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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
season
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a season ticket (=one that allows you to make a journey or go to a sports stadium, theatre etc as often as you like during a fixed time period)
▪ He has a season ticket for Manchester United.
breeding season
▪ Open-sea fish lay several million eggs each breeding season.
close season
closed season
growing season
▪ The growing season is from April to September.
high season
lambing season
▪ the lambing season
low season
open season
▪ the open season for deer
peak season
▪ Hotel prices rise during the peak season.
rainy season
▪ the rainy season
season ticket holder (=someone who owns a season ticket)
season ticket
▪ an annual season ticket
shooting season
▪ the grouse shooting season
silly season
the Christmas season/period (=the days around and including Christmas Day)
▪ Most stores need extra staff during the Christmas season.
the cricket season (=the time of year when people play cricket)
the harvest season
▪ Orchard farmers are busiest during the September and October harvest season.
the season of goodwill (=Christmas)
the summer season
▪ The resort was crammed with holidaymakers for the whole of the summer season.
the tourist season (=the period in a year when large numbers of tourists visit a place)
▪ Even in the tourist season the beaches don’t get packed.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
close
▪ Albion are moving house in the close season: we just got there in time.
▪ He is one of nine players given winter contracts designed to prevent them seeking employment elsewhere during the close season.
▪ Last close season one of the small drains that I fish ran very clear.
▪ During the close season in 1990 the unthinkable happened.
▪ In a close encounter last season, Gloucester pipped Northampton by 7 points to 6.
▪ During the close season in 1974 a dry moat had been constructed and new barriers installed.
▪ Sheffield-born left-back Beresford came close to becoming a Liverpool player during the close season - until the Anfield side pulled out.
▪ Weekends we're usually booked up in advance, you see, even in the close season.
dry
▪ The lean period at the beginning of the dry season with few available fruit resources is tolerated as the marsupials store fat.
▪ I ordered our troops to retreat and disappear like burning grass in the dry season.
▪ In a dry season this prevents the soil surface drying out and enhances the germination rate.
▪ Then, at the beginning of the dry season, Tonle Sap river flows back to the Mekong.
▪ The age-old cycle of wet and dry seasons had become irrelevant.
▪ During the dry season, our tracks would just tear up the clay and create a cloud of red dust.
▪ Soon the dry season will return and food supplies will disappear.
▪ And after a long dry season of neutrals and minimalism, perhaps fantasy fashion is a good thing.
early
▪ Conferences are now big business for Blackpool, and bring extra traffic in the early and late seasons.
▪ Sheffield was forced to move because he was stalked for two to three months early last season.
▪ Some one week windsurf holidays are available in early and late season.
▪ Dave Libbey, another top-flight ref, has been conspicuously absent since his return from an early season injury.
▪ Starting dates, after two exceptionally early seasons, have returned to the more traditional early July point.
▪ Those who haven't taken advantage of early season low prices still have to take their hard-earned rest.
▪ At Edgar Street, United lost out 1-0 earlier in the season.
▪ After early season teething troubles, it also proved a threat to the pre-eminence of Senna's McLaren Honda.
festive
▪ The Chief Executive's Management Group have agreed that the same approach should be adopted for the festive season 1991/92.
▪ She was furious that the work could not be done during the festive season.
▪ We will always be grateful to the doctors and nurses who worked during the festive season, as well as all year round.
▪ With every good wish for the festive season and the New Year ahead.
▪ River Island women's range has already got party dresses in for the festive season.
▪ The shares had just started to recover on faint hopes of a busy festive season.
▪ Treat the gag programs and animated cards that tend to circulate around the festive season, with utmost caution.
high
▪ In high season the village brass band plays regular concerts and there are waterski displays most weeks.
▪ He watched Offerman commit 139 errors, including a major-league high 35 last season in 115 games.
▪ There is a full entertainments programme during the high season and the hotel has a taverna with frequent live music.
▪ Room prices range from $ 56 to $ 72 during high season to $ 29 to $ 46 during low.
▪ A two night self-drive weekend break from their Winter-Inn programme staying at Les Trois Mousquetaires costs £181 per person high season.
▪ Rooms go from $ 95 to $ 175 during high season, $ 90 to $ 160 during low.
▪ There is live music on the terrace in high season.
last
▪ Displaced Gary Connolly from centre before suffering a serious injury last season.
▪ Steding, who struggled much of last season, finished the game with 17 points and five assists.
▪ Lowndes, the club's top scorer last season, has been absent with a back injury since July.
▪ Overall, the roster includes 16 players who were not on the roster at the end of last season.
▪ Sheffield was forced to move because he was stalked for two to three months early last season.
▪ Sheffield received harassing phone calls most of last season.
