter and fresh eggs to delicate salad leaves and edible flowers, the enterprise is underpinned by the farm.
▪ Your eggs are fresher than shop eggs.
fried
▪ Foodstuff varies from fried egg and chips to sausage rolls and sponge cakes.
▪ He kept their backsides so warm you could have fried eggs and bacon on them!
▪ Aunt Edie served up a supper of fried eggs, bacon and tomatoes with bread and butter.
▪ His fried eggs were a bit scrappy: they needed a woman's touch.
golden
▪ I thought your flat feet were firmly on the ground and your grubby little fingers always ready to grab the golden egg.
▪ The next time up the stalk, Jack stole a hen that laid golden eggs.
▪ High taxes kill the goose that lays the golden eggs.
▪ On his way out, Jack stole the goose that laid the golden eggs.
▪ The most popular story concerning her conception was that a golden egg tumbled out of Chaos in the beginning of the world.
▪ An ugly duckling, like a printing press, was transformed into a well-behaved goose laying golden eggs.
▪ They killed Goosie Lucy so now there will be no interest payments from her - and no more golden eggs.
▪ The market for golden eggs has dried up completely.
poached
▪ Perhaps she had been foolish to remain here, eating a poached egg and spinach off a tray.
▪ Top each half with a poached egg and half the tomato mixture; sprinkle each half with cheese.
▪ I should like poached eggs, darling, on anchovy toast and strawberries with kirsch.
▪ Eyes like red poached eggs rolled in their hollows.
▪ As he rather gloomily put together a breakfast of poached egg and grilled bacon he felt neither particularly healthy nor particularly clear-minded.
scrambled
▪ While recalling their moments upstairs, he could speak of scrambled eggs.
▪ Crawfish omelette Cajun omelettes are more like scrambled eggs.
▪ He prepared a cafetière of black coffee and a breakfast of scrambled eggs and bacon.
▪ I like a light lunch, perhaps scrambled eggs and salmon.
▪ Chop a little cooked ham, tomato or mushroom into a scrambled egg or an omelette as a variation.
▪ Paul Lane came back with two plates of scrambled eggs and buttered toast.
▪ The ham was desiccated, the scrambled eggs congealed, and the fruit juice fermented.
▪ I also make wonderful creamy scrambled eggs and gooey-centred omelettes.
■ NOUN
easter
▪ Otherwise it will be like an Easter egg hunt.
▪ How much fun the Easter egg hunt every year on the lawn.
▪ Apparently Mr Tares retired at the end of last week. Easter eggs in all the windows now, expensive.
▪ Julius danced soberly with his Easter egg.
▪ The pool will be opened on Sunday and there will be an Easter egg hung at 2.30 p.m.
▪ Planned events include a fantasy role-playing war games day, an Easter egg hunt and motorcycle display.
▪ My lunch has been planned to allow a morning spent at church, hunting for Easter eggs or admiring the daffodils.
▪ Find out how to decorate your own Easter eggs on pages 30-31.
yolk
▪ They had an impression of very red cheeks and moist yellow hair smeared over the scalp like egg yolk.
▪ Whisk egg yolks and sugar in medium bowl to blend.
▪ Take off the heat and whisk in the yoghurt and the egg yolk.
▪ Beat in egg yolks and vanilla.
▪ Add egg yolks and cream to well.
▪ With a mixer, beat the egg yolks with the bread mixture and garlic.
▪ He wore a baggy tracksuit with what looked like a jam stain down the front and egg yolk all down the sleeve.
▪ Mix the egg yolks with the sour cream and pour over the peaches.
■ VERB
add
▪ Melt butter in a pan, add caster sugar and dark brown sugar, mix and allow to cool. Add eggs.
▪ Scrape down sides. Add egg, cover and whirl an additional minute.
▪ During that time he may mate with other females, and add the eggs to his collection.
▪ Heat oil to 375 degrees and add egg rolls, flap side down.
▪ Gradually add the egg, beating well after each inclusion, until the mixture is shiny and of piping consistency. 4.
▪ Melt chocolate, best done on a double boiler, and add it to the egg white mixture.
▪ Form mixture into mound and make large well in center. Add egg yolks and cream to well.
▪ Remove pan from heat, add the hard-cooked eggs, and set aside until eggs reach the color you desire.
beat
▪ Make a well in the centre of the mixture and add the melted margarine and the beaten egg.
▪ Add the remaining flour mixture to the shortening mixture alternating with the beaten egg.
▪ Let mixture stand 15 minutes. Beat eggs and sugar with fork in separate bowl.
▪ Combine beaten egg with mayonnaise in small bowl.
