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The Collaborative International Dictionary
Modified

Modify \Mod"i*fy\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Modified; p. pr. & vb. n. Modifying.] [F. modifier, L. modificare, modificari; modus limit + -ficare (in comp.) to make. See Mode, and -fy.]

  1. To change somewhat the form or qualities of; to change a part of something while leaving most parts unchanged; to alter somewhat; as, to modify a contrivance adapted to some mechanical purpose; to modify the terms of a contract.

  2. To limit or reduce in extent or degree; to moderate; to qualify; to lower.

    Of his grace He modifies his first severe decree.
    --Dryden.

Wiktionary
modified
  1. changed; altered n. Any vehicle used in modified racing. v

  2. (en-past of: modify)

WordNet
modified
  1. adj. changed in form or character; "their modified stand made the issue more acceptable"; "the performance of the modified aircraft was much improved" [ant: unmodified]

  2. mediocre [syn: limited]

modify
  1. v. make less severe or harsh or extreme; "please modify this letter to make it more polite"; "he modified his views on same-gender marriage"

  2. add a modifier to a constituent [syn: qualify]

  3. cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue" [syn: change, alter]

  4. [also: modified]

modified

See modify

Wikipedia
Modified

Modified may refer to:

  • Modified (album), the second full-length album by Save Ferris
  • Modified racing, or "Modifieds", an American automobile racing genre
Modified (album)

Modified is the second full-length album by Save Ferris. It was released on October 19, 1999.

Usage examples of "modified".

Besides the absence of terrestrial mammals in relation to the remoteness of islands from continents, there is also a relation, to a certain extent independent of distance, between the depth of the sea separating an island from the neighbouring mainland, and the presence in both of the same mammiferous species or of allied species in a more or less modified condition.

A few old and intermediate parent-forms having occasionally transmitted to the present day descendants but little modified, will give to us our so-called osculant or aberrant groups.

I am inclined to believe that in nearly the same way as two men have sometimes independently hit on the very same invention, so natural selection, working for the good of each being and taking advantage of analogous variations, has sometimes modified in very nearly the same manner two parts in two organic beings, which owe but little of their structure in common to inheritance from the same ancestor.

Nevertheless, such a conclusion, even if well founded, would be unsatisfactory, until it could be shown how the innumerable species inhabiting this world have been modified, so as to acquire that perfection of structure and coadaptation which most justly excites our admiration.

From the strong principle of inheritance, any selected variety will tend to propagate its new and modified form.

It is certain that several of our eminent breeders have, even within a single lifetime, modified to a large extent some breeds of cattle and sheep.

The effects of variability are modified by various degrees of inheritance and of reversion.

And as foreigners have thus everywhere beaten some of the natives, we may safely conclude that the natives might have been modified with advantage, so as to have better resisted such intruders.

It is, however, far more necessary to bear in mind that there are many unknown laws of correlation of growth, which, when one part of the organisation is modified through variation, and the modifications are accumulated by natural selection for the good of the being, will cause other modifications, often of the most unexpected nature.

Thus I can understand how a flower and a bee might slowly become, either simultaneously or one after the other, modified and adapted in the most perfect manner to each other, by the continued preservation of individuals presenting mutual and slightly favourable deviations of structure.

Hence, rare species will be less quickly modified or improved within any given period, and they will consequently be beaten in the race for life by the modified descendants of the commoner species.

Hence, if any one species of grass were to go on varying, and those varieties were continually selected which differed from each other in at all the same manner as distinct species and genera of grasses differ from each other, a greater number of individual plants of this species of grass, including its modified descendants, would succeed in living on the same piece of ground.

After the foregoing discussion, which ought to have been much amplified, we may, I think, assume that the modified descendants of any one species will succeed by so much the better as they become more diversified in structure, and are thus enabled to encroach on places occupied by other beings.

But as a general rule, the more diversified in structure the descendants from any one species can be rendered, the more places they will be enabled to seize on, and the more their modified progeny will be increased.

The modified offspring from the later and more highly improved branches in the lines of descent, will, it is probable, often take the place of, and so destroy, the earlier and less improved branches: this is represented in the diagram by some of the lower branches not reaching to the upper horizontal lines.