▪ The 49ers were superior last season and slammed the point home in Miami.
▪ UMass is 4-0 against Big East foes since 1991, and it defeated Pitt, 85-57, last season in Amherst.
new
▪ Trees and bushes have blossomed with new life at the dawn of a new season.
▪ I suppose that if we include New Zealand, we can claim to have new season lamb practically all year long.
▪ One New York season or performance a year tended to be the rule for modern dance in the 1950s.
▪ My view is that most new season lamb is not worthy of the name.
▪ Since 1979, the race has inaugurated the new season one week before the Daytona 500.
▪ The narrow land drain is his favourite fishery and where better to begin the new coarse fishing season?
rainy
▪ During the rainy season, Motabeng was subjected to a type of desert rain.
▪ About thirty years back, he said, because during the rainy season goats and sheep got foot rot.
▪ But we were full of enthusiasm, essential to survive that first rainy season in the forest.
▪ When to go: To avoid the rainy season, travel mid-December to mid-May.
▪ Recharge normally happens in the winter or rainy season.
▪ The rainy season came on and restored her to time and change.
▪ But now it is the rainy season there is little demand for his services.
▪ During the rainy season, that mountain was covered by a cloud.
regular
▪ Heading into the last weekend of the regular season, a record 17 out of 28 teams remain in play-off contention.
▪ The Giants lost seven of 11 games against Atlanta during the regular season.
▪ The Rapids finished the regular season losing six of their last seven.
▪ For his career in the regular season, Anderson has made good on 372 of 472 field-goal attempts.
▪ Yet, despite a disappointing regular season, the 1996 Suns expect good things in the playoffs.
▪ In the regular season, we beat them twice.
■ NOUN
football
▪ When the football season ended, these warrior bands literally vanished.
▪ I just told him he better bet back here before football season starts next August.
▪ But of course the football season hasn't ended yet.
▪ Gazza moved out to the villa in July to acclimatise before the football season kicked off.
▪ Up to this point, it has been the perfect football season in Oklahoma.
▪ The strong football season, however, has generated more alumni giving, albeit earmarked for athletics.
▪ He had no offers from Southeastern Conference schools, for whom the Mocs served as cannon fodder each football season.
holiday
▪ A fuel shortage got the holiday season off to a rocky start, and promises to cause further problems this month.
▪ Tech investors generally have been nervous for some time about semiconductor and personal-computer demand, particularly over the holiday season.
▪ It is intended to be on holiday season tours for at least three years.
▪ For the holiday season, they launched a thriving retail partnership, with Discovery Channel media centers in Nature Company stores.
▪ It was always the same in the holiday season.
▪ It was now summer, and the holiday season had begun.
▪ Edis was there in the holiday season, but lived at 32 Ladbroke Square, West London too.
▪ Fresh goose is difficult to find except for during the holiday season, but frozen goose can be purchased the year around.
summer
▪ In post-war years there was only a nine-minute service of Marton cars during the summer season, until it closed in 1961.
▪ Best claims to be willing to take groups out all year round, although the summer season is obviously more popular.
▪ The new collective bargaining agreement called for 10 weeks of subscription programs plus a four-week summer season.
▪ A programme will be produced in time for the summer season and Welcome will continue to keep Friends informed.
▪ Unlike the trams, they are only seen during the summer season.
▪ In the summer season her troubles were born of her prosperity.
▪ Excursions During the summer season we will be organising a programme of varied optional day and half day excursions most weeks.
ticket
▪ But season ticket holders will not get their first discounts until January 1993.
▪ In all, about 15, 000 fans bought season tickets before a December 1988 deadline.
▪ For £14.50 you can buy a season ticket to last four months.
▪ And an indication of growing support was the much-improved sales of three-guinea season tickets, totalling £1,100.
▪ His Diamondbacks sold 44, 000 season tickets without having a team assembled.
▪ Meanwhile, season ticket holders will likely be listed as creditors in the team's bankruptcy filings.
■ VERB
finish
▪ Chapman aimed to finish the season among the top five so that his players would qualify for bonuses under a new League scheme.
▪ Richardson, at 6-8, was the tallest player to finish the season but is not known for offense or quickness.
▪ But this was an excellent match to finish the season.
▪ He finished the regular season with 2, 575 yards on 200-of-314 passing.
▪ Missouri clinched a bowl berth by finishing the regular season with a 7-4 record.
▪ Brewer hopes to finish the season with Otago, but is uncertain about his playing future in Canterbury.
▪ However, the 37-year-old third baseman also finished the regular season in a terrible slump.
open
▪ It sent a message to law enforcement officers: Open season on immigrants.
▪ I opened the outdoor season in style, beating Mike McFarlane in the Middlesex Championships.
▪ Memorial Day becomes the grand opening of the barbecue season.
▪ When I opened my own season in Ulm with Tannhäuser, I had in my head an entirely new sound concept.
▪ Trotter opened his season with interception return for a touchdown in a 41-14 win over Dallas and went from there.
