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Crossword clues for chase

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
chase
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a car chase
▪ The best bit in the movie was the car chase through the city.
paper chase
wild goose chase
▪ It looks like they’ve sent us on a wild goose chase.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
ball
▪ Just as the wolf will chase its prey, Fido chases his ball.
▪ Sadly, most soccer sims just involve hoofing it up the pitch and loads of chasing aimlessly after the ball.
▪ The child Mary, in the hurly-burly of lacrosse, is simply chasing a ball.
▪ Children still chase a ball there but it isn't the same.
▪ If not chasing a ball, he plays another game, this time it is Chess.
▪ His dodging of tackles, chasing the ball less etc.
car
▪ Two men threw bottles and other material at police cars which chased them after a raid at a chemist shop in Tarporley.
▪ Even when all the falling in love and car chasing and mystery solving goes on among the white folks.
▪ Inspired by those ten minutes in Bullitt, film producers even tried extending the car chase to fill the whole film.
▪ Their car was being chased by police.
▪ Police cars chased two men after a raid at a chemist shop in Tarporley on Saturday.
dream
▪ Changing their destiny Shahidul Alam travels with the poor who chase a dream to distant lands.
▪ Approximately 70 relatives and friends have made the trip from Pittsburgh to watch this grad student in biology chase her dream.
▪ Now he's prepared to give up his day job to chase the dream.
▪ Because education isn't only useful for those countries chasing an impossible dream of Western industrial development.
girl
▪ They're all chasing the good looking girls.
▪ The gunman began shooting from a watchtower, then chased the girls down a hill, spraying gunfire as he ran.
▪ Once, he chased a young girl up into the Milky Way.
man
▪ The man chased me but I ran.
▪ No man liked to be chased.
▪ Should the man choose to chase the quail rather than shoot it, he would almost certainly still have his dinner.
▪ The men in it were chasing me.
▪ Whatever may seem the case to a man chasing a bus, running involves little work for most vertebrates.
▪ She kept going, blindly, and with both men chasing her.
▪ I told him my story, and he and his men chased the pirates down into the cove.
▪ He had seen a man being chased by two Riotsville hoodlums.
other
▪ Knowing those rules, Bush and Gore chased each other in and out of the same battleground states.
▪ I was in New Hampshire recently watching the Republican presidential candidates chase each other and potential primary voters around.
▪ Wyatt noticed, through the window, two squirrels chasing each other on the lawn.
▪ A pair of coevolutionary creatures chasing each other in an escalating arms race can only seem to veer out of control.
▪ Kids were chasing each other and playing.
police
▪ Despite a police chase the men managed to escape through bushes.
▪ The incident began early Sunday when San Jose police began chasing the man for resisting arrest and drug use.
▪ Two men threw bottles and other material at police cars which chased them after a raid at a chemist shop in Tarporley.
▪ The photographers say city police chase them away only occasionally.
▪ His body was discovered not by concerned neighbours but by police chasing unpaid bills.
▪ But he stopped when police chased him and he was almost hit by a passing car.
▪ He was killed when the police were chasing him; he crashed his car.
▪ The police chase them off, but they always come back.
street
▪ On one occasion she was chased through the streets by a car full of excited young Arabs.
▪ Of course, he was being chased down the street by some westside thug wannabes.
▪ Early in the morning, after the Rotonde had closed, Modigliani would chase her up the street.
▪ Reports have the Sharks chasing Gretzky down the street, throwing bills at him.
tail
▪ A cat chasing its own tail.
▪ At work they chase their tails, as Neil says.
▪ Horses kept in small yards by themselves develop repetitive patterns of abnormal behaviour, such as whirling in circles and chasing their tails.
▪ If you don't want your image tarnished, chase your tail before you get into serious trouble.
▪ And some of the grander arguments, too, are beginning to chase their own tails.
▪ The rest of the squadron was still below, plunging and climbing and chasing its tail.
■ VERB
start
▪ They started chasing after all these hippy cult groups and all the criminals were on drugs.
▪ Then they start chasing each other again, screaming and laughing and they run off into the woods.
▪ The climbing predator is in no position to start chasing after the cackling parent bird, nomatterhow tempting it may be.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
chase tail
high-speed chase
▪ Monday, during a high-speed chase through the streets of the Baja California state capital.
▪ The high-speed chase began after police spotted the gang with the stolen vehicles at the M1 Woodhall Services near Sheffield.
▪ They include high-speed chases through densely packed suburban areas, filmed from the air by helicopters.
the thrill of the chase/hunt
▪ A strange feeling of expectation mixed with our fear as we became caught up in the thrill of the hunt.
▪ But it is not every image that succeeds in suggesting something of the thrill of the hunt as well as curiosity.
▪ Was it just the thrill of the chase?
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ He's been chasing some cute girl he met at the ice rink.
▪ I chased around all day looking for a birthday present to give her.
▪ I didn't have the energy to chase him any more.
