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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
soar
verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bird soars (=flies very high in the sky)
▪ We watched birds soar in the blue sky above.
a price shoots up/soars/rockets (=increases quickly by a large amount)
▪ The price of oil soared in the 1970s.
moutains soar/towerliterary (= go very high into the sky)
▪ The distant mountains soar abruptly towards the sky.
profits soar/leap (=increase by a large amount)
sales soar (=increase quickly and by a large amount)
▪ Computer sales soared as prices continued to come down.
sb's popularity soars (=increases by a large amount)
▪ Opinion polls showed that his popularity had soared to a record level.
sb’s spirits rise/lift/soar (=they start feeling happier)
▪ Her spirits rose as they left the ugliness of London behind.
spiralling/soaring inflation (=inflation that is increasing quickly and out of control)
▪ Argentina was suffering from spiralling inflation.
the temperature soars (=rises quickly to a high level)
▪ In summer the temperature can soar to over 40°C (104°F).
unemployment soars (=increases quickly to a high level)
▪ The economic crisis has seen unemployment soar.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
over
▪ Keep a look out too for buzzards soaring over the crags which surround you, and also for the odd kestrel.
▪ Griffon-mounted Elf Lords soared over the army.
▪ Read in studio Dozens of gliders have been soaring over the region competing in one of the country's largest gliding championships.
▪ Lights were on on the Kingston road bridge soaring over the murky river.
to
▪ And his heart soared to wherever his Beth was in that moment.
up
▪ Meredith glanced up uncertainly at the four-storey buildings soaring up forbiddingly on either side of the alley where they were walking.
▪ He soared up over her and shot her with his arrows at no risk to himself.
▪ Both sides have been soaring up their respective divisions.
▪ The Chiefs' balloon soared up and out of the stadium.
▪ As the creatures soared up and down, their laughter began to take on an eerie and mournful tone.
▪ Here the doves soared up to a tree through whose foliage came a bright yellow gleam.
▪ Again it rose from its leafy perch and soared up into the sky.
▪ But, at our request, the planes soared up the bay and through a canyon over LeConte Glacier.
■ NOUN
air
▪ Look down on the trees, lakes and mountains far below as you soar through the air ....
▪ There were hundreds of the Hunters, darting and soaring through the air.
costs
▪ With car running costs set to soar this is good news.
▪ The support system had to be paid and bureaucratized. Costs soared.
▪ Net interest payments were 69% higher than in 1988, and unit labour costs are soaring.
▪ Nonprofit organizations have seen their costs soar, their sources of revenue dry up, and their missions challenged.
▪ Since 1978, costs have soared and Sri Lanka now has to find, £1600 million.
▪ Employer health costs soared 18. 6 percent in 1988 and continued to rise until 1994.
▪ There, events abroad caused major problems: costs were soaring.
eagle
▪ Meanwhile, high overhead, an eagle soared, clutching a tortoise in its talons.
▪ He finds what he is after on the mauve horizon, an eagle soaring quietly there.
▪ High above the immense trees which shadowed the river a magnificent golden eagle soared in slow circles.
height
▪ Vultures soar at great heights, watching not only for carcasses but also for other vultures possibly flying towards carcasses.
▪ The stock market is soaring to new heights.
▪ Usually seen soaring at a considerable height.
▪ This is a well-managed restaurant that I expect will soar to new heights.
▪ Corporate profits are soaring to new heights, but so is income inequality.
▪ In the decade since then, Disney has soared to new heights.
inflation
▪ Queues have lengthened, real incomes have fallen and inflation has soared.
▪ At the same time the peso was devalued by 600 % and inflation soared over consumers' purchasing power declined.
▪ The growth rate fell, inflation soared.
▪ Even if more money were available, a massive payout would send inflation soaring, economists warn.
▪ Over the long term, policymakers have little choice because permitting inflation to soar will, over time, damage job formation.
level
▪ Sales of existing homes soared to an all-time level of 4. 1 million units last year, the study noted.
