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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
while
I.conjunction
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a good while (=a fairly long time)
▪ I’d been waiting a good while.
a little while
▪ He arrived a little while ago.
a little/short while ago
▪ Tom got a letter from him just a little while ago.
a short while (=a short time)
▪ For a short while, the city functioned as the region’s capital.
It might be worth...while
It might be worth your while to talk to the head of department.
see you in a while (=see you soon)
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(every) once in a while
▪ I only see her every once in a while at school.
▪ All of these Helen used, displayed, wore, not once in a while, but every day, blushing.
▪ But look at them once in a while.
▪ He calls me once in a while or I call him.
▪ He just comes round once in a while and they go out.
▪ I do need to see every once in a while.
▪ I think you should change your shampoo and conditioner once in a while to avoid product build-up.
▪ I used to take him out fishing once in a while.
▪ They were both lonely, so why not see each other once in a while.
be worth sb's while (to do/doing sth)
▪ And finally the Soft Sell - it will always be worth your while to invest in a stout umbrella!
▪ Controversy really begins when there are varying views as to whether a house is worth saving.
▪ Dardis assured Bernstein that it would be worth his while to fly down to Miami again.
▪ However, rather than getting upset about this it spurs her on to try harder to show that they are worth watching.
▪ I had to make her see that the exercise was worth her while.
▪ If he! ital! is! off! going to fight, he wants it to be worth his while.
▪ It could be worth your while.
▪ The try is to be worth five points while the drop goal will count for two points.
make hay (while the sun shines)
▪ The tourists won't be here forever, so we'd better make hay while the sun shines.
make it worth sb's while
▪ I'll make sure they approve your application if you make it worth my while.
▪ I didn't want to lend Terry my car, but he said he'd make it worth my while.
▪ The basketball federation in Kuwait offered him a coaching job, and made it worth his while.
▪ He also has a lucrative five-year contract at Hilton that makes it worth his while to stick around.
▪ Obviously he would promise to make it worth your while.
strike while the iron is hot
▪ Don't wait until tomorrow before you tell him, strike while the iron is hot!
▪ So, it should strike while the iron is hot and go to the country as soon as possible.
when/while sb's back is turned
▪ Once, despite the age requirement, my sister charms her way on to this ride while my back is turned.
while I'm/you're etc at it
while the going's good
▪ Let's get out while the going's good.
while you're about it
▪ Er, he said, while we 're about it, you couldn't lend me your bass as well, could you?
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
While I like Carter personally, I don't think what he's doing is right.
While Sandy was filling out the forms, I called Jimmy from the airport.
While she is a likable girl, she can be extremely difficult to work with.
While she was out of the room, he took a quick look at the papers on her desk.
While six percent of ordinary homes were damaged in the earthquake, only three percent of mobile homes were damaged.
While teaching standards could be raised, more funding would also help.
▪ I'll just make a phone call while you finish the dishes.
▪ I bought a magazine while I was waiting for the train.
▪ I read the book while I was on the plane.
▪ My car was stolen while I was on holiday.
▪ Someone broke into her house while she was on vacation.
▪ They were killed while attempting to reach the summit.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
little
▪ Just sit very still and wait a little while.
▪ It might take me a little while.
▪ Concentrating on Emma would help to keep her worries at bay for a little while.
▪ I now had some helpful connections in Warsaw, even if for only a little while.
▪ A little while later he gave his horses a rest, and returned to the spot they had refused to pass.
▪ You finished that first sip of beer, and now it is a little while later.
long
▪ When the names and numbers were read out it was a long while before we heard the name of Deerhurst.
▪ For a long while she heard them in silence.
▪ It was a long while before John got to sleep that night.
▪ A baby carriage was overturned, and a heavy rain of black ash descended for a long while afterward.
▪ After a long while, watching the attack and listening to the screeching wood, Tallis had had enough.
▪ For a long while after that first day, I could not live with the dead woman and her possessions.
▪ Raynor stared into the fire for a long while.
▪ I went into her room and waited a long while.
short
▪ In a short while he found new amusement: walking loudly all over the metal roof, to his own vocal accompaniment.
▪ Sure enough, in a short while a girl called Mitti turned up.
▪ I stay for a short while, looking for Philip.
▪ Granted, he has been in office a short while, and has had much to occupy him.
▪ I carried it out in the field for a short while.
▪ My father went mad and I think he actually hated me for a short while.
■ VERB
sit
▪ She sat for a while, becoming quieter, breathing deeply, ceasing to tremble.
▪ Let it sit there a while.
▪ She sat for a while, checking an anguish which made her want to sob.
▪ We sat for a while, the three of us, as twilight fell.
▪ If he would like to sit there for a while and learn something, I will then cheerfully give way to him.
▪ They sat for a while with no other sound than the wind.
▪ I sat quietly for a while finishing my most recent cup of coffee.
▪ They sat up a good while, watching the stars swarm along the edge of the veranda roof.
stay
▪ So you are going to stay a while on the globe?
▪ I can't stay but a little while.
▪ Dear Friends?: Stay friends for a while longer.
▪ He stayed outside for a while before being ordered back inside his caravan by the soldiers.
▪ They both would stay up for a while yet.
take
▪ It took us a good while to get to the location.