▪ Stop chasing your sister!
▪ The farmer chased the children across the field.
▪ We chased after him for about five blocks but then we lost him and had to turn back.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But old habits die hard, and Apple has shown a proclivity to chase market share while hand-wringing over shrinking gross margins.
▪ Fleischmann shouted, chased Dunn with the beam and grabbed with his other hand at the Luger in his belt.
▪ I chased him with the pitchfork and he ran in the barn.
▪ I have five or six months before the winter chases me away.
▪ Manly-Warringah chased Ofahengaue's signature prior to the Wallaby tour of New Zealand but without success.
▪ Then I'd have had to chase after you wherever you went.
▪ Weapons forged from finest steel, decorated with bronze and chased with gold and silver.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
wild
▪ Save yourself a wild goose chase round the shops.
▪ In a wild chase the crews finally overtake a very old and crippled whale.
▪ They deliberately sent me on a wild goose chase.
▪ I thought, Don't know about a wild goose chase, this is a lame duck chase.
▪ Instead of that, he had become involved in what was most likely a wild goose chase.
▪ The tracks show a gentle canter, no wild chase after red deer.
▪ On that occasion their predicament had been spotted and a boat had been sent out from Sharpness on a wild goose chase.
▪ Each shopping trip is a wild goose chase.
■ NOUN
car
▪ There are few film directors who can resist a good car chase.
▪ His heists invariably end in shootouts, explosions and car chases.
▪ The flash alerted the criminal, and with a few choice words exchanged, the car chase resumed.
▪ And, of course, the climactic car chase, with Jackie piloting a sports car on to a pleasure boat.
▪ It was a world which howled with car chases and teetered between excitement and extinction.
▪ It was going to be a very long car chase.
▪ Eventually car chases became a clich, and film makers explored alternative transport in their quest for cinematic thrills.
▪ The cab paused at an intersection to give right of way to a car chase.
goose
▪ Save yourself a wild goose chase round the shops.
▪ They deliberately sent me on a wild goose chase.
▪ I thought, Don't know about a wild goose chase, this is a lame duck chase.
▪ Instead of that, he had become involved in what was most likely a wild goose chase.
▪ On that occasion their predicament had been spotted and a boat had been sent out from Sharpness on a wild goose chase.
▪ Each shopping trip is a wild goose chase.
▪ Looking around the room, Harry wondered if Potts had deliberately sent him on a wild goose chase.
▪ The photographs might represent a wild goose chase after the random neuroses of an insecure young woman.
paper
▪ I was asked to do a straight forward paper chase, as we call it, and a few interviews.
■ VERB
cut
▪ Alternatively, casual fans can just cut straight to the chase.
▪ These kinds of hi-how-are-yous can be terribly coy and cumbersome, so I thought it best to cut tothe chase.
▪ Again and again, he cuts from the chase to the chaser.
give
▪ It was later spotted in Lisburn at 4.15am on Sunday by police who gave chase.
▪ He gave chase and quickly caught one and killed it with a snap of his bill.
▪ The police gave chase and arrested the man.
▪ The officers gave chase and radioed for assistance.
▪ Sancho fell dying outside his own pavilion while Rodrigo and others gave chase.
▪ When a Gingerbread Man jumped out of the oven and ran away, all sorts of people and animals gave chase.
▪ Matchsticks gave chase, catching her in mid-stride.
▪ The porter gave chase, assisted by two Bulldogs who happened to be in the lodge at the time.
join
▪ After the tour, Manly was joined in the chase for Ofahengaue's signature by St. George.
▪ She started to regret her impulsiveness in joining a wild-goose obstacle chase.
lead
▪ My parliamentary colleague, the Member for Ludlow, Christopher Gill, has been leading the chase.
▪ Opener David Smith led the run chase with 82 and was given crucial support by Martin Speight who chipped in with 38.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
chase tail
cut to the chase
▪ In business meetings, Richardson likes to cut to the chase.
high-speed chase
▪ Monday, during a high-speed chase through the streets of the Baja California state capital.
▪ The high-speed chase began after police spotted the gang with the stolen vehicles at the M1 Woodhall Services near Sheffield.
▪ They include high-speed chases through densely packed suburban areas, filmed from the air by helicopters.
the thrill of the chase/hunt
▪ A strange feeling of expectation mixed with our fear as we became caught up in the thrill of the hunt.
▪ But it is not every image that succeeds in suggesting something of the thrill of the hunt as well as curiosity.
▪ Was it just the thrill of the chase?
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Roswell's high-speed chase with police that ended in tragedy
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ At one time, this may have been a mill chase with a waterwheel turning.
▪ Monday, during a high-speed chase through the streets of the Baja California state capital.
▪ She loved the chase and the battle and her freedom.
▪ Shots were fired by the police during the chase along Belsteel Road, near Poleglass.
▪ The chase came to an abrupt halt when nine Mexicali police cars stopped the Jetta and its occupants.
▪ The three other boats lower away and the chase with the whales begins.
▪ This chase is described from Ralph's mind which is why some things are incomprehensible.
▪ Was it just the thrill of the chase?
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Chase

