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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
climb
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a climbing plant (=one that grows up things)
▪ The wall was covered with climbing plants.
a path climbs (=goes upwards)
▪ I could see the line of a path that climbed up from the bay.
a rating rises/climbs
▪ The president's approval ratings have risen considerably.
a spider climbs somewhere
▪ There's a spider climbing up your leg.
a steep climb
▪ A steep climb brought us to a wide rocky plateau.
climb a hill (=walk or drive up a hill)
▪ She climbed the hill out of the village.
climb a mountain (=walk and/or climb to the top of a mountain)
▪ Hillary had climbed all the big mountains in New Zealand.
climb into bed
▪ Lucy climbed into bed and lay awake thinking.
climb (up/down) a ladder
▪ He climbed the ladder up to the diving platform.
climbing frame
climbing up the greasy pole
▪ a politician climbing up the greasy pole
rock climbing
vertical cliff/climb/drop etc (=one that is very high or steep)
▪ a gorge lined with vertical cliffs
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
aboard
▪ We had a momentary chill when they climbed aboard ... piracy?
▪ John McCain, who climbed aboard shortly after his favorite, Sen.
▪ Gebrec shrugged, climbed aboard, started the engine and drove out of the yard.
▪ Converse placed his bag inside the runner and climbed aboard.
▪ About a dozen men climbed aboard, and I was invited to join them.
▪ As the ship passed, Queequeg paddled to it and climbed aboard.
▪ I hurried round the corner to where I'd parked Armstrong and climbed aboard.
▪ He watched the bus come, the boy climb aboard.
steadily
▪ Disability rates start to climb steadily after 50, but become particularly steep after 70.
▪ After falling steadily to about 25 percent in the mid-1970s, the debt has climbed steadily and unchecked toward 50 percent.
▪ From the junction, the road to Glenelg climbs steadily through a mature forest, winding in curves to ease the gradient.
▪ While the cost of college has obviously climbed over the past twenty years, the payoff has steadily climbed as well.
▪ Since then it has climbed steadily to around 9 million a month and a total subscriber base of around 50 million people.
▪ Plus, vehicle imports are steadily climbing.
▪ This is 48142 steadily climbing the bank with an up ballast train.
▪ Membership is climbing steadily, but there is always room for more, so please encourage your craftsman friends to join you.
■ NOUN
bed
▪ Ven was once more in her head, though, when she climbed into bed and yearned for sleep.
▪ Denver climbed up on the bed and folded her arms under her apron.
▪ Ralph his son and now his wife all began to climb the stairs to bed.
▪ How could I not climb to my bed as she asked?
▪ He climbed into bed and lay on his side, not moving and scarcely breathing.
▪ She undressed and climbed stiffly into bed.
▪ After he had turned off all the lights and climbed into bed, he felt Susan turning him over.
car
▪ Albert remained politely in the car while Rob climbed the water tower.
▪ Now she opened the car door and climbed out.
▪ Little cable cars climbing half way to the stars?
▪ What, after all, are dodgems but toy cars that one can climb into?
▪ A Brush car climbing the Gynn hill in 1963, on the North Station route with which these cars were associated.
▪ A 1937 Brush car climbs the 1:26 gradient to Warley Road. 2.
▪ Roman stopped the car and climbed out, came around to open her door.
flight
▪ No, but I am aware of them if I pant a lot climbing up in a flight of stairs.
▪ Inspectors may have to climb ladders or many flights of stairs, or may have to crawl around in tight spaces.
▪ He climbed the last two flights with effort.
▪ On that fateful January day the beleaguered Matty climbed the five flights of stairs from trading floor to the cafeteria.
▪ Outside Polly's flat, in the well of the building, Jack was climbing the last flight of stairs.
▪ I climb the four flights and tell him to take his time at the door.
▪ My room is on top of a cloth-shop and I have to climb up a flight of dark stairs to get to it.
▪ He heard her climb the last flight, getting slower every day.
foot
▪ All except Rohmer and Gilbert climbed carefully to their feet.