▪ Traffic was fine through the tunnel, but it still took me a while to get a parking space.
▪ It took quite a while for him to get back on his bike again.
▪ It took even Chadwick a while to grasp the beauty of such simplicity.
▪ It might take a while for the contacts to happen, but they'd happen.
▪ It took a while for me to make a decision.
▪ But she knew it would take a while before the immeasurable hunger receded within her.
▪ It took me a while to realize that Uncle Shim no longer visited.
wait
▪ But I decided to wait a while before speaking.
▪ After an erratic and harried greeting, we waited quite a while for some one to initiate contact.
▪ Just sit very still and wait a little while.
▪ I went into her room and waited a long while.
▪ We waited for a while as he shovelled coal and filled his boilers.
▪ Economists will have to wait a while for how the federal government read Massachusetts' employment situation last month.
▪ We waited for quite a while.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(every) once in a while
▪ I only see her every once in a while at school.
▪ All of these Helen used, displayed, wore, not once in a while, but every day, blushing.
▪ But look at them once in a while.
▪ He calls me once in a while or I call him.
▪ He just comes round once in a while and they go out.
▪ I do need to see every once in a while.
▪ I think you should change your shampoo and conditioner once in a while to avoid product build-up.
▪ I used to take him out fishing once in a while.
▪ They were both lonely, so why not see each other once in a while.
be worth sb's while (to do/doing sth)
▪ And finally the Soft Sell - it will always be worth your while to invest in a stout umbrella!
▪ Controversy really begins when there are varying views as to whether a house is worth saving.
▪ Dardis assured Bernstein that it would be worth his while to fly down to Miami again.
▪ However, rather than getting upset about this it spurs her on to try harder to show that they are worth watching.
▪ I had to make her see that the exercise was worth her while.
▪ If he! ital! is! off! going to fight, he wants it to be worth his while.
▪ It could be worth your while.
▪ The try is to be worth five points while the drop goal will count for two points.
make it worth sb's while
▪ I'll make sure they approve your application if you make it worth my while.
▪ I didn't want to lend Terry my car, but he said he'd make it worth my while.
▪ The basketball federation in Kuwait offered him a coaching job, and made it worth his while.
▪ He also has a lucrative five-year contract at Hilton that makes it worth his while to stick around.
▪ Obviously he would promise to make it worth your while.
strike while the iron is hot
▪ Don't wait until tomorrow before you tell him, strike while the iron is hot!
▪ So, it should strike while the iron is hot and go to the country as soon as possible.
when/while sb's back is turned
▪ Once, despite the age requirement, my sister charms her way on to this ride while my back is turned.
while I'm/you're etc at it
while you're about it
▪ Er, he said, while we 're about it, you couldn't lend me your bass as well, could you?
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ After a while he got the point that it was permanent.
▪ After a while we are aware of a deviation, the gravitational pull of an unseen planet.
▪ But I begged his indulgence to share it with him just a little while longer.
▪ Jasper and I watched them for a while, and they summoned us, in a friendly way, to join them.
▪ The industry's hit-men will have to lie quiet, for a while.
▪ Things might be difficult for a while but I didn't envisage any radical changes.
III.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
time
▪ It's hard to while away the time.
▪ Here are seven dad-tested travel ideas that will help you connect with your kids while having a good time.
▪ It is a way of whiling away the time, wearing shirts, while staring across the street at the cops.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(every) once in a while
▪ I only see her every once in a while at school.
▪ All of these Helen used, displayed, wore, not once in a while, but every day, blushing.
▪ But look at them once in a while.
▪ He calls me once in a while or I call him.
▪ He just comes round once in a while and they go out.
▪ I do need to see every once in a while.
▪ I think you should change your shampoo and conditioner once in a while to avoid product build-up.
▪ I used to take him out fishing once in a while.
▪ They were both lonely, so why not see each other once in a while.
be worth sb's while (to do/doing sth)
▪ And finally the Soft Sell - it will always be worth your while to invest in a stout umbrella!
▪ Controversy really begins when there are varying views as to whether a house is worth saving.
▪ Dardis assured Bernstein that it would be worth his while to fly down to Miami again.
▪ However, rather than getting upset about this it spurs her on to try harder to show that they are worth watching.
▪ I had to make her see that the exercise was worth her while.
▪ If he! ital! is! off! going to fight, he wants it to be worth his while.
▪ It could be worth your while.
▪ The try is to be worth five points while the drop goal will count for two points.
make hay (while the sun shines)
▪ The tourists won't be here forever, so we'd better make hay while the sun shines.
make it worth sb's while
▪ I'll make sure they approve your application if you make it worth my while.
▪ I didn't want to lend Terry my car, but he said he'd make it worth my while.
▪ The basketball federation in Kuwait offered him a coaching job, and made it worth his while.
▪ He also has a lucrative five-year contract at Hilton that makes it worth his while to stick around.
▪ Obviously he would promise to make it worth your while.
when/while sb's back is turned
▪ Once, despite the age requirement, my sister charms her way on to this ride while my back is turned.
while I'm/you're etc at it
while the going's good
▪ Let's get out while the going's good.
while you're about it
▪ Er, he said, while we 're about it, you couldn't lend me your bass as well, could you?
The Collaborative International Dictionary
While

