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The Collaborative International Dictionary
Hove

Hove \Hove\, imp. & p. p. of Heave.

Hove short, Hove to. See To heave a cable short, To heave a ship to, etc., under Heave.

Hove

Hove \Hove\, v. i. & t. To rise; to swell; to heave; to cause to swell. [Obs. or Scot.]
--Holland. Burns.

Hove

Hove \Hove\, v. i. [OE. hoven. See Hover.] To hover around; to loiter; to lurk. [Obs.]
--Gower.

Hove

Heave \Heave\ (h[=e]v), v. t. [imp. Heaved (h[=e]vd), or Hove (h[=o]v); p. p. Heaved, Hove, formerly Hoven (h[=o]"v'n); p. pr. & vb. n. Heaving.] [OE. heven, hebben, AS. hebban; akin to OS. hebbian, D. heffen, OHG. heffan, hevan, G. heben, Icel. hefja, Sw. h[aum]fva, Dan. h[ae]ve, Goth. hafjan, L. capere to take, seize; cf. Gr. kw`ph handle. Cf. Accept, Behoof, Capacious, Forceps, Haft, Receipt.]

  1. To cause to move upward or onward by a lifting effort; to lift; to raise; to hoist; -- often with up; as, the wave heaved the boat on land.

    One heaved ahigh, to be hurled down below.
    --Shak.

    Note: Heave, as now used, implies that the thing raised is heavy or hard to move; but formerly it was used in a less restricted sense.

    Here a little child I stand, Heaving up my either hand.
    --Herrick.

  2. To throw; to cast; -- obsolete, provincial, or colloquial, except in certain nautical phrases; as, to heave the lead; to heave the log.

  3. To force from, or into, any position; to cause to move; also, to throw off; -- mostly used in certain nautical phrases; as, to heave the ship ahead.

  4. To raise or force from the breast; to utter with effort; as, to heave a sigh.

    The wretched animal heaved forth such groans.
    --Shak.

  5. To cause to swell or rise, as the breast or bosom.

    The glittering, finny swarms That heave our friths, and crowd upon our shores.
    --Thomson.

    To heave a cable short (Naut.), to haul in cable till the ship is almost perpendicularly above the anchor.

    To heave a ship ahead (Naut.), to warp her ahead when not under sail, as by means of cables.

    To heave a ship down (Naut.), to throw or lay her down on one side; to careen her.

    To heave a ship to (Naut.), to bring the ship's head to the wind, and stop her motion.

    To heave about (Naut.), to put about suddenly.

    To heave in (Naut.), to shorten (cable).

    To heave in stays (Naut.), to put a vessel on the other tack.

    To heave out a sail (Naut.), to unfurl it.

    To heave taut (Naut.), to turn a capstan, etc., till the rope becomes strained. See Taut, and Tight.

    To heave the lead (Naut.), to take soundings with lead and line.

    To heave the log. (Naut.) See Log.

    To heave up anchor (Naut.), to raise it from the bottom of the sea or elsewhere.

Hove

Heave \Heave\ (h[=e]v), v. t. [imp. Heaved (h[=e]vd), or Hove (h[=o]v); p. p. Heaved, Hove, formerly Hoven (h[=o]"v'n); p. pr. & vb. n. Heaving.] [OE. heven, hebben, AS. hebban; akin to OS. hebbian, D. heffen, OHG. heffan, hevan, G. heben, Icel. hefja, Sw. h[aum]fva, Dan. h[ae]ve, Goth. hafjan, L. capere to take, seize; cf. Gr. kw`ph handle. Cf. Accept, Behoof, Capacious, Forceps, Haft, Receipt.]

  1. To cause to move upward or onward by a lifting effort; to lift; to raise; to hoist; -- often with up; as, the wave heaved the boat on land.

    One heaved ahigh, to be hurled down below.
    --Shak.

    Note: Heave, as now used, implies that the thing raised is heavy or hard to move; but formerly it was used in a less restricted sense.

    Here a little child I stand, Heaving up my either hand.
    --Herrick.

  2. To throw; to cast; -- obsolete, provincial, or colloquial, except in certain nautical phrases; as, to heave the lead; to heave the log.

  3. To force from, or into, any position; to cause to move; also, to throw off; -- mostly used in certain nautical phrases; as, to heave the ship ahead.

  4. To raise or force from the breast; to utter with effort; as, to heave a sigh.

    The wretched animal heaved forth such groans.
    --Shak.

  5. To cause to swell or rise, as the breast or bosom.

    The glittering, finny swarms That heave our friths, and crowd upon our shores.
    --Thomson.

    To heave a cable short (Naut.), to haul in cable till the ship is almost perpendicularly above the anchor.

    To heave a ship ahead (Naut.), to warp her ahead when not under sail, as by means of cables.

    To heave a ship down (Naut.), to throw or lay her down on one side; to careen her.

    To heave a ship to (Naut.), to bring the ship's head to the wind, and stop her motion.

    To heave about (Naut.), to put about suddenly.

    To heave in (Naut.), to shorten (cable).

    To heave in stays (Naut.), to put a vessel on the other tack.

    To heave out a sail (Naut.), to unfurl it.

    To heave taut (Naut.), to turn a capstan, etc., till the rope becomes strained. See Taut, and Tight.

    To heave the lead (Naut.), to take soundings with lead and line.

