Find the word definition

Crossword clues for chop

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
chop
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
chop suey
chop wood
▪ He was chopping wood for the fire.
chopping board
lamb chop/cutlet/stew etc
mutton chop whiskers
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
coarsely
▪ Add the tomatoes and chop until the tomatoes are coarsely chopped.
▪ Remove mushrooms and carefully strain soaking liquid to remove any grit or sand. Coarsely chop mushrooms.
▪ Drain, squeezing out excess moisture, and chop coarsely.
down
▪ Use the axe to chop down the tree on the scarecrow screen. 15.
▪ He could feel his eyebrows declare independence-they saluted, they chopped down, they came together like two fuzzy magnets.
▪ They planted a tree to replace one of the hundreds they'd chopped down to help the war effort.
▪ One day some tree cutters came along and they chopped down his two friends.
▪ The biggest threat is from loss of habitat because the rainforests are being chopped down at such a fast rate.
▪ I was born the son of a woodman who chopped down trees in the forest and sold the wood for a living.
▪ The first day the lad chopped down ten large trees entirely by himself.
▪ Even though the ball is further back in your stance, try not to chop down into the ball.
finely
▪ Grate yellow rind of lemons, and finely chop the walnuts.
▪ Variation: Substitute 8 ounces finely chopped fresh mushrooms, sauteed until browned in one tablespoon oil, for dried mushrooms.
▪ Drain well and chop finely in a food processor or with a knife.
▪ Remove and cut the cloves in half, removing any green core, and chop finely.
off
▪ You're standing on a high cliff, chopped off and adumbrated by the heaving green of the sea.
▪ There is no mention of what happened to the pieces that were chopped off.
▪ He knows he can't win the race with his hands tied behind his back, or his toes chopped off.
▪ Another was so distressed he chopped off three of his fingers in an attempt to get out of the study.
▪ She suddenly decided to have it chopped off.
▪ Those they only use, tie, bind, chop off and leave empty.
▪ One of the corpses appeared to have had an ear chopped off.
▪ I hope they chop off his hairy carrot.
roughly
Roughly chop the pineapple and apricots and quarter the cherries.
Roughly chop the livers and scatter over the duck meat along with the ham.
Roughly chop the watercress and stir into the pan.
up
▪ Do you remember the Mulligan case, old man who chopped up his brother and tied the remains to the Leamings sluice-gates?
▪ The tumors were then chopped up and expanded in laboratory culture dishes.
▪ Wear long sleeves because short sleeves chop up the body line.
▪ The screen and the ornamental woodwork of pulpit, font lid and choir stalls they chopped up for firewood.
▪ This liquid was made by chopping up the roots of an inedible yam which looked like stringy, tough beetroot.
▪ Octopus, chopped up live, and giant water slugs may also be on the menu.
▪ Java Joe and his friend Bic chopped up potatoes and began frying them with onions and garlic in a communal kitchen.
■ NOUN
basil
▪ Garnish with reserved pancetta, chopped basil, and wild mushrooms, if used.,.
cilantro
▪ Drizzle with salsa, sour cream and chopped cilantro.
▪ Garnish with chopped cilantro and pass the sour cream.
head
▪ He chopped his son's head off on the spot.
▪ For weeks we sit down to breakfast and dinner with these chopped heads on top of us.
▪ All we would need to do would be to chop off the head of the price raisers.
mushroom
▪ Saute a selection of mushrooms with butter and chopped shallots and garlic.
parsley
▪ Garnish the Quorn with the chopped parsley and serve chilled on a bed of rice.
▪ Add a small can of chopped tomatoes and some parsley.
pork
▪ I went to work cutting pork chops when I was nine years old.
potato
▪ To transform the spuds, scientists chopped potato leaves into small pieces and scattered them across a laboratory culture dish.
▪ Java Joe and his friend Bic chopped up potatoes and began frying them with onions and garlic in a communal kitchen.