play
▪ Oh, they still have eight games to play this season.
▪ Palmeiro and his teammates still were experiencing palpitations after surviving to play another day this season.
▪ Negotiations for the player's £60,000 transfer to Parkhead are ongoing with Bangor insisting that Byrne plays out the season here.
▪ Indeed Leinster have already ruled that all their Senior One games must be played on synthetic this season.
▪ His surgeon, Richard Steadman of Vail, Colo., told him not to try to play again this season.
▪ I think it was the most relaxed and confident I've seen Leeds play so far this season.
▪ That Magic Johnson will play another season and obscure the Clippers more than ever.
start
▪ Ritchie has made only eight starts this season.
▪ Some people blamed the soft camp for a 1-3 start this season.
▪ Alikhan made 963 at 31, and is likely to start the season as Bicknell's opening partner.
▪ Problems started in the first season, the lawsuit said, when Campbell consistently turned down Lawrence for dates.
▪ He started the season with Dunlop tyres and this was only his third race with Michelin.
▪ Walker started the last two seasons as right tackle for the Gators, but worked his first season on the left side.
win
▪ But just to say we had a winning season with a 42-40 record?
▪ Crosfields are still without a league win this season and now occupy bottom place in the league after their defeat at Rosebridge.
▪ Before Wolf and Holmgren arrived for the 1992 season, the Packers had just four winning seasons in 24 years.
▪ They've only lost 3 at home, but Derby, Luton and Brentford have won there this season.
▪ The win was critical for Purdue because it ensured the Boilers of a winning regular-season.
▪ The last time the Tigers had a winning season was in 1983.
▪ The Saints won it last season with a score of 108.90 to Homestead's 108.025.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
off period/season etc
▪ In 1967, he began spending the off season working as an assistant to one of California Gov.
▪ Q: What do you do in the off season?
▪ She worked in the store's office during the off season while attending Indiana.
▪ The remaining truffles are boiled for sterilization and canned for sale as truffles and as truffle juice during the off season.
open season (on sb)
▪ In the press, it seems to be open season on overpaid executives.
▪ It is open season for criticising UDCs for lack of planning, lack of strategic thinking and short termism.
▪ Payroll allocations can be changed only during an open season.
▪ That's the West Coast Trail, limited to 8,000 hikers during its open season from mid-April to the end of September.
▪ The grin meant it was open season.
▪ There would be an open season on scattered singletons.
the compliments of the season
the festive season/period/holiday
▪ River Island women's range has already got party dresses in for the festive season.
▪ She was furious that the work could not be done during the festive season.
▪ The Chief Executive's Management Group have agreed that the same approach should be adopted for the festive season 1991/92.
▪ The food smelled good to her, reflecting the festive holiday preparation.
▪ We will always be grateful to the doctors and nurses who worked during the festive season, as well as all year round.
▪ With every good wish for the festive season and the New Year ahead.
the holiday season
▪ Sales were up during the holiday season.
▪ We'll get together after the holidays.
▪ A fuel shortage got the holiday season off to a rocky start, and promises to cause further problems this month.
▪ For the holiday season, they launched a thriving retail partnership, with Discovery Channel media centers in Nature Company stores.
▪ Fresh goose is difficult to find except for during the holiday season, but frozen goose can be purchased the year around.
▪ It was always the same in the holiday season.
▪ It was now summer, and the holiday season had begun.
▪ Staff at St Tiggywinkles say the holiday season is bad news for wildlife because it means more cars in the countryside.
▪ Tech investors generally have been nervous for some time about semiconductor and personal-computer demand, particularly over the holiday season.
▪ This road is solid with unyielding traffic for the duration of the holiday season.
the silly season
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Foxes become very noisy at the height of the mating season.
▪ Smith should own the record outright by the third or fourth game of the 2001 season.
▪ The Bulls would consider re-signing him next season.
▪ The Lakers need to work on their defense this season.
▪ The latest challenge is to promote the LSO's winter concert season.
▪ The network has several new dramas lined up for the fall season.
▪ When does the baseball season start?
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Although around 12 eggs in a season is normal, one female observed during filming of a television programme laid 25.
▪ Fiddlehead season runs from April to June, depending on locale.
▪ He was phoning to wish us all the best for the season, which was really nice.
▪ Match receipts and season tickets brought in 5.7m.
▪ Phillies catching prospect Eric Schreimann spent part of the last two seasons playing for the Boll Weevils.
▪ Some had other jobs, although their lives tended to be bleak out of tourist season.
▪ The season is a marathon, not a sprint.
II.verb
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ The run on unpretentious style and seasoned finishes has been a boon for the purveyors of shelter chic.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Season

