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Crossword clues for charm

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
charm
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
charm school
charmed circle
▪ politicians outside the charmed circle
old-world charm
▪ The town has retained much of its old-world charm.
oozing charm
▪ Andrew laughed gently, oozing charm.
Prince Charming
▪ She is still waiting to find her Prince Charming.
rustic charm
▪ The village had a certain rustic charm.
seductive charm
▪ She used all of her seductive charm to try and persuade him.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
certain
▪ It didn't compare to his effort, but it had a certain naïve charm.
▪ Plus, a nickname implies jocularity, popularity, a certain friendliness and charm.
▪ He looked at her and smiled slightly, the smile lending his face a certain boyish charm.
▪ As Pinky, Patrick James Clarke is high-spirited, with a certain scruffy charm.
▪ They also have a certain charm, when seen from the comfort and security of an armchair behind a glass barrier.
considerable
▪ Physically attractive and possessed of considerable personal charm, his demeanour was self-effacing, gracious and polite.
▪ Isabel, an aspiring photographer, turns her considerable charm on the boyish Alex to let her go in ahead of him.
▪ Faces of great dignity and considerable charm.
▪ There is an intensity to Nancy, but considerable charm.
▪ Stony Stratford was the town nearest to Wolverton, and by comparison it had considerable charm.
▪ These are fantasies of considerable charm, carefully crafted examples of story-telling.
▪ The music is not jazz, but has considerable charm.
▪ She was having enough trouble fending off his considerable charms.
easy
▪ The easy charm and smiles were gone, and with them went the boyishness.
▪ Fair-haired with a luxuriant drooping moustache. Easy charm.
full
▪ The hotel is full of charm and character and Penny Rawson's beloved and rare plants.
▪ A hospitable host, full of charm and not jumpy, in spite of the scare.
▪ The décor is full of period charm and colour.
▪ She met his eyes again and the full charm of his smile was turned upon her.
▪ Mendip's many attractive villages are full of charm and character - most have quaint churches and other features of interest.
great
▪ These buildings were comfortable and spacious, and had great charm.
▪ Fergus, beautiful and saintly as a baby, grows up to be a wild young man of great charm.
▪ A man of great personal charm, he was yet stubborn and pugnacious towards those with whom he disagreed.
▪ Gould discovered in this hardy, middle-aged explorer, a man of great charm and great ornithological ability.
▪ She performed with great natural charm in a television interview and marvelled at all the stretch-limousines she rode in.
▪ It was part of his great charm.
▪ This is because, despite its great charm, it does look rather odd to most cat-lovers.
▪ It was a smile of great charm, causing even the toughness of Mr Pigdon to crack.
lucky
▪ But, as Daouda Api explains, the lucky charm of literacy often fails to work its magic.
natural
▪ She performed with great natural charm in a television interview and marvelled at all the stretch-limousines she rode in.
▪ She had this wonderful natural and infectious charm.
personal
▪ Physically attractive and possessed of considerable personal charm, his demeanour was self-effacing, gracious and polite.
▪ The book also chronicles his personal charms, social clumsiness and confusion in his own sexuality.
▪ A man of great personal charm, he was yet stubborn and pugnacious towards those with whom he disagreed.
▪ However, he was also a man of exceptional personal warmth and charm.
▪ In a town with a Conservative majority of just 2,661, the personal charm and persuasion of each candidate will be crucial.
▪ He was a good-humoured, patient man of great personal charm, an energetic and skilled administrator and excellent public speaker.
▪ She was a talented artist and had considerable personal charm.
▪ Megan set about raising standards wherever they were needed, using her political skills and considerable personal charm.
rustic
Rustic appeal Create your own oasis of rustic charm with an intimate and cosy garden like this.
▪ Besides, two weeks is about as much rustic charm as most people can stand.
▪ It had a rough, rustic charm, earthy colours.
▪ Bedrooms are modern but full of rustic style and charm with their pine panelling and wonderful mountain views.
■ NOUN
school
▪ The girl is a graduate from the Anne Robinson charm school.
■ VERB
add
▪ Price from about £7,420 Above: Add value and charm to your home with this delightful conservatory from Amdega.
▪ Fine old paintings, marble columns and period furnishings add charm.
▪ Although traditional shopfronts add charm and individuality to high streets, unprecedented damage has been done over the last century.
▪ My Hatchets have always been healthy and add charm to the upper layer of the water.
▪ Today their lovely parklands and orange trees remain, a medieval quarter adds charm and the modern seafront surrounds the glimmering bay.
lose
▪ For many of these, memories of the country are so haunting that the real world has lost is charm.
▪ They have lost their charm, having long ago lost their innocence.
