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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
poll
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a popularity poll (=survey to find how popular someone is)
▪ In most popularity polls, he is in fourth or fifth place.
changed...name by deed poll
▪ Steve changed his name by deed poll to Elvis Presley-Smith.
deed poll
▪ Steve changed his name by deed poll to Elvis Presley-Smith.
exit poll
opinion poll
▪ An opinion poll showed that 70% of adults were against legalizing drugs.
poll tax
polling booth
polling day
polling station
polling station (=where you vote in an election)
straw poll
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
early
▪ The party machines, however, are being oiled and watered for an early poll.
▪ Buchanan had made inroads in Wisconsin, where one early poll had him tied with Dole.
▪ An earlier poll planned for October 1990 had also been postponed.
▪ Latino support drops Early polls showed that Latinos were about evenly split on Proposition 187.
late
▪ Mr Ashdown, buoyed up by the latest opinion poll results, has been touring both constituencies.
▪ In the latest round of polls, Peres holds a 5 percentage point lead over Netanyahu.
▪ Week by week we read of the latest opinion polls on this or that.
▪ While 19 percent gave him a poor rating in the latest poll, 30 percent gave him the lowest rating last May.
▪ According to the latest opinion polls, the noes have 50%, the yeses 35% and the rest are undecided.
▪ Indeed, the latest polls show Dole leading Buchanan by 11 points in South Carolina.
▪ According to him, Mr Major is irresolute, obsessed with his image, and shifts according to the latest opinion poll.
▪ The latest poll found Texas Sen.
national
▪ The Government refuses to hold a national poll despite pressure from its own backbenchers and senior party figures.
▪ In more than 200 national polls taken in 1996, Clinton led in every one.
▪ In January a national poll found that most whites think blacks are lazy, less intelligent and less patriotic than whites are.
▪ Being safe from violence is the single topic kids want to talk about more, according to the national poll released Wednesday.
▪ Three national polls released Monday and Tuesday show Dole trailing Clinton by at least 20 percentage points.
▪ They do not conform well to national polls.
▪ But when the national polls are a wide gap, the country is pretty likely to follow.
▪ The average person starts off looking at the national polls.
new
▪ The verdicts gave up to three months for new polls to be held.
▪ Trailing in the new poll were Alexander at 13 percent and Forbes at 10 percent.
New charge: Gateshead Council is being recommended to approve a new poll tax of £271.
▪ A new poll makes drought-stricken Texas look like an oasis for the support-thirsty presidential campaign of presumptive Republican nominee Bob Dole.
▪ Stuck in two new polls behind frontrunner Bob Dole and two insurgent candidates with clear ideological messages, Texas Sen.
▪ Did you see the new poll out today out there?
▪ A new poll released Monday following the bombings showed Peres's lead shrinking in the race for prime minister.
▪ One new poll showed him pulling ahead of Sen.
public
▪ His chances of accomplishing policy change will also be enhanced if he maintains high levels of support in public opinion polls.
▪ Reduced expectations have shown up in many public opinion polls taken in recent years.
▪ Quantitative data can also be individual, such as that found in the numerous market research surveys and public opinion polls.
▪ His rise in public opinion polls has been swift.
▪ The public also favors taking part in on-line public opinion polls and interactive electronic town-hall political meetings.
▪ Republicans, battered as they are in the public opinion polls, succeeded in dramatically transforming the terms of the national debate.
▪ Dole suddenly edged up in the public opinion polls and Clinton slid slightly.
▪ Despite some public opinion polls and Supreme Court decisions to the contrary, voters have repeatedly rejected liberalization of abortion laws.
recent
▪ The most recent poll shows 61.7% in favour.
▪ A recent poll shows him at 8 percent in the state.
▪ A recent opinion poll showed that 89 percent of the public said they would oppose plans to bury waste in their neighbourhood.
▪ The recent poll indicated that if retired Gen.
▪ A recent Gallup poll found that 98m adults are involved in voluntary service, a 23% increase in two years.
▪ If this measure could indeed alienate Latinos, why do several recent polls show overwhelming support from Latinos for dismantling bilingual education?
▪ Two recent polls showed he would draw more than 20 percent of the vote in a national election.
▪ A recent statewide poll showed nearly three quarters of Californians still believe the state is in recession.
statewide
▪ The paper endorsed commentator Pat Buchanan, who is running third in statewide polls.
▪ Two statewide polls say Californians favor the medical use of marijuana.
