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Crossword clues for cook

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
cook
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a cooked/fried breakfast (=bacon, egg, toast etc)
▪ Do you feel like having a cooked breakfast?
a cooking apple
catering/restaurant/cooking facilities
▪ The rooms all have cooking facilities and a fridge.
cook fish
▪ I think I’ll cook fish tonight.
cook sth over a fire
▪ They cooked strips of meat over a wood fire.
cooked
▪ How will I know when the meat is cooked?
cooking apple
cooking chocolate (=chocolate to use in cooking)
▪ Melt the cooking chocolate and spread it over the tray.
cooking instructions
▪ The cooking instructions can be found on the side of the packet.
cooking oil
cooking tips
▪ Most recipes come with added cooking tips.
cook/make a meal (also prepare a mealformal)
▪ Who cooks most of the meals?
cook/prepare food
▪ I have to cook some food for this evening.
do the shopping/cleaning/ironing/cooking etc
▪ Who does the cooking in your family?
home cooking
▪ good old-fashioned home cooking
make/cook dinner
▪ I offered to cook dinner.
short-order cook
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
through
▪ Fry or grill the steaks in their own juices until they are cooked through and golden brown. 2.
▪ Test one to see if center is cooked through.
▪ Fry fish in batches until golden and cooked through, turning occasionally. 6 Serve with chips and minted peas.
▪ Simmer until livers are just cooked through, 3 to 4 minutes.
▪ To make sure the meat is cooked through, you should use a meat thermometer.
▪ Bake in a 350-degree oven for 20 minutes or until cooked through.
▪ Grill for 5-10 minutes, turning occasionally until the bacon is crisp and sausages are cooked through.
▪ Bake at 375 degrees for 25 to 30 minutes or until cooked through.
up
▪ And there's more to be cooked up yet.
▪ As for new ideas, yes, the Apple folks cooked up a thick stew of them.
▪ A real love song is infinitely more appropriate for Christmas than a trashy song cooked up as a commercial gimmick.
▪ I guess all this shows that Wente can cook up a pretty good deal as well.
▪ And you can use these more unusual varieties to cook up some tasty and nourishing dishes.
▪ This is no disgrace, to cook up beans and cornbread and make it last.
▪ I have vetoed other business arrangements you have cooked up - nothing new about that!
▪ And you can use your own scanned-in photos or designs you cooked up in other programs.
■ NOUN
breakfast
▪ Soon I saw a small hut where an old man was cooking his breakfast over a fire.
▪ When I rose at five Peter had already finished cooking both breakfast and lunch.
▪ I haven't cooked a large breakfast.
▪ Aida, our maid, arrived to cook me breakfast.
▪ It would take a time to catch and then she could heat the water &038; cook Alisdair's breakfast.
▪ When guests awaken, Hodges will be at the ready to cook breakfast.
▪ She went down to the kitchen and cooked herself a large breakfast.
▪ Ordinarily, he would have been down in the kitchen at that hour, cooking breakfast and preparing to start the day.
chicken
▪ Tropicana - cooked diced chicken mixed with sour cream and fresh mango. 5.
▪ While the sauce is cooking, carve the chicken and place on a warm platter.
▪ Eastern Promise - cooked, diced chicken, celery and walnuts mixed together with curried mayonnaise. 7.
▪ Ask an adult to cut as much of the meat away from a cooked chicken leg bone as possible. 2.
▪ There had been a dinner cooked, turkey or chicken with sausages, roast potatoes and stuffing.
dinner
▪ Make believe dinner is being cooked by a group of under 5 children in the playhouse.
▪ On others she presided over family dinners cooked on Sunday afternoons for children who were now gray with age.
▪ There had been a dinner cooked, turkey or chicken with sausages, roast potatoes and stuffing.
▪ Especially that marvellous dinner you cooked.
▪ He cooks dinner and he cooks breakfast, things like that.
food
▪ A shelf allows more food to be cooked at the same time, though the cooking times will be longer.
▪ As long as I could get some food down him I cooked whatever he liked.
▪ The food must be properly cooked to ensure the diners don't go down with food poisoning.
