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Crossword clues for drunk

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
drunk
I.
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a drunken/drunk driver (=who has drunk too much alcohol)
▪ Her husband was killed by a drunken driver.
dead drunk
▪ He came home dead drunk in the middle of the night.
drunk and disorderly
▪ Bell denied being drunk and disorderly.
drunk driving
drunk tank
hopeless romantic/materialist/drunk etc
▪ She was a hopeless romantic, always convinced that one day she would meet the man of her dreams.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
blind drunk
roaring drunk
▪ They were all roaring drunk and kept singing bawdy songs.
▪ I was twenty-three years old, and he got me roaring drunk.
▪ In some of the villages, apparently, vampire hunters get roaring drunk first.
▪ Never an unwise investment, never stone roaring drunk, never a pass at a secretary.
▪ So that night they celebrated, getting roaring drunk, playing cards and gambling.
stinking drunk
▪ Clayton got positively stinking drunk.
▪ At Christmas, I tend to get stinking drunk with schlock.
II.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
as
▪ Willy was as drunk as any of us, if not more so.
▪ Anyway, I became as drunk as a vicar.
▪ He got drunk that night, though not as drunk as he pretended to be.
dead
▪ One young man is leaning back upon a seat, dead drunk.
▪ If you had been dead drunk, you couldn't have slept deeper.
so
▪ If he was so drunk that he could not appreciate the nature of the risk, he will not be volenti.
▪ I am rarely so drunk that I can't talk or walk straight.
▪ Now he told me, that night we got so drunk, that it was because of you that it hadn't happened.
▪ He was so drunk that he almost fell on top of her.
▪ I was allowed no anaesthetic because I was so drunk, but felt nothing of the emergency dental surgery or stitches.
too
▪ I am almost too drunk to hear them.
▪ The second houses were packed, but the people were generally too drunk to pay much attention.
▪ The porter crouched beside him, too drunk to offer any succour.
▪ She had lost him for a while, at the party, but she'd already been too drunk to worry.
▪ Ockleton, Morpurgo, Cornelius, Dysart and half a dozen others too drunk to mention.
▪ The band, too drunk to understand, began to play the Marseillaise.
▪ Paul Farrow slept in the same room when she fell, too drunk to notice.
▪ I never got drunk - that is, I never got too drunk.
very
▪ But she had got very drunk.
▪ She soon became very drunk and forgot about mankind, so they were saved from destruction.
▪ As the evening wore on, Durkin became very drunk.
▪ The Stevens brothers, who had built up Garth Enterprises, got very drunk and very noisy.
▪ As the hon. Gentleman has stated, Mrs. X, by her own admission, was very drunk.
▪ It was obvious that the woman was very drunk.
▪ I met a soldier from the Rifle Brigade who was very drunk, and I made him drunker.
▪ By then, Sikes was very drunk, and Fagin got up to leave.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
blind drunk
stinking drunk
▪ Clayton got positively stinking drunk.
▪ At Christmas, I tend to get stinking drunk with schlock.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Gary was too drunk to remember what had happened that night.
▪ He gets in fights when he's drunk.
▪ I just hope they don't get too drunk and start fighting.
▪ She was so drunk she could hardly stand up.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But he had been coming home drunk too often and now she was determined to let him know her feeling about it.
▪ He wondered if the whole Rorim were drunk tonight.
▪ Many artistes got drunk before they faced the ordeal on stage.
▪ No woman should be treated in a certain way simply because she was drunk when she suffered an assault.
▪ Okay, so I was looking for a politically active, fat, drunk kleptomaniac.
III.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ VERB
get
▪ In some of the villages, apparently, vampire hunters get roaring drunk first.
▪ When getting drunk or belligerent became too exhausting, I went out exploring on layovers.
▪ Manu and her girlfriend, who have got drunk, are kidnapped by a group of men.
▪ Another related a story about a friend who got pregnant unintentionally while drunk and only then was compelled to stop drinking.
▪ Palo sold the coffee and used all the money to get drunk.
▪ I think I must have overheard telephone conversations about Margarett getting drunk and late-night parties at Prides.
▪ Because of the way my grandfather lived, getting drunk and playing around, his son suffered.
▪ The scenario Amelia feared most had happened the men all got drunk.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A couple of drunks were passed out on the sidewalk.
▪ I don't like to take the bus at night. It's full of drunks and crazy people.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
Drunks are heaped on drunks like spawning newts.
▪ Every night, the drunks come in.
▪ He knew that this tunnel-like place was shunned by tramps and feared even by drunks and peg-sellers.
▪ What it did was to take in drunks and sinful women, and not do anything about making them repent.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Drunk

Drunk \Drunk\, n. A drunken condition; a spree. [Slang]

Drunk

Drunk \Drunk\, a. [OE. dronke, drunke, dronken, drunken, AS. druncen. Orig. the same as drunken, p. p. of drink. See Drink.]

  1. Intoxicated with, or as with, strong drink; inebriated; drunken; -- never used attributively, but always predicatively; as, the man is drunk (not, a drunk man).

