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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
pump
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bicycle pump (=for putting more air in a tyre)
▪ Where’s the bicycle pump?
a fuel pump (=a machine that forces fuel into an engine)
▪ The car's fuel pump was leaking.
a petrol pump (=a machine for putting petrol into cars at a petrol station)
air pump
heat pump
parish pump
▪ parish pump politics
stomach pump
suction pump
▪ a suction pump
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
electric
▪ Some pubs, mainly in the Midlands and the North, use electric pumps to draw the beer to the bar.
▪ Residents say several concerns must be addressed immediately: The noise problem could be helped with the installation of an electric pump.
▪ An alternative method is to attach an electric drill water pump attachment to the tap.
▪ He added the city apparently decided on diesel because electric pumps cost more.
▪ As the peat shrank further, more powerful electric pumps and diesel pumps became available.
▪ A high capacity electric pump flooded the engine and no return for excess fuel was fitted.
▪ Examples of different types of electric pumps.
hydraulic
▪ Losing the left engine is trickier since it drives both the single generator and the sole hydraulic pump.
▪ It was originally operated by steam-powered hydraulic pumps, but is now driven electrically.
▪ This was originally done by steam engines with hydraulic pumps.
submersible
▪ These stones extend down the watercourse, over which water flows with the aid of a simple submersible pump.
▪ The project involves initial drilling and completion of 86 oil and 20 water-injection wells and installing a submersible pump system in each.
▪ Because most submersible pumps are not designed to cope with solids.
▪ Then a submersible pump, concealed in a sump, conveys it back up to a blockwork filter filled with Canterbury spar.
▪ Some submersible pumps have a very small discharge and so it is important to judge the water flow required before shopping around.
▪ Installation of a submersible pump is quite simple, for, as described earlier, it is merely placed in the water.
▪ The ring is attached to the outflow of a submersible pump.
■ NOUN
action
▪ They recovered a pump action shotgun.
▪ Trigger sprayers: These hand sprayers easily recognisable by their trigger pump action are known widely to gardeners.
▪ Baillie then confronted McCubbin armed with a cut throat razor and a pump action shotgun.
▪ Your favourite Wella Shockwaves Gel-Sprays and Hairsprays are now in handy pump action bottles with a new advanced spray mechanism.
▪ He worked the pump action frantically to eject the spent cartridge and reload.
air
▪ The equipment need only be a sponge filter, air pump and heaterstat.
▪ His other suggestions were in respect of a chemical pump and an air pump.
▪ When connected and adjusted, an air pump needs very little attention.
▪ At the same time the air pump removes waste water and air from the separate condenser thus maintaining a vacuum in it.
▪ His undergravel filter, therefore was best powered by an air pump rather than powerheads.
▪ Good features Most air pumps are cheap and efficient.
▪ Which you choose, an air pump or alternative means, is a matter of personal choice.
fuel
▪ In the event of a fuel pump failure the same reserve holds good.
▪ The fuel pump gave out and left us sitting by the side of the road in the heat to consider our options.
▪ There is a filter on the inlet side of the fuel pump which may be partially blocked and obstructing fuel flow.
▪ The main engines and fuel pumps are removed and sent for refurbishment.
▪ Since then I have replaced the old leaky fuel pump which has given me a perplexing problem.
▪ It makes control of the fuel pump that much more precise.
▪ However a special fuel pump had to be found to make the tractor suitable for farm work.
▪ It began by not going up hills and it was suggested it might be the fuel pump.
gas
▪ She perches herself on the tiny pink chair near the gas pumps, making sure customers can see her.
▪ There were long lines at the gas pumps, a permanent downturn in the economy, Carly Simon on the radio.
▪ I actually thought of credit cards on gas pumps way before it happened.
hand
▪ In some pubs fake hand pumps serve gassy beer.
▪ The hand pump on the other hand supplies a basic human need required by all people, clean water.
▪ Air was supplied by hand pump.
▪ The book includes a bag of balloons, a hand pump and easy-to-follow instructions.
parish
▪ Perhaps the articles turned out badly because his heart wasn't really in that kind of parish pump, chatty writing.
▪ There was a paper, the Villager, but a parish pump periodical wasn't really what the place needed.
petrol
▪ Londoner Richard Tompkins worked as a petrol pump attendant before starting the stamp company in 1956.
▪ It was normal for large houses to carry their own petrol pumps and fire appliances.
▪ An on/off switch on the dashboard controls the petrol pump, and a hand-operated gas-valve regulates the gas flow.
▪ Once the gas flow is adequate, the petrol pump is switched off.
▪ On a hill, the petrol pump is switched on and the gas valve is switched off.
▪ Out from behind a petrol pump appeared a figure that was female, though it took a few seconds to realise it.
▪ Many want to see the return of petrol pump attendants because of the difficulties with self-self service.
▪ What did the robot say to the petrol pump?
water
▪ An extra water pump in the form of an internal power sponge filter will be necessary for good water circulation.
