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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
palladium
noun
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ An outer cylinder of platinum was used as the anode, with a rod of palladium on its axis as the cathode.
▪ Fleischmann and Pons believed that they had stumbled on another way - intense pressures provided by the natural make-up of solid palladium.
▪ That was offset in part by higher prices for platinum, palladium and nickel.
▪ The palladium cathode was charged with dissolved hydrogen.
▪ The electrical voltage forced the hydrogen into the palladium.
▪ Three different palladium rods were tried of various diameters: the thickest rod gave by far the greatest effect.
▪ Undoubtedly, the bubbling oxygen would have come into contact with palladium.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Palladium

Palladium \Pal*la"di*um\ (p[a^]l*l[=a]"d[i^]*[u^]m), n. [L., fr. Gr. Palla`dion, fr. Palla`s, Palla`dos, Pallas.]

  1. (Gr. Antiq.) Any statue of the goddess Pallas; esp., the famous statue on the preservation of which depended the safety of ancient Troy.

  2. Hence: That which affords effectual protection or security; a safeguard; as, the trial by jury is the palladium of our civil rights.
    --Blackstone.

Palladium

Palladium \Pal*la"di*um\, n. [NL.] (Chem.) A rare metallic element of the light platinum group, found native, and also alloyed with platinum and gold. It is a silver-white metal resembling platinum, and like it permanent and untarnished in the air, but is more easily fusible, with a melting point of 1555[deg] C. It can also be prepared as a finely divided black powder. It is unique in its power of absorbing hydrogen, which it does to the extent of nearly a thousand volumes, forming the alloy Pd2H. It is used for graduated circles and verniers, for plating certain silver goods, and somewhat in dentistry. It was so named in 1804 by Wollaston from the asteroid Pallas, which was discovered in 1802. Symbol Pd. Atomic number, 46. Atomic weight, 106.42. Density 12.0.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
palladium

"safeguard," c.1600, originally (late 14c.) "sacred image of Pallas Athene," from Latin palladium, from Greek Palladion, noun use of neuter of Palladios "of Pallas." It stood in the citadel of Troy and the safety of the city was believed to depend on it.

palladium

metallic element, coined 1803 by discoverer William Hyde Wollaston (1766-1828), from Pallas, name of an asteroid discovered the previous year (by German astronomer Olbers) and named for the goddess (see Pallas).

Wiktionary
palladium

Etymology 1 n. A safeguard (qualifier: from a statue of Athena that was believed to safeguard the ancient city of Troy). Etymology 2

n. A metallic chemical element (''symbol'' Pd) with an atomic number of 46.

WordNet
palladium

n. a silver-white metallic element of the platinum group that resembles platinum; occurs in some copper and nickel ores; does not tarnish at ordinary temperatures and is used (alloyed with gold) in jewelry [syn: Pd, atomic number 46]

Wikipedia
Palladium

Palladium is a chemical element with symbol Pd and atomic number 46. It is a rare and lustrous silvery-white metal discovered in 1803 by William Hyde Wollaston. He named it after the asteroid Pallas, which was itself named after the epithet of the Greek goddess Athena, acquired by her when she slew Pallas. Palladium, platinum, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium and osmium form a group of elements referred to as the platinum group metals (PGMs). These have similar chemical properties, but palladium has the lowest melting point and is the least dense of them.

More than half the supply of palladium and its congener platinum is used in catalytic converters, which convert as much as 90% of the harmful gases in automobile exhaust ( hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen dioxide) into harmless substances ( nitrogen, carbon dioxide and water vapor). Palladium is also used in electronics, dentistry, medicine, hydrogen purification, chemical applications, groundwater treatment, and jewelry. Palladium is a key component of fuel cells, which react hydrogen with oxygen to produce electricity, heat, and water.

Ore deposits of palladium and other PGMs are rare. The most extensive deposits have been found in the norite belt of the Bushveld Igneous Complex covering the Transvaal Basin in South Africa, the Stillwater Complex in Montana, United States, the Sudbury Basin and Thunder Bay District of Ontario, Canada, and the Norilsk Complex in Russia. Recycling is also a source, mostly from scrapped catalytic converters. The numerous applications and limited supply sources result in considerable investment interest.