Season \Sea"son\, n. [OE. sesoun, F. saison, properly, the sowing time, fr. L. satio a sowing, a planting, fr. serere, satum, to sow, plant; akin to E. sow, v., to scatter, as seed.]

  1. One of the divisions of the year, marked by alterations in the length of day and night, or by distinct conditions of temperature, moisture, etc., caused mainly by the relative position of the earth with respect to the sun. In the north temperate zone, four seasons, namely, spring, summer, autumn, and winter, are generally recognized. Some parts of the world have three seasons, -- the dry, the rainy, and the cold; other parts have but two, -- the dry and the rainy.

    The several seasons of the year in their beauty.
    --Addison.

  2. Hence, a period of time, especially as regards its fitness for anything contemplated or done; a suitable or convenient time; proper conjuncture; as, the season for planting; the season for rest.

    The season, prime for sweetest scents and airs.
    --Milton.

  3. A period of time not very long; a while; a time.

    Thou shalt be blind, not seeing the sun for a season.
    --Acts xiii. 11.

  4. That which gives relish; seasoning. [Obs.]

    You lack the season of all natures, sleep.
    --Shak.

    In season, in good time, or sufficiently early for the purpose.

    Out of season, beyond or out of the proper time or the usual or appointed time.

Season

Season \Sea"son\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Seasoned; p. pr. & vb. n. Seasoning.]

  1. To render suitable or appropriate; to prepare; to fit.

    He is fit and seasoned for his passage.
    --Shak.

  2. To fit for any use by time or habit; to habituate; to accustom; to inure; to ripen; to mature; as, to season one to a climate.

  3. Hence, to prepare by drying or hardening, or removal of natural juices; as, to season timber.

  4. To fit for taste; to render palatable; to give zest or relish to; to spice; as, to season food.

  5. Hence, to fit for enjoyment; to render agreeable.

    You season still with sports your serious hours.
    --Dryden.

    The proper use of wit is to season conversation.
    --Tillotson.

  6. To qualify by admixture; to moderate; to temper. ``When mercy seasons justice.''
    --Shak.

  7. To imbue; to tinge or taint. ``Who by his tutor being seasoned with the love of the truth.''
    --Fuller.

    Season their younger years with prudent and pious principles.
    --Jer. Taylor.