▪ In the kitchen, the food continues to be cooked on a charcoal fire, the fuel of the very poor.
▪ The food is freshly cooked using local ingredients.
▪ The fact that foods can be cooked in olestra is an important point for snack manufacturers.
▪ The food is freshly cooked using produce from the kitchen garden and local produce as much as possible.
▪ I got my own food cooking in my room thins afternoon.
lunch
▪ Middle-class families get their investment back in two to three years if they cook half their lunch every day in the cooker.
▪ When I rose at five Peter had already finished cooking both breakfast and lunch.
▪ She was sweeping out the yard while Bella cooked the lunch and sang to the baby.
▪ I usually cooked Sunday lunch after we got back from church.
▪ She had cooked the lunch in it.
▪ And I cooked this superb lunch.
▪ She was worried because she knew that the Copleys were waiting for her to cook lunch.
▪ As for Christmas Day itself, don't panic if you're cooking a big turkey lunch for the very first time.
meal
▪ If you want potatoes with your meal, cook them more often as boiled or jacket potatoes rather than as chips.
▪ Each leg involved an overnight in berths made up by Tokimo and meals he cooked.
▪ Perfect for quick meals, it cooks and browns so the food tastes good and looks good, too.
▪ We had all gathered to eat a meal cooked by Rex.
▪ The meals are cooked at the pub and taken down the road in special insulated containers.
▪ Back home almost every meal is cooked from fresh food.
▪ His suits always went to the cleaner's on time, and his meals were always cooked for him.
▪ He came and had a glass of wine with us while we ate the meal he'd cooked.
meat
▪ Set aside and then cook your meat and fish.
▪ Tightly wrap or store in covered containers all cooked meat, poultry, and fish and shellfish and refrigerate them promptly.
▪ We further demonstrate our human uniqueness by cooking the meat.
▪ Any leftover cooked buffalo meat from roasts can be added just long enough to warm it thoroughly.
▪ They cooked strips of its meat over a fierce wood fire, but the old man's appetite was small.
▪ Perhaps it should be noted that many persons will think that three ounces of cooked lean meat make a stingy portion.
▪ If you thaw by microwave, cook the meat immediately.
▪ Jerky is dried, not cooked, meat and can be easily made at home with any of the red meat game.
oven
▪ The food is then pushed out of its protective package and left in its serving dish to be cooked in a hot-air oven.
▪ Cover and cook in preheated oven for 45 minutes.
▪ Cover and cook in a preheated oven at 180C, 350F or Gas Mark 4 for 20-30 minutes.
▪ Alternatively, to cook in a conventional oven, place the chicken and mushrooms in an ovenproof dish.
▪ Cover and cook in the oven for twenty minutes or so. 4.
▪ Who would want to cook with an oven such as this?
▪ Four thick slices cooked slowly in the oven in a small covered pyrex casserole with salt and black pepper.
pan
▪ Blend the cornflour with a tablespoon of water, add to the pan and cook the sauce until thickened.
▪ In a large saute pan, cook the pork in batches over high heat until browned on all sides.
▪ Place in a hot heavy-based pan or wok and cook until lightly browned, stirring occasionally.
▪ He covers the frying pan and cooks his sandwich until the bottom gets golden and crisp and then flips it over.
▪ Remove the liver from the pan and reserve the cooking liquor.
▪ Add sherry to saute pan with cooking liquid, simmer briefly, and adjust seasoning.
▪ Heat oil in non-stick frying pan and cook sandwich for 3 mins, pressing down firmly with fish slice before turning over.
▪ In almost all instances, cook fresh mushrooms quickly in a little butter or olive oil in a hot saute pan.
pot
▪ A friend of his father said he could get Isaac a job making cooking pots in Ivory Coast.
▪ I just love to cook a pot of beans.
▪ Without running water, women wash their cooking pots in the street.
▪ While the meat barbecued and the cooking pots steamed, the captain explained to me the use of a large earthenware jar.
▪ Too big for a cooking pot, too small for a bath, Mrs Kim-Soon decided.
rice
▪ While the Quorn mixture is cooking, cook the rice according to the instructions.
▪ Our kitchenware consisted of two pots, one for cooking rice and the other for soup or stew.