Palladium (disambiguation)

Palladium is a chemical element, a rare metal.

Palladium may also refer to:

Palladium (band)

Palladium were an English pop rock band, active from 2006 until early 2009. They are not to be confused with the Australian or American bands of the same name.

Palladium (Prague)

Palladium is a shopping mall located in the centre of Prague in the Czech Republic. It opened in 2007. The mall contains 170 shops and 30 restaurants, with a retail area of . There is also designated office space in the building totalling . It is one of the biggest shopping centres in the Czech Republic. It is directly opposite another shopping centre, Kotva.

Palladium (classical antiquity)
See also Palladium (protective image) for post-classical usages.

In Greek and Roman mythology, the palladium or palladion was a cult image of great antiquity on which the safety of Troy and later Rome was said to depend, the wooden statue ( xoanon) of Pallas Athena that Odysseus and Diomedes stole from the citadel of Troy and which was later taken to the future site of Rome by Aeneas. The Roman story is related in Virgil's Aeneid and other works.

In English, since around 1600, the word palladium has been used figuratively to mean anything believed to provide protection or safety, and in particular in Christian contexts a sacred relic or icon believed to have a protective role in military contexts for a whole city, people or nation. Such beliefs first become prominent in the Eastern church in the period after the reign of the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I, and later spread to the Western church. Palladia were carried in procession around the walls of besieged cities and sometimes carried into battle.

Palladium (New York City)

The Palladium (originally called the Academy of Music) was a concert hall (and later a nightclub) in New York City. It was located on the south side of East 14th Street, between Irving Place and Third Avenue.

Designed by Thomas W. Lamb and originally called the Academy of Music, it was built in 1927 across the street from the site of an earlier venue of the same name. Opened as a deluxe movie palace by movie mogul William Fox, the Academy operated as a cinema through the early 1970s.

Beginning in the 1960s, it was also utilized as a rock concert venue, particularly following the 1971 closure of the Fillmore East. It was rechristened the Palladium on September 18, 1976, with The Band live radio broadcast, and continued to serve as a concert hall into the following decade.

On July 25, 1980, Kiss played the venue, their only North American concert in 1980, to introduce new drummer Eric Carr to the American press before heading overseas for their Unmasked Tour. Also part of the reason for having the concert was to help subsidize the rental of the Palladium for tour rehearsals with Carr.

In 1985, the Palladium was converted into a nightclub by Steve Rubell and Ian Schrager, after their success with Studio 54. Japanese architect Arata Isozaki redesigned the building's interior for the club.

The Palladium closed in 1997 and was later demolished. New York University purchased the land and built a 12-story residence hall retaining the name Palladium. The residence hall typically houses 975 undergraduate and 170 MBA students. Two floors in the basement and sub-basement are dedicated to the Palladium Athletic Facility, also known to the University community by its abbreviation, "PLD".

Palladium (Australian band)

Palladium was an Australian band from Brisbane that was active from 1997 to 2003. The band consisted of members Chris Chalk (drums), Andrew Morris (guitar and vocals), Justin Sykes (bass) and Brant Ward (guitar and vocals).

Palladium released their bebut EP, Hoarsey, in 2001. Their debut album, the obscurely named Sister Flute and the Sunday Best, was released later in the year. They released another EP, Everybody Loves New Fashion, in early 2003 and the title track reached No. 92 on the ARIA Top 100 Singles chart.

The band received significant national ariplay on Triple J with songs such as "Hoarsey" and "Good Girls".

They played their last show in October 2003 after Ward had decided to part ways. Morris, Sykes and Chalk were already working together on a new project. The band were recording a new album at the time. In 2009 the material that the band was working on at the time of their break-up had remained unreleased.

Palladium (protective image)

A palladium or palladion is an image or other object of great antiquity on which the safety of a city or nation is said to depend. The word is a generalization from the name of the original Trojan Palladium, a wooden statue ( xoanon) of Pallas Athena that Odysseus and Diomedes stole from the citadel of Troy and which was supposedly later taken to the future site of Rome by Aeneas, where it remained until perhaps transferred to Constantinople and lost sight of after the conversion of the Empire to Christianity.