▪ Jack leant against the stone surround of the village water pump.
▪ An alternative method is to attach an electric drill water pump attachment to the tap.
Water pump stolen A £100 water pump has been stolen from the garden of a house in Long Lane, Rayne.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
foot pedal/brake/pump etc
▪ He then, with a foot pedal, activates the wire-cutter.
▪ I also use a Boogie and split the signal from a foot pedal to two amps usually.
▪ I hear the rat-ta-ta-tat of the foot pedal, as she stitches along.
▪ The amount of push, and therefore the direction the nose points, is controlled by pushing the foot pedals.
prime the pump
put/pump/pour money into sth
▪ Demand for most bonds is high because investors keep putting money into corporate bond funds.
▪ First, it has poured money into Xinjiang.
▪ I too had put money into the hat.
▪ If the possible reward is very high, I would put money into a business that could fail. 4.
▪ In addition, the company has soured some investors by pouring money into headlong expansion at the expense of earnings.
▪ Staff can add credit on to their cards by putting money into card machines in the building.
▪ The people believed, and many of them were putting money into improving their homes, modernizing their small businesses.
▪ This, he says, accounts for developers fighting shy of putting money into the city.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a pair of blue leather pumps
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A visitor treks to the pumps from the darkened viewing room of the aquarium by opening an unmarked door.
▪ After two miles he came to a garage on the left, a small affair with old-style hand-operated pumps and a little office.
▪ At once, Poole could hear the throbbing of the pumps as precious air was sucked out of the lock chamber.
▪ But just as likely, his brief time alongside the men at Midvale ran together with his years at the pump works.
▪ The device which I call a Wurly costs no more than a standard pump to run.
▪ The leak was reportedly from a pump in the plant.
▪ These stones extend down the watercourse, over which water flows with the aid of a simple submersible pump.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
away
▪ He would pump away until he was exhausted, as though by sheer force he could inject her with fertile seed.
▪ He held my head as I pumped away.
▪ Usually they hopped on and pumped away and suddenly it was over.
▪ Karen is pumping away, unsmiling, just beginning to break a sweat.
▪ Feel your body, feel that crimson muscle inside your chest, and those frothy pink bellows of yours, pumping away.
▪ Still clad in her tattered working clothes, her wellingtons pumped away assiduously to give the instrument the breath it required.
in
▪ Air pumped in as the warning sirens died away.
▪ The patient is awake throughout, and must lie absolutely still when the drug is pumped in.
▪ The dip liquid is pumped in from a vacuum tanker.
▪ They roll apart and she looks at him with sullen exhaustion, her head still pumping in and out.
out
▪ It is no good reducing interest rates on their own, because there is no point in just pumping out credit.
▪ Here, 300 workers are busy pumping out solar panels.
▪ My enjoyment was only tempered by my fear of pumping out.
▪ The amount of paper pumped out in those warrens was awesome.
▪ The blood came pumping out and I was sure I was going to die.
▪ But a lot of the water being pumped out of the ground is as nonrenewable as oil.
▪ Berlusconi's television empire pumps out nothing but self-serving propaganda.
▪ It requires putting a protective cover on the site, pumping out the contaminated substance, and then treating it.
up
▪ Flak began to be pumped up one searchlight beam: bombs meant bombers.
▪ Viscosity of the waste stream is not critical unless it prevents the material from being pumped up to the required operating pressure.
▪ A well was sunk in the back garden, and water could be pumped up from it into the kitchen.
▪ Time soured the high feelings pumped up by a winning, if inconclusive, war.
▪ A few insects have tracheae that swell into thin-walled balloons which are depressed and expanded as the abdomen pumps up and down.
▪ When he and his friends used skiing to pump up their egos I encouraged them.
▪ He was still pumped up after the brief battle.
▪ But pumped up to the density required for a robot, circuit strangeness becomes indelible.
■ NOUN
adrenalin
▪ It was a deliciously decadent daydream which stirred the blood, sending adrenalin pumping through his system.
▪ The adrenalin which had been pumping into her bloodstream since early the previous day had burned up all her reserves of energy.
▪ The adrenalin was pumping but I knew that I could control it, knew that it was necessary to a good performance.
▪ Impossible. Adrenalin was pumping round me.
air
▪ This bladder inflated when air was pumped into the suit at a pressure of 26 kPa.
▪ The size of the inner diameter regulates the amount of sample, reagents, water, and air pumped into the system.
▪ However, measures to save the airline failed when Delta Air Lines refused to pump money into the ailing carrier.
▪ Then air is pumped into the area, forcing the water out.
blood
▪ Cut clean, the blood still pumping.
▪ However, the amount of blood pumped by the heart remains the same.
▪ It was a deliciously decadent daydream which stirred the blood, sending adrenalin pumping through his system.
▪ A bright-red liquid, redder than blood pumped from the human heart, flows from this mixture.
▪ Her mouth went dry, and her blood began to pump hot and thick through ultra-sensitive veins.