  8. To copulate with; to impregnate. [R.]
    --Holland.

Season

Season \Sea"son\, v. i.

  1. To become mature; to grow fit for use; to become adapted to a climate.

  2. To become dry and hard, by the escape of the natural juices, or by being penetrated with other substance; as, timber seasons in the sun.

  3. To give token; to savor. [Obs.]
    --Beau. & Fl.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
season

c.1300, "a period of the year," with reference to weather or work, also "proper time, suitable occasion," from Old French seison, saison "season, date; right moment, appropriate time" (Modern French saison) "a sowing, planting," from Latin sationem (nominative satio) "a sowing, planting," noun of action from past participle stem of serere "to sow" (see sow (v.)).\n

\nSense shifted in Vulgar Latin from "act of sowing" to "time of sowing," especially "spring, regarded as the chief sowing season." In Old Provençal and Old French (and thus in English), this was extended to "season" in general. In other Indo-European languages, generic "season" (of the year) words typically are from words for "time," sometimes with a word for "year" (as in Latin tempus (anni), German Jahrzeit). Of game (as in out of season) from late 14c. Spanish estacion, Italian stagione are unrelated, being from Latin statio "station."\n

\nMeaning "time of year during which a place is most frequented" is from 1705. Season ticket is attested from 1820.

season

"improve the flavor of by adding spices," c.1300, from Old French assaisoner "to ripen, season," from a- "to" (see ad-) + root of season (n.) on the notion of fruit becoming more palatable as it ripens. Applied to timber by 1540s. In 16c., it also meant "to copulate with."

Wiktionary
season

n. 1 Each of the four divisions of a year: spring, summer, autumn and winter; yeartide. 2 A part of a year when something particular happens: ''mating season'', ''rainy season'', ''football season''. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To flavour food with spices, herbs or salt. 2 (context transitive English) To make fit for any use by time or habit; to habituate; to accustom; to inure; to ripen; to mature; as, to season one to a climate. 3 (context transitive English) Hence, to prepare by drying or hardening, or removal of natural juices; as, to season timber. 4 (context intransitive English) To become mature; to grow fit for use; to become adapted to a climate. 5 (context intransitive English) To become dry and hard, by the escape of the natural juices, or by being penetrated with other substance; as, timber seasons in the sun. 6 (context obsolete English) To copulate with; to impregnate.

WordNet
season
  1. v. lend flavor to; "Season the chicken breast after roasting it" [syn: flavor, flavour]

  2. make fit; "This trip will season even the hardiest traveller" [syn: harden]

  3. make more temperate, acceptable, or suitable by adding something else; moderate; "she tempered her criticism" [syn: temper, mollify]

season
  1. n. a period of the year marked by special events or activities in some field; "he celebrated his 10th season with the ballet company"; "she always looked forward to the avocado season"

  2. one of the natural periods into which the year is divided by the equinoxes and solstices or atmospheric conditions; "the regular sequence of the seasons" [syn: time of year]

  3. a recurrent time marked by major holidays; "it was the Christmas season"

Gazetteer
Wikipedia
Season (disambiguation)

A season is one of the major divisions of the year.

Season(s) or The Season may also refer to:

Season (sports)

In an organized sports league, a typical season is the portion of one year in which regulated games of the sport are in session. For example, in Major League Baseball, one season lasts approximately from April 1 to October 1; in football, it is generally from August until May (although in some countries, especially those in Scandinavia the season starts in the spring and finishes in the autumn, due either to weather conditions encountered during the winter or to limit conflict with locally more popular football codes).

A year can often be broken up into several distinct sections (sometimes themselves called seasons). These are: a preseason, a series of exhibition games played for training purposes; a regular season, the main period of the league's competition; the postseason, a playoff tournament played against the league's top teams to determine the league's champion; and the offseason, the time when there is no official competition.

Season (society)

The social season, or Season, has historically referred to the annual period when it is customary for members of a social elite of society to hold debutante balls, dinner parties and large charity events. It was also the appropriate time to be resident in the city rather than in the country, in order to attend such events.

Season (film)

Season is a 1989 Malayalam-language Indian feature film directed Padmarajan, starring Mohanlal and Gavin Packard in lead roles. The story is set in Kovalam beach in Kerala and Poojappura Central Prison, Trivandrum.