▪ Cream the margarine and sugar and beat in the eggs.
▪ At medium speed, beat in eggs, one at a time, beating for two minutes after each addition.
▪ She made herself a cup of tea, cut bread for toast, beat up eggs with grated cheese in a pan.
▪ In another large bowl, beat butter and sugar with an electric mixer until fluffy. Beat in egg yolks and vanilla.
boil
▪ Devil eggs Hard boil a dozen eggs and cut them in half lengthways.
▪ Well, I love boiled eggs every day.
▪ I could barely boil an egg.
▪ In that case, the golden yolks of our boiled eggs were truly golden and so are we now.
▪ It's like boiling an egg, easy.
▪ That means at least longer than it takes to boil an egg.
▪ Strain off the liquid and use instead of water to boil the eggs for 10 minutes.
break
▪ Who breaks the egg will find the yolk.
▪ Death came for humans before their dreams hatched; death was the fox who came early and broke the eggs open.
▪ It keeps the tension going until the Tsarevich breaks the egg and thus signifies the death of Kostchei.
▪ The diet was too severe and I broke it by having eggs and fish.
▪ To make a soufflé, you have to break eggs - to make socialism, you have to break heads!
▪ Rub butter into flour. Break egg into flour and add cream.
▪ A chick knows how to break out of its egg.
▪ As many as eleven thousand people have been killed because they refused to break their eggs at the smaller end.
fertilize
▪ Once deposited, she leaves the nest and he immediately fertilizes the eggs.
▪ Their eggs become female only if fertilized.
▪ Only one sperm fertilizes an egg, but it evidently requires the backup of many millions of others.
▪ He fertilizes her eggs and makes a hurried exit.
▪ Thousands of fertilized sea urchin eggs, starfish and blue clams returned to Earth with the astronauts.
▪ The male will immediately follow behind, fertilizing the eggs.
▪ For a pregnancy to occur, one of those sperm must penetrate and fertilize the egg.
fry
▪ Adam fried himself an egg and a couple of rashers of bacon.
▪ Instant scrambled eggs, frozen fried eggs, canned eggnog, and many other convenient egg foods are being market tested.
▪ One could have fried some eggs on the pitching rubber Sunday at Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium.
▪ She fried a couple of eggs, then turned on the heat.
▪ He ate rice and a fried egg three times a day, keeping track of the days by counting the meals.
▪ On the same block they went into a cafeteria and ordered two fried eggs for Isaac.
▪ We sat at the kitchen table eating bread, cheese, fried eggs and drank coffee.
▪ Mr B made lots of toast and then fried eggs, sunny-side up.
hatch
▪ She says the adult birds can't be trusted at this stage to hatch the eggs properly.
▪ They ran up and down my legs, covered my face, hatched their eggs in my hair.
▪ An electric yoghurt-maker is also a good place in which to hatch the eggs.
▪ Certainly, reed warblers with an additional egg in the clutch often fail to hatch all their own eggs.
▪ And, behind the scenes in some superstores, plans are being hatched to ban battery eggs.
▪ The eggs develop extremely rapidly; within a remarkable 24 hours of being laid, the eggs will have hatched.
▪ A large jar is ideal for hatching the eggs.
▪ Rare and widespread flooding gave the locusts the damp soil they need to hatch new eggs.
lay
▪ There is one other bizarre adaptation used by the female cuckoo in laying her eggs.
▪ Different kinds of wasps will then come to lay their eggs on the grubs, and woodpeckers will later feast on both.
▪ In his own colorful expression, he had laid a monstrous egg.
▪ These mate, fly away and the females find new plants to lay eggs on.
▪ And they mate, laying their eggs in the shallow tepid pools.
▪ Chickens bred for meat lay fewer eggs.
▪ A silver-washed fritillary butterfly dipped between the tufts of grass to find the violet leaves on which she lays her eggs.
▪ In toads, for instance, the males sit on the backs of females for a few days before the female lays her eggs.
produce
▪ She must do so in order to produce eggs.
▪ The ovaries will begin to produce their eggs and discharge them, normally one at a time about once a month.
▪ She became pregnant after taking fertility drugs, which caused her to produce a number of eggs.
▪ Muffin has never produced offspring; she did produce infertile eggs while at the Ueno Zoo.
▪ During the next few days, she may produce 25,000 eggs.
▪ Individuals feed and grow slowly, spending longer at each growth stage and ultimately producing fewer eggs.
