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Crossword clues for welcome

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
welcome
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a club welcomes sb (=is happy to accept new members)
▪ The chess club welcomes both beginners and experienced players.
a welcome relief
▪ The holiday was a welcome relief from the pressure of work.
a welcoming atmosphere (=when a place you arrive at feels friendly)
▪ The bar provides a welcoming atmosphere for a relaxing evening drink.
enthusiastic reception/welcome
▪ The audience gave him an enthusiastic reception.
extend a warm welcome
▪ We’d like to extend a warm welcome to our French visitors.
get/be given a hero’s welcome (=be treated as a hero when you arrive somewhere)
▪ The team were given a hero’s welcome when they returned to the city.
rapturous reception/welcome
▪ He was given a rapturous welcome.
warm welcome
▪ Please give a warm welcome to our special guest.
warmly welcomed
▪ We were warmly welcomed by the villagers.
welcome addition
▪ This excellent book will be a welcome addition to the library of any student.
welcome an announcement (=say that you are pleased about it)
▪ Environmental groups welcomed the announcement.
welcome comments (=be glad to hear people’s opinions)
▪ We would welcome your comments and suggestions.
welcome news (=good news that makes you happy)
▪ The lower interest rates will be welcome news to home owners.
welcome suggestions (=be keen to listen to suggestions)
▪ We welcome your comments and suggestions.
welcome the chance to do sth
▪ I’d welcome the chance to discuss the problem with someone.
welcome the move
▪ Environmentalists welcomed the move to limit the length of fishing nets.
welcome the newsformal (= say that you are pleased about some news)
▪ Environmental groups welcomed the news that the area would be protected.
welcome wagon
▪ The company is bringing out the welcome wagon for the new sales recruits.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
also
▪ May I also welcome the inquiry that he has announced?
▪ The foundation also welcomed two new members: Harold Rebenitsch and Bev Schoen.
▪ Powder skiers will also welcome it.
▪ One also welcomes the shortening of the intercessions as compared with the length of those found in the Roman canon.
▪ It also welcomed the realization of the joint hydroelectric power station project Ruzizi-II, and progress on co-operation in scientific research.
▪ We also welcome letters on health policy and management topics in general.
▪ De Klerk's speech was also welcomed in the United States but with markedly less enthusiasm for an early end to sanctions.
always
▪ Other events are at the planning stage but the committee always welcomes any suggestions from staff or offers of help.
▪ We are conservers and preservers, maintaining homes and relationships, and we do not always welcome change.
▪ If he was at home we were always welcome in his study.
▪ New ideas from the other vibrancers were always welcomed and experimented with.
▪ But the movement wasn't always welcomed with entirely open arms.
▪ The sinking stomach pains which heralded this loss were always welcome to me, and afterwards I would feel triumphantly clean.
▪ Everyone is always welcome at our activities, members or non-members, so do please come along.
particularly
▪ His arrival will be particularly welcomed by Boksic, who endured a frustrating afternoon alongside an embarrassingly ineffective Hamilton Ricard.
▪ Applications are particularly welcome from women and those from minority ethnic communities.
▪ His appointment was welcomed particularly in the United States, and Bessmertnykh affirmed that he would continue Shevardnadze's foreign policy.
▪ It was particularly welcome on the Labour side of the House.
▪ The Inland Revenue was particularly welcoming to those with a higher degree.
▪ Increased security measures and better staffing will be particularly welcome to women, elderly and disabled people.
▪ I know that the farmers of Esher would particularly welcome school visits.
warmly
▪ The passengers charter has been warmly welcomed by many of my Back-Bench colleagues many of whom are sitting behind me.
▪ Women have not been welcomed warmly into the ranks here.
▪ However, instead of being welcomed warmly, Laura is greeted with chilly toleration and ill-concealed resentment.
▪ Anyone living locally who wishes to become involved with any of the current projects will be warmly welcomed.
▪ Mr. Nicholas Winterton I warmly welcome my hon. Friend's announcement.
▪ Our revised code of guidance has been warmly welcomed by authorities.
▪ He wanted to go to Caux for much needed rest and perspective others warmly welcomed him.
widely
▪ It was the first time the state's highest court had debated the point and was widely welcomed by accountants.
▪ Mr Adams's defeat in the only Northern Ireland seat to change hands was widely welcomed by nationalist and Unionist politicians.
▪ The series has been widely welcomed and used, and a number of its volumes are being reissued in a different format.
▪ The abolition of the poll tax is widely welcomed until we consider what will replace it - simply more of the same.
▪ That initiative has been widely welcomed.
▪ My statement was widely welcomed by hon. Members on both sides of the House.
▪ It has been widely welcomed by the organisations of and for disabled people outside the House.
▪ Such an approach would be widely welcomed.
■ NOUN
announcement
▪ That firm will have welcomed the recent announcement of an order for a further three of these ships.
▪ Environmental groups such as Transport 2000 welcomed the announcement, but stressed that it would not produce major changes in the transport balance.
arrival
▪ Reg apparently came most Sunday afternoons to help welcome the anxious new arrivals.
▪ John made a speech welcoming the new arrivals.
▪ The boy had the distinct impression he was about to meet some one who would welcome his arrival.
chance
▪ They might welcome the chance to learn.
▪ He would welcome the chance of retiring to his yachts.
