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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
spur
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ VERB
earn
▪ David had done absolutely nothing to earn his spurs when Samuel anointed him.
▪ How is a fellow going to earn spurs without at least trying to ride?
win
▪ But thanks to Sheila, now you don't have to go all the way to Dodge City to win your spurs.
▪ Now he has won his spurs, he can afford to recognise mistakes like that without fearing loss of face.
▪ Pistoliers are young nobles who have yet to win their spurs and assume their rightful position as Knights of the Empire.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a small bone spur in the right shoulder
▪ The desire to make a profit has always been a spur to expanded trade.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A glint of metal behind a spur of rock.
▪ Alejandro and his son all stop horses with five-inch curbs and send them on with spurs about the same length.
▪ Each type can have as many spurs as there are sockets on the original circuit.
▪ The spur for development in tests usually came from a pressing practical need.
▪ The book will help you tell one bird from another and that will be the spur to further enquiry.
▪ This list wasn't compiled on the spur of the moment.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
also
▪ It also spurred him to complete his lengthier expositions of Wittgenstein's thinking.
▪ It also spurred an outpouring of spurious books and sensational films.
▪ Expansion of the personnel supply industry, in general, will also spur job growth.
▪ Changing reader habits are also spurring the rising popularity of alternative weeklies.
on
▪ We are spurred on by advertising images that fun is for the young and fit.
▪ Mom also feels spurred on by the thought that someday Charlie will become aware of her career.
▪ Empowerment enthusiasts are being spurred on by stories of remarkable productivity gains.
▪ Many have become politically active for the first time, spurred on by events and experiences-some of them wrenching7during their undergraduate years.
▪ Today's new generation of black directors has been spurred on by two particular success stories.
▪ Sheridan was in the saddle, and with his command spurring on after the enemy.
▪ That has been spurred on by the successful growth of that sector in Britain.
▪ He was acting out of spite, spurred on to punish the second Stillman for confusing him.
■ NOUN
action
▪ The tiny sound of distress broke the spell and spurred Grant into action.
▪ Hepatitis B woke up the research community and spurred it to action.
▪ This had little to do with the computer but it did spur us into action.
▪ You rally to spur you into action.
▪ The thought suddenly spurred him into action.
▪ However, specific events are often the catalyst that spurs the extremist-activist into action.
▪ In the second half, Cranleigh were spurred into action and began to threaten Caroline Bush, making her debut in goal.
▪ This episode helped spur the revolutionary action taken against the king at the Westminster Parliament which opened a week later.
development
▪ The growth of tourism has spurred equivalent developments in the hotel and leisure-related sectors.
▪ The Illinois law added on to a federal law designed to spur the development of alternative-energy projects.
economy
▪ That spurred concerns the economy might be growing faster than expected.
growth
▪ And other natural resources, like minerals and timber, spurred the growth of technologies needed to extract them.
▪ One of the arguments Forbes makes for a flat tax is that it would spur economic growth.
▪ Was Gates trying to gain important content to spur the growth of Microsoft?
▪ Creating new technologies to clean up the air could actually spur economic growth rather than burden it.
▪ Expansion of the personnel supply industry, in general, will also spur job growth.
▪ Of course, a customs union would spur even more growth if it totally removed barriers even to outsiders.
▪ That, in turn, has spurred algae growth, which clouds the lake.
▪ Increases in population could then spur economic growth at some geometric rate, more rapid than the growth in human fertility.
horse
▪ Sharpe, who hated dancing, smiled at the thought, then turned and spurred the horse towards home.
▪ He spurred the horse into a canter.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And other natural resources, like minerals and timber, spurred the growth of technologies needed to extract them.
▪ Falling out with Anne finally spurred me into activity.
▪ He spurred the horse into a canter.
▪ The growth of tourism has spurred equivalent developments in the hotel and leisure-related sectors.
▪ The rapes that spurred the creation of the task force began Aug. 21.
▪ Today's new generation of black directors has been spurred on by two particular success stories.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Spur

Spur \Spur\ (sp[^u]r), n. [See Sparrow.] (Zo["o]l.)