▪ Other statewide polls on the measure are in the works.
▪ A recent statewide poll showed nearly three quarters of Californians still believe the state is in recession.
▪ Nevertheless, statewide polls still show overwhelming public support for the Games.
▪ Another statewide poll released early this year said 42 percent of Arizona voters thought Symington should resign.
▪ A recent statewide poll put Clinton ahead by 6 points.
straw
▪ Holloway had pledged to follow the results of a straw poll in his district.
▪ For example, they point to the Iowa straw poll conducted last year in which Texas Sen.
▪ But he paid for phone banks, mailings, transportation and registration fees for his straw poll supporters.
▪ Dole and candidate Lamar Alexander brought backers in from out of state so they could participate in the Iowa straw poll.
■ NOUN
deed
▪ I suggested that he might think of removing the last three syllables from his name, which he did by deed poll.
▪ After changing his name by deed poll to Captain Beany he needed a renewed passport to match his new identity.
▪ The Law Society will require evidence such as a marriage certificate, deed poll or statutory declaration.
▪ Like his new name, changed by deed poll nine years before.
exit
▪ Law forbids the publication of exit polls before voting ends in every province.
▪ In Iowa, exit polls reflected similar voter antipathy.
▪ Even before the first exit polls came in he was buying new tackle in readiness.
▪ My guy at Channel 3 saw their exit polls.
▪ It was already showing strength in the exit polls, and may now be boosted by a sympathy vote.
▪ In the election day exit poll, two-thirds of Virginia voters expressed a negative opinion of Robertson.
▪ It may not be possible to decide who has won until the exit polls are announced on Thursday evening.
▪ National exit polls showed 54 percent of women voted for Clinton and 38 percent chose Dole.
gallup
▪ For example, if a Gallup poll goes against the Government, sterling starts to shake.
▪ A Gallup poll taken in July showed that some 80 percent of respondents believe the procedure should be banned.
▪ A recent Gallup poll found that 98m adults are involved in voluntary service, a 23% increase in two years.
▪ Mr Ashdown's personal popularity is also reflected in a separate Gallup poll measuring the standing of the parties.
▪ A Gallup poll of businessmen has revealed that they expect interest rates to be 1.6 percent higher under Labour.
▪ A GALLUP poll on meat-eating habits claims to show that vegetarianism is rampant and on the increase.
▪ The over-simplification of the issues was part and parcel of a Gallup poll that took place last weekend.
news
▪ The number was fewer than the 362, 000 analysts expected, according to a Bloomberg Business News poll.
opinion
▪ Mr Ashdown, buoyed up by the latest opinion poll results, has been touring both constituencies.
▪ His rise in public opinion polls has been swift.
▪ In the summer and autumn of 1989, Labour led strongly in the opinion polls again.
▪ Republicans, battered as they are in the public opinion polls, succeeded in dramatically transforming the terms of the national debate.
▪ He started talking about individuals' opinion poll ratings.
▪ Public opinion polls show as many as 70 percent of respondents oppose gay marriages.
▪ According to opinion polls, a record 38 percent of the electorate is unaligned.
▪ Opponents who once mocked Mr Berlusconi's tactics as kitsch have turned queasy as opinion polls show them tobe working.
rating
▪ Mr Major and his chancellor, Norman Lamont, still have the lowest poll ratings since the second world war.
▪ It is uncertain how the return of the public Gingrich will affect his poll ratings or those of his party.
▪ He started talking about individuals' opinion poll ratings.
▪ And those high poll ratings, they argued, translate into more power in negotiations with Congress.
▪ They tackled their political, tactical and strategic problems swiftly and directly; and, incidentally, their poll ratings rose strongly.
▪ Less than two years ago, at the end of the Gulf War, he had the highest poll rating of any President.
result
▪ The disclosure of Labour's latest spoiling tactic highlighted renewed confidence at Millbank in the face of dire Tory poll results.
▪ Morales was pleased with the poll results.
▪ The poll results suggest that many parents still fail to understand the grant-maintained system.
▪ The poll results come amid a spate of bad news for tobacco companies.
▪ Bucharest's political scientists are quick to argue that the shock poll result did not mean a majority wanted the dictator back.
▪ However, Kweit said he knew of a few friends who abandoned Glassheim for Owens when they saw the poll results.
▪ Vote differs from poll results Finding out what Latino voters think about bilingual education is more problematic.
tax
▪ A company which refused to make attachment of earnings deductions against one poll tax offender, was fined £200 by magistrates.
▪ We have the poll tax because there is no such thing as the sovereignty of Parliament.