Chase \Chase\, n. [Cf. F. chasse, fr. chasser. See Chase, v.]

  1. Vehement pursuit for the purpose of killing or capturing, as of an enemy, or game; an earnest seeking after any object greatly desired; the act or habit of hunting; a hunt. ``This mad chase of fame.''
    --Dryden.

    You see this chase is hotly followed.
    --Shak.

  2. That which is pursued or hunted.

    Nay, Warwick, seek thee out some other chase, For I myself must hunt this deer to death.
    --Shak.

  3. An open hunting ground to which game resorts, and which is private properly, thus differing from a forest, which is not private property, and from a park, which is inclosed. Sometimes written chace. [Eng.]

  4. (Court Tennis) A division of the floor of a gallery, marked by a figure or otherwise; the spot where a ball falls, and between which and the dedans the adversary must drive his ball in order to gain a point.

    Chase gun (Naut.), a cannon placed at the bow or stern of an armed vessel, and used when pursuing an enemy, or in defending the vessel when pursued.

    Chase port (Naut.), a porthole from which a chase gun is fired.

    Stern chase (Naut.), a chase in which the pursuing vessel follows directly in the wake of the vessel pursued.

    cut to the chase (Film), a term used in action movies meaning, to shift the scene to the most exciting part, where someone is being chased. It is used metaphorically to mean ``get to the main point''.

Chase

Chase \Chase\ (ch[=a]s), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Chased (ch[=a]st); p. pr. & vb. n. Chasing.] [OF. chacier, F. chasser, fr. (assumed) LL. captiare, fr. L. captare to strive to seize. See Catch.]

  1. To pursue for the purpose of killing or taking, as an enemy, or game; to hunt.

    We are those which chased you from the field.
    --Shak.

    Philologists, who chase A panting syllable through time and place.
    --Cowper.

  2. To follow as if to catch; to pursue; to compel to move on; to drive by following; to cause to fly; -- often with away or off; as, to chase the hens away.

    Chased by their brother's endless malice from prince to prince and from place to place.
    --Knolles.

  3. To pursue eagerly, as hunters pursue game.

    Chasing each other merrily.
    --Tennyson.

Chase

Chase \Chase\, v. i. To give chase; to hunt; as, to chase around after a doctor.

Chase

Chase \Chase\, n. [F. ch['a]se, fr. L. capsa box, case. See Case a box.] (Print.)

  1. A rectangular iron frame in which pages or columns of type are imposed.

  2. (Mil.) The part of a cannon from the re["e]nforce or the trunnions to the swell of the muzzle. See Cannon.