▪ It has been completely restored and its former importance can be readily appreciated even if it has now lost its earlier charm.
▪ The idea of being sent out again to the Middle East lost what little charm it had left.
▪ Certainly Muswell Hill has lost some of its charms for us.
retain
▪ It also shows that regardless of all her suffering she has retained some of her charm and kind personality.
▪ But no matter how much geography changes in the sprawling Old Pueblo, the site still manages to retain its cottonwood-laced charm.
▪ Hair by Scissors Boyish cuts retain their charm.
▪ Some, like Pesaro and Senigallia, have grown up around medieval towns and still retain old-world charm.
▪ Today, both villages retain their quiet charm and are well worth a visit.
▪ There is a sixteenth-century town hall which has been modernized but still retains its charm.
▪ The new owners of the seventeenth century hotel have pledged to retain its charm and character.
▪ Built in 1884 the house has been modernised but still retains its original charm with a very pretty secluded south-facing garden.
succumb
▪ It was the worst day's work of my life when I succumbed to your charms.
▪ Though he was fifteen years her senior, she easily succumbed to his well-honed charms.
▪ Thomas seemed to be succumbing to Sylvie's charms as much as to her narrative.
turn
▪ I suspect all doctors must learn how to turn charm on and off like a tap.
▪ Isabel, an aspiring photographer, turns her considerable charm on the boyish Alex to let her go in ahead of him.
use
▪ The more blatantly they were prepared to use their charm, the smoother was the way of escape.
▪ Twice already the Wicked Witch had used the charm of the Cap.
▪ Many viewers thought she'd used the famous Lawley charm to make him relax and talk about his childhood and family.
▪ Wave your arms, use your charm.
work
▪ A slap on the hand or the behind works like a charm for one parent-child combination.
▪ However, the schmaltzy parts, near the end, work like a charm.
▪ But let me first applaud the coupling: it works like a charm.
▪ This time, the setup worked like a charm.
▪ Saunders' goals are working like a Championship charm.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
charm/diplomatic offensive
▪ But then Sunderland came up with a new offer and Liverpool launched a fresh diplomatic offensive.
have/lead a charmed life
▪ But since its premier issue in January 1993, Wired has led a charmed life.
▪ By his own admission he has led a charmed life.
▪ It's been too easy for us; we've led charmed lives till now.
▪ No wonder that she and Charles felt that they led a charmed life, that the times were on their side.
magnetic personality/charm etc
▪ Among them was Christopher Hitchens, the Washington-based writer, a figure of magnetic charm and great volubility.
pour on the charm
turn on the charm
▪ Wayne certainly knows how to turn on the charm when he wants something out of you.
work like magic/work like a charm
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a necklace with an angel charm
▪ Beaufort has all the charm of the old South.
▪ She was a leader of great character and tremendous personal charm.
▪ The book captures Savannah's old Southern charm and its eccentric citizens perfectly.
▪ Vanessa has both charm and talent.
▪ With her charm and good looks, she's sure to be a success.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Gould discovered in this hardy, middle-aged explorer, a man of great charm and great ornithological ability.
▪ He had the charm of all people who believe implicitly in themselves, that of integration.
▪ The fortieth floor had low ceilings, no windows, and the charm of an engine room.
▪ The players were an ideal fit for 8, 500-seat Golden Park, which has been renovated to maximum charm.
▪ These buildings were comfortable and spacious, and had great charm.
▪ They even succumb, in the end, to the charms of a girl, which Grahame would have winced at.
▪ This time, the setup worked like a charm.
▪ To McDonough, a stubby 280-pounder, the charm of elective office was not mucking about with papers and figures.
II.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
charm/diplomatic offensive
▪ But then Sunderland came up with a new offer and Liverpool launched a fresh diplomatic offensive.
have/lead a charmed life
▪ But since its premier issue in January 1993, Wired has led a charmed life.
▪ By his own admission he has led a charmed life.
▪ It's been too easy for us; we've led charmed lives till now.
▪ No wonder that she and Charles felt that they led a charmed life, that the times were on their side.
magnetic personality/charm etc
▪ Among them was Christopher Hitchens, the Washington-based writer, a figure of magnetic charm and great volubility.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Goldie Hawn's high-pitched laugh has charmed fans for years.
▪ It's a story that has charmed youngsters for generations.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ As we walked around this pretty little island we were charmed by the friendliness of the local people.
▪ He could even charm himself, I reckoned.
▪ Marcovicci charmed her listeners, all of them old friends, it seemed.
▪ She charmed, then married Baron Phillipe de Rothschild in 1954 and her style became the toast of two continents.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Charm

