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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
struck
I.
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
struck a pose (=stood or sat in a particular position)
▪ Ann struck a pose and smiled for the camera.
struck by...bolt of lightning
▪ There’s not much left of his house after it was struck by a bolt of lightning.
struck dumb
▪ She was struck dumb with terror.
struck...mine
▪ The ship struck a mine and sank.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be struck all of a heap
be struck dumb
▪ Amy was struck dumb. Was it possible that her own son had deceived her?
▪ When he arrived at the scene of the disaster, he was struck dumb with horror and amazement.
▪ At times 25,000-plus onlookers were struck dumb by tension and anticipation, a hiccup resounding like a roar.
▪ I was told it was Duart was struck dumb.
▪ No wonder the computer wizards were struck dumb by the place; the narcissistic attraction must have been overwhelming.
▪ Once again I was struck dumb by the mystery of the world.
▪ One edged remark, and she would be struck dumb.
be struck off
▪ Ancient law, it seems, was on their side; thousands were struck off, and more feared to be.
▪ Do you want me to be struck off?
▪ He was struck off in 1998, but still receives a National Health Service pension.
▪ He was struck off the medical register for his pains.
▪ In serious breaches of these codes, the professional can be struck off the professional register. 5.
▪ Then her head was struck off and fixed on gallows and her body thrown into the pit.
be struck with horror/terror/awe etc
II.adjective
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ The strip of mirror suddenly flashed at a struck match.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Struck

Struck \Struck\, imp. & p. p. of Strike.

Struck jury (Law), a special jury, composed of persons having special knowledge or qualifications, selected by striking from the panel of jurors a certain number for each party, leaving the number required by law to try the cause.

Struck

Strike \Strike\, v. t. [imp. Struck; p. p. Struck, Stricken( Stroock, Strucken, Obs.); p. pr. & vb. n. Striking. Struck is more commonly used in the p. p. than stricken.] [OE. striken to strike, proceed, flow, AS. str[=i]can to go, proceed, akin to D. strijken to rub, stroke, strike, to move, go, G. streichen, OHG. str[=i]hhan, L. stringere to touch lightly, to graze, to strip off (but perhaps not to L. stringere in sense to draw tight), striga a row, a furrow. Cf. Streak, Stroke.]

  1. To touch or hit with some force, either with the hand or with an instrument; to smite; to give a blow to, either with the hand or with any instrument or missile.

    He at Philippi kept His sword e'en like a dancer; while I struck The lean and wrinkled Cassius.
    --Shak.

  2. To come in collision with; to strike against; as, a bullet struck him; the wave struck the boat amidships; the ship struck a reef.

  3. To give, as a blow; to impel, as with a blow; to give a force to; to dash; to cast.

    They shall take of the blood, and strike it on the two sideposts.
    --Ex. xii. 7.

    Who would be free, themselves must strike the blow.
    --Byron.

  4. To stamp or impress with a stroke; to coin; as, to strike coin from metal: to strike dollars at the mint.

  5. To thrust in; to cause to enter or penetrate; to set in the earth; as, a tree strikes its roots deep.

  6. To punish; to afflict; to smite.

    To punish the just is not good, nor strike princes for equity.
    --Prov. xvii. 26.

  7. To cause to sound by one or more beats; to indicate or notify by audible strokes; as, the clock strikes twelve; the drums strike up a march.

  8. To lower; to let or take down; to remove; as, to strike sail; to strike a flag or an ensign, as in token of surrender; to strike a yard or a topmast in a gale; to strike a tent; to strike the centering of an arch.

  9. To make a sudden impression upon, as by a blow; to affect sensibly with some strong emotion; as, to strike the mind, with surprise; to strike one with wonder, alarm, dread, or horror.

    Nice works of art strike and surprise us most on the first view.
    --Atterbury.

    They please as beauties, here as wonders strike.
    --Pope.

  10. To affect in some particular manner by a sudden impression or impulse; as, the plan proposed strikes me favorably; to strike one dead or blind.

    How often has stricken you dumb with his irony!
    --Landor.

  11. To cause or produce by a stroke, or suddenly, as by a stroke; as, to strike a light.

    Waving wide her myrtle wand, She strikes a universal peace through sea and land.
    --Milton.

  12. To cause to ignite; as, to strike a match.

  13. To make and ratify; as, to strike a bargain.

    Note: Probably borrowed from the L. f[oe]dus ferrire, to strike a compact, so called because an animal was struck and killed as a sacrifice on such occasions.

  14. To take forcibly or fraudulently; as, to strike money.

  15. To level, as a measure of grain, salt, or the like, by scraping off with a straight instrument what is above the level of the top.

  16. (Masonry) To cut off, as a mortar joint, even with the face of the wall, or inward at a slight angle.