▪ Given the opportunity, many more would doubtless welcome the chance to exercise their new-found skills in the context of church services.
▪ Pensioners very often welcome the chance to earn a little extra money and are happy to babysit for an evening.
▪ The audience toe-tapped along with the lively rhythms and welcomed the chance to join in with the cha cha cha number.
change
▪ Although in many ways conservative, Jane Austen tolerates and even welcomes change.
▪ I was concerned about that and very much welcomed the change that was made.
▪ His intelligent, aggressive, ambitious son seemed to welcome the change.
▪ I welcome the changes affecting cold weather payments.
▪ Despite the foregoing criticisms, we recognise and welcome the change of direction signalled by the draft guidance.
▪ I welcome the change to a single bill for each household.
▪ But some are welcoming the change.
committee
▪ Other events are at the planning stage but the committee always welcomes any suggestions from staff or offers of help.
▪ The committee welcomed the police's higher profile and said it had improved the image of Darlington town centre.
▪ The committee would welcome input from booksellers within its constituency.
▪ Poor attendance in the Chamber had been criticised, but the televised coverage of select committees had been welcomed.
decision
▪ Opposition politicians, who had blamed the government for the poor organization of the elections, welcomed the decision.
▪ We welcome the decision not to impose another increase in 1993.
▪ Pérez de Cuéllar was quoted as saying that he welcomed the decision of the government to undertake reforms.
▪ At his home in Oxford, Andrew Saxton welcomed the latest decision.
▪ I warmly welcome the decision of the Northern Ireland political leaders to start their talks again.
▪ The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, building societies, builders and local authorities, will all welcome the decision.
▪ He has also welcomed Mr Major's decision to ditch many of the policies he inherited from Lady Thatcher.
development
▪ I hope that the hon. Gentleman will welcome that development.
▪ Not everyone welcomed this new development.
▪ I welcome very much developments such as this one.
▪ It would be narrow-minded and bigoted not to welcome these convergent developments.
▪ A Law Society spokesman welcomed the development.
▪ The Trainers and the National Development Officer have been involved in the draft standard consultation exercise, and welcome the development.
fact
▪ I very much welcome the fact that the Security Council authorised the dispatch of a preliminary team.
▪ I welcome the fact that that is the case.
▪ We welcome the fact that provision for special needs is included in the Bill for the first time.
▪ I welcome the fact that as a country we do not drive the unemployed into begging or starving.
▪ We welcome the fact that the Government have introduced the Bill, and we shall not oppose it.
▪ Today we must welcome the fact that the three major parties in this country all agree about the importance of the Community.
friend
▪ His manner was that of one gladly welcoming a friend.
▪ Stringfellows will welcome you and your friends with drinks on the house the moment you all get there.
▪ This detects any approaching heat source such as people or cars and automatically turns on, welcoming friends and deterring intruders.
▪ And with Tenby already a 2-5 shot, credible challengers would be welcomed like old friends.
government
▪ The gains had been welcomed by the government as confirmation that its economic policies had received a good response from investors.
▪ This conversion, welcomed by the government, provoked anger among some of his former supporters.
guest
▪ Resident proprietors welcome guests back year after year.
▪ All will welcome you or your guests, but startle intruders.
▪ It was my privilege and honour, as trustee of the fund, to welcome the guests and chair the proceedings.
home
▪ Grace, unsupervised, puts on lipstick to welcome Lucy home, and looks extraordinary.
▪ Mrs Nishimae welcomes us to her home.
▪ The development officer felt she could not work with them, and they in turn did not welcome the Home Support Project.
▪ The hospital released her, and her family joyfully welcomed her home.
▪ There was a sudden sound of voices as some of the neighbours came to welcome Joe home.
▪ He orders a crate of champagne and armfuls of red roses to welcome her home.
▪ Annabel saw herself in the role of getting ready to welcome the invalid home.
idea
▪ Mr David Armstrong, who owns Station Taxis, welcomed the idea of taxis being allowed to use the lanes.
▪ The reaction of many will be to welcome the elaboration of ideas to which evidence has already brought them.
▪ Whether you welcome this idea or view it with horror will depend upon who you are.
▪ Companies may say they welcome new ideas but do not have the systems to support them.
▪ However, only 18 percent positively welcome the idea.
▪ We would welcome your comments and ideas for future editions.
▪ But it welcomes the idea of a review.
initiative
▪ We should welcome the initiative of the Advisory Board for the Research Council in looking at quantitative measures of research output.
▪ Most rank-and-file members are more than ready to welcome clearly articulated initiatives that promise to advance their long-term interests.
▪ They welcomed last month's initiative by Mr Bush and called for a summit with him within 90 days.
move
▪ Universities and colleges welcomed the move, seeing it as victory for their long-running campaign to reduce the inspection burden.
▪ Wilmut said he would welcome any moves toward an international agreement to prohibit such attempts.
▪ The international profession has welcomed the move.
▪ They no doubt that conservation groups would welcome the move.
▪ Local councillor Peter Shephard, who led the campaign, has welcomed the positive moves to solve the problem.
▪ Mr. Hague I welcome the moves made so far by my right hon. Friend to encourage manufacturers to make cars more defensible.