Charm \Charm\ (ch[aum]rm), n. [F. charme, fr. L. carmen song, verse, incantation, for casmen, akin to Skr. [,c]asman, [,c]as[=a], a laudatory song, from a root signifying to praise, to sing.]

  1. A melody; a song. [Obs.]

    With charm of earliest birds.
    --Milton.

    Free liberty to chant our charms at will.
    --Spenser.

  2. A word or combination of words sung or spoken in the practice of magic; a magical combination of words, characters, etc.; an incantation.

    My high charms work.
    --Shak.

  3. That which exerts an irresistible power to please and attract; that which fascinates; any alluring quality.

    Charms strike the sight, but merit wins the soul.
    --Pope.

    The charm of beauty's powerful glance.
    --Milton.

  4. Anything worn for its supposed efficacy to the wearer in averting ill or securing good fortune.

  5. Any small decorative object worn on the person, as a seal, a key, a silver whistle, or the like. Bunches of charms are often worn at the watch chain.

  6. (Physics) a property of certain quarks which may take the value of +1, -1 or 0.

    Syn: Spell; incantation; conjuration; enchantment; fascination; attraction.

Charm

Charm \Charm\, v. i.

  1. To use magic arts or occult power; to make use of charms.

    The voice of charmers, charming never so wisely.
    --Ps. lviii. 5.

  2. To act as, or produce the effect of, a charm; to please greatly; to be fascinating.

  3. To make a musical sound. [Obs.]
    --Milton.

Charm

Charm \Charm\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Charmed; p. pr. & vb. n. Charming.] [Cf. F. charmer. See Charm, n.]

  1. To make music upon; to tune. [Obs. & R.]

    Here we our slender pipes may safely charm.
    --Spenser.

  2. To subdue, control, or summon by incantation or supernatural influence; to affect by magic.

    No witchcraft charm thee!
    --Shak.

  3. To subdue or overcome by some secret power, or by that which gives pleasure; to allay; to soothe.

    Music the fiercest grief can charm.
    --Pope.

  4. To attract irresistibly; to delight exceedingly; to enchant; to fascinate.

    They, on their mirth and dance Intent, with jocund music charm his ear.
    --Milton.

  5. To protect with, or make invulnerable by, spells, charms, or supernatural influences; as, a charmed life.

    I, in my own woe charmed, Could not find death.
    --Shak.

    Syn: Syn. - To fascinate; enchant; enrapture; captivate; bewitch; allure; subdue; delight; entice; transport.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
charm

c.1300, "incantation, magic charm," from Old French charme (12c.) "magic charm, magic, spell; incantation, song, lamentation," from Latin carmen "song, verse, enchantment, religious formula," from canere "to sing" (see chant (v.)), with dissimilation of -n- to -r- before -m- in intermediate form *canmen (for a similar evolution, see Latin germen "germ," from *genmen). The notion is of chanting or reciting verses of magical power.\n\nA yet stronger power than that of herb or stone lies in the spoken word, and all nations use it both for blessing and cursing. But these, to be effective, must be choice, well knit, rhythmic words (verba concepta), must have lilt and tune; hence all that is strong in the speech wielded by priest, physician, magician, is allied to the forms of poetry.

[Jacob Grimm, "Teutonic Mythology" (transl. Stallybrass), 1883]

\nSense of "pleasing quality" evolved 17c. Meaning "small trinket fastened to a watch-chain, etc." first recorded 1865. Quantum physics sense is from 1964. To work like a charm (figuratively) is recorded by 1824.
charm

c.1300, "to recite or cast a magic spell," from Old French charmer (13c.) "to enchant, to fill (someone) with desire (for something); to protect, cure, treat; to maltreat, harm," from Late Latin carminare, from Latin carmen (see charm (n.)). In Old French used alike of magical and non-magical activity. In English, "to win over by treating pleasingly, delight" from mid-15c. Related: Charmed; charming. Charmed (short for I am charmed) as a conventional reply to a greeting or meeting is attested by 1825.

Wiktionary
charm

Etymology 1 n. 1 An object, act or words believed to have magic power. 2 The ability to persuade, delight or arouse admiration; often constructed in the plural. 3 (context physics English) A quantum number of hadron determined by the quantity of charm quark. 4 A small trinket on a bracelet or chain, etc., traditionally supposed to confer luck upon the wearer. vb. (senseid en seduce, entrance or fascinate)To seduce, persuade or fascinate someone or something. Etymology 2

n. 1 The mixed sound of many voices, especially of birds or children. 2 A flock, group (especially of finch).