While \While\, n. [AS. hw[=i]l; akin to OS. hw[=i]l, hw[=i]la, OFries. hw[=i]le, D. wigl, G. weile, OHG. w[=i]la, hw[=i]la, hw[=i]l, Icel. hv[=i]la a bed, hv[=i]ld rest, Sw. hvila, Dan. hvile, Goth. hweila a time, and probably to L. quietus quiet, and perhaps to Gr. ? the proper time of season. [root]20. Cf. Quiet, Whilom.]

  1. Space of time, or continued duration, esp. when short; a time; as, one while we thought him innocent. ``All this while.''
    --Shak.

    This mighty queen may no while endure.
    --Chaucer.

    [Some guest that] hath outside his welcome while, And tells the jest without the smile.
    --Coleridge.

    I will go forth and breathe the air a while.
    --Longfellow.

  2. That which requires time; labor; pains. [Obs.]

    Satan . . . cast him how he might quite her while.
    --Chaucer.

    At whiles, at times; at intervals.

    And so on us at whiles it falls, to claim Powers that we dread.
    --J. H. Newman.

    The while, The whiles, in or during the time that; meantime; while.
    --Tennyson.

    Within a while, in a short time; soon.

    Worth while, worth the time which it requires; worth the time and pains; hence, worth the expense; as, it is not always worth while for a man to prosecute for small debts.

While

While \While\, prep. Until; till. [Obs. or Prov. Eng. & Scot.]

I may be conveyed into your chamber; I'll lie under your bed while midnight.
--Beau. & Fl.

While

While \While\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Whiled; p. pr. & vb. n. Whiling.] To cause to pass away pleasantly or without irksomeness or disgust; to spend or pass; -- usually followed by away.

The lovely lady whiled the hours away.
--Longfellow.

While

While \While\, v. i. To loiter. [R.]
--Spectator.

While

While \While\, conj.

  1. During the time that; as long as; whilst; at the same time that; as, while I write, you sleep. ``While I have time and space.''
    --Chaucer.

    Use your memory; you will sensibly experience a gradual improvement, while you take care not to overload it.
    --I. Watts.

  2. Hence, under which circumstances; in which case; though; whereas.

    While as, While that, during or at the time that. [Obs.]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
while

Old English hwile, accusative of hwil "a space of time," from Proto-Germanic *hwilo (cognates: Old Saxon hwil, Old Frisian hwile, Old High German hwila, German Weile, Gothic hveila "space of time, while"), originally "rest" (compare Old Norse hvila "bed," hvild "rest"), from PIE *kwi-lo-, suffixed form of root *kweie- (2) "to rest" (cognates: Avestan shaitish "joy," Old Persian šiyatish "joy," Latin quies "rest, repose, quiet," Old Church Slavonic po-koji "rest"). Notion of "period of rest" became in Germanic "period of time."\n