▪ As a result, company earnings soared to industry-best levels during the four years leading up to 1992.
▪ Consumer debt soared to very high levels because people often thought the relentless rise in the Dow would somehow save them.
market
▪ The market soared, especially in government gilt-edged stock, and the pound emerged ever stronger.
▪ The stock market soared instead, though, leaving the fund far behind.
▪ If he chooses to come back, his market value will have soared.
▪ The stock market is soaring to new heights.
▪ London was a boom town and the stock market was soaring.
▪ The market soared 490 percent from December 1946 to July 1956.
▪ Shares are basically flat in the past year, while the overall market has soared.
percent
▪ But the price hikes helped Pru first-half profits soar by 46 percent to £249 million.
▪ By 1991, the white rate of illegitimacy was up to 22 percent and the black rate had soared to 68 percent.
▪ Teenage pregnancies have soared by 35 percent since 1980.
▪ Agouron shares have soared more than 50 percent since late April on expectations the drug would do well.
▪ The blue-chip Dow Jones industrial average is already up 4. 9 percent this year, after soaring 26 percent in 1996.
▪ Ratings soared 32 percent above a normal Friday night.
▪ In the past two years, the dollar has soared 50 percent against the yen and 25 percent against the mark.
▪ The market soared 490 percent from December 1946 to July 1956.
price
▪ With prices soaring, work is what Kabulis seek above all else.
▪ And with so many players rushing into the market at the last minute, prices soared.
▪ The economic position remain appalling with the value of money plummeting and prices soaring.
▪ The prices calmly soared through the roof.
▪ Firewood will become even more scarce, and its price will soar.
▪ Oil prices soared from $ 3 per barrel to $ 35 per barrel.
▪ The price had soared to 250p before crashing last year.
▪ And even in regions of apparent abundance, the situation was marginal as prices soared along with farm output.
profit
▪ Reported profits soared by a third.
▪ The telecommunications giant joined a growing number of employers in growth industries that have slashed payrolls even as their profits soared.
▪ But the price hikes helped Pru first-half profits soar by 46 percent to £249 million.
▪ Interest rates are low, inflation seems whipped, job growth is strong, corporate profits are soaring.
▪ Corporate profits are soaring to new heights, but so is income inequality.
▪ Much of the profit bonanza came from soaring underwriting fees.
▪ An estimated 3 million workers have been laid off be-tween 1989 and 1995 as corporate profits have soared.
▪ There are no such restraints on capital, and profits are soaring.
rate
▪ Meanwhile, prostitution increases in rural areas, where unemployment has tripled and school drop-out rates for girls are soaring.
▪ These rates did not soar because there was a sudden upward adjustment in thirty-year inflationary expectations.
▪ Oxford began the night teetering on the brink of the relegation zone and pulse rates soared as early as the second minute.
▪ By 1991, the white rate of illegitimacy was up to 22 percent and the black rate had soared to 68 percent.
▪ Commodity prices fell, interest rates soared and in some cases a Mobutu or a Marcos pocketed billions of dollars.
▪ Take away the police from London or Berlin, and see how quickly the crime rate would soar.
▪ Interest rates could soar, asset prices could fall or cash flows could dry up.
▪ True, the rates had soared, but so had the Headleands' incomes.
sale
▪ And Pendleton's managers are hopeful their sales will continue to soar when their famous Twicer ice lolly is relaunched next week.
▪ Instead, chip sales soared 40 percent.
sky
▪ Again it rose from its leafy perch and soared up into the sky.
▪ Like spiralling clouds of smoke thousands of birds swept and soared, stunt-riding the sky.
▪ Then they soared into the sky as one, to make flight north as a pair along the coast to Wrath.
▪ His kiss was pure joy, winging happiness, as if her spirit was soaring into a clear sky.
▪ Ruth squeezed tight her eyes and swallowed hard as the aircraft soared up into the sky.
spirit
▪ But it was not just the short-lived weather which sent spirits soaring.
▪ Down at the parade, spirits soared.
▪ It should have sent her spirits soaring, but it didn't, because wasn't need just another aspect of lust?
▪ And that was the marvel that sent my spirits soaring!
▪ His kiss was pure joy, winging happiness, as if her spirit was soaring into a clear sky.