WordNet
charm
  1. n. attractiveness that interests or pleases or stimulates; "his smile was part of his appeal to her" [syn: appeal, appealingness]

  2. a verbal formula believed to have magical force; "he whispered a spell as he moved his hands"; "inscribed around its base is a charm in Balinese" [syn: spell, magic spell]

  3. something believed to bring good luck [syn: good luck charm]

charm
  1. v. attract; cause to be enamored; "She captured all the men's hearts" [syn: capture, enamour, trance, catch, becharm, enamor, captivate, beguile, fascinate, bewitch, entrance, enchant]

  2. control by magic spells, as by practicing witchcraft [syn: becharm]

  3. protect through supernatural powers or charms

  4. induce into action by using one's charm; "She charmed him into giving her all his money" [syn: influence, tempt]

Wikipedia
Charm

Charm or charms, or The Charm, originally from Latin ("song"), may refer to:

Charm (quantum number)

Charm (symbol C) is a flavour quantum number representing the difference between the number of charm quarks and charm antiquarks that are present in a particle:


$$C = n_\text{c} - n_{\mathrm{\bar{c}}}.\$$

By convention, the sign of flavour quantum numbers agree with the sign of the electric charge carried by the quark of corresponding flavour. The charm quark, which carries an electric charge (Q) of +, therefore carries a charm of +1. The charm antiquarks have the opposite charge , and flavour quantum numbers .

As with any flavour-related quantum numbers, charm is preserved under strong and electromagnetic interaction, but not under weak interaction (see CKM matrix). For first-order weak decays, that is processes involving only one quark decay, charm can only vary by 1 . Since first-order processes are more common than second-order processes (involving two quark decays), this can be used as an approximate " selection rule" for weak decays.

Charm (album)

Charm is the critically acclaimed third studio album from American rapper/ record producer Danny! (see 2006 in music) and the first of his records to be released commercially. As evidenced in the title, Charm was a huge milestone in Danny!'s career; after two unsuccessful attempts to make a name for himself in the music world (2004's The College Kicked-Out and 2005's F.O.O.D.), the record unanimously won rave reviews, culminating in the inclusion of the album on the 49th Annual Grammy Awards short list and, eventually, a record deal with Definitive Jux Records.

Widely regarded as one of the strongest entries in his discography (rivaled by 2008's And I Love H.E.R.), Charm helped Danny! achieve a moderate buzz in the underground hip-hop community and become South Carolina's most heralded hip-hop artist to date. The song "Cafe Surreal" from this album would go on to become a signature tune in commercial bumpers for the MTV early morning video countdown program aMTV, being played since its pilot in early 2009, and was also featured in a 2013 ad campaign for Crown Royal.

Charm (programming language)

Charm is a computer programming language devised in the early 1990s with similarities to the RTL/2, Pascal and C languages in addition to containing some unique features of its own. The Charm language is defined by a context-free grammar amenable to being processed by recursive descent parser as described in seminal books on compiler design.

A set of Charm tools including a compiler, assembler and linker released for the Acorn market has been reviewed in Acorn User magazine under the category of programming software. Charm reworked for RISC OS platforms has subsequently been reviewed in Archive magazine.

Charm is further described in the e-book Programming in Charm on the Raspberry Pi.

Usage examples of "charm".

The idea had an outlaw charm that appealed to the absurdist witness who seemed to be sharing the experience with him.

In the midst of this inextricable mass of plants and sea weed, I noticed some charming pink halcyons and actiniae, with their long tentacles trailing after them, and medusae, green, red, and blue.

As a dinner guest at Fairhill during the First Congress, Adams was charmed.

All that was left of old Algiers tried to boast, in forced dumbness, of past glories, of every charm the beautiful, fierce city of pirates must have possessed before the French came to push it slowly but with deadly sureness back from the sea.

Her features were exquisite and her voice charming, while she made me split my sides with laughing at her Italian pronounced with an Alsatian accent, and at her gestures which were of the most comic description.

Orpheus and Amphion went a little farther, and by the charms of music enchanted things merely inanimate.

The noblest institutions in this part of Spain, the best inventions for comfortable and agreeable living, and all those habitudes and customs which throw a peculiar and Oriental charm over the Andalusian mode of living may be traced to the Moors.

I remember, a particularly charming plant, androgynous, you can see a lot of stamens and pistils, an androecium and a gynaeceum, if I remember rightly.

She answered with a charming smile, and after asking me to sit beside her she continued whatever conversation was possible in the midst of a game at cards.

Lbasa apso or a shib tzu-some animal that had at least the vestigial charm of a cat.

To German Field Marshal Walther Model, however, ordered to drive a quarter of a million men and thousands of tanks, trucks, and guns through the Ardennes in a matter of days, there was nothing charming about it at all.

Cordoba Avenue in Buenos Aires, the very place where the Russian Trade Minister Gregor Komoyedov had charmed the jackboots off the two Argentinian officers.

If the towers of Carthage and the sight of the Libyan city charm thee, a Phoenician, why, pray, grudge the Trojans their settling on Ausonian land?

Not only was she quite possibly the most beautiful woman in the Axumite empire, she had wit and brains and a charming personality to go with it.

I composed the other day, on a charming Ayrshire girl, Miss Leslie Baillie, as she passed through this place to England, will suit your taste better than the Collier Lassie, fall on and welcome.