    To heave the log. (Naut.) See Log.

    To heave up anchor (Naut.), to raise it from the bottom of the sea or elsewhere.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
hove

"wait, linger, hover," mid-13c., of unknown origin. Chiefly nautical at first, of ships standing off a coast, also of birds in the air. Common 13c.-16c., then superseded by its derivative, hover.

hove

"to rise up, to swell," 1590s, from heave, perhaps pulled from a past tense form.

Wiktionary
hove

Etymology 1 alt. 1 (label en obsolete intransitive) To remain suspended in air, water etc.; to float, to hover. 2 (label en obsolete intransitive) To wait, linger. vb. 1 (label en obsolete intransitive) To remain suspended in air, water etc.; to float, to hover. 2 (label en obsolete intransitive) To wait, linger. Etymology 2

vb. 1 (context transitive now chiefly dialectal English) To raise; lift; hold up. 2 (context intransitive now chiefly dialectal English) To rise. Etymology 3

vb. 1 (context nautical English) (en-pastheave) 2 (context obsolete or dialectal English) (en-pastheave)

WordNet
hove

See heave

heave
  1. n. an upward movement (especially a rhythmical rising and falling); "the heaving of waves on a rough sea" [syn: heaving]

  2. (geology) a horizontal dislocation

  3. the act of lifting something with great effort [syn: heaving]

  4. an involuntary spasm of ineffectual vomiting; "a bad case of the heaves" [syn: retch]

  5. the act of raising something; "he responded with a lift of his eyebrow"; "fireman learn several different raises for getting ladders up" [syn: lift, raise]

  6. throwing something heavy (with great effort); "he gave it a mighty heave"; "he was not good at heaving passes" [syn: heaving]

  7. [also: hove]

heave
  1. v. utter a sound, as with obvious effort; "She heaved a deep sigh when she saw the list of things to do"

  2. throw with great effort

  3. rise and move, as in waves or billows; "The army surged forward" [syn: billow, surge]

  4. lift or elevate [syn: heave up, heft, heft up]

  5. nautical: to move or cause to move in a specified way, direction, or position; "The vessel hove into sight"

  6. breathe noisily, as when one is exhausted; "The runners reached the finish line, panting heavily" [syn: pant, puff, gasp]

  7. bend out of shape, as under pressure or from heat; "The highway buckled during the heatwave" [syn: buckle, warp]

  8. make an unsuccessful effort to vomit; strain to vomit [syn: gag, retch]

  9. [also: hove]

Gazetteer
Wikipedia
Hove

Hove is a town on the south coast of England, immediately to the west of its larger neighbour Brighton, with which it forms the unitary authority Brighton and Hove. It forms a single conurbation together with Brighton and some smaller towns and villages running along the coast. As part of local government reform Brighton and Hove were merged to form the borough of Brighton and Hove in 1997. In 2000 the conjoined towns officially attained city status.

Hove is bordered by Brighton to the east and Portslade-by-Sea in the west, the distance between the boundaries being some 2.25 miles (3.75 kilometres).

Hove (disambiguation)

Hove is a town in East Sussex, England. It may also refer to:

Hove (UK Parliament constituency)

Hove is a borough constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2015 by Labour's Peter Kyle.

Usage examples of "hove".

He quickly acquired ships, too, and by the time the mightily augmented navy of the Doldrums hove off to the Renigard coast, he was fully ready for the next stage in the campaign.

And men began springing to their feet and scrambling out of their shelters, and staring around them and waving their hats and shouting congratulation and encouragement, and ducking suddenly as more bullets came whistling in, and from a low rumble the sound rose to distant thunder, and from that to nearer uproar, and Truman and Cranston made a rush for their own herds, ordering the men to side line and hopple instantly, for the surviving horses were excitedly sniffing the air, pawing and snorting, and then there hove in sight up the valley the wiry leaders of the herd, galloping wearily, behind them a dull, dust-hidden, laboring mass, the main body of the Indian prizes swept away at sunrise.

He stepped around his desk and snatched vos Hoven up onto his toes by the front of his suddenly sweat-stained uniform blouse.

When he came across vos Hoven beating Sendahli, he ordered vos Hoven off .

Shaylar was reasonably certain that nothing would have pleased Threbuch more than for vos Hoven to try something which, regrettably, ended up with the prisoner plunging several thousand feet to his doom after a brief, desperate struggle with his guard.

But vos Hoven fell away from him, evading his grip and circled quickly to his own right.

Jasak said, and reached into one of his cargo pockets as Sendahli hauled vos Hoven back to his feet.

November 2, 1999 Kenzie van der Hoven comes from a long line of legal-minded men.

Her great-grandfather had started van der Hoven and Weiss, one of the first law firms in Boston.

Kenzie van der Hoven rises leagues in my estimation as she squats down beside Faith and stares at the television.

I am so jealous of Kenzie van der Hoven that I am having trouble breathing.

But Ian-- well, he does for me what Kenzie van der Hoven did for Faith.

Mariah opens the door a crack to find Kenzie van der Hoven on the threshold.

After Rothbottam agrees, Joan nods to Kenzie van der Hoven, who walks to the doors at the rear of the courtroom.

Van Hoven, his craggy face resolute, walked on shattered glass to a lever on the wall and without hesitation pulled it downward.