▪ And the monks, like wild birds of the spirit, soar above it all.
▪ My father would always be well fed, and his spirit would soar.
stock
▪ London was a boom town and the stock market was soaring.
▪ The Fed delivered a Goldilocks economy -- not too hot, not too cold -- and stocks and bonds soared.
▪ The Nasdaq will also now consider halting trading in a stock that seems to soar or plunge beyond control, Campbell said.
▪ Property-casualty stocks have soared to record highs, more than doubling the explosion enjoyed by the Dow-Jones Industrial Averages in 1985.
▪ The stock soared 4 to 32.
▪ But the government demanded the stock as its value soared to about $ 20 million.
temperature
▪ Tension mounts as temperatures soar on one of the hottest days of the year.
▪ The sun beats down; temperatures soar into the 90s.
▪ It's very tempting to leave your jacket and tie at home when the temperature starts to soar.
▪ Five-year-old cancer victim Belinda Giles was rushed in by her parents, Gill and Paul, when her temperature soared.
▪ During her labour Diana's temperature soared dramatically which in turn gave rise to concern for the baby's health.
top
▪ The result is that family income has soared at the top and fallen at the bottom.
▪ Quality in all areas soared to the top also.
▪ But the soaring incomes of top executives are not the major issue in the great productivity slowdown.
unemployment
▪ A report released last week by the United Nations shows that unemployment has soared from about 70,000 to 260,000.
▪ Now thousands of workers who had manned the booths and the support services had nowhere to turn. Unemployment soared.
▪ But against that, unemployment is soaring, industry running out of patience and he is about to authorise massive cuts in public spending.
▪ The love-in was over, and unemployment had soared.
▪ Economic analysts saw it coming. Unemployment has soared in a region used to jobs for all.
■ VERB
continue
▪ And Pendleton's managers are hopeful their sales will continue to soar when their famous Twicer ice lolly is relaunched next week.
expect
▪ Rescue operations were being hampered by severe winter weather and the death toll was expected to soar.
▪ This is a well-managed restaurant that I expect will soar to new heights.
▪ Demand for rented housing is expected to soar over the next decade.
▪ Pharmaceutical ad revenue is expected to soar 300 percent in 1997.
send
▪ But it was not just the short-lived weather which sent spirits soaring.
▪ Even if more money were available, a massive payout would send inflation soaring, economists warn.
▪ Like a see-saw, her drop had sent him soaring into religiosity.
▪ And what will send me soaring and plunging?
▪ It should have sent her spirits soaring, but it didn't, because wasn't need just another aspect of lust?
▪ And that was the marvel that sent my spirits soaring!
▪ The strike had initially sent copper prices soaring on international metal markets.
▪ The announcement sent shares of Loral soaring to $ 44. 50, up $ 8. 25, on Monday.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
soaring real estate prices
▪ Adam's smile sent her spirits soaring.
▪ An eagle soared above us.
▪ In Montreal, gleaming office towers soar above 18th-century cathedrals.
▪ In the first year of peace, Lebanon's GDP soared by almost 40%.
▪ Last year, the drugs haul soared to 130,00 tablets.
▪ Temperatures soared into the nineties.
▪ The ball soared high into the air.
▪ The cost of a business Website can soar into millions of dollars.
▪ The death toll soars to 376 in Chicago from last week's heat wave.
▪ The snow goose flew down low over the field and then soared back up gracefully.
▪ The space shuttle soared into orbit.
▪ The temperature soared to 90°.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Beyond the river, which was wide and hasty in spate, Llan-fawr soared into cloud.
▪ Bonds soared, as the 10-year government bond yield fell 9 basis points to 8. 24.
▪ But the $ 86 billion F-22 program has been plagued with mismanagement, design flaws and soaring costs.
▪ In the last year, discourse has deteriorated, and partisanship has soared.
▪ Keep a look out too for buzzards soaring over the crags which surround you, and also for the odd kestrel.
▪ The price of a Kalashnikov has soared in just a few days from $ 50 to about $ 250 Tuesday.
▪ The result is that family income has soared at the top and fallen at the bottom.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Soar