▪ I could feel the blood pump through her chest.
▪ The blood came pumping out and I was sure I was going to die.
▪ His skin was bursting, stretched almost to transparency by the blood pumped down into it.
gas
▪ The hot gas is pumped to a coil in the indoor unit where cooler indoor air is blown across the hot coils.
▪ Evcn the coyote chained to a stake near the gas pumps to entertain the tourists understands the meaning of injustice.
hand
▪ The man who was now pumping my hand with just a little too much fervour was completely bald.
▪ Laz pumps my hand in a blustering manner that sends his straight hair bobbing over his ruddy face.
heart
▪ He whirled from the door, heart still pumping madly from his encounter in the basement.
Heart failure means that the heart muscle is not pumping well enough to meet the need for oxygen-rich blood.
▪ Sometimes it would modulate to a hum and at others rise to a shriek according to how hard his heart was pumping.
▪ High blood pressure means the heart is straining to pump blood.
▪ Doyle moved quickly along the gardens, crouching slightly, eyes keen for movement, heart beginning to pump.
▪ Ultimately, that defect prevents the heart from pumping well.
▪ I rest on the top of the wall, my hands shaking, my heart pumping hard.
▪ This makes it hard for the heart to pump blood into the adjacent organ, causing the heart to enlarge and weaken.
leg
▪ When she saw him, she started running, fat legs pumping.
▪ His little eyes struggled in the early sunlight, his pudgy, over-burdened legs pumping on the sand, craving asphalt.
▪ Her legs were pumping and her fingers were wild at her throat.
▪ My legs still pumped but became heavier, denser, as the water in my body boiled into the air.
▪ Their bare legs pump bicycle pedals, they clatter on wooden-soled sandals into the dazzling light over the work benches.
money
▪ Unless they pump in more money, they stand to be forced into massive write-offs.
▪ Simply pumping more money into the public education system only would perpetuate the status quo.
▪ They are prepared to force ministers to pump more money into keeping bills down.
▪ However, measures to save the airline failed when Delta Air Lines refused to pump money into the ailing carrier.
▪ The central bank promised to pump more money into the system if there were any further signs of instability.
▪ Villanova ultimately severed ties with du Pont even after he pumped enormous amounts of money into their wrestling program.
▪ Though the Fed pumped money into the banks, the money supply seemed not to budge much.
oil
▪ They will probably pump more oil in coming months.
▪ Rough weather has all but stopped efforts to pump that oil out of the upside-down hull.
stomach
▪ On pumping her stomach, they find 27 varieties of semen in her.
suction
▪ Then, their ears protected against the piercing whine, they activated the suction pump.
water
▪ As no water is pumped through the unit, no flow rate restrictions apply.
▪ The water is pumped 60 miles and climbs more than 3, 000 feet to reach the city.
▪ A well was sunk in the back garden, and water could be pumped up from it into the kitchen.
▪ But a lot of the water being pumped out of the ground is as nonrenewable as oil.
▪ Thames Water has agreed to reduce the amount of water it pumps from its boreholes during winter by 60 percent.
▪ When the water is pumped out if there is much oil in it the crew knows the casks are leaking.
▪ The grit settles in the quarries and the milk-white water is pumped up into tanks where the china clay settles slowly.
▪ A stream of water is pumped into a hot reactor, where it boils and is heated to very high temperatures.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
foot pedal/brake/pump etc
▪ He then, with a foot pedal, activates the wire-cutter.
▪ I also use a Boogie and split the signal from a foot pedal to two amps usually.
▪ I hear the rat-ta-ta-tat of the foot pedal, as she stitches along.
▪ The amount of push, and therefore the direction the nose points, is controlled by pushing the foot pedals.
put/pump/pour money into sth
▪ Demand for most bonds is high because investors keep putting money into corporate bond funds.
▪ First, it has poured money into Xinjiang.
▪ I too had put money into the hat.
▪ If the possible reward is very high, I would put money into a business that could fail. 4.
▪ In addition, the company has soured some investors by pouring money into headlong expansion at the expense of earnings.
▪ Staff can add credit on to their cards by putting money into card machines in the building.
▪ The people believed, and many of them were putting money into improving their homes, modernizing their small businesses.
▪ This, he says, accounts for developers fighting shy of putting money into the city.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ He pumped away furiously.
▪ We were able to pump clean groundwater from several of the wells.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Actually, Cotton needs pumping about as much as Charles Barkley needs prompting.
▪ As you know, blood begins to settle in the lowest part of the body as soon as the heart stops pumping it around.
▪ Emergency crews were called to pump water from 7 houses.
▪ I pressed in, remained, pumped.
▪ They have not pumped up taxes; personal and corporate income taxes have remained at reasonable levels.
▪ Up to 60, 000 temporary jobs are expected to pump an estimated $ 2 billion in wages into the local economy.
▪ When the water is pumped out if there is much oil in it the crew knows the casks are leaking.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Pump