▪ Place cooked rice sticks in a paper bag and store at room temperature until ready to use.
▪ Pour the Quorn mixture over the cooked rice and serve immediately.
▪ Add the cooked brown rice, honey, and buttermilk and mix.
▪ Check the seasoning of the sauce, pile the cooked rice on to a serving dish and pour the chicken mixture over.
▪ Our attempts to save fresh water by mixing in seawater when cooking rice or noodles had not had much success.
supper
▪ Mrs McGill fries bread for breakfast, takes Chas to bed, cooks supper, lights oil lamp and nurses Nana.
▪ They had cooked groats for supper.
▪ While Janine and John cooked supper, he led us on a trek through the woods and around the two-mile meadow.
▪ I was starting to think about cooking some supper when I heard music.
▪ He left them cooking each other supper and drinking brandy.
▪ After dark, I got under cover to cook my supper.
▪ Time and again he had asked her to cook them for his supper, when she could at least bake them in a hot oven.
▪ Little groups stood about talking of the war or Brighton or what they were going to cook for supper.
■ VERB
continue
▪ Mix well and continue to cook over a low heat for a further 20 minutes or until the meat is tender.
▪ If stocks need to be further reduced because of storage limitations, continue cooking at a gentle simmer.
▪ Add a can of liver spread and continue cooking for five minutes.
▪ Turn and continue cooking on the other side, approximately 4 to 5 minutes.
▪ As she settled back down it continued to cook and burst into flames.
▪ Deglaze pan with Armagnac and continue cooking for 30 seconds.
▪ Add the salt and garam masala and continue cooking over a low heat for 5-7 minutes.
▪ Madame Wong continues to cook every day, and is still inventing dishes.
learn
▪ Kate loved learning to cook for them.
▪ The kitchen was where Ralph spent his free time too, learning to cook.
▪ They learn to cook for the family while standing on a chair by the stove.
▪ Now that there were no servants, Helen was learning to cook.
▪ The broccoli that no one in the South had learned to cook, only to boil?
▪ They are very learned about cooking in San Francisco-people seem to expect as a matter of course things which we consider luxurious.
▪ Instead of sitting around feeling sorry for herself, she decided to learn to cook.
▪ As a child she learned cooking at her grandmother's side, and, indeed, a toque was born.
like
▪ I like to cook recipes that foolproof, able to wait or take a moment to finish before serving.
▪ If you like your potatoes cooked from scratch, experiment with Yukon Golds.
▪ Evening meals are by prior arrangement only, and generally Marypen likes to cook for her guests three times a week.
▪ But a country pub is where I'd really like to cook.
love
▪ Kate loved learning to cook for them.
▪ I just love to cook a pot of beans.
▪ Jack loves my cooking but I suspect that's because he so rarely gets it.
▪ They both loved to cook, and especially loved to cook what they considered healthy food.
▪ I love to cook and bake.
start
▪ I was starting to think about cooking some supper when I heard music.
▪ The women used to start cooking at sunup, here at the house or down at camp.
▪ Before he'd started cooking it he thought he wasn't hungry.
▪ Irene: Well, when we got married we started cooking the way Ma did, all of us.
▪ Ammunition from the burning aircraft on the flight deck starts cooking off, spraying the deck with shrapnel.
▪ Always start cooking meat with the fat or skin side down.
▪ These were the years I started to cook.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
assistant manager/director/cook etc
▪ Employment Hotel managers and assistant managers held about 105, 000 wage and salary jobs in 1994.
▪ He started at the Town House in 1991, working as assistant manager from 1997 to 1999.
▪ He worked his way up from kitchen porter, assistant cook, employment at a casino and by painting and decorating.
▪ Hotel managers and assistant managers strive to ensure their guests will have a pleasant stay.
▪ One of his teammates will be former Darlington assistant manager Tony McAndrew.
▪ She and assistant manager Lance Green had been instructed to improve profits at the expense of Burger King.