▪ Environmentalists welcomed the move, claiming that some fishermen in Cornwall and the South-West were disguising the true extent of the problem.
▪ The warden of Sarah's refuge has welcomed the move.
news
▪ Campaigners fighting to kill off the proposed Darlington Cross Town Route have welcomed the news.
▪ I thought Jasper would welcome this news, but he was distant.
▪ But not everyone has welcomed the news.
▪ Mr. Hughes I welcome that news.
▪ We would welcome any positive news on that front.
▪ The people of the Milton Keynes have welcomed the news.
▪ Does he welcome today's news that factory output prices are the lowest for many years?
opportunity
▪ We welcome this opportunity to restate our position and encourage other units to follow our lead.
▪ Older work-inhibited stu-dents often welcome the opportunity to tutor younger children.
▪ An up-and-coming composer would probably welcome the opportunity to write music in a religious idiom.
▪ Will they welcome opportunities to think collaboratively with friends and authors, to affect and be changed by the ideas of others?
▪ Some of you I know will welcome this new opportunity to pay all due fees together as one lump sum in January.
▪ I welcomed the opportunity to spread the word and to broaden my knowledge about management approaches in the private sector.
▪ Members, whose average age was 22.5 years, welcomed the opportunity to interact on a regular basis with non-disabled peers.
▪ It can be shown that individuals and groups welcome the opportunity to contribute to debate and to participate in policy making.
party
▪ In welcoming him, the party thus welcomed him as a stereotype.
▪ The streets were hot and dusty, so Cranston and Athelstan's party welcomed the tavern's coolness.
▪ We as organisers of all-night dancing parties would welcome the reasonable regulation of parties.
proposal
▪ The presbyterian and methodist churches in Ireland, along with the Church of Ireland, welcomed the proposal.
▪ Contributions will normally be commissioned by an appointed member of the Editorial Board, but the Board welcomes proposals for reviews.
▪ We welcome the proposals to reduce the super-power arsenals.
▪ John's father Eric today welcomed the new proposals.
▪ We welcome your inquiries, proposals, and ideas.
▪ Age Concern welcomes the Government's proposals to remove administrative barriers to people who wish to change general practitioners.
▪ Because science aims at theories with a large informative content, the falsificationist welcomes the proposal of bold speculative conjectures.
▪ However, the FoE did welcome a number of proposals they had been campaigning on for some time.
report
▪ The Select Committee on Energy has also examined the proposals in considerable depth, and the Government welcome its report.
▪ Human rights organisations and campaigners seeking to clean up the arms trade welcomed the report as a step towards transparency.
▪ Of course we welcome the Woolf report and its careful examination of what happened during the Strangeways riot.
▪ The Law Society, which represents solicitors, welcomed the report, which would widen solicitors' scope for fee-earning.
▪ Mr Forsyth announced the Government's response to the Report today, in which he welcomed the Report and its positive recommendations.
▪ The Home Office yesterday broadly welcomed the report, but said it would consult interested parties before deciding on implementation.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
more than happy/welcome/likely etc
▪ And as to the finish, well, they'd be more than happy for you to check the results for yourself.
▪ For the most part, gallery staffers are more than happy to answer questions and discuss artists.
▪ If the leader is open, receptive, and responsive to you, the others will more than likely follow suit.
▪ If this is not possible, then most printers are more than happy to visit enquirers.
▪ The accident, as it turns out, was a broken mirror and more than likely a shortage of time.
▪ The Cap'n had been to Jarman House once ... would be coming again more than likely.
▪ They spend the time getting space for some new person who more than likely will leave.
▪ We trooped along and he more than likely brought his mate John Grey along with him.
welcome/greet sb/sth with open arms
▪ And if the turnout was any indication, the parish was welcoming them with open arms.
▪ Did I welcome him with open arms?
▪ He greeted Riley with open arms.
▪ He welcomed them with open arms, talked freely, played draughts with the younger and learned tables from the elder.
▪ Mind, I welcomed them with open arms because it meant I could stay off school.
▪ Now we welcome death with open arms, especially when we are old.
▪ Would you welcome them with open arms?
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Jill was busy welcoming the guests.
▪ Many citizens welcomed Smith's resignation from office.
▪ Some companies have welcomed the idea of employees working from home.
▪ Texans tend to welcome newcomers and go out of their way to be friendly.
▪ The proposal was warmly welcomed by the German Chancellor.
▪ The university's cafeteria welcomes any suggestions for improvement of its menu or service.
▪ The visitors were welcomed at reception and shown where to go.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But the development will be welcomed by the building trade.
▪ But when they saw me walking out of the sea, they welcomed me warmly with cries of astonishment and delight.
▪ They welcomed last month's initiative by Mr Bush and called for a summit with him within 90 days.
▪ They will be welcomed by police who say that new technology can lead to powerful new evidence being discovered after a trial.
▪ They would welcome resistance in any of its forms, but Joshua Kingsley had said nothing and done nothing to undermine himself.
II.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
also
▪ And help in the form of money and labour is also welcome!
▪ Your partner is also welcome, so why not go along together to discuss the different methods of birth control?
▪ We also welcome letters for our Veterans' Postbag and details of service association meetings.