Pump \Pump\ (p[u^]mp), n. [Probably so called as being worn for pomp or ornament. See Pomp.] A low shoe with a thin sole.
--Swift.

Pump

Pump \Pump\, n. [Akin to D. pomp, G. pumpe, F. pompe; of unknown origin.] An hydraulic machine, variously constructed, for raising or transferring fluids, consisting essentially of a moving piece or piston working in a hollow cylinder or other cavity, with valves properly placed for admitting or retaining the fluid as it is drawn or driven through them by the action of the piston.

Note: for various kinds of pumps, see Air pump, Chain pump, and Force pump; also, under Lifting, Plunger, Rotary, etc.

Circulating pump (Steam Engine), a pump for driving the condensing water through the casing, or tubes, of a surface condenser.

Pump brake. See Pump handle, below.

Pump dale. See Dale.

Pump gear, the apparatus belonging to a pump.
--Totten.

Pump handle, the lever, worked by hand, by which motion is given to the bucket of a pump.

Pump hood, a semicylindrical appendage covering the upper wheel of a chain pump.

Pump rod, the rod to which the bucket of a pump is fastened, and which is attached to the brake or handle; the piston rod.

Pump room, a place or room at a mineral spring where the waters are drawn and drunk. [Eng.]

Pump spear. Same as Pump rod, above.

Pump stock, the stationary part, body, or barrel of a pump.

Pump well. (Naut.) See Well.

Pump

Pump \Pump\, v. i. To work, or raise water, a pump.

Pump

Pump \Pump\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Pumped (p[u^]mt; 215); p. pr. & vb. n. pumping.]

  1. To raise with a pump, as water or other liquid.

  2. To draw water, or the like, from; to from water by means of a pump; as, they pumped the well dry; to pump a ship.

  3. Figuratively, to draw out or obtain, as secrets or money, by persistent questioning or plying; to question or ply persistently in order to elicit something, as information, money, etc.