scramble
▪ The year before he'd had scrambled eggs for Christmas dinner and no presents.
▪ He makes the best grilled cheese sandwiches and scrambled eggs because of his fearless use of butter.
▪ She went into the kitchen, scrambled three eggs and returned to the living room to eat them.
▪ Or, even easier, scramble some eggs and grate some of the heavenly fungus over the top.
▪ I am the one scrambling eggs for dinner and sitting on porches with friends while the kids roam the neighborhood on bikes.
▪ Instant scrambled eggs, frozen fried eggs, canned eggnog, and many other convenient egg foods are being market tested.
▪ Precooked and frozen scrambled eggs with sausage are one combination of ready-to-eat breakfasts being marketed.
separate
▪ This separates the individual eggs from the clump, and I spread them out in a layer one egg thick.
▪ Need to know how to catch a mouse? Separate egg whites?
▪ The failure to separate the egg shells from the live shrimp may prove disastrous.
throw
▪ By the way, I also grew out of throwing rotten duck eggs at noisy bikers.
▪ In London he had joined gangs who had thrown rotten tomatoes, eggs or whatever was at hand into Salvation Army meetings.
▪ Sebastian and I had thrown eggs at Enoch Powell in Salford after his first racist speech.
whisk
▪ Add this mixture to the dry ingredients and beat well. Whisk 2 egg whites until firm and fold into the mixture.
▪ Remove from heat. Whisk egg yolks and sugar in medium bowl to blend.
▪ She dropped the flimsy pages on to the table-top, concentrated on whisking two egg yolks in a china bowl.
▪ Make the egg wash by whisking the egg and the water thoroughly together, and lightly brush the mixture on the dough.
▪ Pour the custard over. Whisk the egg whites until stiff, then gradually add the caster sugar.
▪ Salt and pepper the fish fillets. Whisk egg white with a fork a few times in a small bowl.
▪ Freeze until nearly firm. Whisk 4 egg whites until lightly stiff.
▪ Fold in the remaining cream with a large metal spoon. 3 Lightly whisk the egg white; fold into chocolate mixture.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a chicken and egg situation/problem etc
▪ It's a chicken and egg situation really.
curate's egg
eggs over easy
▪ He orders eggs over easy, bacon and sliced tomatoes.
▪ My father died of eggs-three eggs over easy every day.
kill the goose that lays the golden egg
▪ High taxes kill the goose that lays the golden eggs.
scramble an egg
▪ He makes the best grilled cheese sandwiches and scrambled eggs because of his fearless use of butter.
▪ I am the one scrambling eggs for dinner and sitting on porches with friends while the kids roam the neighborhood on bikes.
▪ Instant scrambled eggs, frozen fried eggs, canned eggnog, and many other convenient egg foods are being market tested.
▪ Precooked and frozen scrambled eggs with sausage are one combination of ready-to-eat breakfasts being marketed.
▪ The year before he'd had scrambled eggs for Christmas dinner and no presents.
teach your grandmother (to suck eggs)
which came first, the chicken or the egg?
you can't make an omelette without breaking eggs
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ We had fried eggs for breakfast.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Brush top of pie with egg.
▪ Her egg will therefore grow into a small, stunted wasp.
▪ In an invasive procedure, a doctor could extract one of her eggs and try to fertilize it in a test tube.
▪ One large egg, for instance, contains about 213 milligrams of cholesterol.
▪ Only after several days does it fuse with the egg and so complete the long process of fertilisation.
▪ The eggs had been microwaved, minus their shells, but with the yolks still intact.
▪ There were the hens to be fed, their eggs to be collected.
II.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a chicken and egg situation/problem etc
▪ It's a chicken and egg situation really.
curate's egg
eggs over easy
▪ He orders eggs over easy, bacon and sliced tomatoes.
▪ My father died of eggs-three eggs over easy every day.
which came first, the chicken or the egg?
you can't make an omelette without breaking eggs
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ So, reading through this book, you feel as thought Alwyn is looking over your shoulder, egging you on.
▪ Sometimes they egg you on, you know.
▪ This may be what some of those egging the freedom fighters on want to happen.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
egg