▪ Guests are also welcome to use the pool and facilities of the nearby Hotel Thermai.
▪ Students interested in a career in illustration are also welcome to attend their annual student seminar.
▪ Professionals from the oil and gas industry with an interest in research are also welcome to apply.
▪ The standard side handle was also welcome.
always
▪ Plecs are always welcome and invariably hardy.
▪ Letters and illustrations from readers are always welcome.
▪ New members at this club for Over-30s are always welcome.
▪ Of course the quality of the timeless writing stays the same but fresh interpretations of the characters are always welcome.
▪ Subject to budgetary restraints, suggestions for book purchases are always welcome.
▪ For this reason, parents are always welcome to see their children at work in our school.
▪ Nordenfalk's book includes the scrupulous examination of visual evidence always welcome and often found in writing by a museum curator.
more
▪ It would be rather more welcome if comics could still be comics.
▪ No sound would have been more welcome.
▪ When people were in trouble, the police were more welcome than the Lone Ranger and Tonto.
▪ And it failed to produce a ticket more welcome in the South.
▪ However a savings gift, as one of a pile of other presents, may be more welcome than you suppose.
▪ This is even more welcome since all through autumn people have been repaying debts from the free-spending 1980s.
▪ But seldom will the visitors have been more welcome than they are today.
▪ This plant, taro, is more welcome.
most
▪ Group Captain Griffiths was a most welcome guest at the opening.
▪ That this is also a marriage of insightful stagecraft and lustrous vocalism is the most welcome news of all.
▪ Tea was brought and yes I was most welcome to stay the night.
▪ Volunteers to boost open class will be most welcome.
▪ Everyone is most welcome to join this happy company.
▪ For Chelsea, then, a prolonged period of silence from their coach would be most welcome.
▪ Yet the most welcome consequence of the making of those documentaries and books was quite unexpected.
particularly
▪ While not particularly welcome, the black knight is considered the lesser of two evils.
▪ The special order for Govan will be particularly welcome.
▪ The position was satisfactory but the Society faced considerable expenditure in connection with the Museum and donations would be particularly welcome.
▪ A volunteer translator would be particularly welcome.
▪ There is a particularly welcome parody of the current theatrical mania for sloping floors.
▪ The staff particularly welcome enquiries and requests for assistance from first-year students.
▪ Emphasis on the importance of integrating retail developments with housing, employment and transport policies is particularly welcome.
▪ The standard of photography is good and some of the long-distance shots are particularly welcome.
very
▪ The increase in capital allowances is very welcome.
▪ Still, to some people death is very welcome.
▪ The hotel has a good reputation for service, and all our clients have been made to feel very welcome.
▪ Lying in it was very welcome.
▪ The performances have not stood the test of time; a successor would be very welcome.
▪ Thanking Stanley, who said he was very welcome, Mungo walked out to the yard, watched by Jos.
▪ They always look attractive and make a very welcome change from vol-au-vents at a party.
▪ Anyway, any publicity you can give Autumnola in your paper would be very welcome.
■ NOUN
addition
▪ There is also the welcome addition of a focus ring on the lens.
▪ The main thing is that they make a welcome addition to marine tanks.
▪ There have been some welcome additions to the Lowestoft fleet.
▪ This time we had the welcome addition of a sheepskin backrest, an inflatable neck support and a selection of surgical collars.
▪ This excellent book will be a welcome addition to the library of many a clinician, student, and teacher.
▪ Chosen with discrimination, they make a welcome addition to parish church music.
▪ For the public they are a welcome addition to the number of foot police regularly patrolling the town.
▪ One shilling on Saturday and threepence for an evening were welcome additions to the family income.
boost
▪ The decision is a big blow to James but a welcome boost for Hooper.
▪ President Clinton's visit gave the province a welcome boost.
▪ Love Hurts, she admits, has given her a welcome boost.
▪ The increase, to 109,373 from 101,107 last October, came as a welcome boost to the struggling industry.
▪ She was so sensational to look at that Tom's own self-esteem took a welcome boost.
break
▪ So last February 1 at Twickenham was a hugely welcome break in what was becoming a sort of personal Aherne tradition.
▪ It gave them a welcome break from the mania of the Olympics and seemed to put everything in its proper perspective.
▪ They promptly shot it for dinner, a welcome break from dehydrated rations.
▪ It was a welcome break from comedy, but it wasn't noticed enough for there to be a great many similar offers.
▪ At Great Bedwyn we stop for welcome break and cheer the first of the singles through.
▪ That would be a most welcome break.
▪ For some, the visit is a welcome break from medical treatment they're receiving for radiation sickness.
▪ Stops for meals and for the navigator to fix their position were a welcome break from the jolting ride.
change
▪ Over the five years since the present Administration were returned in 1987, there has been a welcome change in the picture.
▪ The restaurant offers 20 wines by the glass, and not just Chardonnays either-a welcome change from most local lists.
▪ They always look attractive and make a very welcome change from vol-au-vents at a party.
▪ The palm-tree groves and pedestrian walkways represent a welcome change from the mostly treeless parking lots elsewhere in the valley.
▪ Jane was cheered by his sagacity and quick eye for the ridiculous - a welcome change from pompous people like the Pyglings.
▪ That first morning dawned clear and cool, a welcome change after sweltering Boston.