  3. A groove, or channel, as in the face of a wall; a trench, as for the reception of drain tile.

  4. (Shipbuilding) A kind of joint by which an overlap joint is changed to a flush joint, by means of a gradually deepening rabbet, as at the ends of clinker-built boats.

Chase

Chase \Chase\, v. t. [A contraction of enchase.]

  1. To ornament (a surface of metal) by embossing, cutting away parts, and the like.

  2. To cut, so as to make a screw thread.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
chase

mid-13c., chace, "a hunt," from Old French chace "a hunt, a chase; hunting ground" (12c.), from chacier (see chase (v.)). Meaning "a pursuit" (of an enemy, etc.) is early 14c.

chase

c.1300, chacen "to hunt; to cause to go away; put to flight," from Old French chacier "to hunt, ride swiftly, strive for" (12c., Modern French chasser), from Vulgar Latin *captiare (source of Italian cacciare, Catalan casar, Spanish cazar, Portuguese caçar "to chase, hunt;" see catch (v.)).\n

\nMeaning "run after" developed mid-14c. Related: Chased; chasing. Older European words for "pursue" often also cover "persecute" (Greek dioko, Old English ehtan); modern ones often derive from words used primarily for the hunting of animals.

chase

"bore of a gun barrel," 1640s, from French chas "eye of a needle; enclosure," from Vulgar Latin *capsum, variant of Latin capsa "box" (see case (n.2)).

Wiktionary
chase

Etymology 1 alt. 1 The act of one who chases another; a pursuit. 2 A hunt. 3 (context uncountable English) A children's game where one player chases another. 4 (context British English) A large country estate where game may be shoot or hunted. 5 Anything being chased, especially a vessel in time of war. 6 (context nautical English) Any of the guns that fire directly ahead or astern; either a bow chase or stern chase. 7 (context real tennis English) The occurrence of a second bounce by the ball in certain areas of the court, giving the server the chance, later in the game, to "play off" the chase from the receiving end and possibly win the point. 8 (context real tennis English) A division of the floor of a gallery, marked by a figure or otherwise; the spot where a ball falls, and between which and the dedans the adversary must drive the ball in order to gain a point. n. 1 The act of one who chases another; a pursuit. 2 A hunt. 3 (context uncountable English) A children's game where one player chases another. 4 (context British English) A large country estate where game may be shoot or hunted. 5 Anything being chased, especially a vessel in time of war. 6 (context nautical English) Any of the guns that fire directly ahead or astern; either a bow chase or stern chase. 7 (context real tennis English) The occurrence of a second bounce by the ball in certain areas of the court, giving the server the chance, later in the game, to "play off" the chase from the receiving end and possibly win the point. 8 (context real tennis English) A division of the floor of a gallery, marked by a figure or otherwise; the spot where a ball falls, and between which and the dedans the adversary must drive the ball in order to gain a point. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To pursue, to follow at speed. 2 (context transitive English) To hunt. 3 (context intransitive English) To give chase; to hunt. 4 (context transitive nautical English) To pursue a vessel in order to destroy, capture or interrogate her. 5 (context transitive English) To dilute alcohol. 6 (context transitive cricket English) To attempt to win by scoring the required number of runs in the final innings. 7 (context transitive baseball English) To swing at a pitch outside of the strike zone, typically an outside pitch 8 (context transitive baseball English) To produce enough offense to cause the pitcher to be removed Etymology 2

n. (context printing English) A rectangular steel or iron frame into which pages or columns of type are locked for printing or plate making. Etymology 3

n. 1 A groove cut in an object; a slot: the chase for the quarrel on a crossbow. 2 (context architecture English) A trench or channel for drainpipes or wiring; a hollow space in the wall of a building containing ventilation ducts, chimney flues, wires, cables or plumbing. 3 The part of a gun in front of the trunnions. 4 The cavity of a mold. 5 (context shipbuilding English) A kind of joint by which an overlap joint is changed to a flush joint by means of a gradually deepening rabbet, as at the ends of clinker-built boats. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To groove; indent. 2 (context transitive English) To cut (the thread of a screw). 3 (context transitive English) To decorate (metal) by engraving or embossing.

