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Crossword clues for young

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
young
I.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a young child
▪ Young children are naturally curious about the world.
a young infant
▪ The never-ending demands of a young infant can be very stressful for parents.
a young learner (=a learner who is a child)
▪ The activities are good for young learners.
a younger brother
▪ Do you have any younger brothers?
a younger sister
▪ Mary showed a lot of aggressive behaviour towards her younger sister.
a young/middle-aged/elderly couple
▪ A young couple with a baby have just moved into the house next door.
a young/teenage audience
▪ a magazine with a young audience
at an early/young age
▪ Kids can start learning a second language at a young age.
die young
▪ They had seven children and three of them died young.
from an early/young age
▪ She’d been playing the piano from a very early age.
little/small/young girl
▪ I’ve known Mollie ever since I was a little girl.
married young (=at a young age)
▪ She married young.
the younger generation
▪ The party needs to make its policies appeal to the younger generation too.
young hopefuls
▪ Thousands of young hopefuls were auditioned for the role.
young lad
▪ a young lad
young lovers
▪ a pair of young lovers
young offender
young/old folkBritish Englishold-fashioned
▪ Young folk these days don’t know the meaning of work.
young/old/elderly etc lady
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
so
▪ Fear, rage and awe contend in me - such talent for deception in one so young!
▪ Second and third graders are still so young.
▪ She was so young, scarcely older than some of his pupils.
▪ She was so young, and a real beauty.
▪ She had not realised that they were so young.
▪ Yesterday he would have been fifty-nine. So young, Primo thinks.
▪ She was so young, so full of life.
▪ It must be nice to be so young and to be able to touch some one for no reason at all.
too
▪ It looked strange and far too young.
▪ Probably he was too young for them.
▪ But, all young. Too young to be Regent, I say.
▪ She knows the team is too young and too raw to make much of a showing this season.
▪ I was too young to exercise my intellectual force to demolish prejudices that made me sick.
▪ She was 14, too young to be on a world stage.
▪ He wore a black leather coat, too young for him if he had looked his age.
▪ Self-reliance was the lesson, but it was intended for those too young to understand it.
very
▪ All the girls were skilled at farm work, work they had done since they were very young.
▪ They were tough, highly trained volunteers in the Airborne, but some looked very young to me.
▪ She's very young, only a girl really, and it takes time to get used to this funny little country.
▪ In its current manifestation, the Berlin band looks very young and substantially female and sounds extremely enthusiastic.
▪ How to increase joy Think back to when you were very young.
▪ I was fifteen, remember. Very young.
▪ The very young can stop feeding and rapidly become very ill.
▪ Other chapter books are, of course, emotionally inappropriate for very young children.
■ NOUN
age
▪ There are a number of species generally similar to this one in rocks of Cretaceous and younger age.
▪ Consequently, he learned to be self-sufficient at a young age.
▪ Species resembling this one in general shape are met with in rocks of Cretaceous and younger age.
▪ Other justices seemed concerned with the young age of the grade-school children involved.
▪ This was a big step for me and put me on the road to caddying top tournaments at a very young age.
▪ These women were old and toothless at a young age, their eyes bereft of hope.
▪ Richard Lewis has expanded the Bisham Abbey squad and they have started to select children at a younger age than before.
▪ From a very young age he had an extraordinary in-built ability to focus.
boy
▪ Then they were asked to look at a young boy.
▪ The younger boys were not deaf, it turned out.
▪ Dauntless had been a young boy then, newly recruited into the order and eager to prove himself worthy.
▪ But his dismissal was too abrupt for young boys.
▪ The young boy was running down the road towards Martin with a posse of four helpers close behind.
▪ By the time Derek Dashwood first saw it as a young boy in 1952, it was falling into disrepair.
▪ And young boys grin over their first pint of cider.
▪ A younger boy, six or so, sits on the seat of the moped and watches them.
brother
▪ They assist their parents in feeding their new younger brothers and sisters and in defending them from predators such as snakes.
▪ Only the youngest brother, Goiko, kept his word and said nothing of the matter to his wife.
▪ I do not kneel to the younger brothers and sisters, but I owe them respect.
▪ Gelon of Syracuse had left his younger brother Hiero in charge of Gela.
▪ Cameron was educated at home in a remote farmhouse with his younger brother and sister by parents Val and Phil.
▪ The struggle continues in the light of day in two stories which tell how he, the younger brother, gets the better of Esau.
▪ She bitterly resented her husband's domination by his younger brother.
child
▪ This is especially important in a home with young children.
