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prosperous
Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
prosperous
adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
less
▪ Bath, beautiful as ever, is less prosperous than it was.
▪ The middle classes, who used to be the backbone of the regime, are becoming less prosperous.
▪ Its only hope of meeting targets was to purchase the right to pollute from less prosperous nations.
more
▪ That alone will provide the resources that are essential if we are to build a steadily more prosperous society.
▪ To recover, psychologically, it was not enough to become more prosperous than ever.
▪ The North-East is much more prosperous than ten years ago.
▪ Migration, for example, may be an enforced personal tragedy following persecution or a voluntary choice for a more prosperous life.
▪ Perhaps she does not realise that that is a characteristic of people becoming more prosperous.
▪ Money you could have used to make your future, and that of all your employees, more secure and more prosperous.
▪ Before the war it was reserved for Budapest's more prosperous citizens.
▪ Now that we are a little more prosperous, the habit of bringing a bottle seems to have dropped off.
most
▪ I remind the Minister that Gateshead is far from being one of Britain's most prosperous towns.
▪ They've become one of the world's most prosperous nations by engineering their flood-risks to an acceptably low level.
▪ The company has also chosen the most prosperous and diversified of all the Windward Islands.
▪ Du sseldorf, by contrast, is one of the most prosperous cities in the country's western zone.
▪ In the region's most prosperous countries, it is doubling every four to six months.
▪ What had once been the greatest and most prosperous of Elf realms had effectively ceased to be.
▪ Firstly, the Angevin government in Aquitaine commanded the support of the most prosperous and populated towns.
▪ His most prosperous theme is that the frustration is damaging his health.
relatively
▪ All study practices were in relatively prosperous areas: none was in receipt of a deprivation allowance.
▪ Other surveys, including those carried out in relatively prosperous areas such as Bristol made similar estimates.
▪ For a relatively prosperous family, spending on cooking probably drops to less than 5 percent of the annual income.
▪ Despite the economic problems and some unrelated political problems of the 1960s, the country remained a relatively prosperous one.
■ NOUN
area
▪ Similarly, in the North there are prosperous areas within otherwise depressed regions.
▪ Other surveys, including those carried out in relatively prosperous areas such as Bristol made similar estimates.
▪ Regional policies designed to promote employment sought to maintain population levels in the less prosperous areas by curbing voluntary out-migration.
country
▪ In the region's most prosperous countries, it is doubling every four to six months.
▪ It's a medium-sized, prosperous country town.
future
▪ Above all, I want to help my farmer constituents towards a prosperous future.
▪ Your Board and employees at all levels send you our very best wishes for a prosperous future with Palatine.
▪ Only then will my family-and my country-have any chance of a peaceful and prosperous future.
town
▪ I remind the Minister that Gateshead is far from being one of Britain's most prosperous towns.
▪ Male speaker It's precisely prosperous towns like Wallingford which are suffering from the recession.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a prosperous American businessman
▪ After the war, Germany became one of Europe's most prosperous countries.
▪ Deng was the son of a prosperous landowner.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Although these were prosperous years, disposable income of individuals increased by only about 2 I percent.
▪ Corinth's peculiar position created two prosperous harbours, Lechaion in the west- and Kenchreai in the east.
▪ His father was a prosperous woollen-draper and former mayor of Maidstone.
▪ I am proud to report that the condition of the country as a whole is prosperous.
▪ In the region's most prosperous countries, it is doubling every four to six months.
▪ It is the middle class that can truly make a nation prosperous and strong.
▪ Merry Christmas and a prosperous and healthy New Year to you all.
▪ The impoverished crossed in steerage for fifty dollars; the prosperous strolled first-class decks and drank champagne at captains' tables.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Prosperous

Prosperous \Pros"per*ous\, a. [L. prosperus or prosper, originally, answering to hope; pro according to + the root of sperare to hope. See Despair.]

  1. Tending to prosperity; favoring; favorable; helpful.

    A happy passage and a prosperous wind.
    --Denham.

  2. Being prospered; advancing in the pursuit of anything desirable; making gain, or increase; thriving; successful; as, a prosperous voyage; a prosperous undertaking; a prosperous man or nation.

    By moderation either state to bear Prosperous or adverse.
    --Milton.

    Syn: Fortunate; successful; flourishing; thriving; favorable; auspicious; lucky. See Fortunate. [1913 Webster] -- Pros"per*ous*ly, adv. -- Pros"per*ous*ness, n.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
prosperous

early 15c., "tending to bring success," from prosper + -ous, or else from obsolete Middle French prospereus (15c.), from prosperer. The sense of "flourishing" is first recorded late 15c.