  1. A sparrow. [Scot.]

  2. A tern. [Prov. Eng.]

Spur

Spur \Spur\, n. [OE. spure, spore, AS. spura, spora; akin to D. spoor, G. sporn, OHG. sporo, Icel. spori, Dan. spore, Sw. sporre, and to AS. spor a trace, footstep, spyrian to trace, track, examine, and E. spurn. [root]17

  1. Cf. Sparrow, Spere, Spoor, Spurn.] 1. An implement secured to the heel, or above the heel, of a horseman, to urge the horse by its pressure. Modern spurs have a small wheel, or rowel, with short points. Spurs were the badge of knighthood.

    And on her feet a pair of spurs large.
    --Chaucer.

  2. That which goads to action; an incitement.

    Fame is the spur that the clear spirit doth raise (That last infirmity of noble mind) To scorn delights and live laborious days.
    --Milton.

  3. Something that projects; a snag.

  4. One of the large or principal roots of a tree.
    --Shak.

  5. (Zo["o]l.) Any stiff, sharp spine, as on the wings and legs of certain birds, on the legs of insects, etc.; especially, the spine on a cock's leg.

  6. A mountain that shoots from any other mountain, or range of mountains, and extends to some distance in a lateral direction, or at right angles.

  7. A spiked iron worn by seamen upon the bottom of the boot, to enable them to stand upon the carcass of a whale, to strip off the blubber.

  8. (Carp.) A brace strengthening a post and some connected part, as a rafter or crossbeam; a strut.

  9. (Arch.)

    1. The short wooden buttress of a post.

    2. A projection from the round base of a column, occupying the angle of a square plinth upon which the base rests, or bringing the bottom bed of the base to a nearly square form. It is generally carved in leafage.

  10. (Bot.)

    1. Any projecting appendage of a flower looking like a spur.
      --Gray.

    2. Ergotized rye or other grain. [R.]

  11. (Fort.) A wall that crosses a part of a rampart and joins to an inner wall.

  12. (Shipbuilding)

    1. A piece of timber fixed on the bilge ways before launching, having the upper ends bolted to the vessel's side.

    2. A curved piece of timber serving as a half beam to support the deck where a whole beam can not be placed.

  13. (Mining) A branch of a vein.

  14. The track of an animal, as an otter; a spoor.

    Spur fowl (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of Asiatic gallinaceous birds of the genus Galloperdix, allied to the jungle fowl. The males have two or more spurs on each leg.

    Spur gear (Mach.), a cogwheel having teeth which project radially and stand parallel to the axis; a spur wheel.

    Spur gearing, gearing in which spur gears are used. See under Gearing.

    Spur pepper. (Bot.) See the Note under Capsicum.

    Spur wheel. Same as Spur gear, above.

Spur

Spur \Spur\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Spurred (sp[^u]rd); p. pr. & vb. n. Spurring.]

  1. To prick with spurs; to incite to a more hasty pace; to urge or goad; as, to spur a horse.

  2. To urge or encourage to action, or to a more vigorous pursuit of an object; to incite; to stimulate; to instigate; to impel; to drive.

    Love will not be spurred to what it loathes.
    --Shak.

  3. To put spurs on; as, a spurred boot.

Spur

Spur \Spur\, v. i. To spur on one's horse; to travel with great expedition; to hasten; hence, to press forward in any pursuit. ``Now spurs the lated traveler.''
--Shak.

The Parthians shall be there, And, spurring from the fight, confess their fear.
--Dryden.

The roads leading to the capital were covered with multitudes of yeomen, spurring hard to Westminster.
--Macaulay.