  17. To hit upon, or light upon, suddenly; as, my eye struck a strange word; they soon struck the trail.

  18. To borrow money of; to make a demand upon; as, he struck a friend for five dollars. [Slang]

  19. To lade into a cooler, as a liquor.
    --B. Edwards.

  20. To stroke or pass lightly; to wave.

    Behold, I thought, He will . . . strike his hand over the place, and recover the leper.
    --2 Kings v. 11.

  21. To advance; to cause to go forward; -- used only in past participle. ``Well struck in years.'' --Shak. To strike an attitude, To strike a balance. See under Attitude, and Balance. To strike a jury (Law), to constitute a special jury ordered by a court, by each party striking out a certain number of names from a prepared list of jurors, so as to reduce it to the number of persons required by law. --Burrill. To strike a lead.

    1. (Mining) To find a vein of ore.

    2. Fig.: To find a way to fortune. [Colloq.] To strike a ledger or To strike an account, to balance it. To strike hands with.

      1. To shake hands with.
        --Halliwell.

      2. To make a compact or agreement with; to agree with. To strike off.

        1. To erase from an account; to deduct; as, to strike off the interest of a debt.

        2. (Print.) To impress; to print; as, to strike off a thousand copies of a book.

    3. To separate by a blow or any sudden action; as, to strike off what is superfluous or corrupt. To strike oil, to find petroleum when boring for it; figuratively, to make a lucky hit financially. [Slang, U.S.] To strike one luck, to shake hands with one and wish good luck. [Obs.] --Beau. & Fl. To strike out.

      1. To produce by collision; to force out, as, to strike out sparks with steel.

      2. To blot out; to efface; to erase. ``To methodize is as necessary as to strike out.''
        --Pope.

      3. To form by a quick effort; to devise; to invent; to contrive, as, to strike out a new plan of finance.

    4. (Baseball) To cause a player to strike out; -- said of the pitcher. See To strike out, under Strike, v. i. To strike sail. See under Sail. To strike up.

      1. To cause to sound; to begin to beat. ``Strike up the drums.''
        --Shak.

      2. To begin to sing or play; as, to strike up a tune.

      3. To raise (as sheet metal), in making diahes, pans, etc., by blows or pressure in a die.

        To strike work, to quit work; to go on a strike.

Struck

Strike \Strike\, v. t. [imp. Struck; p. p. Struck, Stricken( Stroock, Strucken, Obs.); p. pr. & vb. n. Striking. Struck is more commonly used in the p. p. than stricken.] [OE. striken to strike, proceed, flow, AS. str[=i]can to go, proceed, akin to D. strijken to rub, stroke, strike, to move, go, G. streichen, OHG. str[=i]hhan, L. stringere to touch lightly, to graze, to strip off (but perhaps not to L. stringere in sense to draw tight), striga a row, a furrow. Cf. Streak, Stroke.]

  1. To touch or hit with some force, either with the hand or with an instrument; to smite; to give a blow to, either with the hand or with any instrument or missile.

    He at Philippi kept His sword e'en like a dancer; while I struck The lean and wrinkled Cassius.
    --Shak.

  2. To come in collision with; to strike against; as, a bullet struck him; the wave struck the boat amidships; the ship struck a reef.

  3. To give, as a blow; to impel, as with a blow; to give a force to; to dash; to cast.

    They shall take of the blood, and strike it on the two sideposts.
    --Ex. xii. 7.

    Who would be free, themselves must strike the blow.
    --Byron.

  4. To stamp or impress with a stroke; to coin; as, to strike coin from metal: to strike dollars at the mint.

  5. To thrust in; to cause to enter or penetrate; to set in the earth; as, a tree strikes its roots deep.

  6. To punish; to afflict; to smite.

    To punish the just is not good, nor strike princes for equity.
    --Prov. xvii. 26.

  7. To cause to sound by one or more beats; to indicate or notify by audible strokes; as, the clock strikes twelve; the drums strike up a march.

  8. To lower; to let or take down; to remove; as, to strike sail; to strike a flag or an ensign, as in token of surrender; to strike a yard or a topmast in a gale; to strike a tent; to strike the centering of an arch.

  9. To make a sudden impression upon, as by a blow; to affect sensibly with some strong emotion; as, to strike the mind, with surprise; to strike one with wonder, alarm, dread, or horror.

    Nice works of art strike and surprise us most on the first view.
    --Atterbury.

    They please as beauties, here as wonders strike.
    --Pope.

  10. To affect in some particular manner by a sudden impression or impulse; as, the plan proposed strikes me favorably; to strike one dead or blind.

    How often has stricken you dumb with his irony!
    --Landor.