▪ This deliciously light and quick-to-prepare dinner party menu makes a welcome change from the richer, traditional fare of the season.
▪ The fresh air made a welcome change from the polluted Victorian London atmosphere.
drink
▪ Guests receive a welcome drink on their first full day.
▪ Alba All guests receive a welcome drink.
▪ During the stay a welcome drink and an evening meal will be hosted by the Port du Crouesty Tourist Office.
▪ And even if you just pop in for a welcome drink, look out for our Happy Days bar promotions.
▪ You will be greeted with a welcome drink, and once a week you can enjoy a romantic candle-lit dinner.
mat
▪ To satisfy this need, the owners of the local establishments have rolled out the welcome mat.
▪ She approves of the balcony and the east-facing front door, as well as the moon design on her welcome mat.
▪ I hope André doesn't see this as a welcome mat for him to make any more advances.
▪ President Clinton has put out the welcome mat.
▪ Well, she'd been warned not to expect the welcome mat, Sabine thought, as she drove under the arch.
news
▪ The Halifax figures, however, will be welcome news to more than a million homeowners.
▪ The fact that the railroad was willing to lease depot space came as welcome news.
▪ It comes as welcome news for around three thousand pension holders in Swindon.
▪ That this is also a marriage of insightful stagecraft and lustrous vocalism is the most welcome news of all.
▪ Newslines Newspaper accounts of the latest national round of university funding had welcome news for Bristol.
▪ That would be welcome news for Clippers coach Bill Fitch.
▪ Some of this would seem welcome news, but, once again, things seldom are as they seem.
relief
▪ But for most Tories, excluding a minority who thought he was too soft, this budget was welcome relief.
▪ The cool water slipping down her throat was a welcome relief.
▪ Some will find it a welcome relief, others an indication of personal failure, and the cause of personal guilt.
▪ Posy Simmonds' whimsical humour comes as a welcome relief in a medium that is surprisingly low on laughs.
▪ For others, Christmas is a welcome relief from the pressure of work and a time to recuperate.
▪ This provided a welcome relief from the constant travelling of the last three days.
respite
▪ It had been a welcome respite in a cruel and anguished time.
▪ The tent is air-conditioned, making it a welcome respite on the hottest days.
▪ Intragroup rituals build cohesiveness, offer a welcome respite from long hours and high pressure, and imbue the enterprise with meaning.
▪ For most people at Cu Chi, the traditional Tet truce was anticipated as a welcome respite.
▪ Fighting back seasickness, Jeff Whitworth, an ex-Marine, got a welcome respite.
return
▪ He plays Jacob Marley, and it will be a welcome return visit to Oxford for him.
▪ Jimmy Phillips has been sorely missed through suspension and will make a welcome return at left back.
▪ In 1954, he joined Mercedes, who had made a welcome return to racing, and his second championship followed.
▪ The new policy of openness has led to the abolition of censorship and to a welcome return to Leninist cultural pluralism.
▪ Something else making a welcome return is the bumble bee.
▪ But they also underlined the welcome return to a more activist approach.
sight
▪ Here we chose a cherry with pale pink spring blossom, a welcome sight early in the year.
▪ Needless to say, the rising of the sun was a welcome sight.
▪ The forwards had a genuine hardness and solidity about them, a welcome sight after the pathetic shaven-headed posturing of recent years.
▪ An even more welcome sight met my eyes.
sign
▪ Its welcome sign says it has 90,000 inhabitants.
visitor
▪ Most of the wine lodges in Funchal welcome visitors and are willing to offer samples of the various blends.
▪ He was not a welcome visitor.
▪ Patterson, with his ebullient North Country temperament, had been a welcome visitor at Allen Street.
▪ He later had a spell in charge of Palace's Youth side and is still an occasional but welcome visitor to Selhurst Park.
▪ My family also liked him very much, so he was a welcome visitor to our house.
▪ The sites listed here welcome visitors.
▪ As well as deterring possible burglars, this will light the way for welcome visitors without you having a light on all night.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
more than happy/welcome/likely etc
▪ And as to the finish, well, they'd be more than happy for you to check the results for yourself.
▪ For the most part, gallery staffers are more than happy to answer questions and discuss artists.
▪ If the leader is open, receptive, and responsive to you, the others will more than likely follow suit.
▪ If this is not possible, then most printers are more than happy to visit enquirers.
▪ The accident, as it turns out, was a broken mirror and more than likely a shortage of time.
▪ The Cap'n had been to Jarman House once ... would be coming again more than likely.
▪ They spend the time getting space for some new person who more than likely will leave.
▪ We trooped along and he more than likely brought his mate John Grey along with him.
wear out your welcome
▪ For a decade, Jerusalem continued approaching Washington with a measure of humility, careful not to wear out its welcome.
▪ I mean when you get bored or some one wears out their welcome do you treat them like you would your job?
▪ They may become tired of being asked constantly; you may wear out your welcome.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ I don't think I'm welcome there anymore.
▪ The trip to Mexico will be a welcome break from work.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ In some areas, though, changes are welcome, especially if they lead to a better and more reliable product.
▪ Individuals and groups are welcome and entry fees range from free to £2.
▪ It crosses my mind, briefly, that a new bottle would be a welcome gift.
▪ No sound would have been more welcome.
▪ President Clinton has put out the welcome mat.
▪ Some will find it a welcome relief, others an indication of personal failure, and the cause of personal guilt.