Some bold men, . . . by spurring on, refine themselves.
--Grew.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
spur

c.1200, from spur (n.). Figurative use from c.1500. Related: Spurred; spurring. Old English had spyrian, but it meant "follow the track of, track down, investigate."

spur

Old English spura, spora "metal implement worn on the heel to goad a horse" (related to spurnan "to kick"), from Proto-Germanic *spuron (cognates: Old Norse spori, Middle Dutch spore, Dutch spoor, Old High German sporo, German Sporn "spur"), from PIE *spere- "ankle" (see spurn). Related to Dutch spoor, Old English spor "track, footprint, trace."\n

\nGeneralized sense of "anything that urges on, stimulus," is from late 14c. As a sharp projection on the leg of a cock, from 1540s. Meaning "a ridge projecting off a mountain mass" is recorded from 1650s. Of railway lines from 1837. "Widely extended senses ... are characteristic of a horsey race" [Weekley]. Expression on the spur of the moment (1801) preserves archaic phrase on the spur "in great haste" (1520s). To win one's spurs is to gain knighthood by some valorous act, gilded spurs being the distinctive mark of a knight.

Wiktionary
spur

Etymology 1 n. 1 A rigid implement, often roughly y-shaped, that is fixed to one's heel for the purpose of prodding a horse. Often worn by, and emblematic of, the cowboy or the knight. 2 Anything that inspires or motivates, as a spur does to a horse. 3 An appendage or spike pointing rearward, near the foot, for instance that of a rooster. 4 Any protruding part connected at one end, for instance a highway that extends from another highway into a city. 5 root, tree roots. 6 A mountain that shoots from another mountain or range and extends some distance in a lateral direction, or at right angles. 7 A spiked iron worn by seamen upon the bottom of the boot, to enable them to stand upon the carcass of a whale to strip off the blubber. 8 (context carpentry English) A brace strengthening a post and some connected part, such as a rafter or crossbeam; a strut. 9 (context architecture English) The short wooden buttress of a post. 10 (context architecture English) A projection from the round base of a column, occupying the angle of a square plinth upon which the base rests, or bringing the bottom bed of the base to a nearly square form. It is generally carved in leafage. 11 ergotized rye or other grain. 12 A wall in a fortification that crosses a part of a rampart and joins to an inner wall. 13 (context shipbuilding English) A piece of timber fixed on the bilgeways before launching, having the upper ends bolted to the vessel's side. 14 (context shipbuilding English) A curved piece of timber serving as a half to support the deck where a whole beam cannot be placed. 15 (cx mining English) A branch of a vein. vb. 1 To prod (especially a horse) in the side or flank, with the intent to urge motion or haste, to gig. 2 To urge or encourage to action, or to a more vigorous pursuit of an object; to incite; to stimulate; to instigate; to impel; to drive. 3 To put spurs on; as, a spurred boot. Etymology 2

n. 1 (context Scotland English) A sparrow. 2 A tern. Etymology 3

n. (cx electronics English) A spurious tone, one that interferes with a signal in a circuit and is often masked underneath that signal. Etymology 4

n. The track of an animal, such as an otter; a spoor.

WordNet
spur
  1. n. a verbalization that encourages you to attempt something; "the ceaseless prodding got on his nerves" [syn: goad, goading, prod, prodding, urging, spurring]

  2. any pointed projection [syn: spine]

  3. tubular extension at the base of the corolla in some flowers

  4. a sharp prod fixed to a rider's heel and used to urge a horse onward; "cowboys know not to squat with their spurs on" [syn: gad]

  5. a railway line connected to a trunk line [syn: branch line, spur track]

  6. [also: spurring, spurred]

spur
  1. v. incite or stimulate; "The Academy was formed to spur research"

  2. give heart or courage to [syn: goad]

  3. strike with a spur

  4. goad with spurs; "the rider spurred his horse"

  5. equip with spurs; "spur horses"

  6. [also: spurring, spurred]

Gazetteer
Spur, TX -- U.S. city in Texas
Population (2000): 1088
Housing Units (2000): 641
Land area (2000): 1.615794 sq. miles (4.184888 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 1.615794 sq. miles (4.184888 sq. km)
FIPS code: 69848
Located within: Texas (TX), FIPS 48
Location: 33.477650 N, 100.857018 W
ZIP Codes (1990): 79370
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Spur, TX
Spur
Wikipedia
Spur

A spur is a metal tool designed to be worn in pairs on the heels of riding boots for the purpose of directing a horse to move forward or laterally while riding. It is usually used to refine the riding aids (commands) and to back up the natural aids (the leg, seat, hands and voice). The spur is used in many equestrian disciplines. There are rules in most equestrian organizations about spur design, use and penalties for using spurs in any manner that constitutes animal abuse.