    But pump not me for politics.
    --Otway.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
pump

"apparatus for forcing liquid or air," early 15c., of uncertain origin, possibly from Middle Dutch pompe "water conduit, pipe," or Middle Low German pumpe "pump" (Modern German Pumpe), both from some North Sea sailors' word, possibly of imitative origin.

pump

"low shoe without fasteners," 1550s, of unknown origin, perhaps echoic of the sound made when walking in them, or perhaps from Dutch pampoesje, from Javanese pampoes, of Arabic origin. Klein's sources propose a connection with pomp (n.). Related: pumps.

pump

c.1500, from pump (n.1). Metaphoric extension in pump (someone) for information is from 1630s. To pump iron "lift weights for fitness" is from 1972. Related: Pumped; pumping.

Wiktionary
pump

Etymology 1 n. 1 A device for moving or compressing a liquid or gas. 2 An instance of the action of a pump; one stroke of a pump; any action similar to pumping 3 A device for dispensing liquid or gas to be sold, particularly fuel. 4 (context bodybuilding English) A swelling of the muscles caused by increased blood flow following high intensity weightlifting. 5 (context colloquial English) A ride on a bicycle given to a passenger, usually on the handlebars or fender. 6 (context US obsolete slang English) The heart. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To use a pump to move (liquid or gas). 2 (context transitive lang=en often followed by '''up''') To fill with air. 3 (context transitive English) To move rhythmically, as the motion of a pump. 4 (context transitive English) To shake (a person's hand) vigorously. 5 (context transitive English) To gain information from (a person) by persistent questioning. 6 (context intransitive English) To use a pump to move liquid or gas. 7 (context intransitive slang English) To be going very well. 8 (context sports English) To kick, throw or hit the ball far and high. Etymology 2

n. 1 (context British English) A type of shoe, a trainer or sneaker. 2 (context chiefly North America English) A type of very high-heeled shoe; stilettoes. 3 A dance#Verb shoe. 4 A type of shoe without a heel (source: Dictionarium Britannicum - 1736)

WordNet
pump
  1. n. a mechanical device that moves fluid or gas by pressure or suction

  2. the hollow muscular organ located behind the sternum and between the lungs; its rhythmic contractions pump blood through the body; "he stood still, his heart thumping wildly" [syn: heart, ticker]

  3. a low-cut shoe without fastenings [syn: pumps]

pump
  1. v. operate like a pump; move up and down, like a handle or a pedal

  2. deliver forth; "pump bullets into the dummy"

  3. draw or pour with a pump

  4. supply in great quantities; "Pump money into a project"

  5. flow intermittently

  6. move up and down; "The athlete pumps weights in the gym"

  7. raise (gases oor fluids) with a pump

  8. question persistently; "She pumped the witnesses for information"

Gazetteer
Wikipedia
Pump (skateboarding)

Pumping is a skateboarding technique used to accelerate without the riders' feet leaving the board. Pumping can be done by turning or on a transition, like a ramp or quarter pipe. When applied to longboards, it is also known as Long distance skateboard pumping or LDP. Pumping is a technique similar to pumping a surfboard.

Pump (disambiguation)

A pump is a mechanical device used to move fluids or slurries.

Pump may also refer to:

Pump (band)

Pump was an experimental, pre- electronica, band, active between 1979-1993. They released five cassette albums as MFH on the YHR label before changing their name to Pump in 1986 and recording the LP “The Decoration of the Duma Continues” in 1987 (Final Image) and “Sombrero Fallout” in 1992 (released by Plague Recordings in 2010).

Pump (film)

Pump is a 2014 documentary film by Josh Tickell and Rebecca Harrell Tickell. The film explores the history of petroleum-based fuel consumption, the use of the Internal combustion engine and the geopolitics involved with petroleum. The film then explores in-depth on the alternative energy options for vehicles that are either readily available for use or can be on a mass scale.

Funding for the film came from Patrón tequila founder John Paul DeJoria, Rhino Films executive Stephen Nemeth and the Fuel Freedom Foundation.

Pump

A pump is a device that moves fluids ( liquids or gases), or sometimes slurries, by mechanical action. Pumps can be classified into three major groups according to the method they use to move the fluid: direct lift, displacement, and gravity pumps.

Pumps operate by some mechanism (typically reciprocating or rotary), and consume energy to perform mechanical work by moving the fluid. Pumps operate via many energy sources, including manual operation, electricity, engines, or wind power, come in many sizes, from microscopic for use in medical applications to large industrial pumps.