    Be not drunk with wine, where in is excess. -- Eph. v. 18.

    Drunk with recent prosperity.
    --Macaulay.

  2. Drenched or saturated with moisture or liquid.

    I will make mine arrows drunk with blood. -- Deut. xxxii. 42.

Drunk

Drink \Drink\ (dr[i^][ng]k), v. i. [imp. Drank (dr[a^][ng]k), formerly Drunk (dr[u^][ng]k); & p. p. Drunk, Drunken (-'n); p. pr. & vb. n. Drinking. Drunken is now rarely used, except as a verbal adj. in sense of habitually intoxicated; the form drank, not infrequently used as a p. p., is not so analogical.] [AS. drincan; akin to OS. drinkan, D. drinken, G. trinken, Icel. drekka, Sw. dricka, Dan. drikke, Goth. drigkan. Cf. Drench, Drunken, Drown.]

  1. To swallow anything liquid, for quenching thirst or other purpose; to imbibe; to receive or partake of, as if in satisfaction of thirst; as, to drink from a spring.

    Gird thyself, and serve me, till have eaten and drunken; and afterward thou shalt eat and drink.
    --Luke xvii. 8.

    He shall drink of the wrath the Almighty.
    --Job xxi. 20.

    Drink of the cup that can not cloy.
    --Keble.

  2. To quaff exhilarating or intoxicating liquors, in merriment or feasting; to carouse; to revel; hence, to lake alcoholic liquors to excess; to be intemperate in the ?se of intoxicating or spirituous liquors; to tipple.
    --Pope.

    And they drank, and were merry with him.
    --Gem. xliii. 34.

    Bolingbroke always spoke freely when he had drunk freely.
    --Thackeray.

    To drink to, to salute in drinking; to wish well to, in the act of taking the cup; to pledge in drinking.

    I drink to the general joy of the whole table, And to our dear friend Banquo.
    --Shak.

Drunk

Drink \Drink\ (dr[i^][ng]k), v. i. [imp. Drank (dr[a^][ng]k), formerly Drunk (dr[u^][ng]k); & p. p. Drunk, Drunken (-'n); p. pr. & vb. n. Drinking. Drunken is now rarely used, except as a verbal adj. in sense of habitually intoxicated; the form drank, not infrequently used as a p. p., is not so analogical.] [AS. drincan; akin to OS. drinkan, D. drinken, G. trinken, Icel. drekka, Sw. dricka, Dan. drikke, Goth. drigkan. Cf. Drench, Drunken, Drown.]

  1. To swallow anything liquid, for quenching thirst or other purpose; to imbibe; to receive or partake of, as if in satisfaction of thirst; as, to drink from a spring.

    Gird thyself, and serve me, till have eaten and drunken; and afterward thou shalt eat and drink.
    --Luke xvii. 8.

    He shall drink of the wrath the Almighty.
    --Job xxi. 20.

    Drink of the cup that can not cloy.
    --Keble.

  2. To quaff exhilarating or intoxicating liquors, in merriment or feasting; to carouse; to revel; hence, to lake alcoholic liquors to excess; to be intemperate in the ?se of intoxicating or spirituous liquors; to tipple.
    --Pope.

    And they drank, and were merry with him.
    --Gem. xliii. 34.

    Bolingbroke always spoke freely when he had drunk freely.
    --Thackeray.

    To drink to, to salute in drinking; to wish well to, in the act of taking the cup; to pledge in drinking.

    I drink to the general joy of the whole table, And to our dear friend Banquo.
    --Shak.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
drunk

past participle of drink, used as an adjective from mid-14c. in sense "intoxicated." In various expressions, such as "drunk as a lord" (1891); Chaucer has "dronke ... as a Mous" (c.1386); and, from 1709, "as Drunk as a Wheelbarrow." Medieval folklore distinguished four successive stages of drunkenness, based on the animals they made men resemble: sheep, lion, ape, sow. Drunk driver first recorded 1948. Drunk-tank "jail cell for drunkards" attested by 1912, American English. The noun meaning "drunken person" is from 1852; earlier this would have been a drunkard.

Wiktionary
drunk
  1. 1 In a state of intoxication caused by the consumption of excessive alcohol, usually by drinking alcoholic beverages. 2 (usually followed by with or on) elated or emboldened. 3 Drenched or saturated with moisture or liquid. n. 1 A habitual drinker, especially one who is frequently intoxicated. 2 A drinking-bout; a period of drunkenness. 3 A drunken state. v

  2. 1 (past participle of drink English) 2 (context Southern US English) (en-simple past of: drink)

WordNet
drunk
  1. adj. stupefied or excited by a chemical substance (especially alcohol); "a noisy crowd of intoxicated sailors"; "helplessly inebriated" [syn: intoxicated, inebriated] [ant: sober]

  2. as if under the influence of alcohol; "felt intoxicated by her success"; "drunk with excitement" [syn: intoxicated]

drunk
  1. n. a chronic drinker [syn: drunkard, rummy, sot, inebriate]