WordNet
chase

n. the act of pursuing in an effort to overtake or capture; "the culprit started to run and the cop took off in pursuit" [syn: pursuit, following]

chase
  1. v. go after with the intent to catch; "The policeman chased the mugger down the alley"; "the dog chased the rabbit" [syn: chase after, trail, tail, tag, give chase, dog, go after, track]

  2. pursue someone sexually or romantically [syn: chase after]

  3. cut a groove into; "chase silver"

  4. cut a furrow into a columns [syn: furrow, chamfer]

Gazetteer
Chase, AK -- U.S. Census Designated Place in Alaska
Population (2000): 41
Housing Units (2000): 90
Land area (2000): 92.903484 sq. miles (240.618909 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.623183 sq. miles (1.614037 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 93.526667 sq. miles (242.232946 sq. km)
FIPS code: 12350
Located within: Alaska (AK), FIPS 02
Location: 62.422316 N, 150.077553 W
ZIP Codes (1990):
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Chase, AK
Chase
Chase, KS -- U.S. city in Kansas
Population (2000): 490
Housing Units (2000): 222
Land area (2000): 0.293148 sq. miles (0.759250 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 0.293148 sq. miles (0.759250 sq. km)
FIPS code: 12650
Located within: Kansas (KS), FIPS 20
Location: 38.355682 N, 98.348743 W
ZIP Codes (1990): 67524
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Chase, KS
Chase
Chase -- U.S. County in Kansas
Population (2000): 3030
Housing Units (2000): 1529
Land area (2000): 775.887075 sq. miles (2009.538213 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 2.122146 sq. miles (5.496332 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 778.009221 sq. miles (2015.034545 sq. km)
Located within: Kansas (KS), FIPS 20
Location: 38.313664 N, 96.607734 W
Headwords:
Chase
Chase, KS
Chase County
Chase County, KS
Chase -- U.S. County in Nebraska
Population (2000): 4068
Housing Units (2000): 1927
Land area (2000): 894.495131 sq. miles (2316.731656 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 3.139206 sq. miles (8.130506 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 897.634337 sq. miles (2324.862162 sq. km)
Located within: Nebraska (NE), FIPS 31
Location: 40.507192 N, 101.699405 W
Headwords:
Chase
Chase, NE
Chase County
Chase County, NE
Wikipedia
Chase

Chase may refer to:

Chase (Kumi Koda song)

"Chase" is Kumi Koda's 12th domestic CD single. The title song is the ending theme for ANB's program SAMAA〜to Yuka no ayashii××kashi chau no kayo!! (さまぁ〜ずと優香の怪しい××貸しちゃうのかよ!! / SUMMER〜Suspicious of Yuka xx What it Becomes!!). It reached #18 on Oricon and stayed on the charts for eight weeks.

Despite the a-side being Chase, the single's artwork was inspired more by its b-side, Heat feat. MEGARYU.

Chase (comics)

Chase was a comic book series published by DC Comics. It was written by Dan Curtis Johnson, illustrated by J.H. Williams III and inked by Mick Gray. It lasted ten issues (including a special #1,000,000 issue). The character of Cameron Chase first appeared in Batman #550, January (1998) written by Doug Moench and drawn by Kelley Jones. The Batman appearance was used to promote the upcoming series.

The original Chase series was reprinted in graphic novel form in December 2011.

Chase (bank)
  1. Redirect Chase Bank
Chase (band)

Chase is an American jazz rock band. They are best known for their hit single, "Get It On" (1971).

Chase (novel)

Chase is Dean Koontz's first hardcover novel, originally written under the name K. R. Dwyer and released in 1972, it was revised and reissued in 1995 within Strange Highways.

Chase (instrumental)

"Chase" (also known as "The Chase") is an instrumental composition by Italian music producer Giorgio Moroder. It was released as a single during 1978 from his Academy Award-winning soundtrack album Midnight Express (1978). It is a disco instrumental that was subsequently extended and released as a maxi single. It made the Billboard Hot 100 in January 1979, peaking at number 33, and the UK Singles Chart, peaking at number 48.

Chase (lighting)

A chase is an electrical application where strings of adjacent light bulbs cycle on and off frequently to give the illusion of lights moving along the string. With computerized lighting consoles, building chase sequences has become easier, while previously chases used mechanical means, such as a wheel with an electrified spindle which strikes electrical contacts for each circuit.