Mechanical pumps serve in a wide range of applications such as pumping water from wells, aquarium filtering, pond filtering and aeration, in the car industry for water-cooling and fuel injection, in the energy industry for pumping oil and natural gas or for operating cooling towers. In the medical industry, pumps are used for biochemical processes in developing and manufacturing medicine, and as artificial replacements for body parts, in particular the artificial heart and penile prosthesis.

Single stage pump - When in a casing only one impeller is revolving then it is called single stage pump.

Double/ Multi stage pump - When in a casing two or more than two impellers are revolving then it is called double/ multi stage pump.

In biology, many different types of chemical and bio-mechanical pumps have evolved, and biomimicry is sometimes used in developing new types of mechanical pumps.

Pump (album)

Pump is the tenth studio album by American rock band Aerosmith, released on September 12, 1989. The album was remastered and reissued in 2001.

Pump incorporates the use of keyboards and a horn section on many of the singles (" Love in an Elevator", " The Other Side"), and contains straightforward rockers (" F.I.N.E.", "Young Lust"), the ballad " What It Takes", songs about issues such as incest and murder (" Janie's Got a Gun") and drug and alcohol abuse (" Monkey on My Back"), as well as a variety of instrumental interludes such as "Hoodoo" and "Dulcimer Stomp."

The album has certified sales of seven million copies in the U.S. to date, and is tied with its successor Get a Grip as Aerosmith's second best-selling studio album in the U.S. ( Toys in the Attic leads with eight million). It produced a variety of successes and "firsts" for the band including their first Grammy Award (" Janie's Got a Gun"). " Love in an Elevator" became the first Aerosmith song to hit #1 on the Mainstream Rock Tracks chart. Additionally, it is the only Aerosmith album to date to have three Top 10 singles on the Billboard Hot 100 and three #1 singles on the Mainstream Rock Tracks chart. The album was the fourth bestselling album of the year 1990.

In the UK, it was the second Aerosmith album to be certified Silver (60,000 units sold) by the British Phonographic Industry, achieving this in September 1989.

Pump was the second of three sequentially recorded Aerosmith albums to feature producer Bruce Fairbairn and engineers Mike Fraser and Ken Lomas at The Little Mountain Sound Studios.

A video documentary on the recording, The Making of Pump, was released in 1994.

Pump (Water)

Pump is a brand of bottled spring water available in Australia and New Zealand. It is owned and manufactured by Coca-Cola Amatil.

Usage examples of "pump".

The screw aft of the rudder, a moment before pumping water forward, slowed, stopped and began rotating in the opposite direction, now pumping water aft, thrusting the ship forward.

An amine solution pump came on, a vent fan winding up in the space, whirring quietly in the otherwise church like quiet.

His apish visage began to look as if whitewash were being pumped under the skin.

Or he could get up again, and return the aquarium to its shelf, and reassemble its pump and light.

He could feel his heart laboring in his chest, a pounding arrhythmic tattoo as it pumped the blood through his body.

He could see fields of good alfalfa hay, all irrigated by the water flowing from the artesian wells and pumped by the windmills.

It was sheer blind reflex, speech centres in the brain spewing an analogue of what she was pumping out at transmission levels, like a man gesturing furiously on an audio- phone link.

One emblematic evening I watched Franklin pump to apogee and bail out, no doubt escaping one of those avuncular Flying Fortresses on a parachute that thighs sacrificed their stocking silks for.

Crude oil came in from the Baku fields, pumped through furnaces into the fractionating towers, where the superhot crude was separated into light, medium, and heavy fractions.

Now the surface had a rusty sheen to it, mirroring a redness in the sky that came, Ralph Bales believed, from garbage pumped into the air by refineries outside of Wood River, across the Mississippi.

Sheridan Automatic Pump Works, and at the end of six months the family physician sent Bibbs to begin at the bottom and learn from the ground up in a sanitarium.

Down near the sugar Pump Works, where Bibbs sat, there was audible speculation and admiration.

While the pumps clanged throughout the ship to free her of the hundreds of tons of sea-water that washed through her, von Kleine left the bridge and, with his engineer commander and damage control officer, they listed the injuries that Blucher had received.

So Bonaire became a pumping station in the cocaine pipeline into the United States, and there was so much money, people would kill to protect it.

Dean clearly saw an armless man stumbling and screaming in the street, the severed brachial arteries pumping his blood away in bright spurts.