\nNow largely superseded by time except in formulaic constructions (such as all the while). Middle English sense of "short space of time spent in doing something" now only preserved in worthwhile and phrases such as worth (one's) while. As a conjunction, "during or in the time that; as long as" (late Old English), it represents Old English þa hwile þe, literally "the while that." Form whiles is recorded from early 13c.; whilst is from late 14c., with excrescent -st as in amongst, amidst. Service while-you-wait is attested from 1911.

while

"to cause (time) to pass (without dullness)," 1630s, earlier "to occupy or engage (someone or something) for a period of time" (c.1600), new formation from while (n.), not considered to be from Middle English hwulen "to have leisure," which is from a Germanic verb form of while (n.) (compare German weilen "to stay, linger"). An association with phrases such as Shakespearean beguile the day, Latin diem decipere, French tromper le temps "has led to the substitution of WILE v by some modern writers" [OED] (see wile (v.)).

Wiktionary
while

conj. During the same time that. n. An uncertain duration of time, a period of time. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To pass (time) idly. 2 To loiter.

WordNet
while

n. a period of indeterminate length (usually short) marked by some action or condition; "he was here for a little while"; "I need to rest for a piece"; "a spell of good weather"; "a patch of bad weather" [syn: piece, spell, patch]

Wikipedia
While

"While" is a word in the English language that functions both as a noun and as a subordinating conjunction. Its meaning varies largely based on its intended function, position in the phrase and even the writer or speaker's regional dialect. As a conjunction, it is synonymous with the word "whilst", a form often considered archaic in American and Canadian English, as well as in some style guides on both sides of the Atlantic.

While (true)
  1. redirect infinite loop
While(true)
While (True)
While(True)
While(TRUE)
While (TRUE)
While (1)
While(1)
While (disambiguation)

While is an English word indicating duration or simultaneity.

While may also refer to:

  • Chris While (born 1956), British singer-songwriter
  • Kellie While (born 1976), British singer-songwriter
  • While loop in computer programming
While(1 Is Less Than 2)

while(1<2) is the seventh studio album by the Canadian electronic music producer deadmau5, released on 17 June 2014 by mau5trap and Astralwerks in the United States and by Virgin EMI Records internationally. It is his first studio album to be released by Virgin EMI internationally and by Astralwerks in the United States. Many of the songs on the album were originally uploaded to deadmau5's SoundCloud account before they were removed from the site in early 2014.

Usage examples of "while".

He had learned her opinions on the subject of Aberrancy over the weeks they had spent together, and while he did not agree with much of what she said, it had enough validity to make him think.

In their aberration they believed it was worth their while to break all the barriers of perception, even if they had to become trees to do that.

We wondered for a long while why Kadra was so adamant about evacuating Tenua to the Abesse and sending her people straight into Volan hands.

Now he thought that he would abide their coming and see if he might join their company, since if he crossed the water he would be on the backward way: and it was but a little while ere the head of them came up over the hill, and were presently going past Ralph, who rose up to look on them, and be seen of them, but they took little heed of him.

Dale of the Tower: there shall we abide a while to gather victual, a day or two, or three maybe: so my Lord will hold a tourney there: that is to say that I myself and some few others shall try thy manhood somewhat.

Either come down to us into the meadow yonder, that we may slay you with less labour, or else, which will be the better for you, give up to us the Upmeads thralls who be with you, and then turn your faces and go back to your houses, and abide there till we come and pull you out of them, which may be some while yet.

I made for thee, and one also for me, while I was abiding thee after the battle, and my love and my hope is woven into it.

Apparently satisfied it would support his weight, he leaned back, rocking gently while Abie prepared their coffee.

The sheriff thrust the papers at Major MacInnes and Abigail could only stare while he quickly scanned the pages.

He noticed the older antidepressants like amitriptyline decreased psychic ability, while the newer serotonin reuptake inhibitors were either neutral or they enhanced it.

They abjured the implicit reverence which the pride of Rome had exacted from their ignorance, while they acquired the knowledge and possession of those advantages by which alone she supported her declining greatness.

Those that remained were vacuum ablating, their edges fraying like worn cloth, while their flat surfaces slowly dissolved, reducing their overall thickness.

In the cold stream Deacon Rose bathed and performed his ablutions and meditations, while a much subdued Pryor saw to the horses.

In offering a few hints for the domestic management of these abnormal conditions, we would at the same time remark, that, while health may be regained by skillful treatment, recovery will be gradual.

All the while the shaft of phosphorescence from the well was getting brighter and brighter, bringing to the minds of the huddled men, a sense of doom and abnormality which far outraced any image their conscious minds could form.