▪ It is no wonder that local government finance officers regard the poll tax as a financial nightmare.
▪ There will be a lot of losers in changing from the poll tax, which will make the new tax unpopular too.
▪ The poll tax has been a nightmare which shows no sign of ending.
▪ The arrangements announced yesterday to ease the introduction of the poll tax are symptomatic of a less rigorous approach.
▪ Many of those anomalies were identified by my colleagues at the very outset of the poll tax escapade.
▪ The bill was almost three times the amount of her last poll tax demand.
■ VERB
accord
▪ Putin appears to have survived the political storm over his handling of the crisis, according to opinion polls.
▪ Two in five are dissatisfied with how much they weigh, according to a recent poll.
▪ Most are unhappy that it has replaced their national currency, according to a poll published in eight countries this week.
▪ Clinton leads Dole statewide by 20 percent according to a poll completed Sept. 26.
▪ Voters who prefer a flat tax think it will lead to a rising standard of living, according to the poll.
▪ Being safe from violence is the single topic kids want to talk about more, according to the national poll released Wednesday.
▪ They draw a line that the public, according tothe polls, rejects.
conduct
▪ Councils that conduct local polls say that that is the primary concern.
▪ Greenberg and Lake conducted seven polls over the last year to study the role of women voters in the election.
▪ At the Irving Plaza, a gaggle of girls are wandering around conducting a poll.
lead
▪ Mrs Miriam Santiago, a lawyer, is leading in the polls.
▪ He leads Dole in Arizona polls.
▪ Haunted Suddenly, Clinton was leading in the polls a position he held on to throughout the remainder of the campaign.
▪ Bush has led in 168 polls, Gore in just five.
▪ Gore has never led when the poll is restricted to likely voters.
▪ It is likely to be its party chairman Gennady Zyuganov, who now leads nationwide polls for president.
pay
▪ Two of my constituents, Mr. and Mrs. Bellis, were sent to prison because they did not pay the poll tax.
▪ Are you better off paying your poll tax?
▪ A number of women with no income have been sent to prison because they were unable to pay the poll tax.
▪ I urge all Opposition Members who have not paid their poll tax to do so without delay.
▪ She'd been summoned there for refusing to pay a poll tax surcharge of £14.52.
▪ He claimed he was inside for not paying his poll tax.
▪ The Government have moved away from their view that everybody should pay the poll tax and are making some amends.
▪ He has also opposed the imprisonment of those unable to pay their poll tax.
show
▪ They regularly showed him opinion polls which indicated that most of the electorate favoured a five-year term.
▪ Your wives must show up at the polls, husbands can not vote for them.
▪ He is shown polls indicating percentage satisfaction with the Prime Minister and the performance of the Government.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A poll of 700 female registered voters found that 56% favor full abortion rights.
▪ According to the polls, a huge majority of citizens oppose bilingual education.
▪ In a nationwide poll carried out in January, only one person in ten said they were happy with the tax reforms.
▪ In our poll, we asked teachers how they felt about teacher testing.
▪ Recent polls indicate strong support for cutting taxes.
▪ Recent opinion polls show that the President's popularity has slipped.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And the implications of that can not be catered for by opinion polls.
▪ Another statewide poll released early this year said 42 percent of Arizona voters thought Symington should resign.
▪ He was still behind in the polls.
▪ In the end, we were seduced by the polls, against our better judgment.
▪ Like his new name, changed by deed poll nine years before.
▪ Stanford, a 28-22 loser to Arizona, fell nine spots to No. 25 in both polls.
▪ This Tuesday, August 5, voters will go to the polls to accept or reject the proposed charter.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
before
▪ Mr Berisha promised before polling day to respect the verdict of the international observers.
▪ At this rate he should have it down to zero a few days before polling.
▪ On Thursday night, he appeared before 3,500 party faithful in the north of Paris in his last rally before polling day.
▪ This is made more grim as most pollsters claim voters have made up their minds well before polling day.
▪ He and Yeltsin command roughly a quarter of the electorate apiece and there is nearly a month to go before polling.
■ NOUN
business
▪ Private economists polled by Bloomberg Business News project the economy will grow 1. 9 percent this year.
▪ C., which polls primarily for business clients.
candidate
▪ Ivashko defeated three other candidates, polling 278 votes for and 61 against.
▪ Bruce King lost because a Green Party candidate polled 10 %.
▪ Twenty-six candidates polled 74,824 votes, all but five of them forfeiting their deposits.