  11. To cause or produce by a stroke, or suddenly, as by a stroke; as, to strike a light.

    Waving wide her myrtle wand, She strikes a universal peace through sea and land.
    --Milton.

  12. To cause to ignite; as, to strike a match.

  13. To make and ratify; as, to strike a bargain.

    Note: Probably borrowed from the L. f[oe]dus ferrire, to strike a compact, so called because an animal was struck and killed as a sacrifice on such occasions.

  14. To take forcibly or fraudulently; as, to strike money.

  15. To level, as a measure of grain, salt, or the like, by scraping off with a straight instrument what is above the level of the top.

  16. (Masonry) To cut off, as a mortar joint, even with the face of the wall, or inward at a slight angle.

  17. To hit upon, or light upon, suddenly; as, my eye struck a strange word; they soon struck the trail.

  18. To borrow money of; to make a demand upon; as, he struck a friend for five dollars. [Slang]

  19. To lade into a cooler, as a liquor.
    --B. Edwards.

  20. To stroke or pass lightly; to wave.

    Behold, I thought, He will . . . strike his hand over the place, and recover the leper.
    --2 Kings v. 11.

  21. To advance; to cause to go forward; -- used only in past participle. ``Well struck in years.'' --Shak. To strike an attitude, To strike a balance. See under Attitude, and Balance. To strike a jury (Law), to constitute a special jury ordered by a court, by each party striking out a certain number of names from a prepared list of jurors, so as to reduce it to the number of persons required by law. --Burrill. To strike a lead.

    1. (Mining) To find a vein of ore.

    2. Fig.: To find a way to fortune. [Colloq.] To strike a ledger or To strike an account, to balance it. To strike hands with.

      1. To shake hands with.
        --Halliwell.

      2. To make a compact or agreement with; to agree with. To strike off.

        1. To erase from an account; to deduct; as, to strike off the interest of a debt.

        2. (Print.) To impress; to print; as, to strike off a thousand copies of a book.

    3. To separate by a blow or any sudden action; as, to strike off what is superfluous or corrupt. To strike oil, to find petroleum when boring for it; figuratively, to make a lucky hit financially. [Slang, U.S.] To strike one luck, to shake hands with one and wish good luck. [Obs.] --Beau. & Fl. To strike out.

      1. To produce by collision; to force out, as, to strike out sparks with steel.

      2. To blot out; to efface; to erase. ``To methodize is as necessary as to strike out.''
        --Pope.

      3. To form by a quick effort; to devise; to invent; to contrive, as, to strike out a new plan of finance.

    4. (Baseball) To cause a player to strike out; -- said of the pitcher. See To strike out, under Strike, v. i. To strike sail. See under Sail. To strike up.

      1. To cause to sound; to begin to beat. ``Strike up the drums.''
        --Shak.

      2. To begin to sing or play; as, to strike up a tune.

      3. To raise (as sheet metal), in making diahes, pans, etc., by blows or pressure in a die.

        To strike work, to quit work; to go on a strike.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
struck

past tense and past participle of strike (v.).

Wiktionary
struck

vb. 1 (en-paststrike) (delete) 2 (en-paststrike) (hit)

WordNet
strike
  1. n. a group's refusal to work in protest against low pay or bad work conditions; "the strike lasted more than a month before it was settled" [syn: work stoppage]

  2. an attack that is intended to seize or inflict damage on or destroy an objective; "the strike was scheduled to begin at dawn"

  3. a pitch that is in the strike zone and that the batter does not hit; "this pitcher throws more strikes than balls"

  4. a gentle blow [syn: rap, tap]

  5. a score in tenpins: knocking down all ten with the first ball; "he finished with three strikes in the tenth frame" [syn: ten-strike]

  6. a conspicuous success; "that song was his first hit and marked the beginning of his career"; "that new Broadway show is a real smasher"; "the party went with a bang" [syn: hit, smash, smasher, bang]

  7. [also: struck]

struck

See strike

struck

adj. (used in combination) affected by something overwhelming; "conscience-smitten"; "awe-struck" [syn: smitten, stricken]

strike
  1. v. hit against; come into sudden contact with; "The car hit a tree"; "He struck the table with his elbow" [syn: hit, impinge on, run into, collide with] [ant: miss]

  2. deliver a sharp blow, as with the hand, fist, or weapon; "The teacher struck the child"; "the opponent refused to strike"; "The boxer struck the attacker dead"

  3. have an emotional or cognitive impact upon; "This child impressed me as unusually mature"; "This behavior struck me as odd" [syn: affect, impress, move]

  4. make a strategic, offensive, assault against an enemy, opponent, or a target; "The Germans struck Poland on Sept. 1, 1939"; "We must strike the enemy's oil fields"; "in the fifth inning, the Giants struck, sending three runners home to win the game 5 to 2" [syn: hit]