▪ Place chopped and whole potatoes plus all ingredients except peas, parsley, salt and pepper in cooker.
shallot
▪ Saute a selection of mushrooms with butter and chopped shallots and garlic.
stalk
▪ Put the mushrooms to one side and chop the stalks.
tomato
▪ Add the tomatoes and chop until the tomatoes are coarsely chopped.
tree
▪ Use the axe to chop down the tree on the scarecrow screen. 15.
▪ George Washington chopped down the tree, and then he threw away the money.
▪ And there were men chopping at the trees.
▪ A boy chopped the tree into pieces and burned it.
▪ The first day the lad chopped down ten large trees entirely by himself.
▪ Their strength and inertia allowed them to chop small tree branches with ease.
▪ It is the same as swinging an axe to chop down a tree.
▪ I was born the son of a woodman who chopped down trees in the forest and sold the wood for a living.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
chump chop/steak
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ I think my mother chopped the nuts a little finer.
▪ Over 200,000 jobs were chopped from the payrolls in November.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Another three, including a grandmother, were shot dead in their beds, the corpses dragged outside and chopped up.
▪ As soon attempt to slice water with a sword, or chop up the sea.
▪ Firms with shorter names like Boeing do not get chopped off.
▪ He actually chops wood and aids an old woman.
▪ The first day the lad chopped down ten large trees entirely by himself.
▪ You're standing on a high cliff, chopped off and adumbrated by the heaving green of the sea.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
lamb
▪ Apart from the inevitable sausages, there were numerous chicken pieces, lamb chops and cubed steak on skewers.
▪ Faith has asked for two high quality lamb chops and steak.
▪ I collapse over my lamb chops and have to be put to bed.
▪ I cradled the bottom of the paper bag containing my lamb chops.
▪ She heard her sister's complaint and paid no attention. Lamb chops were both nourishing and cheap.
▪ Sometime between the lamb chops and the chocolate mousse, Maestro Domingo presented his illustrious cast.
▪ It's easy to see the fat on a lamb chop - and easy to cut it off.
▪ Then I went up to the store and bought lamb chops for dinner.
mutton
▪ The grill had mutton chops and mash; the buffet ran things like smoked salmon, potted shrimps and corned ox tongue.
▪ They had mutton chops, fried potatoes, and coffee with brandy in it.
pork
▪ Remove all the fat from the pork chops or steaks.
▪ I ordered a double pork chop.
▪ That is why some people adore eating spiders and grubs, whilst others would throw up if fed a pork chop.
▪ We stoke the coals, put on a pot of potatoes, and slap five pork chops on to the grill.
▪ Uncle Philip was laid out on a charcoal grill like a barbecued pork chop.
▪ Steam rises from the kettle and the pork chops sizzle, licked by flames from the dripping, igniting fat.
▪ All during supper, eating a pork chop and cauliflower and mashed potatoes, Stephen had wanted to be alone.
▪ He neglected his fried shrimp and watched Schwartzwalder consume his pork chop, salad, and martinis.
whisker
▪ They smacked of mutton-chop whiskers and paternalism.
■ VERB
lick
▪ Only a few of Wolsey's men lingered, licking their chops, expecting to be tossed this last juicy morsel.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ pork chops and applesauce
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Faith has asked for two high quality lamb chops and steak.
▪ He cut slowly into his chop.
▪ I collapse over my lamb chops and have to be put to bed.
▪ I ordered a double pork chop.
▪ Lamb chops were both nourishing and cheap.
▪ Often I could only afford a small steak and kidney pie and I'd give it to him, or a chop.
▪ That is why some people adore eating spiders and grubs, whilst others would throw up if fed a pork chop.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Chop