Season

A season is a division of the year marked by changes in weather, ecology and hours of daylight. Seasons result from the yearly orbit of the Earth around the Sun and the tilt of the Earth's rotational axis relative to the plane of the orbit. In temperate and polar regions, the seasons are marked by changes in the intensity of sunlight that reaches the Earth's surface, variations of which may cause animals to go into hibernation or to migrate, and plants to be dormant.

During May, June, and July, the northern hemisphere is exposed to more direct sunlight because the hemisphere faces the sun. The same is true of the southern hemisphere in November, December, and January. It is the tilt of the Earth that causes the Sun to be higher in the sky during the summer months which increases the solar flux. However, due to seasonal lag, June, July, and August are the hottest months in the northern hemisphere and December, January, and February are the hottest months in the southern hemisphere.

In temperate and subpolar regions, four calendar-based seasons (with their adjectives) are generally recognized: spring (vernal), summer (estival), autumn (autumnal) and winter (hibernal). In American English and Canadian English, fall is sometimes used as a synonym for both autumn and autumnal. Ecologists often use a six-season model for temperate climate regions that includes pre-spring (prevernal) and late summer (serotinal) as distinct seasons along with the traditional four.

Hot regions have two or three seasons; the rainy (or wet, or monsoon) season and the dry season, and, in some tropical areas, a cool or mild season.

In some parts of the world, special "seasons" are loosely defined based on important events such as a hurricane season, tornado season, or a wildfire season.

Seasons often held special significance for agrarian societies, whose lives revolved around planting and harvest times, and the change of seasons was often attended by ritual.

Season (band)

Season were an English rock band from Birmingham.

Usage examples of "season".

Kingsley looked out over the flower beds that, still abloom in spite of the lateness of the season, lay before Aylesberg Hall.

Boil the fish in salted and acidulated water, with a bunch of parsley to season.

At the stated season of the melting of the snows in Armenia, the River Mygdonius, which divides the plain and the city of Nisibis, forms, like the Nile, an inundation over the adjacent country.

Though you cannot want sufficient calls to repentance for the many unwarrantable weaknesses exemplified in your behaviour to this wretch, so much to the prejudice of your own lawful family, and of your character, I say, though these may sufficiently be supposed to prick and goad your conscience at this season, I should yet be wanting to my duty, if I spared to give you some admonition in order to bring you to a due sense of your errors.

Hot Grocery Store Man catches my eye just as I approach the adobo seasoning.

Finally, after having remarked that times of tranquillity were the proper seasons for lessening the national debt, and strengthening the kingdom against future events, he recommended to the commons the improvement of the public revenue, the maintenance of a considerable naval force, the advancement of commerce, and the cultivation of the arts of peace.

April gambolled in like a lamb this year, and taking a cue from his sprightly kick-up-your-heels mood, the Spring season was all aflutter with the gay bustle of arrivals and departures.

Fathom, believing that now was the season for working upon her passions, while they were all in commotion, became, if possible, more assiduous than ever about the fair mourner, modelled his features into a melancholy cast, pretended to share her distress with the most emphatic sympathy, and endeavoured to keep her resentment glowing by cunning insinuations, which, though apparently designed to apologise for his friend, served only to aggravate the guilt of his perfidy and dishonour.

The yard Goldplated was stabled in was very spacious, used to agist stallions during the off season.

Sometimes used for an anabranch, but more often used for one that, in dry season or droughts especially, is cut off at either or both ends from the main stream.

In parts of Germany, where some say andouille originated, the sausage was made with all remaining intestines and casings pulled through a larger casing, seasoned and smoked.

Traditionally, the andouilles from France were made from the large intestines and stomach of the pig, seasoned heavily and smoked.

She held animistic beliefs and was positive that everything from the moon and seasons and winds to the trees and mountains and lakes had its own individual personality.

But though the annelids were fresh and the dried anemone crunchy and well seasoned, the food failed to alleviate his discomfort.

During a more favourable season, moderately sized bits of the skinned ear of a cat, which includes cartilage, areolar and elastic tissue, were placed on three leaves.