  5. indicate (a certain time) by striking; "The clock struck midnight"; "Just when I entered, the clock struck"

  6. affect or afflict suddenly, usually adversely; "We were hit by really bad weather"; "He was stricken with cancer when he was still a teenager"; "The earthquake struck at midnight" [syn: hit]

  7. stop work in order to press demands; "The auto workers are striking for higher wages"; "The employees walked out when their demand for better benefits was not met" [syn: walk out]

  8. touch or seem as if touching visually or audibly; "Light fell on her face"; "The sun shone on the fields"; "The light struck the golden necklace"; "A strange sound struck my ears" [syn: fall, shine]

  9. attain; "The horse finally struck a pace" [syn: come to]

  10. produce by manipulating keys or strings of musical instruments, also metaphorically; "The pianist strikes a middle C"; "strike `z' on the keyboard"; "her comments struck a sour note" [syn: hit]

  11. cause to form between electrodes of an arc lamp; "strike an arc"

  12. find unexpectedly; "the archeologists chanced upon an old tomb"; "she struck a goldmine"; "The hikers finally struck the main path to the lake" [syn: fall upon, come upon, light upon, chance upon, come across, chance on, happen upon, attain, discover]

  13. produce by ignition or a blow; "strike fire from the flintstone"; "strike a match"

  14. remove by erasing or crossing out; "Please strike this remark from the record" [syn: expunge, excise]

  15. cause to experience suddenly; "Panic struck me"; "An interesting idea hit her"; "A thought came to me"; "The thought struck terror in our minds"; "They were struck with fear" [syn: hit, come to]

  16. drive something violently into a location; "he hit his fist on the table"; "she struck her head on the low ceiling" [syn: hit]

  17. occupy or take on; "He assumes the lotus position"; "She took her seat on the stage"; "We took our seats in the orchestra"; "She took up her position behind the tree"; "strike a pose" [syn: assume, take, take up]

  18. form by stamping, punching, or printing; "strike coins"; "strike a medal" [syn: mint, coin]

  19. smooth with a strickle; "strickle the grain in the measure" [syn: strickle]

  20. pierce with force; "The bullet struck her thigh"; "The icy wind struck through our coats"

  21. arrive at after reckoning, deliberating, and weighing; "strike a balance"; "strike a bargain"

  22. [also: struck]

Wikipedia
Struck

Struck is the surname of people:

  • Hermann Struck (1876–1944), German artist
  • Karin Struck (1947–2006), German author
  • Peter Struck (1943–2012), German politician (SPD)
  • Peter T. Struck, Classics professor

see also Strikebreaker

Usage examples of "struck".

On this occasion it was unlocked, and Marian was about to rush forward in eager anticipation of a peep at its interior, when, child as she was, the reflection struck her that she would stand abetter chance of carrying her point by remaining perdue.

He started to intone another spell, but the archmage struck again, seeking to dispel any enchantments or abjurations protecting the lich.

The purpose of my visit, and the frightful abnormalities it postulated struck at me all at once with a chill sensation that nearly over-balanced my ardour for strange delvings.

The hardier swimmers, with Paul, struck out for the abutment on the pier in their usual way and poor Michael was left alone.

To prevent, therefore, any such suspicions, so prejudicial to the credit of an historian, who professes to draw his materials from nature only, we shall now proceed to acquaint the reader who these people were, whose sudden appearance had struck such terrors into Partridge, had more than half frightened the postboy, and had a little surprized even Mr.

He struck up an acquaintanceship with the foreman of the toolroom, a man called John Franklin who was about 50 years of age.

Sheridan had struck up an acquaintanceship with the actor-murderer Giles, a slightly bizarre eventuality which might have odd consequences.

And even if the freak chance that had struck Wally with a severe loss of his mental acuity, were to hit him too, he wanted no anaesthesia, no blurring of the memory.

She might have struck her skin alight, her favorite trick spell, but she was too addled and exhausted.

I was struck by the dread in her voice, which seemed to be more fear of Aden himself than a reluctance to share the bad news.

Actually, as little as I liked the idea of being beholden to Aden at this particular moment, it struck me as a great idea.

I loved her tenderly, I adored her, but at that moment it was not her whom I wanted, because at first her presence had struck me as a mystification.

The Reverend Father Agaric steadfastly endured the rigour of the laws which struck himself personally, as well as the terrible fall of the Emiral of which he was the chief cause.

When the agriculturists of China struck to obtain a reasonable allowance of electric power for their tillage, Gordelpus affected them with an evil atmosphere, so that they choked and died in thousands.

The memory of the need in him struck like an arrow, a need deeper than his love for Alde, a wordless yearning so deeply buried he had never sensed its loss in all his aimless life.