Chop \Chop\, v. t. & i. To crack. See Chap, v. t. & i.

Chop

Chop \Chop\, n. A change; a vicissitude.
--Marryat.

Chop

Chop \Chop\, n.

  1. The act of chopping; a stroke.

  2. A piece chopped off; a slice or small piece, especially of meat; as, a mutton chop.

  3. A crack or cleft. See Chap.

Chop

Chop \Chop\, n. [See Chap.]

  1. A jaw of an animal; -- commonly in the pl. See Chops.

  2. A movable jaw or cheek, as of a wooden vise.

  3. The land at each side of the mouth of a river, harbor, or channel; as, East Chop or West Chop. See Chops.

Chop

Chop \Chop\, n. [Chin. & Hind. ch[=a]p stamp, brand.]

  1. Quality; brand; as, silk of the first chop.

  2. A permit or clearance.

    Chop dollar, a silver dollar stamped to attest its purity.

    chop of tea, a number of boxes of the same make and quality of leaf.

    Chowchow chop. See under Chowchow.

    Grand chop, a ship's port clearance.
    --S. W. Williams.

Chop

Chop \Chop\, v. t. [Cf. D. koopen to buy. See Cheapen, v. t., and cf. Chap, v. i., to buy.]

  1. To barter or truck.

  2. To exchange; substitute one thing for another.

    We go on chopping and changing our friends.
    --L'Estrange.

    To chop logic, to dispute with an affected use of logical terms; to argue sophistically.

Chop

Chop \Chop\, v. i.

  1. To make a quick strike, or repeated strokes, with an ax or other sharp instrument.

  2. To do something suddenly with an unexpected motion; to catch or attempt to seize.

    Out of greediness to get both, he chops at the shadow, and loses the substance.
    --L'Estrange.

  3. To interrupt; -- with in or out.

    This fellow interrupted the sermon, even suddenly chopping in.
    --Latimer.

Chop

Chop \Chop\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Chopped; p. pr. & vb. n. Chopping.] [Cf. LG. & D. kappen, Dan. kappe, Sw. kappa. Cf. Chap to crack.]

  1. To cut by striking repeatedly with a sharp instrument; to cut into pieces; to mince; -- often with up.

  2. To sever or separate by one more blows of a sharp instrument; to divide; -- usually with off or down.

    Chop off your hand, and it to the king.
    --Shak.

  3. To seize or devour greedily; -- with up. [Obs.]

    Upon the opening of his mouth he drops his breakfast, which the fox presently chopped up.
    --L'estrange.

Chop

Chop \Chop\, v. i.

  1. To purchase by way of truck.

  2. (Naut.) To vary or shift suddenly; as, the wind chops about.

  3. To wrangle; to altercate; to bandy words.

    Let not the counsel at the bar chop with the judge.
    --Bacon.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
chop

"to cut with a quick blow," mid-14c., of uncertain origin, perhaps from Old North French choper (Old French coper "to cut, cut off," 12c., Modern French couper), from Vulgar Latin *cuppare "to behead," from a root meaning "head," but influenced in Old French by couper "to strike." Related: Chopped; chopping.

chop

"shift quickly," 1530s, earlier "to bargain" (early 15c.), ultimately from Old English ceapian "to bargain" (see cheap); here with a sense of "changing back and forth," probably from common expressions such as to chop and change "barter." To chop logic is recorded from 1570s. Related: Chopped; chopping.

chop

"act of chopping," mid-14c., from chop (v.1). Meaning "piece cut off" is mid-15c.; specifically "slice of meat" from mid-17c. Sense of "a blow, strike" is from 1550s.

Wiktionary
chop

Etymology 1 n. 1 A cut of meat, often containing a section of a rib. 2 A blow with an axe, cleaver, or similar utensil. 3 (context martial arts English) A blow delivered with the hand rigid and outstretched. 4 ocean waves, generally caused by wind, distinguished from swell by being smaller and not lasting as long. 5 (context poker English) A hand where two or more players have an equal-valued hand, resulting in the chips being shared equally between them. 6 (context informal with "the" English) Termination, especially from employment. 7 (context dated English) A crack or cleft; a chap. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To cut into pieces with short, vigorous cutting motions. 2 (context transitive English) To sever with an axe or similar implement. 3 (context transitive baseball English) To hit the ball downward so that it takes a high bounce. 4 (context poker English) To divide the pot (or tournament prize) between two or more players. (rfex) 5 (lb en intransitive) To make a quick, heavy stroke or a series of strokes, with or as with an ax. 6 (lb en intransitive) To do something suddenly with an unexpected motion; to catch or attempt to seize. 7 (lb en intransitive) To interrupt; with ''in'' or ''out''. Etymology 2

n. 1 (context mostly in the plural English) A jaw of an animal. 2 A movable jaw or cheek, as of a vice. 3 The land at each side of the mouth of a river, harbour, or channel. 4 A change; a vicissitude. vb. 1 (context obsolete English) To exchange, to barter; to swap. 2 To chap or crack. 3 (context nautical English) To vary or shift suddenly. 4 To wrangle; to altercate; to bandy words. Etymology 3

n. 1 An official stamp or seal. 2 Mark indicating nature, quality, or brand. Etymology 4

n. (context internet English) An IRC channel operator.