Spur (architecture)

A spur (French griffe, German Eckblatt), in architecture, is the ornament carved on the angles of the base of early columns.

Spur (botany)

A spur in botany is a spike, usually part of a flower.

In certain plants, part of a sepal or petal develops into an elongated hollow spike extending behind the flower, containing nectar which is sucked by long-tongued animals (insects, birds or bats). Plants with such structures include Delphinium, Aquilegia, Piperia, and some orchids, such as Gymnadenia. Spurs may be useful in species identification – for example Yadon's piperia cannot be easily distinguished from other Piperia save for the unusually short length of its spur.

In tropical pitcher plants of the genus Nepenthes, the spur is a small appendage at the base of the pitcher lid.

Spur (topography)

A spur is a lateral ridge or tongue of land descending from a hill, mountain or main crest of a ridge. Sometimes the term is used in sense of subpeak.

Spur (horse)

Spur (1913–1930) was an American thoroughbred racehorse. In 1916, he won eight major races and finished second in the Belmont Stakes. At age four, he equaled the Empire City track record for a mile and a sixteenth on the dirt in winning his second straight Yonkers Handicap. As a sire, standing at James Butler's Eastview Farm in Tarrytown, New York, Spur's best progeny was Sting.

Spur died on May 31, 1930 at Eastview Farm.

Spur (zoology)

A spur is an outgrowth of bone covered in a sheath of horn found in various anatomical locations in some animals. Unlike claws or nails, which grow from the tip of the toes, spurs form from other parts of the foot, usually in connection with joints where the toes meet the foot or the foot meets the long bones. Spurs are most commonly found on the hindfeet, though some birds possess spurs at the leading edge of the wings.

SPUR (Australian newspaper)

SPUR is an independent student newspaper that is distributed to all major university campuses in Adelaide, Australia. The first issue was released early in 2012, and the SPUR Magazine website was launched in November 2012. Three print editions were released in 2012, with plans for a monthly schedule in 2013. The website is updated with a new post thrice daily.

Spur (disambiguation)

A spur is a metal instrument fastened to the heel of a horse rider.

Spur may also refer to:

In fauna:

  • Spur (horse), an American thoroughbred racehorse
  • Spur (zoology), an outgrowth of bone covered in a sheath of horn
  • Bone spurs, skeletal disorder forming small bony outgrowth along joint margins
    • Heel spur, a thin spike of calcification in the human foot
    • A condition such as plantar fasciitis, in which "spurs" develop on certain parts of a bone

In flora:

  • Spur (botany), an elongated appendage of certain sepals
  • Spur (vine), one-year-old wood of a grapevine that is pruned back to leave just one or two buds to be used for next year's crop of grapes

In geography:

  • Spur (topography), a mountain ridge projecting laterally from a main mountain or mountain range
  • Spur, Texas, United States
  • Spur line, a short railway (railroad) branching from a main line
  • Spur route, a short road branching from longer, more important route
  • Spur trail, a shorter trail which branches from a longer route

In organizations:

  • SPUR (magazine), a student magazine in Adelaide, Australia
  • San Francisco Planning and Urban Research Association, a non-profit research, education, and advocacy organization
  • Gruppe SPUR, a German artistic collaboration, and their journal of the same name
  • Spur Steak Ranches, a chain of steakhouses in South Africa
  • Spur gas, North American gas stations operated by Murphy Oil

In Sports:

  • Tottenham Hotspur F.C., an association football team based in North London, England
  • The San Antonio Spurs, a National Basketball Association team based in San Antonio, Texas, U.S.A.
  • The Chancellor's Spurs, a traveling trophy awarded to the winner of the college football game between Texas Tech University and the University of Texas at Austin
  • The Witbank Spurs, an association football club from South Africa
  • SPURS National Honor Society, a collegiate sophomore honor-service society in the United States