▪ Jinju stayed awhile longer before climbing to her feet.
▪ I climbed to my feet, stuffing the bag of mints into my pouch.
▪ The trail loops to the south flank of Eddy, then climbs 900 feet with seven switchbacks.
▪ I climbed to 1,000 feet and asked to resume our track for Blackpool and leave the area clear for the rescue.
▪ But the greatest pleasure comes from what you can climb on foot.
▪ Starting in numerical order, each plane would climb to fifteen thousand feet and empty its sack.
▪ The summit of Snowdon can be climbed on foot or by train.
hill
▪ I tied the horse up at the foot of the hill and climbed up to the stone sheds.
▪ Just one more hill to climb.
▪ Once the first hill was climbed we could see Golden Cap off in the distance, two miles away.
▪ No one who thinks for a moment will suppose that that is a path in which there are no hills to climb.
▪ But I wouldn't say the festival is in jeopardy though it definitely gives us a hill to climb.
▪ There's also plenty of off-road action with hill-climbing and rock-jumping, plus loads of other stuff.
ladder
▪ Mr Honecker is up a pole and all the ladders offered him to climb down would be an admission of failure.
▪ The playmaster had to walk all the way down to the end ladder before he could climb up on to the stage.
▪ He pulled the ladder into position, climbed two-thirds of its height to stand on eye level with the filing box.
▪ The servants had realized what was happening, and brought ladders to climb up on to the roof.
mountain
▪ We gave ourselves a mountain to climb and didn't quite make it.
▪ There are many good podunk mountains to climb.
▪ At last they reach the mountains and begin to climb up.
▪ These facts alone suggest that Bovis had a mountain to climb.
▪ But seeing the top of the mountain and climbing the mountain are different.
▪ There are undoubtedly higher mountains to climb, but something tells me underneath that Beatle wig lies a trace of genius.
▪ And here were the Mets with a mountain to climb.
percent
▪ Unemployment climbed by 30 percent in January 1991 and was expected to double to nearly 300,000 by the end of 1991.
▪ In other earnings news yesterday: Motorola said third-quarter earnings before a charge climbed 59 percent, beating expectations.
▪ The Dow climbed 33 percent last year, one of the best performances in history.
▪ Its shares climbed 24 percent to 15 11 / 16.
▪ But by the late I980s, the Catholic divorce rate had climbed to almost 30 percent.
▪ Its profits in the past five years have climbed 122 percent.
▪ If the stock exchange climbs 10 percent, for example, this particular stock will climb 10 percent as well.
price
▪ Analysts predict the agency's share price will now climb above £2m.
▪ Due to a relatively thin market in the stock, the share price would climb.
▪ But at any point in time, some prices will be climbing while others will be slipping.
▪ On occasions when the whole dealing room was punting out the stock, the price might climb even further.
▪ Since Greenspan and other officials first began to worry that stocks were overvalued, prices have continued to climb.
▪ By the time that the Earthtrust team arrived, the price had climbed higher still.
▪ Current taste for bigger cars seems unabated, even as gas prices climb.
road
▪ From the junction, the road to Glenelg climbs steadily through a mature forest, winding in curves to ease the gradient.
▪ As the road climbed upward, gray-white cloud veils drifted among the dales, chiffon scarves of some giant Isadora Duncan.
▪ The slow gradient ended when the road climbed the steepest incline I had yet encountered.
▪ We parked on the side of the road and all climbed out.
▪ Crossing the coast road, she climbed up the gradual grassy slope on the land ward side of the sea wall.
▪ Go out of the car park and turn left, following the road as it climbs up the hill.
▪ The road climbed, kinked back on itself and started a sweeping curve around a nearly bare hill.
rock
▪ The north Cornish coast is rocky, and climbing the rocks was a constant challenge and excitement.
▪ To escape that potentially maddening scene, make like a monk and climb a rock.
▪ He climbed out on the rocks to get a better look, but still he saw nothing.
▪ This characteristic stems from the diversity of techniques required to climb the rock.