▪ Peter Allen, a hard-working local candidate, polled 8,400 votes in November and will be looking for an improvement.
▪ Eight opposition candidates withdrew shortly before polling.
day
▪ On polling day itself, the worst unemployment figures for 30 years were announced.
▪ He then sparked off a row by suggesting that floating voters should stay in bed on polling day.
▪ The Representation of the People Act 1969 extended the franchise to persons aged 18 or more on polling day.
▪ Mr Berisha promised before polling day to respect the verdict of the international observers.
▪ On Thursday night, he appeared before 3,500 party faithful in the north of Paris in his last rally before polling day.
▪ On polling day, the Information Ministry estimated turnout at 85 percent.
▪ This is made more grim as most pollsters claim voters have made up their minds well before polling day.
▪ The market even proved it was more canny than the pollsters by climbing 43 points on polling day itself.
dole
▪ Phil Gramm of Texas, DiVall polled for Dole in his 1988 presidential race.
election
▪ At least 14 people were reported dead after violence erupted during polling in local elections in the Punjab on Dec. 29.
▪ A challenger has never overcome such a deep deficit in public opinion polls 27 days before Election Day.
month
▪ He will face the runner-up, Liberal party leader Drazen Budisa, in a run-off poll next month.
news
▪ Private economists polled by Bloomberg Business News project the economy will grow 1. 9 percent this year.
▪ This played to Forbes' advantage, according to exit polling by Voter News Service.
opinion
▪ After trailing for months in the opinion polls, Yeltsin this week pulled even with his Communist rival.
▪ So far Gramm has been unable to close in on Dole in the public opinion polls.
▪ Public opinion polls show crime and violence to be a major issue in the November elections.
▪ Public opinion polling did not begin in earnest until the l930s.
▪ A challenger has never overcome such a deep deficit in public opinion polls 27 days before Election Day.
▪ After a shaky start, the president now gets a better than 50 percent approval rating in opinion polls here.
party
▪ In the election of 1983, however, third parties polled some 28 percent of the vote and secured forty-four seats.
▪ Bruce King lost because a Green Party candidate polled 10 %.
percent
▪ By 60 percent to 35 percent, those polled believe he should resign as speaker.
▪ A subsequent Gallup poll showed that 57 percent of the people polled supported his actions.
▪ Twenty percent of those polled say it is much worse off.
▪ By contrast, first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton was seen favorably by 32 percent of those polled and unfavorably by 36 percent.
▪ Only 13 percent of those polled believe that all the money they have been promised will be available when they retire.
vote
▪ In each ward, two workers canvassed some 2,000 voters and polled a respectable vote.
▪ Nigel Downing polled 163 votes in last November's Langbaurgh byelection, but can not afford to stand again.
▪ Ivashko defeated three other candidates, polling 278 votes for and 61 against.
▪ Preston polled 28 votes, Tranmere 21, Wigan 15 and Stockport 2 votes.
▪ Twenty-six candidates polled 74,824 votes, all but five of them forfeiting their deposits.
▪ Peter Allen, a hard-working local candidate, polled 8,400 votes in November and will be looking for an improvement.
▪ Gorbachev polled 3,411 votes in favour and 1,116 against, compared with 501 for Avaliani and 4,026 against.
voter
▪ In each ward, two workers canvassed some 2,000 voters and polled a respectable vote.
▪ A few months before the 1994 election, a bare majority of Latino voters polled said they supported Prop. 187.
▪ The monitors cited clusters of cases of voter intimidation and polling officials ordering citizens how to vote.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ For its study the company polled 150 randomly selected physicians.
▪ He polled 23,579 votes.
▪ Nearly 60% of the voters who were polled did not recognize Bronson's name.
▪ Only 16 percent of the freshmen polled said they intended to major in business.
▪ The Labour candidate polled 52% of the votes.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He breathed a sigh or relief when Mrs Long announced he had polled 31.
▪ In Ayrshire this July, Systems Three found that four out of five of those polled were strongly opposed to the scheme.
▪ Ivashko defeated three other candidates, polling 278 votes for and 61 against.
▪ Lanier emerged as the winner after polling 53 percent of the votes cast, compared with 47 percent for Turner.
▪ On Thursday night, he appeared before 3,500 party faithful in the north of Paris in his last rally before polling day.
▪ Private economists polled by Bloomberg Business News project the economy will grow 1. 9 percent this year.
▪ With 75 % of the vote counted he had polled 52 % to Mr Garcia's 48 %.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Poll