▪ Certainly, younger children show affection and have feelings of liking and disliking.
▪ For example, young children are held less liable than older children.
▪ Tale-telling on each other and inciting each other to be naughty are frequent problems faced by parents of young children.
▪ The youngest child was wearing a soiled diaper.
couple
▪ She sighed, and wondered if all she had done to help the young couple could possibly have been worth it.
▪ And there was this terrific young couple, Herb, deep in lust and love.
▪ A young couple and the wife's parents bought a house together but only the younger couple were registered as owners.
▪ On our other side a young couple wandered by and plopped down with only a six-pack and a sleeping bag.
▪ Time allowed 00:18 Read in studio Eight young couples are living in new homes thanks to a village's own housing scheme.
▪ A starter home is for young couples on the way up.
▪ The idea is stop young couples from moving away.
▪ A young couple I know has just been blessed with a new baby boy.
daughter
▪ Actually standing beside him was Matthew's younger daughter Clare.
▪ He certainly did not treat her as a little princess, a status that youngest daughters in some families enjoy.
▪ When we moved from Durham to Bristol our youngest daughter was ten.
▪ The parents left three young daughters behind.
▪ On 9 July 1877 Matcham married Robinson's younger daughter Maria, by whom he had two daughters.
▪ Every time the father took a wrong guess, the youngest daughter laughed loudly.
▪ The poor man left a widow and a young daughter.
▪ In the row directly in front of us sat a father and his young daughter.
family
▪ Demographics: Are there a lot of young families?
▪ Some years back, when he had a young family, Lewry joined his local National Trust centre.
▪ There are a lot of young families in the neighborhood and I see kids playing on bikes, which I really like.
▪ Younger lawyers often have greater need for current cash to support young families and pay off educational loans and mortgages.
▪ A more dramatic change for the youngest family member came in the new year.
▪ Wootton had already gone home: he had a young family and a termagant wife.
▪ There are good swimming beaches each end of town with shallow sandy water, ideal for young families.
generation
▪ The younger generation did seem less committed to the politics of the street demonstration and the illegal parade.
▪ Basic compassion, not just for the old but for the younger generation too, lies at the heart of this idea.
▪ Voice over It's a recruiting ground for the younger generation and a meeting place for old friends like Billy Connolly.
▪ I began to encounter a younger generation.
▪ But, again, it's the same young generation of women making it this far.
▪ For the younger generation, they have no knowledge of the history, so they think it is very interesting.
▪ Rock and roll, which arrived for me in 1958, had completely severed the younger generation from its elders.
▪ Barred from selling shares to outsiders, some of the younger generation of Moores are keen to realise their enormous paper wealth.
girl
▪ I think his pleasure was merely to talk about it in that calm way to a completely ignorant young girl.
▪ In college he loved a young girl of a lower class and ruined her; she died a suicide.
▪ The shoes she had when she was a young girl.
▪ A pretty young girl, who looked a little like Gabby.
▪ I was just a young girl from a small planet and I felt very unimportant here.
▪ In it she tries to justify the vindictiveness with which she treated the young girl.
▪ Yet it is the head movements of the young girl as she dances to Pie Jesu that are so telling.
▪ After Rubin Stacy was lynched, young girls were allowed to view the body.
lad
▪ Hadn't he actually been elected to the State Senate - old Jack Ryan's youngest lad?
▪ They've put together a side of young lads and journeyman pros, and that is meant as a compliment.
▪ Two young lads from Hafnarfjödur, a small fishing village near Reykjavik, were going like loonies.
▪ He's a young lad who was employed in the house here, living in.
▪ He had been a recruit in his class, a bright young lad.
▪ A young lad, a boy; probably still an adolescent and little for his age at that.
▪ There was scope here for a young lad with ability.
lady
▪ Many young ladies will mourn Steven's departure.
▪ Stephens collected samplers done by young ladies from prominent Eastern families who attended female academies.
▪ The Senior Management team were evidently congratulating themselves on having recruited such an able young lady.
▪ That's the young lady you saw at Wuthering Heights, Mr Lockwood.
▪ She hadn't known Mr Arkwright was thinking of getting married; and what a lovely young lady!
▪ The young lady doctor had said ten minutes, but they must have been here twenty.
▪ Ann did most of the cooking, assisted occasionally, by the young ladies and teachers.
man
▪ The hotel was almost empty and all the young men had been drafted into the army.
▪ Dvorah dear, this is the young man.
▪ One day, after the play, he was talking to a young man outside the Rose.
▪ Was the future of the Rabari incarnate in this young man?
▪ There was moreover, a young man in the congregation who lapsed into this sin.