Soar \Soar\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Soared; p. pr. & vb. n. Soaring.] [F. s'essorer to soar, essorer to dry (by exposing to the air), fr. L. ex out + aura the air, a breeze; akin to Gr. ?????.]

  1. To fly aloft, as a bird; to mount upward on wings, or as on wings.
    --Chaucer.

    When soars Gaul's vulture with his wings unfurled.
    --Byron.

  2. Fig.: To rise in thought, spirits, or imagination; to be exalted in mood.

    Where the deep transported mind may soar.
    --Milton.

    Valor soars above What the world calls misfortune.
    --Addison.

  3. (A["e]ronautics) To fly by wind power; to glide indefinitely without loss of altitude.

Soar

Soar \Soar\, n. The act of soaring; upward flight.

This apparent soar of the hooded falcon.
--Coleridge.

Soar

Soar \Soar\, a. See 3d Sore. [Obs.]

Soar

Soar \Soar\, a. See Sore, reddish brown.

Soar falcon. (Zo["o]l.) See Sore falcon, under Sore.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
soar

late 14c., from Old French essorer "fly up, soar," from Vulgar Latin *exaurare "rise into the air," from Latin ex- "out" (see ex-) + aura "breeze, air" (see aura). Of mountains, buildings, etc., by 1812; of prices, emotions, etc. from 1929. Related: Soared; soaring.

Wiktionary
soar

n. 1 The act of soaring. 2 An upward flight. vb. 1 to fly aloft with little effort, as a bird. 2 to mount upward on wings, or as on wings. 3 to remain aloft by means of a glider or other unpowered aircraft. 4 to rise, especially rapidly or unusually high. 5 (context figuratively English) To rise in thought, spirits, or imagination; to be exalted in mood.

WordNet
soar

n. the act of rising upward into the air [syn: zoom]

soar
  1. v. rise rapidly; "the dollar soared against the yes" [syn: soar up, soar upwards, surge, zoom]

  2. fly by means of a hang glider [syn: hang glide]

  3. fly upwards or high in the sky

  4. go or move upward; "The stock market soared after the cease-fire was announced"

  5. fly a plane without an engine [syn: sailplane]

Wikipedia
Soar (cognitive architecture)

Soar is a cognitive architecture, created by John Laird, Allen Newell, and Paul Rosenbloom at Carnegie Mellon University , now maintained by John Laird's research group at the University of Michigan. It is both a view of what cognition is and an implementation of that view through a computer programming architecture for artificial intelligence (AI). Since its beginnings in 1983 and its presentation in a paper in 1987, it has been widely used by AI researchers to model different aspects of human behavior.

Soar

Soar or SOAR may refer to:

  • 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (Airborne), a US Army regiment
  • The Special Operations Assault Rifle, primary assault rifle for the special forces unit of the Philippine National Police
  • Soar (cognitive architecture), a symbolic cognitive architecture
  • "Soar", a song by Christina Aguilera from the album Stripped (2002)
  • Soar (album), the second album (released 1991) by the American band Samiam
  • S.O.A.R., 2016 album by Devour The Day
  • Safe operating area, typically used to describe power limitations of electronic components
  • Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope, a modern 4.1-meter-aperture optical and near-infrared telescope located on Cerro Pachón, Chile
  • Student orientation, also known as SOAR or Student Orientation And Registration
  • Surgical Outcomes Analysis and Research, a research collaborative in the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
  • SOAR, air-space system under development for launch of satellites and suborbital space tourism from Swiss Space Systems company, Switzerland
  • Soar, a fictional airline in Flight Simulator X
Soar (album)

Soar is the second album from the American band Samiam released in 1991 on New Red Archives.