Poll \Poll\, n. [From Polly, The proper name.] A parrot; -- familiarly so called.

Poll

Poll \Poll\, n. [Gr. ? the many, the rabble.] One who does not try for honors, but is content to take a degree merely; a passman. [Cambridge Univ., Eng.]

Poll

Poll \Poll\, n. [Akin to LG. polle the head, the crest of a bird, the top of a tree, OD. pol, polle, Dan. puld the crown of a hat.]

  1. The head; the back part of the head. ``All flaxen was his poll.''
    --Shak.

  2. A number or aggregate of heads; a list or register of heads or individuals.

    We are the greater poll, and in true fear They gave us our demands.
    --Shak.

    The muster file, rotten and sound, upon my life, amounts not to fifteen thousand poll.
    --Shak.

  3. Specifically, the register of the names of electors who may vote in an election.

  4. The casting or recording of the votes of registered electors; as, the close of the poll.

    All soldiers quartered in place are to remove . . . and not to return till one day after the poll is ended.
    --Blackstone.

  5. pl. The place where the votes are cast or recorded; as, to go to the polls.

  6. The broad end of a hammer; the but of an ax.

  7. (Zo["o]l.) The European chub. See Pollard, 3 (a) .

    Poll book, a register of persons entitled to vote at an election.

    Poll evil (Far.), an inflammatory swelling or abscess on a horse's head, confined beneath the great ligament of the neck.

    Poll pick (Mining), a pole having a heavy spike on the end, forming a kind of crowbar.

    Poll tax, a tax levied by the head, or poll; a capitation tax.

Poll

Poll \Poll\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Polled; p. pr. & vb. n. Polling.]

  1. To remove the poll or head of; hence, to remove the top or end of; to clip; to lop; to shear; as, to poll the head; to poll a tree.

    When he [Absalom] pollled his head.
    --2 Sam. xiv. 26.

    His death did so grieve them that they polled themselves; they clipped off their horse and mule's hairs.
    --Sir T. North.

  2. To cut off; to remove by clipping, shearing, etc.; to mow or crop; -- sometimes with off; as, to poll the hair; to poll wool; to poll grass.