▪ That means everyone is welcome here any time.
III.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
cautious
▪ Liberal politicians also gave a cautious welcome to the appointment.
enthusiastic
▪ The proposal received an enthusiastic welcome from the smaller political parties allied with Labour.
▪ Their enthusiastic welcome brought a smile to her face for the first time that morning.
friendly
▪ The Reisch is well known for its excellent standards of service and friendly welcome.
▪ With just 16 rooms the management can extend a friendly, personal welcome, and offer relaxed, warm accommodation.
▪ Cramped wooden benches, a friendly welcome for regulars and improbably large plates of home-made pies, omelettes, grills and chips.
▪ The staff pride themselves on offering a friendly welcome and helpful service.
▪ A warm and friendly Somerset welcome awaits you.
▪ Thanks Your friendly and warm welcome has been very much appreciated.
rapturous
▪ Franco landed in Tetuán on 19 July to a rapturous welcome from rebel officers.
▪ A player representation, led by caretaker manager Edwin Stein, received a rapturous welcome.
▪ In May 1961 the show opened in London to a rapturous welcome.
warm
▪ Palm-fringed beaches, guaranteed gorgeous weather and an equally warm local welcome make it one of the finest holiday hot-spots.
▪ And the warmest welcome is extended to Bob Marley, who draws the sort of tourists that don't mind the rain.
▪ The audience gave a warm welcome to the father of four, fresh from paternity leave.
▪ Collectors, bibliophiles and browsers will find a warm welcome from the many dealers when the fair opens at 10.00 am precisely.
▪ This was a busy and fruitful time, and the team were given a warm welcome in all the places we worked.
▪ The accommodation is cool and spotless and staff pride themselves on offering a warm welcome.
▪ Finally a warm welcome was extended to all the newly-qualified teachers. 2.
■ VERB
extend
▪ Zhukov came towards him eagerly, his arms extended in welcome.
find
▪ Collectors, bibliophiles and browsers will find a warm welcome from the many dealers when the fair opens at 10.00 am precisely.
▪ Telemachus saw her waiting by the threshold and was vexed to the heart that a guest should not find instant welcome.
give
▪ He was given a great welcome by the waiters and Jane was introduced to the Maître in person.
▪ Uncle Tom was at work that day, but Aunt Goldie gave us a warm welcome.
▪ The audience gave a warm welcome to the father of four, fresh from paternity leave.
▪ I hope Tendulkar is given a kindly welcome by the Yorkshire spectators.
▪ President Sékou-Touré gave him a warm welcome.
▪ On arrival at Hillsborough she was given a boisterous welcome by 150 children given time off school to greet her.
▪ This was a busy and fruitful time, and the team were given a warm welcome in all the places we worked.
▪ Liberal politicians also gave a cautious welcome to the appointment.
offer
▪ The accommodation is cool and spotless and staff pride themselves on offering a warm welcome.
▪ The staff pride themselves on offering a friendly welcome and helpful service.
receive
▪ His announcement at the annual conference of the Association of Children's Reporters in Peebles received an immediate welcome from childcare agencies.
▪ This alternative drug has received an open-armed welcome from insomniacs around the world.
▪ You are sure to receive a warm welcome.
▪ And yet, CrystEngComm has received a warm welcome and many researchers have begun to send in their papers.
▪ The recommendations have received a mixed welcome from the Angling Foundation.
▪ This is a family-run hotel and the management prides itself on the fact that Citalia guests have always received a warm welcome.
▪ He received a tumultuous welcome on returning to unsaddle, and when the dust settled the plaudits rained down.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
more than happy/welcome/likely etc
▪ And as to the finish, well, they'd be more than happy for you to check the results for yourself.
▪ For the most part, gallery staffers are more than happy to answer questions and discuss artists.
▪ If the leader is open, receptive, and responsive to you, the others will more than likely follow suit.
▪ If this is not possible, then most printers are more than happy to visit enquirers.
▪ The accident, as it turns out, was a broken mirror and more than likely a shortage of time.
▪ The Cap'n had been to Jarman House once ... would be coming again more than likely.
▪ They spend the time getting space for some new person who more than likely will leave.
▪ We trooped along and he more than likely brought his mate John Grey along with him.
wear out your welcome
▪ For a decade, Jerusalem continued approaching Washington with a measure of humility, careful not to wear out its welcome.
▪ I mean when you get bored or some one wears out their welcome do you treat them like you would your job?
▪ They may become tired of being asked constantly; you may wear out your welcome.
welcome/greet sb/sth with open arms
▪ And if the turnout was any indication, the parish was welcoming them with open arms.
▪ Did I welcome him with open arms?
▪ He greeted Riley with open arms.
▪ He welcomed them with open arms, talked freely, played draughts with the younger and learned tables from the elder.
▪ Mind, I welcomed them with open arms because it meant I could stay off school.
▪ Now we welcome death with open arms, especially when we are old.
▪ Would you welcome them with open arms?
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Their guests were given a very warm welcome on arrival.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ She could just imagine the welcome she was about to get from her workmates!
▪ The welcome he received on the factory tour obviously boded well for the by-election as ten days later both candidates were elected.
▪ Then, as always, a big kiss in welcome.
▪ This alternative drug has received an open-armed welcome from insomniacs around the world.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Welcome

