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loo
Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
loo
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
paper
▪ No water sold at the bar, scratchy loo paper, and a dancefloor that doesn't yet kick till after midnight.
▪ If your child says the loo paper often runs out, tell the teacher.
▪ Daisy blew her nose on a piece of blue loo paper.
▪ No, perhaps you'd better not mention loo paper in the same breath as Easter eggs.
■ VERB
go
▪ Anything to do with going to the loo makes children laugh.
▪ So I had a slice of pie and then he put the kettle on for coffee and went to the loo.
▪ Unfortunately, I dropped the paintbrush, which of course went down the loo.
▪ They'd gone to the loo together by the time I joined Bunny.
▪ I do not have five roubles, therefore I can not go to the loo.
▪ It is hard to stay awake but I had to keep going to the loo!
▪ And at an age when five times a night normally means how often you go to the loo, too.
▪ I had to go to the loo.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A door closed, taps ran, the loo flushed.
▪ All rooms are comfortably furnished and have their own shower and loo.
▪ He says that Dodo often uses a shoe as a loo.
▪ In the Legion, there was no guarantee that a man had even used a flushing loo before.
▪ It was like being in a loo that rose and fell.
▪ So far, she'd just flushed the smack down the loo and shoved the syringes in the bin.
▪ Sybil papered the loo with that article and others.
▪ Then I took my bag into a loo and took everything off and changed into clean clothes.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
loo

Lanterloo \Lan"ter*loo`\, n. An old name of loo (a) .

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
loo

"lavatory," 1940, but perhaps 1922, probably from French lieux d'aisances, "lavatory," literally "place of ease," picked up by British servicemen in France during World War I. Or possibly a pun on Waterloo, based on water closet.

loo

type of card game, 1670s, short for lanterloo (1660s), from French lanturelu, originally (1620s) the refrain of a popular comic song; according to French sources the refrain expresses a mocking refusal or an evasive answer and was formed on the older word for a type of song chorus, turelure; apparently a jingling reduplication of loure "bagpipe" (perhaps from Latin lura "bag, purse"). \n\nFrom its primary signification -- a kind of bagpipe inflated from the mouth -- the word 'loure' came to mean an old dance, in slower rhythm than the gigue, generally in 6-4 time. As this was danced to the nasal tones of the 'loure,' the term 'loure' was gradually applied to any passage meant to be played in the style of the old bagpipe airs.

["Grove's Dictionary of Music and Musicians," London, 1906]

\nThe refrain sometimes is met in English as turra-lurra.
Wiktionary
loo

Etymology 1 n. (context colloquial Australia NZ UK English) A toilet. Etymology 2

n. The card game lanterloo. vb. (context transitive English) To beat in the game of loo by winning every trick. Etymology 3

n. A hot, dusty wind in Bihar and the Punjab.

WordNet
loo

n. a toilet in England [syn: water closet, closet, W.C.]

Wikipedia
Loo (surname)

Loo (written 盧/卢 as a Han character) may refer to these people:

Loo (wind)

. The Loo (, , Punjabi Gurmukhi: ਲੂ) is a strong, hot and dry summer afternoon wind from the west which blows over the western Indo-Gangetic Plain region of North India and Pakistan. It is especially strong in the months of May and June. Due to its very high temperatures (45 °C–50 °C or 115°F-120°F), exposure to it often leads to fatal heatstrokes.

Since it causes extremely low humidity and high temperatures, the Loo also has a severe drying effect on vegetation leading to widespread browning in the areas affected by it during the months of May and June.

Lõo

Lõo is a village in Hanila Parish, Lääne County, in western Estonia.

Category:Villages in Lääne County

Usage examples of "loo".

Solitude had killed every power in her save vanity, and the form her vanity took was peculiarly irritating to her husband, and in a lesser degree to her daughter, for neither the Elder nor Loo would have founded self-esteem on adventitious advantages of upbringing.

As usual, when I used the loo I found that someone with pubic alopecia had beaten me to it.

September 1509 Sequeira anchored at Malacca, the great emporium of the east, to which were brought cloves from the Moluccas, nutmegs from Banda, sandalwood from Timor, camphor from Borneo, gold from Sumatra and Loo Choo, and gums, spices and other precious commodities from China, Japan, Siam, Pegu, etc.

With breath came memories, Deva and Loo and children burning, a man breathing fire and Second People screaming, dying.

This was a matter of some consequence to Loo Choy, for every afternoon his master, Wang Foo, inquired whom he had seen outside the store.

Then, early in the evening, shortly after he had made his daily report to Wang Foo, Loo Choy received an agreeable surprise which he took in typically calm Chinese fashion.

His great genius for financial combinations was at this time employed by him in gleek, trick-track, quadrille, whist, loo, ombre, and other pastimes of mingled luck and skill.

As we travelled we were overtaken by thousands of warriors hurrying up to Loo to be present at the great annual review and festival, and more splendid troops I never saw.

Look, Loo, how the ivory light bathes the prairie and shimmers on the sea of corn, and makes of the little creek a ribband of silver.

But it is a question as to who knows such games as My Lady Coventry, All Fours, Snip Snap Snorum, Old Maid, Commerce, Put, Pope Joan, Brag, Blind Hookey, Loo, etc.

Also, on the day before we started back to Loo, we made a further examination of the wonders of the stalactite cave, and, drawn by a kind of restless feeling, even penetrated once more into the Chamber of the Dead.

Ma and Pa Yeehaw, who actually were married and from Missouri originally, he happened to open that drawer, and son of a bitch loo kit there it was.

I left the Menin Gate and hurried to the battlefield of Loos while there was still daylight left.

I was given any of that Montayne, not to take it, but flush it down the loo.

Though I was looed I played on, and I lost five or six hundred fish without opening my lips.