Gamete \Gam"ete\ (g[a^]m"[=e]t; g[.a]*m[=e]t"; the latter usually in compounds), n. [Gr. gameth` wife, or game`ths husband, fr. gamei^n to marry.] (Biol.) A sexual cell or germ cell having a single set of unpaired chromosomes; a conjugating cell which unites with another of like or unlike character to form a new individual. In Bot., gamete designates esp. the similar sex cells of the lower thallophytes which unite by conjugation, forming a zygospore. The gametes of higher plants are of two sorts, sperm (male) and egg (female); their union is called fertilization, and the resulting zygote an o["o]spore. In Zo["o]l., gamete is most commonly used of the sexual cells of certain Protozoa, though also extended to the germ cells of higher forms.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
egg

mid-14c., egge, mostly in northern England dialect, from Old Norse egg, from Proto-Germanic *ajja(m) (cognates: Old Saxon, Middle Dutch, Dutch, Old High German, German ei, Gothic ada), probably from PIE *owyo-/*oyyo- "egg" (cognates: Old Church Slavonic aja, Russian jajco, Breton ui, Welsh wy, Greek oon, Latin ovum); possibly derived from root *awi- "bird."\n

\nThis Norse-derived northern word vied in Middle English with native cognates eye, eai, from Old English æg, until finally displacing the others after c.1500. Caxton (15c.) writes of a merchant (probably a north-country man) in a public house on the Thames who asked for eggs:And the goode wyf answerde, that she coude speke no frenshe. And the marchaunt was angry, for he also coude speke no frenshe, but wolde have hadde egges, and she understode hym not.She did, however, recognize another customer's request for "eyren." Used of persons from c.1600. Bad egg in the figurative sense is from 1855; bad eggs aren't always obvious to outward view (there was an old proverb, "bad bird, bad egg"). To have egg on (one's) face "look foolish" is attested by 1948.\n\n[Young & Rubincam] realize full well that a crew can sometimes make or break a show. It can do little things to ruin a program or else, by giving it its best, can really get that all-important rating. They are mindful of an emcee of a variety show who already has been tabbed "old egg in your face" because the crew has managed to get him in such awkward positions on the TV screen.

["Billboard," March 5, 1949]

\nEggs Benedict attested by 1898. The figure of speech represented in to have all (one's) eggs in one basket is attested by 1660s.
egg

c.1200, from Old Norse eggja "to goad on, incite," from egg "edge" (see edge (n.)). The unrelated verb meaning "to pelt with (rotten) eggs" is from 1857, from egg (n.). Related: Egged; egging.