▪ Two men climb the rock to check that all has been eaten and to clean it for the next burial.
▪ The tide was high, so they could not climb on the rocks and breakwaters, or explore the caves.
roof
▪ They could not open the door, so they climbed down from the roof and got in through the window.
▪ They climbed to the roofs of the terminals, broke windows and shutters and created an ear-splitting din.
▪ Is there a handy dustbin or a down-spout that will assist the thief to climb on to the roof?
▪ He climbed on to the roof and counted the missing shingles he would replace.
▪ Dean climbed off the roof and let himself into the car the way he had come.
▪ The raiders removed tiles to climb into the roof space.
▪ Raiders lifted tiles and climbed in through the roof space to take the guns and 150 rounds of ammunition.
slope
▪ Adventurous skiers in search of new experiences are shunning the drag-lifts and climbing the slopes themselves.
▪ He climbed the steep slope to the Incident Room, forcing his pace, and arrived just a little out of breath.
▪ The cart-track crossed by a brick culvert and climbed the opposite slope to a five-barred gate in the thorn hedge.
▪ The seed of City Earth lay here, now, before them physically before them - as they climbed the grassy slope.
▪ He climbed the lower slopes of Big Allen and stood, looking westwards.
▪ I climbed the slope to the hollow where Neil's tent was pitched.
▪ Wycliffe left his car on the park and climbed the slope to the street.
stair
▪ Would it be best to accept another cup of tea before trying to climb the stairs?
▪ They climbed canopied stairs from the sidewalk to eat and drink with the writers and painters who were Luks's friends.
▪ Edwin must have been struck by the contrast each time he climbed the stairs.
▪ She climbed the stairs until she stood before me, I not daring to look up, staring at my black Keds.
▪ Not long after we had reached the Old parsonage and climbed the stairs to Michael's rooms, Father D'Arcy arrived.
▪ Climbing the organizational hierarchy is no longer like climbing stairs in a stable structure.
▪ Forcing herself to climb the stairs, she eventually regained the turret room.
top
▪ We climbed to the top of it.
▪ This is the Old Man of Stoer and incredibly has been climbed to its top, the first time in 1966.
▪ It was a three-hour climb to the top and shade was the only comfort.
▪ These are paragliders; mad fools who climb to the top of Munros and jump off.
▪ He climbed to the top of the fence and looked around to see if there was some one keeping watch there as well.
▪ We were told to climb to the top of the mountain behind the farmhouse.
▪ Jen and I climbed back to the top of the dune and sat down to-gether.
tree
▪ But once we had to walk all day and climb great trees for just one honey comb.
▪ Last evening I climbed my observation tree to survey the fall panorama one last time.
▪ We climbed some trees looking for nests but didn't find any.
▪ I climbed a chestnut tree and got a good shot of them together.
▪ I was much too small to climb their trees, or dig their fields, or kill and eat their animals.
▪ Large-muscle coordination comes from riding bikes and climbing trees, not from watching junk food commercials where other kids play and run.
▪ Sneaking into the courtyard, the toad climbed the tallest persimmon tree in the garden.
wall
▪ I did not want to damage these walls by trying to climb over them.
▪ She ran to the wall and began to climb.
▪ And along the wall a man was climbing.
■ VERB
begin
▪ But then they began to climb up a narrow, spiral staircase, and she saw no more.
▪ At the same time, the truckload of urinals began to climb the foothills.
▪ Lee, who'd begun to climb it, trying to pull Caspar over with him, lost his balance and fell.
▪ Clarice began climbing in the window again.
▪ On the edge of the town we began to climb.
▪ The driver shifted into a lower gear as they began to climb Ooah Mountain, the engine a wounded wheeze.
▪ Ralph his son and now his wife all began to climb the stairs to bed.
continue
▪ Then the three continued forward, climbing the high steps where Glover sat watching.
▪ The circulation continues to climb: in 1990 it was up to 1.1m on weekdays and 1.7m on Sundays.
▪ Many market analysts expect the sector to continue to climb in 1996, benefiting in part from the colder weather this winter.