▪ The, the, the late director was pushed and knocked down I guess when he was assistant director.
▪ West Ham's assistant manager Harry Redknapp has been another victim of a fans' fit-up.
chief cook and bottle washer
dance/sing/cook etc up a storm
▪ She danced up a storm at an Alexandria, Va., club where the Desperadoes played right after the election.
▪ They are blowing trumpets singing up a storm and waving as they walk past us.
ethnic cooking/fashion/design etc
ready cooked/prepared etc
▪ After the church service he was conducted to a house ready prepared, where a regal feast was laid before him.
▪ Anyone who has given online demonstrations and experienced systems breakdown, will appreciate the advantage of having alternative ready prepared demonstration material!
▪ Brownie albums were provided, with spaces ready prepared for slotting in a sequence of the snapshots.
▪ But fresh potatoes are less expensive than many of the dehydrated and ready prepared and frozen products.
▪ Freezer: Pack of steaks, beefburgers, fish-fingers, peas, runner beans, ready cooked curry meal, cod.
▪ Microwave combination ovens can successfully prime cook fresh and frozen foods and regenerate ready cooked dishes from chilled and frozen.
wet through/cooked through etc
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Cover and cook slowly until beets are tender, stirring occasionally.
▪ Cover and simmer until the chicken finishes cooking.
▪ Do you want me to cook some pasta or something?
▪ I'm just too tired to cook after work.
▪ I usually cook a big meal on Sundays.
▪ In a large sauté pan, cook the bacon until crisp.
▪ Mom always says no when I offer to cook.
▪ Prick the potatoes with a fork before cooking them.
▪ The last time she cooked a meal for us we really enjoyed it.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And the three hundred horsepower presumably needed to cook and dry the pulp?
▪ I always tried to teach Auguste to cook from Mr Dolby's recipes.
▪ Many people are timid about eating pork cooked less than well-done.
▪ Some Sharp models track the progress of the food as it cooks by assessing the moisture level.
▪ Then they killed one of the prisoners and began to cook their terrible meal.
▪ Will you be cooking for yourself, communally or in turns? 4.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
assistant
▪ He worked his way up from kitchen porter, assistant cook, employment at a casino and by painting and decorating.
▪ The assistant cooks toyed with salamanders and spits without interest.
▪ The assistant cooks heaved on the rope and the cook pot lurched slowly backwards.
good
▪ He is a good cook, isn't he?
▪ My aunt and I are good cooks.
▪ Mrs Wood was a very good cook.
▪ The best cooks never submerge an iron skillet in dishwater.
▪ Nils may be a good cook, but his time will be better spent away from the galley.
▪ She is not a good cook.
▪ Zelah was a good cook and he enjoyed the meal.
▪ Of motivation to get good grades in school or to be a good cook?
great
▪ She lived in the country with her husband and she was a great cook.
▪ Father was a great cook and seemed to use every pot in San Francisco.
▪ My mom and aunts were great cooks.
▪ Janie had become a great cook and provided us pleasure in her meals.
▪ Not that he was a great cook, of course.
wonderful
▪ She was such a hard worker and a wonderful cook.
■ NOUN
book
▪ You have to get out the cook books and the fancy attachments for the food processor.
home
▪ The increasing emphasis on meatless meals in restaurants and in cookbooks also provides inspiration to home cooks minding a budget.
▪ No home cook could achieve the quick sear of the restaurant's special oven, which reaches about 1,500 degrees.
▪ This might, in part, explain the resistance many home cooks have to making fresh stocks.
▪ Taking careful note, Zahler then adapted the recipes for the home cook and put together this beguiling book.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Frank's a very good cook.
▪ Jane used to work as a cook in an Italian restaurant.
▪ She's a cook for one of the airlines.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ This column takes a look at local cooks, their culinary likes and dislikes and favorite recipes.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
cook