Wiktionary
egg

Etymology 1 n. 1 (context zoology countable English) An approximately spherical or ellipsoidal body produced by birds, snakes, insects and other animals, housing the embryo during its development. 2 (context countable English) The '''egg''' of a domestic fowl as an item of food. 3 (context uncountable English) The contents of one or more (hen's usually) eggs as a culinary ingredient, etc. 4 (context biology countable English) The female primary cell, the ovum. vb. 1 To throw '''eggs''' at. 2 To dip in or coat with beaten '''egg''' (cooking). 3 To distort a circular cross-section (as in a tube) to an elliptical or oval shape, either inadvertently or intentionally. Etymology 2

vb. (context obsolete except in egg on English) To encourage, incite.

WordNet
egg
  1. n. animal reproductive body consisting of an ovum or embryo together with nutritive and protective envelopes; especially the thin-shelled reproductive body laid by e.g. female birds

  2. oval reproductive body of a fowl (especially a hen) used as food [syn: eggs]

  3. one of the two male reproductive glands that produce spermatozoa and secrete androgens; "she kicked him in the balls and got away" [syn: testis, testicle, orchis, ball, ballock, bollock, nut]

egg
  1. v. throw eggs at

  2. coat with beaten egg; "egg a schnitzel"

Gazetteer
Wikipedia
Egg (disambiguation)

An egg is an organic vessel in which an embryo begins to develop.

Egg or eggs may also refer to:

Egg

An egg is the organic vessel containing the zygote in which an animal embryo develops until it can survive on its own, at which point the animal hatches. An egg results from fertilization of an ovum. Most arthropods, vertebrates, and mollusks lay eggs, although some do not, such as scorpions and most mammals.

Reptile eggs, bird eggs, and monotreme eggs are laid out of water, and are surrounded by a protective shell, either flexible or inflexible. Eggs laid on land or in nests are usually kept within a favorable temperature range (warm) while the embryo grows. When the embryo is adequately developed it hatches, i.e. breaks out of the egg's shell. Some embryos have a temporary egg tooth with which to crack, pip, or break the eggshell or covering.

The largest recorded egg is from a whaleshark, and was in size; whale shark eggs normally hatch within the mother. At and up to , the ostrich egg is the largest egg of any living bird, though the extinct elephant bird and some dinosaurs laid larger eggs. The bee hummingbird produces the smallest known bird egg, which weighs half of a gram (around 0.02 oz). The eggs laid by some reptiles and most fish can be even smaller, and those of insects and other invertebrates can be much smaller still.

Reproductive structures similar to the egg in other kingdoms are termed " spores," or in spermatophytes " seeds," or in gametophytes "egg cells".

Egg (band)
See also The Egg (band) for the electronic dance music band formed in the 1990s.

Egg were an English progressive rock band formed in January 1969.

Egg (magazine)

Egg was a style magazine for gyaru fashion, distributed in Japan. It featured photos of ganguro girls and synopses of their tastes and popular trends. The magazine also usually had photos of the newest fashions, where to buy them, latest hairstyles, cell phones, and make up tips. It also had candid photos of ganguro girls on the streets of Japan, similar to Fruits magazine. Egg had its own models which starred in every magazine. Due to the decline of Gyaru popularity, the magazine shut down with the last issue on 31 May 2014.

Egg (chair)

The Egg is a chair designed by Arne Jacobsen in 1958 for the Radisson SAS hotel in Copenhagen, Denmark. It is manufactured by Republic of Fritz Hansen.

The Egg was designed in a typical Jacobsen style, using state-of-the-art material.

It is believed to be inspired by Eero Saarinen's "Womb chair", from which it borrows some traits.

Related to the Egg is the Swan chair and, to some degree, many of Jacobsen's plywood chairs such as "7", the Ant, the Cigar, the Grand Prix-chair, the Pot, the Drop and the Giraffe.

The Egg (like the Swan) was also designed as a couch. While the Swan couch is still in production, only a handful of Egg couches have ever been made. A few were made for the Radisson Hotel, and a few years back, some were made as a "special edition" couch. The price was quite high — about 400 000 DKR, the equivalent of roughly 75 000 USD.