▪ Madam Sahib, it is because he is a young man.
▪ The younger man agreed to fly back to Swindon with Wiltshire detectives.
▪ He shook his head to drive away some bottleneck flies straying from the vile puddle in front of the horse-faced young man.
offender
▪ A few children's homes have been opened but they also double as reformatories for young offenders.
▪ Sentence: three years' detention in a young offender institution.
▪ My Department is providing £200,000 this financial year to motor projects dealing with young offenders, thereby keeping them out of custody.
▪ Punishing the criminal Home secretary Jack Straw has a policy of placing more young offenders in custody.
▪ They say the centre, to be based at a former young offenders institution, will treat refugees as criminals.
▪ Putting young offenders into a prison or other custodial establishment does not deter them from offending.
people
▪ One approach was to read these young people the riot act and let them repent or retreat.
▪ Among the issues considered were homelessness, unemployment, children and young people in poverty and the benefits systems.
▪ Yet in our society we systematically separate young people from adults.
▪ Educating young people to drink responsibly and in moderation is best achieved by parents setting a good example.
▪ Almost 2. 5 million young people were attending college.
▪ Many young people with the encouragement of their parents, left home at this time to avoid these responsibilities.
▪ One of the main issues today is the future of young people.
person
▪ Dominic's show-off fact: He was the youngest person ever to run for London Mayor.
▪ And so when I talk to a young person I have a captive audience.
▪ When a child or young person is received into care a placement with a carer or carers has to be made.
▪ The uncommon 7-year-old wanted to be the youngest person to pilot a plane across the country.
▪ The breakthrough for the young person who has left their family home is different.
▪ It was an extraordinary time for a young person like Alvin, black and a dancer, to arrive in New York.
▪ But it failed to discuss how consent should be interpreted where children, young persons and the mentally backward are concerned.
▪ Immobilization produces increased bone resorption resulting in hypercalcemia and hypercalciuria, and is particularly severe in young persons.
player
▪ Jamie, 18, is Boro's young player of the year while Sean, also 18, plays for the Quakers.
▪ There are too many good prospects in each system, promising young players no organization wishes to lose.
▪ She is a good role model for young players with her excellent attitude and obvious love of the game.
▪ The show will start with Napoleon Kaufman, the most dynamic young player in the game.
▪ Wayne Williams took the top scorer's award and David Flinn was the chosen as the best young player.
▪ But I didn't feel like I had the right as a young player to just come in an act like that.
▪ Vijay Singh and Paul Broadhurst are just two examples of young players with real potential who have obviously benefited from the experience.
▪ These were young players, too young.
sister
▪ She eats the eggs laid by her daughter, whose sole job is to raise her own young sisters.
▪ Two younger sisters have also joined the force.
▪ Hathi had come with us because no one could imagine our youngest sister, Rose, without him.
▪ She was the glamorous, daring one-Muriel was the younger, timid, plump, solemn younger sister.
▪ It was high time some one took his young sister down a peg.
▪ Despite our differences, though, they treated me like a younger sister.
▪ I refuse to allow you to inspect my cellars simply because you have seen my young sister carrying a torch.
▪ The survivors were Nietzsche himself and a younger sister.
son
▪ Other birds stood on Tallis, pecked at her, pecked at the charred flesh of the youngest son.
▪ Some say that Diomedes went with him and others Neoptolemus, also called Pyrrhus, the young son of Achilles.
▪ At the date of this book, 1569, the press had been taken over by Aldus's youngest son, Paulus.
▪ Redmond is Harry Trench, a new doctor and youngest son of landed gentry with a small investment income.
▪ The Mellors and their two young sons became regular guests at the Garrads' home at Frinton-on-Sea, Essex.
▪ Lord Douglas lived in the castle, and his young son, William, liked me.
▪ He was the youngest son of a poor parson.
▪ William's young son, Edwin, plays on the Adventure Playground nearby.
woman
▪ Myeloski had been joined by a young woman in her early twenties.
▪ Softball is played on the college level by young women.
▪ This story of a self-obsessed young woman wears thin well before her world comes to its crashing end.
▪ At the time, the necessary math was done by a group of young women using mechanical desk calculators.
▪ It's not every day a young woman pulls a gun on a burglar.
▪ Two young women flag me down.
▪ And in the village of Marlott, following ancient custom, the young women gathered to dance every holiday.
▪ Gibson began to draw what he was interested in most: beautiful young women.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
little/young ones
▪ As Jack goes on hunting, the little ones look at him as an expert.