▪ There is enough interest on Newby Moss to evaporate all thoughts of continuing upwards to climb Ingleborough.
▪ Since Greenspan and other officials first began to worry that stocks were overvalued, prices have continued to climb.
start
▪ Disability rates start to climb steadily after 50, but become particularly steep after 70.
▪ She afterwards stated she had seen a vision of a golden ladder and had started to climb it.
▪ More pirates were starting to climb into the stockade.
▪ I then start to climb down.
▪ The bloke who'd wanted to get on with it started to climb out of the front seat.
▪ Then she started to climb down into the pool.
▪ The train now starts to climb through the woods.
try
▪ I did not want to damage these walls by trying to climb over them.
▪ He climbed down the beanstalk and chopped the whole thing down, killing the giant, who was trying to climb down.
▪ Would it be best to accept another cup of tea before trying to climb the stairs?
▪ Adult males would spend more time trying to climb the political hierarchy than with their families.
▪ Lopsided and vulnerable, he tried to climb the barrage and get to the second balloon.
▪ In the next scene, Scottie tries to climb a stepladder.
▪ When it was refused, some of them tried to climb over the wall.
▪ For agonizing seconds the Boeing 757 tried to climb, almost clearing a mountain ridge.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(have) a mountain to climb
be climbing/crawling (up) the walls
▪ Realizes he is moving in her desperately, as if he is climbing the walls of a closed building.
climb/jump/get on the bandwagon
▪ And everyone tried to climb on the bandwagon.
▪ And other quick-serve restaurant chains, such as Boston Market, are jumping on the bandwagon.
▪ Companies such as Oracle are jumping on the bandwagon, too, with low-priced network computers.
▪ Competitors are certain to jump on the bandwagon with rival systems and Nimslo's much-vaunted patents could be unable to stop them.
▪ For a while, the seif-centred members of celebrity circles were falling over themselves in their eagerness to jump on the bandwagon.
▪ If the petition is advertised, more creditors may jump on the bandwagon.
▪ Just a preliminary communication first, without the experimental details, so that nobody can jump on the bandwagon right away.
▪ The Communists have climbed on the bandwagon, but only to put the brakes on.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ As the plane began to climb Karen started to feel ill.
▪ Burglars climbed a chain-link fence to gain access to the building.
▪ Demand for goods grew and imports climbed steadily.
▪ Ivy climbed up the front of the building.
▪ Jennifer Lopez's new single has climbed to number two in the US charts.
▪ Most kids love climbing trees.
▪ One of the boys lost his footing as he was climbing up the steepest part of the cliff.
▪ Sales have climbed 11% this quarter.
▪ Several fans climbed onto the roof of the arena to get a better view.
▪ Temperatures are expected to climb to record levels this weekend.
▪ The burglar escaped by climbing down a drainpipe.
▪ The geese climbed high above us and set off on their long journey south.
▪ The kids love climbing trees.
▪ The original estimate of $500 million has now climbed to a staggering $1300 million.
▪ The path climbs high into the hills above the village of Glenridding.
▪ The road climbs steadily, reaching 6,000 feet after 18 miles.
▪ Towards the end of the season Benfica suddenly climbed the league table and finished third.
▪ Trying not to look down, Alan began to climb.
▪ We saw a group of people climbing El Capitan in Yosemite.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Instead, the Dow Jones industrial average climbed to still another record high.
▪ Jinju stayed awhile longer before climbing to her feet.
▪ Now drop left to avoid the guard, while climbing back up left and collecting a crate.
▪ There were roses bedded out, climbing in flower beds, in pots and cut.
▪ We climbed into the cockpit to face the morning sun.
▪ We don't climb Munros because we are not climbers.
▪ Woolworth Corp. climbed as much as 7 / 8 to 10 3 / 4.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
final
▪ Tea helped us rise at 3am for the final climb.