Peacock \Pea"cock`\ (p[=e]"k[o^]k`), n. [OE. pecok. Pea- in this word is from AS. pe['a], p[=a]wa, peacock, fr. L. pavo, prob. of Oriental origin; cf. Gr. taw`s, taw^s, Per. t[=a]us, t[=a]wus, Ar. t[=a]w[=u]s. See Cock the bird.]

  1. (Zo["o]l.) The male of any pheasant of the genus Pavo, of which at least two species are known, native of Southern Asia and the East Indies.

    Note: The upper tail coverts, which are long and capable of erection, are each marked with a black spot bordered by concentric bands of brilliant blue, green, and golden colors. The common domesticated species is Pavo cristatus. The Javan peacock ( Pavo muticus) is more brilliantly colored than the common species.

  2. In common usage, the species in general or collectively; a peafowl.

    Peacock butterfly (Zo["o]l.), a handsome European butterfly ( Hamadryas Io) having ocelli like those of peacock.

    Peacock fish (Zo["o]l.), the European blue-striped wrasse ( Labrus variegatus); -- so called on account of its brilliant colors. Called also cook wrasse and cook.

    Peacock pheasant (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of handsome Asiatic pheasants of the genus Polyplectron. They resemble the peacock in color.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
cook

Old English coc, from Vulgar Latin cocus "cook," from Latin coquus, from coquere "to cook, prepare food, ripen, digest, turn over in the mind" from PIE root *pekw- "to cook" (cognates: Oscan popina "kitchen," Sanskrit pakvah "cooked," Greek peptein, Lithuanian kepti "to bake, roast," Old Church Slavonic pecenu "roasted," Welsh poeth "cooked, baked, hot"). Germanic languages had no one native term for all types of cooking, and borrowed the Latin word (Old Saxon kok, Old High German choh, German Koch, Swedish kock).There is the proverb, the more cooks the worse potage. [Gascoigne, 1575]

cook

late 14c., from cook (n.); the figurative sense of "to manipulate, falsify, doctor" is from 1630s. Related: Cooked, cooking. To cook with gas is 1930s jive talk.\n\n

Wiktionary
cook

Etymology 1 n. 1 (context cooking English) A person who prepares food for a living. 2 (context cooking English) The head cook of a manor house 3 (context slang English) One who manufactures certain illegal drugs, especially meth. 4 A fish, the European striped wrasse. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To prepare (food) for eating by heating it, often by combining it with other ingredients. 2 (context intransitive English) To prepare (unspecified) food for eating by heating it, often by combining it with other ingredients. 3 (context intransitive English) To be being cooked. 4 (context intransitive figuratively English) To be uncomfortably hot. 5 (context transitive slang English) To hold onto (a grenade) briefly after igniting the fuse, so that it explodes almost immediately after being thrown. 6 To concoct or prepare. 7 To tamper with or alter; to cook up. Etymology 2

vb. (context obsolete rare English) To make the noise of the cuckoo. Etymology 3

vb. (context UK dialect obsolete English) To throw.

WordNet
cook
  1. v. prepare a hot meal; "My husband doesn't cook"

  2. prepare for eating by applying heat; "Cook me dinner, please"; "can you make me an omelette?"; "fix breakfast for the guests, please" [syn: fix, ready, make, prepare]

  3. transform and make suitable for consumption by heating; "These potatoes have to cook for 20 minutes"

  4. transform by heating; "The apothecary cooked the medicinal mixture in a big iron kettle"

  5. fake or falsify; "Fudge the figures"; "cook the books"; "falsify the data" [syn: fudge, manipulate, fake, falsify, wangle, misrepresent]

cook
  1. n. someone who cooks food

  2. English navigator who claimed the east coast of Australia for Britain and discovered several Pacific islands (1728-1779) [syn: James Cook, Captain Cook, Captain James Cook]

Gazetteer
Cook, NE -- U.S. village in Nebraska
Population (2000): 322
Housing Units (2000): 175
Land area (2000): 0.173598 sq. miles (0.449617 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 0.173598 sq. miles (0.449617 sq. km)
FIPS code: 10390
Located within: Nebraska (NE), FIPS 31
Location: 40.510526 N, 96.161506 W
ZIP Codes (1990): 68329
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Cook, NE
Cook
Cook, MN -- U.S. city in Minnesota
Population (2000): 622
Housing Units (2000): 302
Land area (2000): 0.787253 sq. miles (2.038976 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 0.787253 sq. miles (2.038976 sq. km)
FIPS code: 13006
Located within: Minnesota (MN), FIPS 27
Location: 47.852989 N, 92.686755 W
ZIP Codes (1990): 55723
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Cook, MN
Cook
Cook -- U.S. County in Illinois
Population (2000): 5376741
Housing Units (2000): 2096121
Land area (2000): 945.680365 sq. miles (2449.300798 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 689.360841 sq. miles (1785.436307 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 1635.041206 sq. miles (4234.737105 sq. km)
Located within: Illinois (IL), FIPS 17
Location: 41.837649 N, 87.767817 W
Headwords:
Cook
Cook, IL
Cook County
Cook County, IL
Cook -- U.S. County in Minnesota
Population (2000): 5168
Housing Units (2000): 4708
Land area (2000): 1450.604787 sq. miles (3757.048990 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 1889.112522 sq. miles (4892.778762 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 3339.717309 sq. miles (8649.827752 sq. km)
Located within: Minnesota (MN), FIPS 27
Location: 47.856408 N, 90.497890 W
Headwords:
Cook
Cook, MN
Cook County
Cook County, MN
Cook -- U.S. County in Georgia
Population (2000): 15771
Housing Units (2000): 6558
Land area (2000): 229.018029 sq. miles (593.153947 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 4.203139 sq. miles (10.886080 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 233.221168 sq. miles (604.040027 sq. km)
Located within: Georgia (GA), FIPS 13
Location: 31.154793 N, 83.429366 W
Headwords:
Cook
Cook, GA
Cook County
Cook County, GA
Wikipedia
Cook (surname)