▪ Bowel frequency, for example, was little greater in the older patients than in the younger ones.
▪ Happy shall he be who takes your little ones and dashes them against the rock!
▪ Helping with academic or social tasks, the older children develop a sense of responsibility for the younger ones in the building.
▪ Mr Preston had recently cleared out his old trees and planted new young ones.
▪ Older respondents tend to state their replies in honorifics; younger ones are less reverential.
▪ The older kids were at school and two of the women had taken the younger ones to the park.
▪ They were thinking of wives and little ones far away, and wondering if they would ever see them again.
start young
▪ You have to start young if you want to be a great musician.
▪ Awareness of personal attitudes to ageing has to start young.
▪ But protest comes from awareness and today awareness starts young.
▪ But they say the best pilots start young and David Leech will have to wait till August for his first solo.
▪ With many sexually active before their sixteenth birthday and with drug taking on the increase, education needs to start young.
young blood
▪ It's about time we got some young blood in this company.
▪ But Kit wasn't having some young blood replace his female prizes.
▪ He stopped once to look at the young blood sleeping among the Begonias.
▪ Leaning over the parapet to watch the young bloods in the river sprucing up their horses for the fair.
▪ Well, that 25-yard volley makes it two-nil to the young bloods.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "Impact" is a lively young company which specializes in public relations.
▪ a single mother with two young children
▪ As a country, Zimbabwe is still quite young.
▪ At 35, he is the youngest person to hold this office.
▪ He's a perfectly respectable young man.
▪ Her youngest son works for a television company.
▪ In just a week, you can have younger, smoother skin.
▪ Most banks are keen to loan money to promising young businesses.
▪ Sometimes I forget you're younger than I am.
▪ There was a young pine tree in the back yard.
▪ When I was younger, I used to play a lot of baseball.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ In 1900 she married Stephen Townesend, a young doctor with stage aspirations whom she had tried to help.
▪ It is hard to discard traditional notions of what young people need to succeed in the economy.
▪ Most were hired annually, and the employment did give young women a measure of choice and relative economic independence.
▪ Next time I saw Joe he looked maybe not 10 years younger but certainly a totally different man and ready to rock.
▪ Such seriousness, intensity, and power in a young man set him apart and left an impression on others.
▪ The young man, sputtering now, rested his long head-which seemed to swell and turn a mahogany color-against the tree trunk.
▪ The pressures on young people - especially students - to use drugs are increasing.
▪ The story began when a young man attended a party in Mournacre Hill, a suburb of Leicester.
II.noun
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
an old head on young shoulders
little/young ones
▪ As Jack goes on hunting, the little ones look at him as an expert.
▪ Bowel frequency, for example, was little greater in the older patients than in the younger ones.
▪ Happy shall he be who takes your little ones and dashes them against the rock!
▪ Helping with academic or social tasks, the older children develop a sense of responsibility for the younger ones in the building.
▪ Mr Preston had recently cleared out his old trees and planted new young ones.
▪ Older respondents tend to state their replies in honorifics; younger ones are less reverential.
▪ The older kids were at school and two of the women had taken the younger ones to the park.
▪ They were thinking of wives and little ones far away, and wondering if they would ever see them again.
sb the Younger
▪ Pliny the Younger
start young
▪ You have to start young if you want to be a great musician.
▪ Awareness of personal attitudes to ageing has to start young.
▪ But protest comes from awareness and today awareness starts young.
▪ But they say the best pilots start young and David Leech will have to wait till August for his first solo.
▪ With many sexually active before their sixteenth birthday and with drug taking on the increase, education needs to start young.
young blood
▪ It's about time we got some young blood in this company.
▪ But Kit wasn't having some young blood replace his female prizes.
▪ He stopped once to look at the young blood sleeping among the Begonias.
▪ Leaning over the parapet to watch the young bloods in the river sprucing up their horses for the fair.
▪ Well, that 25-yard volley makes it two-nil to the young bloods.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Kangaroos carry their young in a pouch.
▪ The mother bird's main concern is to provide food for her young.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But at least the young have education on their side.
▪ Low-ranking females will have young of whatever gender leaves the troop in order not to saddle the young with low rank.
▪ Status pays, because females at the top get more meat and have twice as many young as do others.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Young