Welcome \Wel"come\, n.

  1. Salutation to a newcomer. ``Welcome ever smiles.''
    --Shak.

  2. Kind reception of a guest or newcomer; as, we entered the house and found a ready welcome.

    His warmest welcome at an inn.
    --Shenstone.

    Truth finds an entrance and a welcome too.
    --South.

    To bid welcome, to receive with professions of kindness.

    To thee and thy company I bid A hearty welcome.
    --Shak.

Welcome

Welcome \Wel"come\, a. [OE. welcome, welcume, wilcume, AS. wilcuma a welcome guest, from wil-, as a prefix, akin to willa will + cuma a comer, fr. cuman to come; hence, properly, one who comes so as to please another's will; cf. Icel. velkominn welcome, G. willkommen. See Will, n., and Come.]

  1. Received with gladness; admitted willingly to the house, entertainment, or company; as, a welcome visitor.

    When the glad soul is made Heaven's welcome guest.
    --Cowper.

  2. Producing gladness; grateful; as, a welcome present; welcome news. ``O, welcome hour!''
    --Milton.

  3. Free to have or enjoy gratuitously; as, you are welcome to the use of my library.

    Note: Welcome is used elliptically for you are welcome. ``Welcome, great monarch, to your own.''
    --Dryden.

    Welcome-to-our-house (Bot.), a kind of spurge ( Euphorbia Cyparissias).
    --Dr. Prior.

Welcome

Welcome \Wel"come\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Welcomed; p. pr. & vb. n. Welcoming.] [AS. wilcumian.] To salute with kindness, as a newcomer; to receive and entertain hospitably and cheerfully; as, to welcome a visitor; to welcome a new ide

  1. ``I welcome you to land.''
    --Addison.

    Thus we salute thee with our early song, And welcome thee, and wish thee long.
    --Milton.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
welcome

Old English wilcuma "welcome!" exclamation of kindly greeting, from earlier wilcuma (n.) "welcome guest," literally "one whose coming suits another's will or wish," from willa "pleasure, desire, choice" (see will (n.)) + cuma "guest," related to cuman (see come). Similar formation in Old High German willicomo, Middle Dutch wellecome. Meaning "entertainment or public reception as a greeting" is recorded from 1530. The adjective is from Old English wilcuma. You're welcome as a formulaic response to thank you is attested from 1907. Welcome mat is from 1908; welcome wagon is attested from 1940.

welcome

Old English wilcumian "to welcome, greet gladly," from wilcuma (see welcome (n.)). Related: Welcomed; welcoming.

Wiktionary
welcome
  1. 1 Whose arrival is a cause of joy; received with gladness; admitted willingly to the house, entertainment, or company. 2 Producing gladness. interj. (non-gloss definition greeting Greeting given upon someone's arrival.) n. 1 The act of greeting someone’s arrival, especially by saying "Welcome!"; reception. 2 The utterance of such a greeting. 3 Kind reception of a guest or newcomer. v

  2. To affirm or greet the arrival of someone, especially by saying "Welcome!".

WordNet
welcome

adj. giving pleasure or satisfaction or received with pleasure or freely granted; "a welcome relief"; "a welcome guest"; "made the children feel welcome"; "you are welcome to join us" [ant: unwelcome]

welcome
  1. n. the state of being welcome; "don't outstay your welcome"

  2. a greeting or reception; "the proposal got a warm welcome"

welcome
  1. v. accept gladly; "I welcome your proposals"

  2. bid welcome to; greet upon arrival [syn: receive] [ant: say farewell]

  3. receive someone, as into one's house

Gazetteer
Welcome, NC -- U.S. Census Designated Place in North Carolina
Population (2000): 3538
Housing Units (2000): 1514
Land area (2000): 9.348916 sq. miles (24.213580 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 9.348916 sq. miles (24.213580 sq. km)
FIPS code: 71760
Located within: North Carolina (NC), FIPS 37
Location: 35.904822 N, 80.252481 W
ZIP Codes (1990):
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Welcome, NC
Welcome
Welcome, SC -- U.S. Census Designated Place in South Carolina
Population (2000): 6390
Housing Units (2000): 2947
Land area (2000): 4.614729 sq. miles (11.952092 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 4.614729 sq. miles (11.952092 sq. km)
FIPS code: 75535
Located within: South Carolina (SC), FIPS 45
Location: 34.822089 N, 82.448455 W
ZIP Codes (1990):
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Welcome, SC
Welcome
Welcome, MN -- U.S. city in Minnesota
Population (2000): 721
Housing Units (2000): 347
Land area (2000): 0.909949 sq. miles (2.356756 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 0.909949 sq. miles (2.356756 sq. km)
FIPS code: 69070
Located within: Minnesota (MN), FIPS 27
Location: 43.667335 N, 94.618756 W
ZIP Codes (1990): 56181
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Welcome, MN
Welcome
Wikipedia
Welcome

Welcome may refer to:

Welcome (band)

Welcome is a band from Seattle.

Welcome (2009 film)

Welcome is a 2009 French film directed by Philippe Lioret. It stars Vincent Lindon and features Firat Ayverdi and Derya Ayverdi in their inaugural roles. The film was released on 11 March 2009 in France. The director wanted to highlight the plight of immigrants living in Calais, France, and their plans to reach the United Kingdom meeting activists and associations trying to help the refugees.

Welcome (Erick Sermon song)

"Welcome" is a song by American hip hop artist Erick Sermon recorded for his second album Double or Nothing (1995). The song, which features Sermon's fellow Def Squad member Keith Murray, was released as the second and final single for the album on January 23, 1996.

Welcome (Taproot album)

Welcome is the second major label album by the rock music group Taproot. It was released on October 15, 2002. " Poem" served as the album's lead single and became a smash hit, propelling the group to stardom. A follow-up single, " Mine," was produced and its video was directed by System of a Down bassist Shavo Odadjian. The third single and video was announced for "Art," but curiously Atlantic pulled the plug soon after the announcement, further irking fans who claimed the label was holding Taproot back. Welcome remains Taproot's most successful record, selling around 450,000 copies.

The band performed on Disturbed's Music as a Weapon II in promotion of the album.

Welcome (Santana album)

Welcome is the fifth studio album by Santana, released in 1973. It followed the jazz-fusion formula that the preceding Caravanserai had inaugurated, but with an expanded and different lineup this time. Gregg Rolie had left the band along with Neal Schon to form Journey, and they were replaced by Tom Coster, Leon Thomas and John McLaughlin, who had collaborated with Carlos Santana on Love Devotion Surrender. Welcome also featured John Coltrane's widow, Alice, as a pianist on the album's opening track, "Going Home" and Flora Purim (the wife of Airto Moreira) on vocals. Because this album was far more experimental than the first four albums, Welcome did not feature any hit singles.