In English, since around 1600, the word "palladium" has been used figuratively to mean anything believed to provide protection or safety, and in particular in Christian contexts a sacred relic or icon believed to have a protective role in military contexts for a whole city, people or nation. Such beliefs first become prominent in the Eastern church in the period after the reign of the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I, and later spread to the Western church. Palladia were processed around the walls of besieged cities and sometimes carried into battle. In this more offensive role they may also be referred to as "vexilla" (singular vexillum, Latin for "battle standard").

Palladium (St. Louis)

The Palladium is a disused and endangered historic building in the Grand Center arts district of St. Louis, Missouri. It is especially noted as the site of the Plantation Club, a 1940s and early 1950s dance club where famous African-American musicians performed. It was in some ways St. Louis's equivalent to Harlem's famous Cotton Club and was almost certainly modeled after it.

The building opened in 1914 as the Palladium Roller Skating Rink, although from its early days it also served as a ballroom. In 1940 the Plantation Club night club, which had existed since 1931 on the west end of the block, moved into the building and replaced the roller rink. Like the Cotton Club, the Plantation was owned by a gangster, Tony Scarpelli in this case. And like the Cotton Club, it offered entertainment by African-Americans to a white-only audience. Performers included Jimmie Lunceford, Nat King Cole, Ella Fitzgerald, Benny Carter, the Mills Brothers, the Fletcher Henderson Orchestra, the Noble Sissle Orchestra, the Ink Spots, and Billy Eckstine’s band with musicians Charlie Parker, Lucky Thompson, Art Blakey and musical director Dizzy Gillespie and vocalists Billie Holiday and Sarah Vaughan.

Business boomed during World War II; the club installed air conditioning and offered shows at 11:00 pm, 1:00 am, and 3:00 am. The house band was the Jeter-Pillars Orchestra, which featured Sweets Edison and Clark Terry, and later Jimmy Blanton and Charlie Christian, and also Jimmy Forrest.

The club declined after the early 1950s. Later the building hosted various bars. It was home to thrift shops – Veteran's Village from 1963 to 2006, then HHV Thrift Plus until 2010, since when it has been vacant.

The John Cochran Veteran's Administration Hospital, which is looking to expand, was in talks in the mid 2010s with the owners to purchase and raze the building. The National Trust for Historic Preservation consequently placed the Palladium (which is not on the National Register of Historic Places) on its 2014 list of most endangered historic places.

Usage examples of "palladium".

She felt her nose, stiff with the palladium sponges inside its nostrils.

Agamemnon, Aeneas fled the burning city with his aged father perched upon his shoulder and the Palladium under one arm.

The gas chromatograph which separates out volatile substances and the mass spectrometer which detects ions were divided by a palladium separator.

You have been wisely admonished to "accustom yourselves to think and speak of the Union as of the palladium of your political safety and prosperity, watching for its preservation with Jealous anxiety, discountenancing whatever may suggest even a suspicion that it can in any event be abandoned, and indignantly frowning upon the first dawning of any attempt to alienate any portion of our country from the rest or to enfeeble the sacred ties which now link together the various parts.

Tried to get a job at Palladium but some other Camden grad got the only job left: coat check.

It is keyed to the second triad of the periodic table, rhodium and ru­thenium and palladium, in very much the same way that ferromagnetism is keyed to the first triad, iron and nickel and cobalt.

It is keyed to the second triad of the periodic table, rhodium and ruthenium and palladium, in very much the same way that ferromagnetism is keyed to the first triad, iron and nickel and cobalt.

Unless you threw out millennia of development work and started from scratch with a lump of sponge palladium and a hand calculator, there was no way to step clear of the ancient technology and produce a more efficient robot brain.

Baron Palladium wouldn't allow a cult like the Midnites to survive— providing he knew they existed.

Two of them came to Hippo, a brother and a sister, Paulus and Palladia, already known in many other places by the fame of their wretched lot.

A small concave palladium mirror, at the base of it, faced a similar mirror mounted on something not quite like a small rotary converter.