Young \Young\, n. The offspring of animals, either a single animal or offspring collectively.

[The egg] bursting with kindly rupture, forth disclosed Their callow young.
--Milton.

With young, with child; pregnant.

Young

Young \Young\ (y[u^]ng), a. [Compar. Younger (y[u^][ng]"g[~e]r); superl. Youngest (-g[e^]st).] [OE. yung, yong, [yogh]ong, [yogh]ung, AS. geong; akin to OFries. iung, iong, D. joing, OS., OHG., & G. jung, Icel. ungr, Sw. & Dan. ung, Goth. juggs, Lith. jaunas, Russ. iunuii, L. juvencus, juvenis, Skr. juva[,c]a, juvan. [root]28

  1. Cf. Junior, Juniper, Juvenile, Younker, Youth.] 1. Not long born; still in the first part of life; not yet arrived at adolescence, maturity, or age; not old; juvenile; -- said of animals; as, a young child; a young man; a young fawn.

    For he so young and tender was of age.
    --Chaucer.

    ``Whom the gods love, die young,'' has been too long carelessly said; . . . whom the gods love, live young forever.
    --Mrs. H. H. Jackson.

  2. Being in the first part, pr period, of growth; as, a young plant; a young tree.

    While the fears of the people were young.
    --De Foe.

  3. Having little experience; inexperienced; unpracticed; ignorant; weak.

    Come, come, elder brother, you are too young in this.
    --Shak.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
young

"young animals collectively, offspring," late 15c., from young (adj.).

young

Old English geong "youthful, young; recent, new, fresh," from Proto-Germanic *juwunga- (cognates: Old Saxon and Old Frisian jung, Old Norse ungr, Middle Dutch jonc, Dutch jong, Old High German and German jung, Gothic juggs), from PIE *yuwn-ko-, suffixed form of root *yeu- "vital force, youthful vigor" (cognates: Sanskrit yuva "young," Latin juvenis "young," Lithuanian jaunas, Old Church Slavonic junu, Russian junyj "young," Old Irish oac, Welsh ieuanc "young").\n

\nFrom c.1830-1850, Young France, Young Italy, etc., were loosely applied to "republican agitators" in various monarchies; also, especially in Young England, Young America, used generally for "typical young person of the nation." For Young Turk, see Turk.