Chase lights (or chaser lights) are often associated with the marquee signs of some movie theaters, and have also been used as a common element of television game show sets.

Chase (land)

In the United Kingdom a chase is a type of common land used for hunting to which there are no specifically designated officers and laws but instead reserved hunting rights for one or more persons. Similarly, a Royal Chase is a type of Crown Estate by the same description, but where certain rights are reserved for a member of the British Royal Family.

Chase (Chase album)

Chase was the debut album by jazz-rock fusion band Chase_(band).

Bill Chase was already a well-established lead trumpet player when he decided to form his own band. He recruited three other veteran trumpet players and vocalist Terry Richards, backed them with a rock rhythm section, and created a band which merged both jazz and rock styles. The album was recorded in Chicago in November and early December 1970 and released in late March 1971.

The single "Get It On" spent thirteen weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 chart starting in May 1971. This success drove album sales to more than 400,000 units - unusually high for a jazz artist. The album charted for a total of 26 weeks, peaking at #22. 1

Long out of print in the U.S., the album was re-released in Japan on CD in 1997.

Chase (algorithm)

The Chase is a simple fixed-point algorithm testing and enforcing implication of data dependencies in database systems. It plays important roles in database theory as well as in practice. It is used, directly or indirectly, on an everyday basis by people who design databases, and it is used in commercial systems to reason about the consistency and correctness of a data design. New applications of the chase in meta-data management and data exchange are still being discovered.

The Chase has its origins in two seminal papers of 1979, one by Alfred V. Aho, Catriel Beeri, and Jeffrey D. Ullman and the other by David Maier, Alberto O. Mendelzon, and Yehoshua Sagiv.

In its simplest application the chase is used for testing whether the projection of a relation schema constrained by some functional dependencies onto a given decomposition can be recovered by rejoining the projections. Let t be a tuple in π(R) ⋈ π(R) ⋈ ... ⋈ π(R) where R is a relation and F is a set of functional dependencies (FD). If tuples in R are represented as t, ..., t, the join of the projections of each t should agree with t on π(R) where i = 1, 2, ..., k. If t is not on π(R), the value is unknown.

The chase can be done by drawing a tableau (which is the same formalism used in tableau query). Suppose R has attributesA, B, ... and components of t are a, b, .... For t use the same letter as t in the components that are in S but subscript the letter with i if the component is not in i. Then, t will agree with t if it is in S and will have a unique value otherwise.

The chase process is confluent.

Chase (1973 TV series)

Chase is an American television series that aired on the NBC network from September 11, 1973 to August 28, 1974. The show was a production of Jack Webb's Mark VII Limited for Universal Television and marked the first show created by Stephen J. Cannell, who later became known for creating and/or producing his own programs, including NBC's The A-Team.

Chase (film)

Chase is a 2010 Bollywood action film directed by Jagmohan Mundhra, who has previously directed films such as Shoot on Sight and Provoked. The film stars Anuj Saxena, Udita Goswami, Sameer Kochhar and Tareena Patel in the lead roles, while Gulshan Grover makes a special appearance. The film was released on 30 April 2010. The musical score is by Udbhav Ojha and Vijay Verma and the lyrics are by Jalees Sherwani, Manthan and Prashant Vasl. The title song is sung by Sajid Khan in his funky style whereas the other songs are sung by Shaan, Shreya Ghoshal and Vasundhara Das. The background musical score is by Amar Mohile.

Chase (name)

Chase is a given name and surname in the English language, especially popular in the United States. The given name is a transferred use of the surname.

Chase (Djumbo album)

Chase is the fourth album from pop group Djumbo.

Chase (L'Arc-en-Ciel song)

"Chase" is the fortieth single by L'Arc-en-Ciel, released on December 21, 2011. The single reached number 2 on the Oricon chart, selling 71,894 copies in the first week.

The song was used for live action film adaptation of Wild 7, released on December 21, 2011.

Chase (House episode)

"Chase" is the twelfth episode of the season eight of House and the 167th overall. It aired on February 13, 2012. The format of this episode is similar to " 5 to 9" and " Wilson" (both from season six).

Chase (dog)

Chase "That Golden Thunder" (2000 – July 8, 2013) was a Golden Retriever who served as " bat dog" and mascot for the Trenton Thunder minor league baseball team.

