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Crossword clues for paid

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
paid
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
earn/be paid a pittance
▪ The musicians earn a pittance.
paid employment (=a job for which you receive money)
▪ 51% of women return to paid employment within 5 years of having a child.
paid in full
▪ The debt must be paid in full.
paid peanuts
▪ The hotel workers get paid peanuts.
paid work
▪ She hasn’t done any paid work since she had children.
paid/unpaid leave
▪ She took three days unpaid leave in order to help her daughter.
paid/unpaid overtime
▪ Many teachers do a lot of unpaid overtime.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
all expenses paid
paid in arrears
put paid to sth
▪ But the glint of mockery in his dark eyes put paid to that fantasy.
▪ But Travis McKenna had put paid to that by being particularly vigilant.
▪ Hitler's assault in the summer of 1940 put paid to the agitation for peace negotiations.
▪ It rather put paid to any idea she'd had of motoring around and discovering more of the area though.
▪ Lefkowitz, a classicist and humanities professor at Wellesley College, puts paid to Afrocentric myth-making.
▪ People were cursing the Greenhouse Effect and swearing that it had put paid to surf in Hawaii for all time.
▪ This was the cause of his deafness, which put paid to a planned career in the army and in politics.
▪ Yet an inflamed shin almost put paid to Sampras in the first week.
put paid to sth
▪ But the glint of mockery in his dark eyes put paid to that fantasy.
▪ But Travis McKenna had put paid to that by being particularly vigilant.
▪ Hitler's assault in the summer of 1940 put paid to the agitation for peace negotiations.
▪ It rather put paid to any idea she'd had of motoring around and discovering more of the area though.
▪ Lefkowitz, a classicist and humanities professor at Wellesley College, puts paid to Afrocentric myth-making.
▪ People were cursing the Greenhouse Effect and swearing that it had put paid to surf in Hawaii for all time.
▪ This was the cause of his deafness, which put paid to a planned career in the army and in politics.
▪ Yet an inflamed shin almost put paid to Sampras in the first week.
sb has paid their debt to society
▪ After 20 years in jail, Murray feels he has paid his debt to society.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ It is not known whether the fine was eventually paid.
▪ Most people want to be paid in a valuable, stable currency that is a sound store of wealth.
▪ Since you do not accept paid tobacco advertisements, why did you allow this one?
▪ Some grants are paid directly to the developer; others are paid to the local authority or other public body.
▪ The fees would be paid direct to institutions on students' behalf by local education authorities.
▪ The gambles very often paid off.
▪ They paid a lot of money for me to come here.
▪ Where applicable, a London Weighting Allowance of £1702, £1012 or £160 p.a. will also be paid.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Paid

Pay \Pay\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Paid; p. pr. & vb. n. Paying.] [OE. paien, F. payer, fr. L. pacare to pacify, appease, fr. pax, pacis, peace. See Peace.]

  1. To satisfy, or content; specifically, to satisfy (another person) for service rendered, property delivered, etc.; to discharge one's obligation to; to make due return to; to compensate; to remunerate; to recompense; to requite; as, to pay workmen or servants.

    May no penny ale them pay [i. e., satisfy].
    --P. Plowman.

    [She] pays me with disdain.
    --Dryden.

  2. Hence, figuratively: To compensate justly; to requite according to merit; to reward; to punish; to retort or retaliate upon.

    For which, or pay me quickly, or I'll pay you.
    --B. Jonson.

  3. To discharge, as a debt, demand, or obligation, by giving or doing what is due or required; to deliver the amount or value of to the person to whom it is owing; to discharge a debt by delivering (money owed). ``Pay me that thou owest.''
    --Matt. xviii. 28.

    Have patience with me, and I will pay thee all.
    --Matt. xviii. 26.

    If they pay this tax, they starve.
    --Tennyson.

  4. To discharge or fulfill, as a duy; to perform or render duty, as that which has been promised.

    This day have I paid my vows.
    --Prov. vii. 14.

  5. To give or offer, without an implied obligation; as, to pay attention; to pay a visit. Not paying me a welcome. --Shak. To pay off.

    1. To make compensation to and discharge; as, to pay off the crew of a ship.

    2. To allow (a thread, cord, etc.) to run off; to unwind.

      To pay one's duty, to render homage, as to a sovereign or other superior.

      To pay out (Naut.), to pass out; hence, to slacken; to allow to run out; as, to pay out more cable. See under Cable.

      To pay the piper, to bear the cost, expense, or trouble.

Paid

Paid \Paid\, imp., p. p., & a. from Pay.