Wiktionary
young
  1. In the early part of growth or life; born not long ago. n. 1 People who are young; young beings. 2 The younger generation. 3 offspring. v

  2. (context informal or demography English) To become or seem to become #Adjective

WordNet
young
  1. n. any immature animal [syn: offspring]

  2. United States film and television actress (1913-2000) [syn: Loretta Young]

  3. United States civil rights leader (1921-1971) [syn: Whitney Young, Whitney Moore Young Jr.]

  4. British physicist and Egyptologist; he revived the wave theory of light and proposed a three-component theory of color vision; he also played an important role in deciphering the hieroglyphics on the Rosetta Stone (1773-1829) [syn: Thomas Young]

  5. United States jazz tenor saxophonist (1909-1959) [syn: Pres Young, Lester Willis Young]

  6. English poet (1683-1765) [syn: Edward Young]

  7. United States baseball player and famous pitcher (1867-1955) [syn: Cy Young, Danton True Young]

  8. United States religious leader of the Mormon Church after the assassination of Joseph Smith; he led the Mormon exodus from Illinois to Salt Lake City, Utah (1801-1877) [syn: Brigham Young]

  9. young people collectively; "rock music appeals to the young"; "youth everywhere rises in revolt" [syn: youth] [ant: aged]

  10. [also: youngest, younger]

young
  1. adj. (used of living things especially persons) in an early period of life or development or growth; "young people" [syn: immature] [ant: old]

  2. (of crops) harvested at an early stage of development; before complete maturity; "new potatoes"; "young corn" [syn: new]

  3. [also: youngest, younger]

Gazetteer
Young, AZ -- U.S. Census Designated Place in Arizona
Population (2000): 561
Housing Units (2000): 446
Land area (2000): 42.012466 sq. miles (108.811784 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 42.012466 sq. miles (108.811784 sq. km)
FIPS code: 85330
Located within: Arizona (AZ), FIPS 04
Location: 34.111688 N, 110.929208 W
ZIP Codes (1990):
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Young, AZ
Young
Young -- U.S. County in Texas
Population (2000): 17943
Housing Units (2000): 8504
Land area (2000): 922.332083 sq. miles (2388.829028 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 8.512770 sq. miles (22.047971 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 930.844853 sq. miles (2410.876999 sq. km)
Located within: Texas (TX), FIPS 48
Location: 33.210656 N, 98.658910 W
Headwords:
Young
Young, TX
Young County
Young County, TX
Wikipedia
Young

Young may refer to:

  • Offspring, the product of reproduction of a new organism produced by one or more parents
  • Youth, the time of life when one is young, often meaning the time between childhood and adulthood
Young (Kenny Chesney song)

"Young" is a song written by Naoise Sheridan, Steve McEwan and Craig Wiseman, and recorded by American country music singer Kenny Chesney. It was released in December 2001 as the lead single from his album No Shoes, No Shirt, No Problems. It peaked at number 2 on the U.S. Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart and at number 35 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart.

Young (mango)

The 'Young' mango, also known as the 'Tebow' mango, is a named mango cultivar that originated in south Florida.

Young (Hollywood Undead song)

"Young" is a song by American rock band Hollywood Undead. It is the fourth single from their debut studio album, Swan Songs, and is the sixth track on that album. The single was released after the album's release on April 13, 2009, with a music video directed by Kevin Kerslake released the same day.

Young (crater)

Young is a lunar crater that is located in the rugged southeast part of the Moon's near side. It lies to the east of the crater Metius, and southeast of Rheita. The long Vallis Rheita follows a line tangential to the southwest rim of Rheita, and cuts a wide trough through the southwest floor and outer rim of Young.

The surviving part of the crater is a worn, eroded formation that has seen better times. The rim and inner wall can still be followed across the surface, but it is indented and notched by smaller impacts. The inner floor contains a pair of small, bowl-shaped craters designated Young A and Young B.

To the south of Young, the valley is overlain by Young D, a somewhat less eroded feature than Young. The valley continues intermittently to the southeast, spanning a total distance of about 500 kilometers. This is the longest valley on the near side of the Moon.