Chase (printing)

A chase is a heave steel frame used to hold type in a letterpress. Most of the space in the chase not occupied with type is filled with blocks of wood called furniture. The type and furniture are locked in place by quoins. When a chase is locked up with type, furniture, and quoins, it is called a forme.

Chase (son of Ioube)

Chase, the son of Ioube , originally Hasan ibn Ayyub, was a senior Byzantine official of Arab origin.

Chase (2010 TV series)

Chase is an American police procedural drama television series created by Jennifer Johnson for the NBC network. The series follows a U.S. Marshals fugitive-apprehension team, based out of Houston, Texas. Jerry Bruckheimer and Johnson serve as executive producers for the one-hour drama. The series originally aired on Mondays at 10:00 pm ET/9:00 pm CT and premiered on September 20, 2010. After the mid-season break, Chase returned on Wednesdays at 9:00 pm ET/8:00 pm CT On October 19, 2010, the network ordered a full season consisting of 22 episodes, but this order was cut to 18 in December. On February 3, 2011, the show was put on "a hiatus" with no plan regarding the remaining episodes. On April 6, 2011, NBC announced the remaining five episodes would be broadcast on Saturday nights beginning on April 23, 2011. Later the show was replaced by Harry's Law.

In the United Kingdom, Chase was re-titled Jerry Bruckheimer's Chase and, as of July 2010, was expected to debut on Living TV in 2011.

Chase (TV channel)

Chase (capitalized as CHASE) was a Philippine television network owned and produced by Solar Entertainment Corporation through Solar TV Network, Inc. It is the sister of the networks Talk TV, ETC, 2nd Avenue, Universal Channel, Jack TV, Basketball TV, Solar Sports, The Game Channel (which formerly used its evening airtime block) and Diva Universal. It was formerly available over and also broadcast via BEAM Channel 31 ( free TV). Launched on December 24, 2011, its programming was focused on suspense, science fiction, and drama series (the same as the defunct C/S). It dissolved its operations on October 19, 2012 as it had been replaced by Jack City, the secondary network channel of Jack TV, although some of its programs are still carried over by said network station channel.

Usage examples of "chase".

Right now the only one of us tars actually working was Halle, who was chasing down a pool of vomit sicked up by Pael, the Academician, the only non-Navy personnel on the bridge.

He had been spotted by some little girls en route to Acequia Madre grade school, who chased the beast into a garage and shut the door behind him.

Out in the amphitheater, the afanc finished chasing down the stray bits of bodies left floating in the water.

The man aims for that rapidly vanishing afterglow, alone on a darkly painted sea, a single, tiny figure chasing a sun that has already deserted him.

Turning about, Aganippe finally got a look at the man who was chasing her.

What, exactly, was he accomplishing by continuing this aimless chase, when he could not even hope to gain honest satisfaction by eventually flailing away at the body of an innocent man?

It meant another two-week delay as they chased down and answered the allegation, Gray said.

It seemed a hopeless chase for these shells to sail after that dying monster with her cloud of canvas all drawing, alow and aloft.

Pendleton on an extreme Democratic platform, to go to the other extreme and take Chief Justice Chase on a platform of amnesty and suffrage.

That was because his father had known the laws of engineering and had opened the sluices at the head of the aqueduct exactly eighteen hours before the ceremony was due to reach its climax, and had ridden back into the city faster than the water could chase him.

He then recounted to Arabin once more how he had been chased by men with coffins, and likewise how effectually he had done up one of his pursuers.

Conyers mentioned Gregory Persimmons to me as having taken part with him in a curious little chase after a chalice which had been more or less stolen by the Duke of the North Ridings and the Archdeacon of Fardles.

Belle and Jimmy had given up chasing the dog, and angry and ashamed, stood waiting half a block away.

Shah Tahmasp, who was himself a master miniaturist and spent his youth in his own workshop, closed down his magnificent atelier as his death approached, chased his divinely inspired painters from Tabriz, destroyed the books he had produced and suffered interminable crises of regret.

Brinan and Crisavec suddenly burst into the space in the middle of the Mammoth Hearth, running down the passageway from the Aurochs and Crane hearths, chasing each other.