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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
rout
I.verb
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ The Australians have once again routed the English cricket team.
▪ The general was killed and his armies were routed in a magnificent cavalry charge.
▪ The Seattle SuperSonics routed Atlanta 111-88.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Again, the faxes are technically routed through Bangkok.
▪ Early on, it appeared the Clippers would rout Toronto, taking a 33-17 lead.
▪ He had been moving towards resignation since being routed by Mr Smith in the July leadership election.
▪ It was routed by the Republican-controlled Congress.
▪ Ras Gugsa was killed and his army routed.
II.noun
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A 3-0 rout of Canada qualified the U.S. for the World Cup.
▪ The game was a rout, with the home team winning by 10 goals to nil.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Barnes started the rout, bewildering two defenders before supplying the perfect cross for Steve Mcmanaman to head in.
▪ Dorian West emerged for a sharp run before Cohen appeared at even greater pace for the try that began the rout.
▪ General Lee had reached the scene and was in command during the rout of the Federals.
▪ Indeed, even amid the rout, some bellwether high-tech companies continue to report strong results.
▪ It turned into a rout, more thorough than anyone could have imagined.
▪ Stock prices followed the rout in bonds in the morning only to zigzag to record highs in the afternoon.
▪ Three more conversions by Strett completed the rout.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Rout

Rout \Rout\, v. i. To assemble in a crowd, whether orderly or disorderly; to collect in company. [obs.]
--Bacon.

In all that land no Christian[s] durste route.
--Chaucer.

Rout

Rout \Rout\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Routed; p. pr. & vb. n. Routing.] To break the ranks of, as troops, and put them to flight in disorder; to put to rout.

That party . . . that charged the Scots, so totally routed and defeated their whole army, that they fied.
--Clarendon.

Syn: To defeat; discomfit; overpower; overthrow.

Rout

Rout \Rout\, n. [OF. route, LL. rupta, properly, a breaking, fr. L. ruptus, p. p. of rumpere to break. See Rupture, reave, and cf. Rote repetition of forms, Route. In some senses this word has been confused with rout a bellowing, an uproar.] [Formerly spelled also route.]

  1. A troop; a throng; a company; an assembly; especially, a traveling company or throng. [Obs.] ``A route of ratones [rats].''
    --Piers Plowman. ``A great solemn route.''
    --Chaucer.

    And ever he rode the hinderest of the route.
    --Chaucer.

    A rout of people there assembled were.
    --Spenser.

  2. A disorderly and tumultuous crowd; a mob; hence, the rabble; the herd of common people.

    the endless routs of wretched thralls.
    --Spenser.

    The ringleader and head of all this rout.
    --Shak.

    Nor do I name of men the common rout.
    --Milton.

  3. The state of being disorganized and thrown into confusion; -- said especially of an army defeated, broken in pieces, and put to flight in disorder or panic; also, the act of defeating and breaking up an army; as, the rout of the enemy was complete.

    thy army . . . Dispersed in rout, betook them all to fly.
    --Daniel.

    To these giad conquest, murderous rout to those.
    --pope.

  4. (Law) A disturbance of the peace by persons assembled together with intent to do a thing which, if executed, would make them rioters, and actually making a motion toward the executing thereof.
    --Wharton.

  5. A fashionable assembly, or large evening party. ``At routs and dances.''
    --Landor.

    To put to rout, to defeat and throw into confusion; to overthrow and put to flight.

Rout

Rout \Rout\, v. i. To search or root in the ground, as a swine.
--Edwards.

Rout

Rout \Rout\, v. t. [A variant of root.] To scoop out with a gouge or other tool; to furrow. To rout out

  1. To turn up to view, as if by rooting; to discover; to find.

  2. To turn out by force or compulsion; as, to rout people out of bed. [Colloq.]

Rout

Rout \Rout\, n. A bellowing; a shouting; noise; clamor; uproar; disturbance; tumult.
--Shak.

This new book the whole world makes such a rout about.
--Sterne.

``My child, it is not well,'' I said, ``Among the graves to shout; To laugh and play among the dead, And make this noisy rout.''
--Trench.

Rout

Rout \Rout\ (rout), v. i. [AS. hr[=u]tan.] To roar; to bellow; to snort; to snore loudly. [Obs. or Scot.]
--Chaucer.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
rout

"drive into disordered flight by defeat," c.1600, from rout (n.). Related: Routed; routing.

rout

1590s, "disorderly retreat following a defeat," from Middle French route "disorderly flight of troops," literally "a breaking off, rupture," from Vulgar Latin rupta "a dispersed group," literally "a broken group," from noun use of Latin rupta, fem. past participle of rumpere "to break" (see rupture (n.)).\n

\nThe archaic English noun rout "group of persons, assemblage," is the same word, from Anglo-French rute, Old French route "host, troop, crowd," from Vulgar Latin rupta "a dispersed group," here with sense of "a division, a detachment." It first came to English meaning "group of soldiers" (early 13c.), also "gang of outlaws or rioters, mob" (c.1300) before the more general sense developed 14c. Also as a legal term. A rout-cake (1807) was one baked for use at a reception.