SOAR (spaceplane)

SOAR is a partially reusable air-launched spaceplane launch system designed to launch small satellites on a suborbital or orbital trajectory. The vehicle, derived from the Hermes spacecraft developed by the European Space Agency, is planned to be built, launched, and operated by Swiss Space Systems. The spaceplane will launch from an Airbus A300 aircraft named S3 Zero Gravity Airliner. Once at altitude, the spaceplane will separate from the aircraft and ignite an NK-39 engine developed by Russian Federal Space Agency. After fuel depletion at about 80 kilometers altitude, the plane will release its payload before gliding back and landing on Earth.

The launch vehicle will also have low Earth orbit capability when launched in conjunction with an expendable upper stage. Swiss Space Systems has contracted the Russian firm RKK Energia to develop the upper stage. With an upper stage, the spacecraft will be able to launch a 250 kilogram payload into orbit.

The spaceplane is currently targeted to have its first test launch by 2017. Swiss Space Systems claims that the spaceplane could cost about four times less than current suborbital launch costs.

Usage examples of "soar".

And immediately after her prayer breaks forth, soars upward in a shrill nasal falsetto, like a morning alarum when the hour for waking has come, the mechanical noise of a spring let go and running down.

The final visa approval had come through only the day before, the fifth of June, and just hours later Mondschein had boarded the Aero Alvarado flight that would take him in a single soaring supersonic arc nonstop from Zurich to his long-lost homeland on the west coast of South America.

When he looked back the way he had come he could see the Gull of Moray anchored not far off a tiny rind of beach that clung precariously to the foot of the soaring rocky cliffs where the mountains fell into the sea.

As he spoke he raised his arbalest to his shoulder and was about to pull the trigger, when a large gray stork flapped heavily into view skimming over the brow of the hill, and then soaring up into the air to pass the valley.

The nobleman commented briefly on these diverse kinds of love, but when he came to the love of God he began to soar, and I was greatly astonished to see Marcoline shedding tears, which she wiped away hastily as if to hide them from the sight of the worthy old man whom wine had made more theological than usual.

The full-court press, passes out of the double-team, the pick-and-roll, cutting off the passing lanes, a tip-in from a high-flying forward soaring from out of nowhere all constitute a coordination of intellect and athleticism, a harmony of mind and body.

Soaring over the Duomo, the Baptistry, and the Piazza della Signoria, which rose from the streets like minarets around a heavenly dome .

Grey-headed kingfisher, pied hornbill, black-capped oriole, a flock of superb starlings which were just that, blue-collared, red breasted, green in the wings, and, best of all, a bateleur eagle, cruising beneath a perfectly unblemished blue sky, not soaring, just moving steadily forwards without, apparently, moving its wings.

Then man burst his bidimensional limits, and invaded the third dimension, soaring with Montgolfier into the clouds, and sinking with a diving bell into the purple treasure-caves of the waters.

She turned down a corridor to her left, then ran lightly down several levels of stairs, her grace causing the Icarii birdman who soared past her to turn his head and watch for long moments until the Groundwalker woman disappeared into a corridor far below.

When the griffins wearily leveled out, heads bent down between their spread wings, ready to soar or sideslip if the thing came for them, the blueness leaped into a long flash of azure light, rushing in zigzags underneath them faster even than lightning, and disappeared into the distance behind.

With his sensitive nostrils it was not particularly difficult for Bozo to track the Yathoon and their beasts through the maze of the foothills which rose before the soaring rampart of the Black Mountains.

Soon the air was chili, but chill air must still lift over hills, over soaring heights, because of catabatic convection flow.

Dense macca-fat palms stood next to silk-cotton, or ceiba, trees that soared out of sight, their tops obscured by the midgrowth.

I wish to speak about, and I need not exhort you to master them, for the day is not far off when you, and each of you, will be soaring in outer space, with the welfare of this nation and indeed of all mankind depending upon how you perform.