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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
calf
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a cow calves (=produces a calf, a young cow)
▪ At this time of year the cows are calving.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
fetal
▪ Monolayers of human hepatoma cell line Hep3B were maintained in Dulbecco modified Eagle's medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum.
▪ Dulbeco's modified Eagles' medium containing 10% fetal calf serum had an advantage in both plating efficiency and growth.
golden
▪ The guests were completely cowed, like golden calf worshippers contemplating shards of Moses' broken tablets.
right
▪ He belted a ten-inch hunting-knife to his right calf.
▪ She had a mild case that left her right calf weak.
▪ A masseuse started to attack Joujou's right calf.
▪ I had a cramp in my right calf.
▪ My strange shoes felt uncomfortable and my right calf muscle pulled each time my foot left the track's cinder surface.
▪ At least the Clippers welcomed back Richardson, who missed two games with a strained right calf.
▪ The first substitution did not come until Richardson suffered a slightly strained right calf early in the fourth quarter.
young
▪ Thus farmers sell milk and young calves, as well as wool and lambs which are fattened on nearby lowland farms.
▪ The Comanche liked to kill young buffalo calves and eat the curdled, partially digested milk from the stomach.
▪ The only reliable method of preventing parasitic bronchitis is to immunise all young calves with lungworm vaccine.
▪ The six young calves in a pile were all frozen solid.
▪ One female is struck in the back, but still attempts to swim away, accompanied by her young calf.
▪ She has two young calves that look remarkably like fawns without spots.
▪ Old stags and hinds and young calves numbers have not been cut as in the past by the cold climate.
■ NOUN
bull
▪ I want you to come and look at a week-old bull calf.
▪ Sucklers hit a high of £818 going to M Mackin for a Limousin heifer and bull calf.
injury
▪ It is very likely that since the calf injury the strength of the muscles will have deteriorated considerably.
▪ His back is sore and a calf injury bothers him.
▪ But the greatest potential damage to Rangers' hopes of victory would be the loss of McCoist with a calf injury.
▪ But a calf injury ruled him out of the final just two days ago.
▪ But Torquay had a League match at Colchester on the same night, with the black star out with a calf injury!
▪ Robson missed Saturday's game at Coventry with shin and calf injuries.
▪ Winger John Hendrie misses the match with a calf injury.
▪ He's got a calf injury.
muscle
▪ Any exercises which use the calf muscles, such as heel raises, hopping, standing on one leg would be beneficial.
▪ There were thick bulbous calf muscles teetering on stiletto heels.
▪ If you can improve the power of your calf muscles you will find that you can build up your mileage without difficulty.
▪ George Williams played his first game after suffering from a strained calf muscle and quite clearly didn't have his full movement.
▪ But defender Andy Barlow will be sidelined for a month after straining a calf muscle in training.
▪ Harvey Williams did not suit up because of his torn calf muscle.
▪ Only a few minutes ago I felt a slight twitch in the boy's calf muscle.
▪ Williams said Thursday that he expects to miss three weeks with his partially torn calf muscle.
serum
▪ Monolayers of human hepatoma cell line Hep3B were maintained in Dulbecco modified Eagle's medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum.
▪ Many researchers have tried to obtain a medium for growing antibodies that is free from calf serum.
▪ Fetal calf serum is one such ingredient; and there are many others.
▪ Dulbeco's modified Eagles' medium containing 10% fetal calf serum had an advantage in both plating efficiency and growth.
strain
▪ Ward will have a full squad to choose from apart from former Hartlepool defender Tony Barratt, who has a calf strain.
▪ Sharpe has been down with a calf strain this week but he trained yesterday and does not look in danger.
▪ Glenn Hoddle won't be naming his side, until he's given himself a fitness test on a calf strain.
▪ There's a bigger doubt though, over Martin Ling, who's got a calf strain.
■ VERB
produce
▪ At least know your gestation times so that you are not surprised when a mating at some forgotten date actually produces a calf!
▪ They produce a single calf once every 2 or 3 years.
▪ It is a fast-growing breed and can produce a more acceptable calf for beef than the Jersey.
sell
▪ Thus farmers sell milk and young calves, as well as wool and lambs which are fattened on nearby lowland farms.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
kill the fatted calf
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ George Williams played his first game after suffering from a strained calf muscle and quite clearly didn't have his full movement.
▪ How many more calves will she be able to bear?
▪ Juanito was ready for him, and the Kalashnikov crashed down at Trent's calf.
▪ Then, work on your calves and ankles so you are ready to concentrate on more advanced leg exercises.
▪ When she finishes with the calf she puts down the bottle and goes to the console, frowning at the text.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Calf

Calf \Calf\, n.; pl. Calves. [OE. calf, kelf, AS. cealf; akin to D. kalf, G. kalb, Icel. k[=a]lfr, Sw. kalf, Dan. kalv, Goth. kalb[=o]; cf. Skr. garbha fetus, young, Gr. ?????, Skr grabh to seize, conceive, Ir. colpa, colpach, a calf.

  1. The young of the cow, or of the Bovine family of quadrupeds. Also, the young of some other mammals, as of the elephant, rhinoceros, hippopotamus, and whale.