WordNet
chop
  1. n. a small cut of meat including part of a rib

  2. a tennis return made with a downward motion that puts backspin on the ball [syn: chop shot]

  3. a grounder that bounces high in the air [syn: chopper]

  4. [also: chopping, chopped]

chop
  1. v. cut into pieces; "Chop wood"; "chop meat" [syn: chop up]

  2. move suddenly

  3. strike sharply, as in some sports

  4. cut with a hacking tool [syn: hack]

  5. hit sharply

  6. [also: chopping, chopped]

Wikipedia
CHOP

CHOP is the acronym for a chemotherapy regimen used in the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. CHOP consists of:

  • (C)yclophosphamide, an alkylating agent which damages DNA by binding to it and causing the formation of cross-links
  • (H)ydroxydaunorubicin (also called doxorubicin or Adriamycin), an intercalating agent which damages DNA by inserting itself between DNA bases
  • (O)ncovin ( vincristine), which prevents cells from duplicating by binding to the protein tubulin
  • (P)rednisone or (P)rednisolone, which are corticosteroids.
Chop (furniture)

A chop is a signature or identifying mark made by a furniture or cabinet maker to identify his work. In the 18th and 19th centuries, cabinet makers (sic) furniture makers were allowed to use their own individual chop to identify their work only when they had qualified as a Master Cabinetmaker. This practice originated from the Chinese tradition of seals called "chops" and was introduced to Europe in the middle ages. A chop was normally created by a mallet and chisel, creating a unique design. In some cases, fathers would pass the chop to their sons, and the son would then add a slight modification to indicate which generation created the piece.

The act of striking the chisel with the mallet or chopping is the root of the term.

Category:Seals (insignia)

Usage examples of "chop".

He was indefatigable when it came to crushing bitter almond seeds in the screw press or mashing musk pods or mincing dollops of grey, greasy ambergris with a chopping knife or grating violet roots and digesting the shavings in the finest alcohol.

He et chops till the ribs was done, an' he et ribs till the leg was done.

I came here to try to chop the Ancestress to pieces, but her soldiers caught me first.

In a minute I had a bag of crackers and a long-handled spoon, with an open can each of apricots and pineapples and cherries and greengages beside of me with Uncle Emsley busy chopping away with the hatchet at the yellow clings.

The yeoman-marshal, a young man a few years older than Aris, put him to work chopping wood and carrying water.

I smell the tarragon in the Breton sauce prepared for the artichoke leaves, and hurry to the drinks cabinet, heart thumping, absurdly fearful that my living soul is chopped into the sauce with the tarragon leaves.

When removed from the mould, garnish with chopped aspic and fans cut from gherkins and lettuce.

Ali Baba found himself chopping the most sturdy wood from the darkest part of the forest, a place so dense with undergrowth that it seemed to be twilight at noon, and every shadow appeared to produce a further shadow of its own.

I met up with Foster at the Pan Pan just in time for an early lunch of juicy barbecued ribs and an excellent chopped barbecued-pork sandwich.

And pathos and bathos delightful to see, And chop and change ribs, a-la-mode Germanorum, And high diddle ho diddle, pop tweedle dee.

Hovering over the scene was a bunch of particularly ugly buzzards, looking down upon the good guys and licking their beaky chops.

Rarely does it occur to Bev that she has no good reason to compete with a woman Jay fantasizes about chopping up and feeding to the alligators and crawfish in the bayou outside their door.

Part of the village and some stacks of bhoosa, a kind of chopped straw, were set on fire, and the two companies prepared to return to camp.

He clearly saw a first edition of the damned poem with title page a horrid mixture of typefaces, fat ill-drawn nymphs on it, a round chop which said Bibliotheca Somethingorother.

Charlie chopped the throttle and the big biplane settled toward the desert floor at an unnerving rate.