The reason for the limited production of the Egg couch, besides the wish for exclusivity, is the difficulty involved in making it, plus a design flaw: the couch is too big to be covered by two entire cow-hides, which is only just possible with the Egg-chair. This leaves a very visible stitching down the middle of the couch. This problem can, however, be solved by making the upholstery in fabric rather than leather.

According to a New York Times article, the Egg chair has also been used by McDonald's as part of a high-concept redesign of one of its restaurants in London. Furthermore, The Egg is in a McDonald's restaurant in Nørrebrogade, Copenhagen, among other furniture by Arne Jacobsen, although some are imitations.

It was used as the diary room chair in the first UK series of "Big Brother".

The newly renovated Terminal 2 at San Francisco International Airport features the Egg in its boarding area.

Egg (album)

Egg is the 1970 debut album by British prog rock band Egg.

Egg (film)

Egg is a 2007 Turkish drama film directed by Semih Kaplanoğlu. The film is the first instalment of the Yusuf Trilogy, named after the eponymous lead character of the series, which includes Milk and Honey, filmed and released in reverse chronological order. It was shown Directors' Fortnight at the 60th Cannes Film Festival.

Egg (car)

Egg or Egg & Egli was a Swiss car made in business from 1896 to 1919. It was one of the more long-lived early Swiss car makes. It appeared at numerous auto shows and competed in France's annual smash-up derby.

Egg (hieroglyph)

The ancient EgyptianEgg hieroglyph, Gardiner sign listed no. H8, is a portrayal of an oval-shaped egg, tilted at an angle, within the Gardiner signs for parts of birds.

EGG (file format)

The EGG file format is a compressed archive file format that supports for Unicode and intelligent compression algorithms. EGG format is created by ESTsoft and was first applied in their file compression software ALZip.

The filename extension used by EGG is .egg . If an EGG archive is split into multiple smaller files, those files use the .egg extension by placing .volX (X for sequence number starting from 1) ahead of it, i.e. .vol1.egg, .vol2.egg, .vol3.egg and so on.

Usage examples of "egg".

Fifty eggs well fried will yield about five ounces of this oil, which is acrid, and so enduringly liquid that watch-makers use it for lubricating the axles and pivots of their most delicate wheels.

Through the ripples of the water Addle could see the sun quivering like the yolk of an egg.

It was a little amusing to me that I could speak with some authority to skilled and experienced agriculturists, who felt our rivalry at Mark lane, but who did not dream that with the third great move of Australia towards the markets of the world through cold storage we could send beef, mutton, lamb, poultry, eggs, and all kinds of fruit to the consumers of Europe, and especially of England and its metropolis.

Egged on by Aiken, she had tested her ability by snooping into Stein, intrigued by the apparent helplessness of the sleeping giant.

There the true gods led him to the subterranean pool where eyeless, albescent fish swam around the clutch of huge eggs, as hard as the finest armor, left there countless centuries past.

Catarrh of any membrane, when the discharge is rich in albumin, transparent, like white of egg before it is cooked.

Seregil and Alec warmed themselves gratefully at the cheerful blaze on the hearth while their host shuffled about with practiced efficiency, setting out bread, soup, and boiled eggs for them at the scrubbed wooden table.

When the spy master sprinkled alegar over an egg and held it in the light of a particular lamp, the powder rose like mist.

When she added of yellow gossypol to the alegar, the mist became a face and the egg became a short-lived conduit between the spy master and her spy.

Drifting like shadows across the ground the Amar crept toward the Egg.

Red cree lacked the medicinal quality of the blue in which, partly because of its chemical reaction to the ammoniated air and partly due to the latent eggs it harbored, lay the curative power so much in demand on Earth.

I am just now, but I shall be all right when I have distilled the whites of eggs, one by one, into your amorous soul.

Sudarat and her boys are going to come home with a hold full of early angiosperms and dinosaur eggs.

McWatt was deeply impressed with Milo, who, to the amusement of Corporal Snark, his mess sergeant, was already buying eggs for seven cents apiece and selling them for five cents.

Milo could buy eggs in Malta for seven cents apiece and sell them at a profit in Pianosa for five cents.