  1. Receiving pay; compensated; hired; as, a paid attorney.

  2. Satisfied; contented. [Obs.] ``Paid of his poverty.''
    --Chaucer.

Wiktionary
paid

alt. (en-pastpay) vb. (en-pastpay)

WordNet
paid
  1. adj. marked by the reception of pay; "paid work"; "a paid official"; "a paid announcement"; "a paid check" [ant: unpaid]

  2. involving gainful employment in something often done as a hobby [syn: nonrecreational]

  3. yielding a fair profit [syn: gainful, paying]

pay
  1. n. something that remunerates; "wages were paid by check"; "he wasted his pay on drink"; "they saved a quarter of all their earnings" [syn: wage, earnings, remuneration, salary]

  2. [also: paid]

pay
  1. v. give money, usually in exchange for goods or services; "I paid four dollars for this sandwich"; "Pay the waitress, please"

  2. convey, as of a compliment, regards, attention, etc.; bestow; "Don't pay him any mind"; "give the orders"; "Give him my best regards"; "pay attention" [syn: give]

  3. do or give something to somebody in return; "Does she pay you for the work you are doing?" [syn: pay off, make up, compensate]

  4. bear (a cost or penalty), in recompense for some action; "You'll pay for this!"; "She had to pay the penalty for speaking out rashly"; "You'll pay for this opinion later"

  5. cancel or discharge a debt; "pay up, please!" [syn: pay up, ante up] [ant: default]

  6. bring in; "interest-bearing accounts"; "How much does this savings certificate pay annually?" [syn: yield, bear]

  7. render; "pay a visit"; "pay a call"

  8. be worth it; "It pays to go through the trouble"

  9. dedicate; "give thought to"; "give priority to"; "pay attention to" [syn: give, devote]

  10. discharge or settle; "pay a debt"; "pay an obligation"

  11. make a compensation for; "a favor that cannot be paid back"

  12. [also: paid]

paid

See pay

Wikipedia
Paid

Paid or PAID may refer to:

  • Paid (1930 film), an American film starring Joan Crawford
  • Paid (2006 film), a Dutch film
  • Personality and Individual Differences, a journal
Paid (1930 film)

Paid is a 1930 American Pre-Code drama film starring Joan Crawford, Robert Armstrong, and Kent Douglass in a story about a wrongly accused ex-convict who seeks revenge on those who sent her to prison using a scam called the "Heart Balm Racket".

The film was adapted by Lucien Hubbard and Charles MacArthur from the play, Within the Law by Bayard Veiller (1912) and was the fourth film version of the play. The film was directed and produced by Sam Wood.

Paid (2006 film)

Paid is a 2006 English language feature film directed by Laurence Lamers. It was filmed in Netherlands between 2004 and 2005 with Anne Charrier, Murilo Benício, Tom Conti, Guy Marchand, Corbin Bernsen, Marie-France Pisier, Beppe Clerici and Tygo Gernandt.

Usage examples of "paid".

Now this cheaping irked Ralph sorely, as was like to be, whereas, as hath been told, he came from a land where were no thralls, none but vavassors and good yeomen: yet he abode till all was done, hansel paid, and the thralls led off by their new masters.

In the beginning of November I sold shares for fifty thousand francs to a man named Gamier, living in the Rue du Mail, giving up to him a third part of the materials in my warehouse, and accepting a manager chosen by him and paid by the company.

She paid him a daily visit, but always escorted by her mother, a former actress, who had retired from the stage in order to work out her salvation, and who, as a matter of course, had made up her mind to combine the interests of heaven with the works of this world.

It was a cold-blooded lottery that paid off often enough to be worthwhile adapting for.

The entry of the adjournment of the house immediately after its meeting on the previous day, out of respect to the memory of the deceased statesman, was an honour which would live for ever in the journals of that house, and an honour which was never before paid to a subject.

I went down and saw that their fines were paid, and pledged to the stationer adjudicator that they would be confined to quarters for the duration of our stay.

I cannot contravene the order of knights errant, about whom I know it is true, not having read anything to the contrary, that they never paid for their lodging or anything else in any inn where they stayed, because whatever welcome they receive is owed to them as their right and privi-lege in return for the unbearable hardships they suffer as they seek adventures by night and by day, in winter and in summer, on foot and on horseback, suffering thirst and hunger, heat and cold, and exposed to all the inclemencies of heaven and all the discomforts on earth.

If the article is advertised, and a reward sufficiently in excess of what he paid for it is offered, the Fence frequently returns it to its rightful owner, upon condition that no questions shall be asked, and claims the reward.

Combination rate-a discounted rate paid by an advertiser who commits to running space in various publications owned and operated by the same company.

We paid with a sheaf of Afghanis, drank the tea his sweating assistant had brought, and parted from him on a wave of mutual good wishes.

A fat old Albacore shark swam past us, blotched and piebald like a pig, but he paid us no attention and I lowered the spear as he drifted away into the hazy distance.

But they paid their taxes to us, albeit with complaining, and we had to discipline them only occasionally, so we managed.

Seregil paid his price without quibbling and Maklin threw in a sword belt, showing Alec how to wrap it twice around his waist 63 and fix the lacings so that the blade hung at the proper angle against his left hip.

Those that appeared to be servants or visitors paid them little heed, but Alec noticed that the wizards, whom he distinguished by their long, colorful robes, invariably drew back from them as if in fear or disgust.

People paid good money to see dogs just like him in cinemas all over the world.