  2. Leather made of the skin of the calf; especially, a fine, light-colored leather used in bookbinding; as, to bind books in calf.

  3. An awkward or silly boy or young man; any silly person; a dolt. [Colloq.]

    Some silly, doting, brainless calf.
    --Drayton.

  4. A small island near a larger; as, the Calf of Man.

  5. A small mass of ice set free from the submerged part of a glacier or berg, and rising to the surface.
    --Kane.

  6. [Cf. Icel. k[=a]lfi.] The fleshy hinder part of the leg below the knee.

    Calf's-foot jelly, jelly made from the feet of calves. The gelatinous matter of the feet is extracted by boiling, and is flavored with sugar, essences, etc.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
calf

"young cow," Old English cealf (Anglian cælf) "young cow," from Proto-Germanic *kalbam (cognates: Middle Dutch calf, Old Norse kalfr, German Kalb, Gothic kalbo), perhaps from PIE *gelb(h)-, from root *gel- "to swell," hence, "womb, fetus, young of an animal." Elliptical sense of "leather made from the skin of a calf" is from 1727. Used of icebergs that break off from glaciers from 1818.

calf

fleshy part of the lower leg, early 14c., from Old Norse kalfi, source unknown; possibly from the same Germanic root as calf (n.1).

Wiktionary
calf

Etymology 1 n. 1 A young cow or bull. 2 Leather made of the skin of the calf; especially, a fine, light-coloured leather used in bookbinding. 3 A young elephant, seal or whale (qualifier: also used of some other animals). 4 A chunk of ice broken off of a larger glacier, ice shelf, or iceberg. 5 A small island, near a larger island. 6 A cabless railroad engine. 7 (context informal dated English) An awkward or silly boy or young man; any silly person; a dolt. Etymology 2

n. 1 (context anatomy English) The back of the leg below the knee. 2 The muscle in the back of the leg below the knee.

WordNet
calf
  1. n. young of domestic cattle

  2. the muscular back part of the shank [syn: sura]

  3. fine leather from the skin of a calf [syn: calfskin]

  4. young of various large placental mammals e.g. whale or giraffe or elephant or buffalo

  5. [also: calves (pl)]

Wikipedia
Calf

A calf (plural, calves) is the young of domestic cattle. Calves are reared to become adult cattle, or are slaughtered for their meat, called veal, and for their calfskin.

The term "calf" is also used for some other species. See "Other animals" below.

Calf (disambiguation)
  • Calf (plural calves) refers to a young bovine
    or
  • Calf (leg); in humans (and other primates), the back portion of the lower leg

Calf may also refer to:

Calf (leg)

The calf ( TA: sura) is the back portion of the lower leg in human anatomy. The muscles within the calf correspond to the posterior compartment of the leg. The two largest muscles within this compartment are known together as the calf muscle and attach to the heel via the Achilles tendon. Several other, smaller muscles attach to the knee, the ankle, and via long tendons to the toes.

Usage examples of "calf".

There were still 62ALL THINGS WISE AND WONDERFUL more than thirty calves left in the building and the terrible thought arose that the disease might spread through all of them.

Softly he traced a blue vein that started under the delicate anklebone and disappeared up a curvaceous calf.

Below the towel the legs lay aligned in parallel, the knees, calves, and anklebones just touching in classic symmetry.

Aaron restored the worship of Apis when he made the golden calf, 369-m.

Yet I was disturbed when he spoke of a prodigy, for suddenly I remembered the birth of this Apis calf and my own fears.

So we went home as quickly as we could, and afterwards these priests removed the calf whither I knew not, without so much as paying me its price, to keep it until such time as it should take the place of the old Apis, which was so near to death that its sarcophagus was already fashioned and in its niche at the burying-place of bulls some leagues away.

Or it might have to do with the accursed Apis calf which had been born amongst my herd, that now would take the place of the old bull god they buried this day in the tomb of bulls.

The huge hike of the day before had left every joint in my body aching, my muscles, especially in my calves and hamstrings stiff as well as painful, and a huge heavy weight of tiredness on my shoulders.

Leo dropped to his knees and slashed at the calf of another: hamstringing was highly effective, if not at all the type of blow Asherah expected an aristocrat of Byzantium to resort to.

Grey Beallach drifted down into the glens to look for breakfast: hinds and calves moved up from the hazel shows to the high fresh pastures: the tiny rustling noises of night disappeared in that hush which precedes the awakening of life: and then came the flood of morning gold from behind the dim eastern mountains, and in an instant the earth had wheeled into a new day.

Tomas waded out into the harbor, his bicolor robe floating around his calves.

Across from me, Brenda was busily sketching and in a minute she showed us: a slim, leggy blonde with my hair and face, dressed in a skin-tight black bodysuit, a revolver strapped to her hip, a bow and quiver at her back, and a knife in a sheath at her calf.

The young calves scampered out of our way, but their sedate mothers permitted us to ride near enough to read the brands as we met and passed.

When the last tin was inside the shed, the doors shoved shut, the chains wrapped around the board, the deputy rested against his car, his breathing as labored as a bulldogger struggling with a calf.

They were bulldoggers, the boots favored by rodeo topers because the heels angled forward to give better traction when taking down a roped calf.