    Who, as he polled off his dart's head, so sure he had decreed That all the counsels of their war he would poll off like it.
    --Chapman.

  3. To extort from; to plunder; to strip. [Obs.]

    Which polls and pills the poor in piteous wise.
    --Spenser.

  4. To impose a tax upon. [Obs.]

  5. To pay as one's personal tax.

    The man that polled but twelve pence for his head.
    --Dryden.

  6. To enter, as polls or persons, in a list or register; to enroll, esp. for purposes of taxation; to enumerate one by one.

    Polling the reformed churches whether they equalize in number those of his three kingdoms.
    --Milton.

  7. To register or deposit, as a vote; to elicit or call forth, as votes or voters; as, he polled a hundred votes more than his opponent.

    And poll for points of faith his trusty vote.
    --Tickell.

  8. (Law) To cut or shave smooth or even; to cut in a straight line without indentation; as, a polled deed. See Dee? poll.
    --Burrill.

    To poll a jury, to call upon each member of the jury to answer individually as to his concurrence in a verdict which has been rendered.

Poll

Poll \Poll\, v. i. To vote at an election.
--Beaconsfield.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
Poll

fem. proper name, short for Polly. Noted from 1620s as a parrot's name.

poll

"head," early 14c., polle "hair of the head; piece of fur from the head of an animal," also "head," from Middle Low German or Middle Dutch pol "head, top." Sense extended early 14c. to "person, individual." Meaning "collection of votes" is first recorded 1620s, from notion of "counting heads;" meaning "survey of public opinion" is first recorded 1902. Poll tax, literally "head tax," is from 1690s. Literal use in English tends toward the part of the head where the hair grows.

poll

"to take the votes of," 1620s, from poll (n.). Related: Polled; polling. A deed poll "deed executed by one party only," is from earlier verbal meaning "cut the hair of," because the deed was cut straight rather than indented (see indent).

poll

"to cut, trim," late 14c., "to cut short the hair" (of an animal or person), from poll (n.). Of trees or plants from 1570s. Related: Polled; polling.

Wiktionary
poll

Etymology 1

  1. (context of kinds of livestock which typically have horns English) Bred without horns, and thus hornless. alt. 1 A survey of people, usually statistically analyzed to gauge wider public opinion. 2 A formal election. 3 A polling place (context usually as plural polling places English) 4 (context now obsolete except in veterinary contexts) The head, particularly the scalp or pate upon which hair (normally) grows 5 (context: in extended senses of the above) A mass of people, a mob or muster, considered as a head count. 6 The broad or butt end of an axe or a hammer. 7 The pollard or European chub, a kind of fish. n. 1 A survey of people, usually statistically analyzed to gauge wider public opinion. 2 A formal election. 3 A polling place (context usually as plural polling places English) 4 (context now obsolete except in veterinary contexts) The head, particularly the scalp or pate upon which hair (normally) grows 5 (context: in extended senses of the above) A mass of people, a mob or muster, considered as a head count. 6 The broad or butt end of an axe or a hammer. 7 The pollard or European chub, a kind of fish. v

  2. 1 (context transitive English) To take, record the votes of (an electorate). 2 (context transitive English) To solicit mock votes from (a person or group). 3 (context intransitive English) To vote at an election. 4 To register or deposit, as a vote; to elicit or call forth, as votes or voters. 5 To cut off; to remove by clipping, shearing, et

  3. ; to mow or crop. 6 (context transitive English) To cut the hair of (a creature). 7 (context transitive English) To remove the horns of (an animal). 8 To remove the top or end of; to clip; to lop. 9 (context transitive computing communication English) To (repeatedly) request the status of something (such as a computer or printer on a network). 10 (context intransitive with adverb English) To be judged in a poll. 11 (context obsolete English) To extort from; to plunder; to strip. 12 To impose a tax upon. 13 To pay as one's personal tax. 14 To enter, as polls or persons, in a list or register; to enroll, especially for purposes of taxation; to enumerate one by one. 15 (context legal English) To cut or shave smooth or even; to cut in a straight line without indentation. Etymology 2

    n. A pet parrot. Etymology 3

    n. (context UK dated Cambridge University English) One who does not try for honors at university, but is content to take a degree merely; a passman.