In 2003, the album was re-released with a bonus track, "Mantra", which was part of a jam session between Tom Coster, Carlos Santana, and Mike Shrieve.

Welcome (2007 film)

Welcome is a 2007 Indian masala comedy film directed by Anees Bazmee and produced by Firoz A. Nadiadwala and Ronnie Screwvala under the banner of UTV Motion Pictures. The film features a large ensemble cast of Akshay Kumar, Anil Kapoor, Nana Patekar, Katrina Kaif, Paresh Rawal, Malika Sherawat and Feroz Khan in his last film appearance, whilst Sunil Shetty makes a guest appearance and Malaika Arora Khan appears in an item number.

Welcome released worldwide on 21 December 2007, to mixed critical reviews and despite initial competition from Taare Zameen Par, was a strong financial success at the box office both in India and overseas. According to The Hindu, the film's climax scene is a rip-off from the Charlie Chaplin film, The Gold Rush and Michael Madana Kama Rajan.

Welcome (1986 film)

Welcome is a 1986 Soviet paint-on-glass-animated 10-minute film adapted from the 1948 children's book by Dr. Seuss Thidwick the Big-Hearted Moose. Coproduction of Sverdlovsk television studio and Gosteleradio.

Released in 1986, the film went on to win the Grand Prix at the Ottawa International Animation Festival in 1988 and in Los Angeles. Although the visual style is quite different, the story is mostly the same with the exception of some subtle changes — for example, the moose isn't shown rejoining his herd at the end and the squatter animals aren't stuffed and mounted. Also, none of the animals are ever named and there is no narrator. The film was directed by Alexei Karayev. The art director was Aleksandr Petrov, who would later win an Oscar for his 1999 film The Old Man and the Sea. The screenplay was written by Yury Iosifovich Koval, a renowned author.

Welcome (Doyle Bramhall II album)

Welcome is the third solo studio album by the blues rock guitarist Doyle Bramhall II, the first to feature his band Smokestack. It was first released in the US in 2001, then re-released in 2008. When it was re-released it was credited solely to Bramhall. The album is produced by Benmont Tench of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers under the RCA Records label.

Welcome (Patrick Nuo album)

Welcome is the debut studio album by Swiss recording artist Patrick Nuo. It was released by Warner Music on September 4, 2003 in German-speaking Europe and reached the top twenty of the German and Swiss Albums Charts.

Welcome (Fort Minor song)

"Welcome" is a song by American hip hop act Fort Minor, the side project of rock band Linkin Park's co-lead vocalist Mike Shinoda. Mike Shinoda released the song via the official Fort Minor site on June 21, 2015. Shinoda has stated the track is not part of a future album and is just meant as a single to be heard "right now". It is also the first release from Fort Minor since going on hiatus back in 2006.

Usage examples of "welcome".

Moira had simply joined them uninvited, though where either of the MacInnes men were concerned, Abigail looked upon Moira as a welcome interloper.

He stopped pacing when he heard the whistles, set to welcome the general aboard with a salute that accorded with his rank.

Malipiero would often inquire from me what advantages were accruing to me from the welcome I received at the hands of the respectable ladies I had become acquainted with at his house, taking care to tell me, before I could have time to answer, that they were all endowed with the greatest virtue, and that I would give everybody a bad opinion of myself, if I ever breathed one word of disparagement to the high reputation they all enjoyed.

I dare say if those letters had ever reached their addressees, some of them would have been every bit as astonished as Lubov was and just about as likely to welcome their assignments.

I cannot contravene the order of knights errant, about whom I know it is true, not having read anything to the contrary, that they never paid for their lodging or anything else in any inn where they stayed, because whatever welcome they receive is owed to them as their right and privi-lege in return for the unbearable hardships they suffer as they seek adventures by night and by day, in winter and in summer, on foot and on horseback, suffering thirst and hunger, heat and cold, and exposed to all the inclemencies of heaven and all the discomforts on earth.

I also knew that when we came back the enemy would have stepped up their own aggressiveness, no doubt adding a few more booby traps around the area to welcome us.

I had only to walk in, there was no house in Agios Georgios where I would not be welcome, so young and pretty, and speaking such good Greek .

At the Royal Canal bridge, from his hoarding, Mr Eugene Stratton, his blub lips agrin, bade all comers welcome to Pembroke township.

Forfarshire he found lord Airlie and his sons awaiting him, with the welcome addition of fifty horse, which formed his entire cavalry.

There was an intimacy to the scene that made Alec halt, but before he could withdraw Feeya caught sight of him and broke into a broad, welcoming smile.

Whatever misgivings Thryis might have had about him that first night, she had soon taken to Alec and made him welcome in the group that gathered around the scrubbed oak table each morning.

Following him in the darkness, it occurred to Alec that Micum, too, had come and gone here freely over the years, always certain of welcome.

The place sounded as welcoming as a Ministry of Defence shooting range, and the entrance area of the school had the ambience of a hospital waiting-room.

He was working gypsy construction jobs by day and playing at night with the Corvairs, never anyplace near the surf but inland, for this sun-beat farm country had always welcomed them, beer riders of the valleys having found strange affinities with surfers and their music.

However, he welcomed the Archdeacon without showing this, and settled down to chat about the book.