Young (surname)

The surname Young has several origins.

In some cases — particularly in England, Northern Ireland, and Scotland – the surname is derived from the Middle Englishyunge, yonge ("young"); This particular surname usually originated to distinguish a younger son.

In other cases, the surname is an Americanization of any number of like-sounding, or cognate surnames in other languages. For example: the GermanJung and Junk; the DutchJong; and the FrenchLejeune and Lajeunesse. The surname can also be a form of the French Dion or Guyon.

In yet other cases, it is a romanization of Chinese Yang . Very rarely, it may be a romanization of the Korean surnames Yong or Yeong ; however, if seen in a Korean name, it is far more likely that Young is a portion of the given name instead.

Young is the 49th-most common surname in England; 22nd in Scotland and 11th in New Zealand.

Notable people with this surname include:

Young (Tulisa song)

"Young" is the debut single by British singer Tulisa from her debut solo album, The Female Boss. It was released as the album's lead single on 29 April 2012. "Young" peaked at number one on the UK Singles Chart, as well as number five in the Republic of Ireland.

Young (Korean name)

Young, also romanisedYeong or Yŏng, is a rare Korean family name, a single-syllable unisex Korean given name, and as a common element in two-syllable given names. It has different meanings depending on which hanja is used to write it.

Young (England cricketer)

Young (full name and dates of birth and death unknown) was an English cricketer. Young's batting style is unknown.

Young made a single first-class appearance for England against Surrey at Lord's Old Ground in 1801. Batting twice in a match which England won by 52 runs, he was dismissed for a duck in England's first-innings, while in their second-innings he ended not out on 3.

Young (MCC cricketer)

Young (first name and details of birth and death unknown) was an English cricketer with amateur status who was active in 1831 and was a member of Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). He played his only first-class match in 1831, playing in an 'A to K' versus 'L to Z' match organised by MCC and involving several top-class players including Jem Broadbridge, William Lillywhite and William Ward. Young's team, L to Z, won the match by 12 runs. A batsman of unknown handedness whose bowling style is not recorded, he scored five runs and a duck and took no wickets.

Usage examples of "young".

The conflict, grown beyond the scope of original plans, had become nothing less than a fratricidal war between the young king and the Count of Poitou for the succession to the Angevin empire, a ghastly struggle in which Henry was obliged to take a living share, abetting first one and then the other of his furious sons.

And a gorgeous pair of eyes they were, the young police sergeant noted as Abie Singleton continued her tirade against the Houston Police Department.

The skin of this young creature, from continual ablutions and the use of mollifying ointments, was inconceivably smooth and soft.

Nan was younger, Aborigines were considered sub-normal and not capable of being educated the way whites were.

It provides a complete array of services to young people who decide not to abort their babies and instead carry them to term.

In virtual, hours ago, he had been young and solid, just as Abrim remembered him, his shoulders rounded with muscle.

Whether Walter West let him watch while he abused young girls, or whether he encouraged his son to take his place, or whether, in fact, he abused him directly Frederick West was never to reveal.

For Juanita Mott became the sixth young woman in the space of just two years to be sexually abused, tortured, decapitated and finally dismembered in the cellar beneath the pavement of number 25 Cromwell Street.

Like every other young woman who suffered at the hands of Frederick West, Shirley Robinson was to be abused, tortured and mutilated before she died.

One tape, in particular, featured a young girl hung up by her arms from a beam in a cellar and abused by two men, one black, one white, while she is helpless.

Another showed a young woman apparently drugged, and then gagged with masking tape, before being abused by two men.

And to rage was added fear: fear that once on her own she might complain that he had sexually abused her as a child, and, worse still, that she might voice her suspicions about the fate of some of the young women she had seen in Cromwell Street.

Fred were in the habit of sexually and sadistically abusing young girls in the cellar of their house for their joint pleasure.

You get older daughters trying to protect younger siblings by doing anything they can to keep the abusive father focused on them.

With a young child and an abusive boyfriend, she had used up all the reserves of hope that she had stored up for emergencies and hard times.