Wiktionary
prosperous

a. 1 characterized by success 2 well off; affluent 3 favorable

WordNet
prosperous
  1. adj. in fortunate circumstances financially; moderately rich; "they were comfortable or even wealthy by some standards"; "easy living"; "a prosperous family"; "his family is well-situated financially"; "well-to-do members of the community" [syn: comfortable, easy, well-fixed, well-heeled, well-off, well-situated, well-to-do]

  2. very lively and profitable; "flourishing businesses"; "a palmy time for stockbrokers"; "a prosperous new business"; "doing a roaring trade"; "a thriving tourist center"; "did a thriving business in orchids" [syn: booming, flourishing, palmy, prospering, roaring, thriving]

  3. marked by peace and prosperity; "a golden era"; "the halcyon days of the clipper trade" [syn: golden, halcyon]

  4. tending to favor or bring good luck; "miracles are auspicious accidents"; "encouraging omens"; "a favorable time to ask for a raise"; "lucky stars"; "a prosperous moment to make a decision" [syn: auspicious, encouraging, favorable, favourable, lucky]

Wikipedia
Prosperous (album)

Prosperous is the second album by Irish folk musician Christy Moore, released in 1972. His first album, Paddy On The Road, was recorded by Dominic Behan in 1969 and has long been out of print. In addition to Moore's guitar and voice, Prosperous featured musicians Andy Irvine ( mandolin, mouth organ), Liam Óg O'Flynn ( uilleann pipes, tin whistle) and Dónal Lunny ( guitar, bouzouki). These four musicians later gave themselves the name Planxty, making this album something of the first Planxty album in all but name. Other musicians included Kevin Conneff (later of The Chieftains) on bodhrán, Clive Collins on fiddle, and Dave Bland on concertina.

The album takes its name from the house and town of Prosperous, County Kildare, where it was recorded by producer Bill Leader in the summer of 1971. The house (featured on the front cover of the album) is owned by Dr Andrew Rynne, surgeon and medical practitioner and founder of Clane General Hospital in Co Kildare.

The majority of the songs on the album are traditional, with the exception of " James Connolly" by established folk singer Patrick Galvin, "Tribute to Woody" (about Woody Guthrie) by Bob Dylan (originally titled " Song to Woody"), "The Ludlow Massacre", by Guthrie, "A Letter to Syracuse" by English folksingers Dave Cartwright and Bill Caddick, and "I Wish I Was In England", an early composition by Moore, who would go on to establish himself as a significant songwriter of Irish music. The album opens with a medley of the traditional song " The Raggle Taggle Gipsies" and the harp tune " Tabhair dom do Lámh", which would be the opening track of Planxty's self-titled album released the following year.

Prosperous

Prosperous, the adjectival form of Prosperity, may also refer to:

Places
  • Prosperous, County Kildare, Ireland
    • Battle of Prosperous (1798)
  • Prosperous Bay Plain, Saint Helena
Political parties
  • Prosperous Armenia
  • Prosperous Indonesia Party
  • Prosperous Justice Party (Indonesia)
  • Prosperous Peace Party (Indonesia)
  • Prosperous and Safe Aceh Party (Indonesia)
Other
  • Prosperous (album), by Christy Moore
  • Prosperous and Qualified, 1988 album by free jazz ensemble Universal Congress Of
  • The Prosperous Few and the Restless Many, 1992 book compiling three interviews of Noam Chomsky by David Barsamian

Usage examples of "prosperous".

The employed must recognize the necessity of an accumulated fund of capital, and on the other hand the employer must be as anxious to have about him a contented, prosperous community, as to heap up money beyond any reasonable use for it.

Who that has glowed over this exalted picture will tell us that we must make Virtue prosperous in order to allure to it, or clothe Vice with misery in order to revolt us from its image?

Kensington Methodist Hall expressed in stone the ambivalent feelings of prosperous Methodists, who be424 KEN FOLLETT lieved in religious simplicity but secretly longed to display their wealth.

Timour might boast, that, at his accession to the throne, Asia was the prey of anarchy and rapine, whilst under his prosperous monarchy a child, fearless and unhurt, might carry a purse of gold from the East to the West.

His name was Bardan Aliat, and he was the heir and pride of the prosperous merchant Melkor Aliat.

Mister Roberts saw that it really was Barnacle, and he rejoiced to see him so prosperous.

They passed through a prosperous bourgeois neighbour hood, where the newly rich merchants bedizened their dwellings with ifilled and gilded cupolas, silvered wrought iron lace work and hideous painted statuary.

Chingkim finally led us into a room that, except for its torch light and beslimed rock walls, might have been a counting room in a prosperous mercantile establishment.

Rodde could picture them: comfortable, prosperous traders with their wives and servants all around them, children running and playing among the rushes, the fires glowing and adding to the thick atmosphere as servants ladled stews, panters cut hunks of bread, bottlers topped up mugs and cups, and all about dogs sat and scratched or waited, watching hopefully.

There is something in the tone of those instructions of his to Sancho that evokes in one the image of an elderly, seedy, obscure poet, who has never been successful in anything, giving to his sturdy, popular, extravert son a sound bit of advice as to how to be a prosperous plumber or politician.

The nonsensical idea of importing only medical opium would not keep one merchant prosperous, much less the dozens who now made fortunes from it.

The wages of this original sin are with us still - the idea that so-called Chicanos can find parity with whites only through government coercion, income redistribution and racial chauvinism, rather than by the very hard work of traditional education that once ensured that Mexican kids spoke perfect English, knew as much about math and science as members of any other ethnic group, and expected to find status and respect by becoming educated and prosperous.

So absorbed was he in these visions of a comfortable and prosperous life, that he did not see the Presidente come in with the letter in her hand, and she, looking at him, thought him less ugly now than at first.

Their descendants still plough the windy hillsides, cutting saw-logs and pulpwood on their own timber lots in the winter-time, and shopping at the Corner on Saturday nights, though many have drifted away to the States and other scenes more prosperous.

Though Racketts, Mudges, and Blunts attended our school and worshiped in our Temple, though they were at least as prosperous as we in town save the converts in their mansions, we knew them tainted with an essential inferiority.