WordNet
poll
  1. n. an inquiry into public opinion conducted by interviewing a random sample of people [syn: opinion poll, public opinion poll, canvass]

  2. the top of the head [syn: pate, crown]

  3. the part of the head between the ears

  4. a tame parrot [syn: poll parrot]

  5. the counting of votes (as in an election)

poll
  1. v. get the opinions (of people) by asking specific questions [syn: canvass, canvas]

  2. vote in an election at a polling station

  3. get the votes of

  4. convert into a pollard; "pollard trees" [syn: pollard]

Wikipedia
Poll

Poll, polled or polling may refer to:

Poll (livestock)

The poll is a name of the part of an animal's head, alternatively referencing a point immediately behind or right between the ears. This area of the anatomy is of particular significance for the horse.

Specifically, the "poll" refers to the occipital protrusion at the back of the skull. However, in common usage, many horsemen refer to the poll joint, between the atlas (C1) and skull as the poll. The area at the joint has a slight depression, and is a sensitive location. Thus, because the crownpiece of a bridle passes over the poll joint, a rider can indirectly exert pressure on the horse's poll by means of the reins, bit, and bridle.

Poll (band)

Poll was a Greek pop group founded in 1971 by Kostas Tournas, Robert Williams, Stavros Logarides and Kostas Papaioannou. In Greece, it is considered a historic group of the 1970s with pioneering lyrics. Poll is a legendary pop group which resonated with the Greek youth of the 70s, and its songs are viewed as "some of the best songs, which have remained in the history of Greek music". Poll is the most commercially successful Greek band of all time.

Usage examples of "poll".

Court was unable to concede that a Georgia statute levying on inhabitants of the State a poll tax payment of which is made a prerequisite for voting but exempting females who do not register for voting, in any way abridged the right of male citizens to vote on account of their sex.

Then, in the middle of pardoning some rich guys during his all-night Agonistes on January 19, he finally decided to do some good for all those women who sit at keyboards all day and who, with their crippled hands, went to the polls TWICE to make him their President.

Republican strategist Roger Ailes that the press was mostly interested only in conflict, scandal, polls, process and gaffes.

Between the name, the ancestry, the manner, the looks, the charm, the ease and the intellectual ability, whatever election Caesar contested would see him returned at the top of the poll.

Of the twenty successful candidates he had polled last, no surprise given his lack of ancestry, and drew the lot for duty supervising all the ports of Italy save for Ostia and Brundisium, which had their own quaestors.

She would be swinging in the midst of them, with one tiny black maiden on the seat beside her, and one little black man with high stomach and shaven poll holding on to the rope behind her, and another mighty Moor in a diminutive white jellab pushing at their feet in front, and all laughing together, or the children singing as the swing rose, and she herself listening with head aslant and all her fair hair rip-rip-rippling down her back and over her neck, and her smiling white face resting on her shoulder.

He shot up in the polls, and bipartisan support for his action and the resolution took the issue of Vietnam out of the campaign, except as a negative for Goldwater.

Gaius Piso had brought in four years earlier against electoral bribery in the consular polls.

First he attacked the law the consul Gaius Piso had brought in four years earlier against electoral bribery in the consular polls.

Before and after every ride, Emel rubbed the horse down from the poll of its head to the dock of its tail, up and down each powerful leg.

All the polls show him to be the front-runner in the gubernatorial race.

Reginald Boulay was his name, and at this exact moment he was giving Dallas King the results of his Husker Poll.

The numbers from the Husker Poll were never found in the newspapers or on TV.

King had decided after talking to two of his regular Pollsters, and being irritated at their inability to understand what he wanted, that if there was ever a time to spend money on Boulay and his Husker Poll, now was it.

According to the Husker Poll, a little over sixty percent of those surveyed felt that Vice President Baxter should exhaust almost all options in an effort to resolve the crisis in a peaceful way.