Wiktionary
rout

Etymology 1 n. 1 A noise; a loud noise; a bellowing; a shouting; clamor; an uproar; disturbance; tumult. 2 snoring. vb. 1 (context intransitive English) To make a noise; roar; bellow; snort. 2 (context intransitive English) To snore; snore loudly. 3 (context intransitive English) To belch. 4 (context intransitive English) To howl as the wind; make a roaring noise. Etymology 2

n. (context now chiefly dialectal English) A violent movement; a great or violent stir; a heavy blow; a stunning blow; a stroke. vb. (context transitive now chiefly dialectal English) To beat; strike; assail with blows. Etymology 3

n. 1 A troop; a throng; a company; an assembly; especially, a traveling company or throng. 2 A disorderly and tumultuous crowd; a mob; hence, the rabble; the herd of common people. 3 The state of being disorganized and thrown into confusion; -- said especially of an army defeated, broken in pieces, and put to flight in disorder or panic; also, the act of defeating and breaking up an army. 4 (context legal English) A disturbance of the peace by persons assembled together with intent to do a thing which, if executed, would make them rioters, and actually making a motion toward the executing thereof. 5 A fashionable assembly, or large evening party. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To defeat completely, forcing into disorderly retreat. 2 (context obsolete intransitive English) To assemble in a crowd, whether orderly or disorderly; to collect in company. Etymology 4

vb. 1 To search or root in the ground, as a swine. 2 To scoop out with a gouge or other tool; to furrow. 3 To use a router in woodworking.

WordNet
rout
  1. n. a disorderly crowd of people [syn: mob, rabble]

  2. an overwhelming defeat

rout
  1. v. cause to flee; "rout out the fighters from their caves" [syn: rout out, expel]

  2. dig with the snout; "the pig was rooting for truffles" [syn: root, rootle]

  3. make a groove in [syn: gouge]

  4. defeat disastrously [syn: spread-eagle, spreadeagle]

Wikipedia
Rout (surname)

Rout is a surname, and may refer to Odia Community.

India (mainly used by the Rauts):

  • Padmini Rout (born 1994), Indian chess player

New Zealand:

  • Alexandra Rout (born 1993), New Zealand figure skater
  • Ettie Annie Rout (1887-1936), New Zealand
Rout

A rout is a chaotic and disorderly retreat or withdrawal of troops from a battlefield, resulting in the victory of the opposing party, or following defeat, a collapse of discipline, or poor morale. A key feature of a true rout is that the routing forces abandon equipment, especially weapons.

A routed army often disintegrates into a state of "every man for himself" or as the survivors flee for safety. A rout often results in much higher casualties for the retreating force than an orderly withdrawal. On many occasions, more soldiers are killed in the rout than in the actual battle. Normally, though not always, routs either end a battle or provide the moment the winner needs to win decisively a battle (or even campaign).

The opposite of a rout is a rally, in which a military unit that has been giving way and is on the verge of a rout, suddenly gathers itself and turns back to the offensive. More commonly, the over-matched force retires in good order without losing cohesion as a military unit.

The recommended reaction to an enemy's rout is to launch your reserves, especially reserve cavalry, in a pursuit. A pursuit, which is normally conducted without support on its flanks, is itself a dangerous operation, in the category of "all or nothing", since the pursuing force itself might be cut off and destroyed. Therefore experience and judgment are required to recognize a rout and make the decision to conduct a pursuit.

Usage examples of "rout".

What if Ascham should think the case urgent, rout out an alienist, and come back with him?

James should have held it in leash till he had routed Argyll and Baillie and Hurry, and brought the Kirk and Estates to their knees, is a proof of genius for war that Gustavus never bettered.

The next day, however, when I came to think of that rather too lively night, during which, as is generally the case, Love had routed Reason, I felt some remorse.

The harts and hinds in their herds, the boars in their singulars, the skulks of foxes, the richesses of martens, the bevies of roes, the cetes of badgers and the routs of wolves: all came to him more or less as something which you either skin or flayed and then took home to the cook.

Nereide had traversed the country in all directions, doing no harm to private property, paying for whatever they needed, treating the private Mauritians civilly, and routing all the meagre troops that the southern commander could bring against them, the attitude of the militia came more to resemble a neutrality, and a benevolent neutrality at that.

Though she rarely went to balls or routs, Clair had no qualms about that social sacrifice.

They fled in great disorder, and the panic would have spread to the whole army, had not Albuquerque brought up 3000 fresh cavalry and held the French in check, while Cuesta retreated in great disorder and, had the French pressed forward, would have fled in utter rout.

Once you snag some fleas in the comb, dip them in a glass of water mixed with rubbing alcohol or detergent and watch the routed buggers sink to the bottom.

Saddam did not use WMD to prevent the rout during the ground phase of Desert Storm, it may be that he was deterred, but it seems at least as likely that he simply was unable to do so.

A poor Dyspepsy may talk as he will, but he is the one who never gets sympathy, or experiences compassion: and it is he whose groaning petitions for charity do at last rout that Christian virtue.

These numbered fewer than a hundred, mostly stragglers from the great rout of the Farer army, and who because of fear or injuries had hidden in the hills instead of returning to Ged Darod with the bulk of the mob after the alien lightnings had barred their way to Irnan.

The routed soldiers that had been fleeing uphill stopped in their tracks and crouched in grass, fearful of putting themselves between the bowmen and their targets.

Let the laity undergo the judgment of the secular arm, that either sewn up in sacks they may be carried out to Neptune, or planted in the earth may fructify for Pluto, or may be offered amid the flames as a fattened holocaust to Vulcan, or at least may be hung up as a victim to Juno: while our nursling at a single reading of the book of life is handed over to the custody of the Bishop, and rigour is changed to favour, and the forum being transferred from the laity, death is routed by the clerk who is the nursling of books.

This famous rout had a house at Pausilippo, and his wife was none other than the pretty Irish girl Sara, formerly a drawer in a London tavern.

This disturbance that had routed him out of his room before he had completed preparation for bed, this aimless running about of men, the tongue-tied lack of explanation on the part of Hennes, all were to him nothing but a series of pinpricks.