▪ Diving at it and pecking it may just be enough to unsettle it as it makes the difficult final climb.
hard
▪ Is this the world's hardest climb?
▪ Its overhanging walls provide a number of hard rock climbs.
▪ A hard climb can take hours, even most of a day.
long
▪ With the spring we could begin the long slow climb out of the recession.
▪ From that low point, Mitterrand started his long climb to power.
▪ For the first time in this long climb back to their fortune he began to feel a sort of panic.
▪ A long climb through short vegetation was not helped by my taking my mountain bike.
▪ They crossed the city and began a long, slow climb up through the Alfama district.
▪ It was a longer climb than she expected.
▪ And it is both a warning to the public and an acknowledgment of the long climb out of recession which still lies ahead.
steady
▪ This is quite a steady climb but well worth it for the superb views.
▪ This passes a medley of buildings before commencing a steady climb, fringed by trees, to Twisleton Hall, a farm.
▪ The rest of the day saw a fairly effortless steady climb to finish 18.2 points higher at 2,400.9.
steep
▪ A steeper climb of around 500% occurred between 1960 and 1975 bringing the average to £20,000.
▪ There are also some steeper climbs behind the village.
▪ Then came June and the steep climb in the number of cases that climaxed in August or September.
▪ The course was designed to give them a running start on their steep uphill climb through the curriculum.
▪ A steep climb through bracken and bilberries brought us to a wide rocky plateau.
▪ Despite its steep climbs, the journey seemed easy.
vertical
▪ Start from a vertical climb directly downwind.
■ NOUN
rock
▪ Its overhanging walls provide a number of hard rock climbs.
■ VERB
begin
▪ They turned through the gateway on the left and began the sharp climb to Top Field.
▪ With the spring we could begin the long slow climb out of the recession.
▪ She soon found the path and began the climb.
resume
▪ Pull hard, and it will resume its climb.
▪ Then investors regained their balance, and the market resumed its upward climb.
▪ The funicular had resumed its climb, apparently smoothly enough.
start
▪ However, it seemed fair enough to start the climb in the hope of an improvement.
▪ From that low point, Mitterrand started his long climb to power.
▪ Twice the road had been cut and we hadn't even started the climb up to the pass.
▪ Finally you can walk in from the A86, an eight- or nine-mile hike, and then start the climb.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(have) a mountain to climb
climb/jump/get on the bandwagon
▪ And everyone tried to climb on the bandwagon.
▪ And other quick-serve restaurant chains, such as Boston Market, are jumping on the bandwagon.
▪ Companies such as Oracle are jumping on the bandwagon, too, with low-priced network computers.
▪ Competitors are certain to jump on the bandwagon with rival systems and Nimslo's much-vaunted patents could be unable to stop them.
▪ For a while, the seif-centred members of celebrity circles were falling over themselves in their eagerness to jump on the bandwagon.
▪ If the petition is advertised, more creditors may jump on the bandwagon.
▪ Just a preliminary communication first, without the experimental details, so that nobody can jump on the bandwagon right away.
▪ The Communists have climbed on the bandwagon, but only to put the brakes on.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Atlanta's climb from the bottom of the league to first place has increased ticket sales.
▪ It's a steep uphill climb all the way to the top.
▪ Mount Rainier is a tough climb.
▪ The dollar continued its climb against the Japanese yen.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Hartzell claim improved take-off and climb performance, reduced noise and vibration, and better ground clearance.
▪ He twisted a leg around the rope to rest his hands, then continued his climb.
▪ It is logical to narrate a climb from the valley upwards.
▪ P and Nasdaq resumed their climbs after the July 19 drop -- but money flow into both kept declining.
▪ Routes here provide some of the best climbs at their standard in Britain.
▪ Soon another major climb will begin.
▪ The track downhill was worse than the climb.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Climb