Cook is a surname of English origin. There are several figures named Cook:

Cook (crater)

Cook is a lunar crater that lies in the western part of the Mare Fecunditatis, just to the southeast of the prominent crater Colombo. To the southwest is Monge.

The interior of this crater has been flooded with lava, leaving only a low rim projecting above the surface. This rim is not quite circular, and has a somewhat hexagonal appearance. The low wall is worn in a few places, particularly along the northeastern rim. There is a tiny craterlet called Cook A on the interior floor near the southeast rim.

Cook (profession)

A cook is a person who prepares food for consumption.

A cook is sometimes referred to as a chef, although in the professional kitchen, the terms are not interchangeable.

Cook (domestic worker)

A cook or private chef is a household staff member responsible for food preparation.

Cook

Cook may refer to:

  • The action of cooking, the preparation of food with heat for consumption
  • Chef, a professional proficient in all aspects of food preparation
  • Cook (profession), a professional who prepares food for consumption
  • Cook (domestic worker), a domestic worker who cooks food for his or her employer
  • Cook (surname), a family name (and a list of people with that name)
Cook (Brentford cricketer)

Cook (dates unknown) was an English professional cricketer from Brentford who played in first-class cricket for Middlesex and Brentford Cricket Club during the 1730s. He was "reckoned one of the best bowlers in England".

Usage examples of "cook".

The cooking, I can tell you, kept her nose to the pot, and even if there was nothing in it, even if there was no pot, she had to keep watching that it came aboil just the same.

Sir John Fenwick, Smith, and Cook, to say nothing of the corroborative evidence of Goodman, establish beyond doubt that you were accessorily, though perhaps not actively, guilty of high treason--at this period, I say, there can be little doubt that if you were brought to trial--that is, in the course of next week, as I have heard it rumoured--the result would be fatal, such, in short, as we should all deplore.

Cook the roes for five minutes in salted and acidulated water, drain, cut in two, and arrange around the fish.

Cook three or four large perch for twenty minutes with a bunch of parsley in salted and acidulated water.

English dishes, he was acquainted with the French system of cooking, and did fricandeaus, cutlets, ragouts, and above all, the excellent French soup, which is one of the principal glories of France.

Atari Ado, cooked in half by a Sunjet blast, scrabbling with the last of her strength to get a sidearm to her throat and pull the trigger.

Cooks, New Zealand, and Hawaii all possessed adzes and other cultural features of Eastern Polynesian type.

Tell the cook to prepare cabbage soup and aforce the stew with barley.

The two women disappeared behind the afterclap, the canvas screen at the back of the wagon, and Sarah called for the servants to bring the copper hip bath and buckets of hot water from the cooking fire.

Neb and Pencroft, on whom the functions of cooks naturally devolved, to the one in his quality of Negro, to the other in that of sailor, quickly prepared some broiled agouti, to which they did great justice.

The fire was lighted, and Neb and Pencroft, on whom the functions of cooks naturally devolved, to the one in his quality of Negro, to the other in that of sailor, quickly prepared some broiled agouti, to which they did great justice.

Catarrh of any membrane, when the discharge is rich in albumin, transparent, like white of egg before it is cooked.

Our cooks employ it with vinegar for making the mint sauce which we eat with roast lamb, because of its condimentary virtues as a spice to the immature meat, whilst the acetic acid of the vinegar serves to help dissolve the crude albuminous fibre.

She smiled, watching with satisfaction as Alec tucked in to her cooking.

Miss Ames is an excellent cook, so you could be in for a beatific experience.