In other:

  • Spur (architecture), the ornament carved on the angles of the bases of early columns
  • Spur (typography), a small continuation of part of a printed letter, especially an uppercase G
  • Spur, or a spurious tone, a tone in an electronic circuit which interferes with a signal
  • Spur, or trace (linear algebra), sum of the elements on the main diagonal
  • Spur Award, an annual literary prize awarded by the Western Writers of America
  • Spur gear, the simplest and probably most common type of gear
  • Spurs (short story), a short story by Tod Robbins that served as the basis of the film Freaks
Spur (lunar crater)

Spur is a feature on Earth's Moon, a crater in the Hadley–Apennine region. Astronauts David Scott and James Irwin visited it in 1971, on the Apollo 15 mission, during EVA 2. Spur was designated Geology Station 7.

Spur is located on the north slope of Mons Hadley Delta, about 200 m above the plain to the north. It is east of the much larger St. George crater, and about 5 km south of the Apollo 15 landing site itself.

The astronauts found the " Genesis Rock", sample 15415, at Spur. The sample contains a large clast of anorthosite, and Dave Scott said "Guess what we just found! I think we found what we came for" as he examined the sample. They also found samples 15445 and 15455, so-called black and white breccias, which are thought to be impact melt breccia resulting from the Imrbrium basin impact event.

The crater was named by the astronauts, and the name was formally adopted by the IAU in 1973.

Usage examples of "spur".

Airthrey Castle, standing in a fine park with a lake, adjoins the town on the south-east, and just beyond it are the old church and burying-ground of Logie, beautifully situated at the foot of a granite spur of the Ochil range.

As the adulation showered upon Napoleon reaches a fevered pitch and spurs a movement to name him First Consul for Life with the right to name a successor, Josephine has misgivings.

Among the molluscs and zoophytes, I found in the meshes of the net several species of alcyonarians, echini, hammers, spurs, dials, cerites, and hyalleae.

But now the trumpets blew a fanfare, and forth rode divers gallant knights, who, spurring rearing steeds, charged amain to gore, to smite and batter each other with right good will while the concourse shouted, caps waved and scarves and ribands fluttered.

Michel invested Aumery with a white belt and golden spurs, and instructed him in his duties.

Spurred on by their avariciousness and vaulting ambition, they had endeavored to wrest her empire away from her in the most underhanded way, seriously underestimating her in the process.

An eye for an eye, the old book says, and I was waiting for Aymer to come of age and earn his spurs.

Gunther bade Siegfried spur ahead and announce his safe return to his family and subjects.

He then shewed me the steel spurs, at the sight of which the cock began to ruffle and crow.

The doctor went upstairs, and buckled on a long-necked pair of old-fashioned spurs, and Mrs.

One cachalot killed, it ran at the next, tacked on the spot that it might not miss its prey, going forwards and backwards, answering to its helm, plunging when the cetacean dived into the deep waters, coming up with it when it returned to the surface, striking it front or sideways, cutting or tearing in all directions and at any pace, piercing it with its terrible spur.

I had no time to spare in clambering up it, for I had to tear my heel out of the mouth of the foremost of them, and might have been dragged down by it had he not found my spur too tough a morsel for his chewing.

Less than ten yards from where I stood, a wide, flat spur of tawny rock extended out from the Mogado side of the bank some twenty-five feet over the river, and upon it, slithering atop one another, stacked almost to the height of a man, were dozens of crocs, perhaps more than a hundred.

Spurred by the vast wartime use of secret communications, and beckoned by the new age of mechanization, they independently created the machine whose principle is perhaps the most widely used in cryptography today.

After crossing one of the low spurs of the Nikkosan mountains, we wound among ravines whose steep sides are clothed with maple, oak, magnolia, elm, pine, and cryptomeria, linked together by festoons of the redundant Wistaria chinensis, and brightened by azalea and syringa clusters.