Climb \Climb\, v. t. To ascend, as by means of the hands and feet, or laboriously or slowly; to mount.

Climb

Climb \Climb\, n. The act of one who climbs; ascent by climbing.
--Warburton.

Climb

Climb \Climb\ (kl[imac]m), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Climbed (kl[imac]md), Obs. or Vulgar Clomb (kl[o^]m); p. pr. & vb. n. Climbing.] [AS. climban; akin to OHG. chlimban, G. & D. klimmen, Icel. kl[=i]fa, and E. cleave to adhere.]

  1. To ascend or mount laboriously, esp. by use of the hands and feet.

  2. To ascend as if with effort; to rise to a higher point.

    Black vapors climb aloft, and cloud the day.
    --Dryden.

  3. (Bot.) To ascend or creep upward by twining about a support, or by attaching itself by tendrils, rootlets, etc., to a support or upright surface.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
climb

Old English climban "raise oneself using hands and feet; rise gradually, ascend; make an ascent of" (past tense clamb, past participle clumben, clumbe), from West Germanic *klimban "go up by clinging" (cognates: Dutch klimmen "to climb," Old High German klimban, German klimmen). A strong verb in Old English, weak by 16c. Most other Germanic languages long ago dropped the -b. Meaning "to mount as if by climbing" is from mid-14c. Figurative sense of "rise slowly by effort" is from mid-13c. Related: Climbed; climbing.

climb

1580s, "act of climbing," from climb (v.). Meaning "an ascent by climbing" is from 1915, originally in aviation.

Wiktionary
climb

n. 1 An act of climbing. 2 The act of getting to somewhere more elevated. 3 An upwards struggle vb. 1 (context intransitive English) To ascend; rise; to go up. 2 (context transitive English) To mount; to move upwards on. 3 (context transitive English) To scale; to get to the top of something.

WordNet
climb
  1. n. an upward slope or grade (as in a road); "the car couldn't make it up the rise" [syn: ascent, acclivity, rise, raise, upgrade] [ant: descent]

  2. an event that involves rising to a higher point (as in altitude or temperature or intensity etc.) [syn: climbing, mounting]

  3. the act of climbing something; "it was a difficult climb to the top" [syn: mount]

climb
  1. v. go upward with gradual or continuous progress; "Did you ever climb up the hill behind your house?" [syn: climb up, mount, go up]

  2. move with difficulty, by grasping

  3. go up or advance; "Sales were climbing after prices were lowered" [syn: wax, mount, rise] [ant: wane]

  4. slope upward; "The path climbed all the way to the top of the hill"

  5. improve one's social status; "This young man knows how to climb the social ladder"

  6. increase in value or to a higher point; "prices climbed steeply"; "the value of our house rose sharply last year" [syn: rise, go up]

Wikipedia
Climb (aeronautics)

thumb|right|An Embraer ERJ 145 climbing

In aviation, a climb is the operation of increasing the altitude of an aircraft. It is also the logical phase of a typical flight (the climb phase or climbout) following takeoff and preceding the cruise. During the climb phase there is an increase in altitude to a predetermined level.

Usage examples of "climb".

Why, Abigail could best nearly any boy in the county at what were deemed masculine pursuits: hunting, riding and climbing trees.

The one who climbed aboard had another oilskin pouch in his hand, which he handed to the Frenchman.

Carefully, he swung onto the downdeck ladder and climbed down three levels, feeling the increased acceleration in his thighs.

Lark was flooded with relief when she rounded a bend in the trail and saw Ace Brandon climbing toward her.

Giving up, she tied Acorn to the back, retrieved the offside ribbon, then climbed into the phaeton.

Pavilion Key climbed a tree with her baby and was compelled to let it go adrift from her arms.

He adjusted his aerator more comfortably and climbed into the waiting truck.

The next instant the propeller became a whirring blur, and the aeroplane, after a brief preliminary run, began to climb upward.

In time of winter and snow he forsook the land and grave of his father, and climbing into the high regions of Gorgoroth, the Mountains of Terror, he descried afar the land of Doriath.

Upwards, now, in silence, the two men climbed until at last they reached a corridor which was aflare with dancing torchlight.

There was a small amount of sulphurous light from the street lights strung along the se afront path, and I saw Danny climbing the metal steps over the sea wall.

Slowly Brandt climbed to the top of the sail from the aft bulkhead of the cockpit, keeping low to the top of the structure where he could see clearly yet not be picked off from the deck.

Without stopping to shut the hatch Sai climbed through and ran along the tight tunnel leading to the aft compartment, and felt the deck tilt as the ship turned at high speed.

You climb down the ladder and go aft to the ballast-tank vents, the shiny metal plates in pairs along the centerline.

Morris now began the walk aft along the sail to climb back up, but by this time the ship had settled into the water so that only the sail remained above the waves.