  2. someone who is intoxicated

drunk

See drink

drink
  1. v. take in liquids; "The patient must drink several liters each day"; "The children like to drink soda" [syn: imbibe]

  2. consume alcohol; "We were up drinking all night" [syn: booze, fuddle]

  3. propose a toast to; "Let us toast the birthday girl!"; "Let's drink to the New Year" [syn: toast, pledge, salute, wassail]

  4. be fascinated or spell-bound by; pay close attention to; "The mother drinks in every word of her son on the stage" [syn: drink in]

  5. drink excessive amounts of alcohol; be an alcoholic; "The husband drinks and beats his wife" [syn: tope]

  6. [also: drunk, drank]

drink
  1. n. a single serving of a beverage; "I asked for a hot drink"; "likes a drink before dinner"

  2. the act of drinking alcoholic beverages to excess; "drink was his downfall" [syn: drinking, boozing, drunkenness, crapulence]

  3. any liquid suitable for drinking; "may I take your beverage order?" [syn: beverage, drinkable, potable]

  4. any large deep body of water; "he jumped into the drink and had to be rescued"

  5. the act of swallowing; "one swallow of the liquid was enough"; "he took a drink of his beer and smacked his lips" [syn: swallow, deglutition]

  6. [also: drunk, drank]

Wikipedia
Drunk (album)
  1. redirect Vic Chesnutt

Category:Vic Chesnutt albums Category:English-language albums Category:1993 albums

Drunk (Ed Sheeran song)

"Drunk" is a song by English singer-songwriter Ed Sheeran. It was released as the fourth single lifted from the debut studio album + on 17 February 2012. The song was written by Ed Sheeran and Jake Gosling and produced by Gosling. The single entered the UK Singles Chart at number 63. The week after, it climbed to number 29. Later on, it climbed to number 9, making it his fourth top ten single.

Drunk (Jimmy Liggins song)

"Drunk" is a 1953 Jimmy Liggins song. The song was released on Art Rupe's Specialty Records with another Liggins' composition "I'll Never Let You Go" as the B-side. The song "Drunk" has been covered by many artists including Ace Cannon (1971) and Steve Tallis (1986).

The lyrics include the line "Came home one night with a spinning in my head/reached for the pillow, missed the whole darned bed".

Drunk (disambiguation)

Drunk refers to alcohol intoxication. Drunk, Drunks, Drunkard, or Drunken may also refer to:

Usage examples of "drunk".

For your willing ear and prospectus of what you might teach us, we will make sure, on your eight-hour shift, that we take all drunks, accidents, gunshots, and abusive hookers away from the House of God and across town to the E.

When there is great acidity of the stomach, which may be known by heart burn, saleratus may be taken in water, to neutralize it, but should not be drunk within an hour of the time for taking other medicines.

The image of his mother, her face when looking at his father while he sat at the kitchen table in the drinks that were between affable and drunk.

I was especially happy whenever I was sent afield to take the place of some peasant shepherd who was ill or drunk or otherwise incapacitated, for I enjoyed being by myself in the green pastures, and the herding of sheep is no backbreaking job.

Confronted by the full implications of the message he would deliver tomorrow to Lady Agatine Slegin, getting blind drunk tonight was a real temptation.

Even a bit drunk, Jill was agile, and she got through the dancing with her purity intact.

And before she had any time to prepare herself for it, there they stood on the embankment, with the Grand Canal opening resplendently before them in gleaming amorphous blues and greens and olives and silvers, and the tottering palace fronts of marble and inlay leaning over to look at their faces in it, and the mooring poles, top-heavy, striped, lantern-headed, bristling outside the doorways in the cobalt-shadowed water, and the sudden bunches of piles propped together like drunks holding one another up outside an English pub after closing time.

A cheerful and slightly drunk excursionist in the train had found this a theme for continual merriment at the general expense of the clergy and the Church, and something he had said had caused the Archdeacon to wonder whether perhaps he were being a stumbling-block to one of those little ones who had not yet attained detachment.

He had drunk the best part of a bottle of arrack, had woken in the night with gripes in the belly, and then slept unevenly until dawn when someone had scratched at his door and Torrance had shouted at, the pest to go away, after which he had at last fallen into a deeper sleep.

Many were half drunk, for their officers had issued extra rations of arrack and rum.

The Major was very slightly drunk and evidently intent on becoming more drunk for he snatched a whole jug of arrack from a servant, then scooped up two beakers from a table.

The bhinjanies all sold chickens, rice, flour, beans and, best of all, the throat-burning skins of arrack which could make a man drunk even faster than rum.

A subjective viewpoint, tailored to fit what the drunk tank prisoners saw, the assaulters trying to flee the cellblock and liberate other inmates.

The paper had one other general reporter, Baggy Suggs, a pickled old goat who spent his hours hanging around the courthouse across the street sniffing for gossip and drinking bourbon with a small club of washed-up lawyers too old and too drunk to practice anymore.

One day, when he was so drunk as to be unable to attend on me, I began to scold him, and threatened him with the stick if he did not mend his ways.