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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
limb
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
hind legs/feet/quarters/limbs
risk life and limb (=risk your life and health)
▪ Why risk life and limb jumping out of a plane just to raise money for charity?
your lower limbs (=your legs)
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
artificial
▪ After the war he founded the Disabled Society, lobbying the government to improve the quality of artificial limbs.
▪ Some came on canes and artificial limbs.
▪ What has it been like climbing with artificial limbs?
▪ In much the same way computer simulation has been used in bioengineering in the design of prosthesis such as artificial limbs or hips.
▪ He explains how new technology can make some products, like artificial limbs, lighter.
▪ The main problem in Chechnya today is how to find artificial limbs for amputees.
▪ The only hospital unit that can fit artificial limbs is in Vladikavkaz, in northern Ossetia.
broken
▪ There would be a broken tree limb, she could sit quietly, think of other things.
▪ When the prefect learned tbat Hadrian had been baptized, he had him broken limb from limb.
long
▪ She straightened the long limbs and pressed the strands of black cotton she had used for hair more firmly into the scalp.
▪ Amy Van Dyken, 23, all giddy laughter and long limbs.
low
▪ Awards made during and after World War Two have the year of the award engraved on the reverse lower limb.
▪ The lower limbs are very high, allowing in morning sun and filtered or dappled light during the rest of the day.
▪ Symmetrical wasting and weakness was present in the upper and lower limbs and all tendon reflexes were absent.
▪ Jeanie the Half Woman, born without lower limbs, walks on her hands, cooks and even raised a family.
▪ Immobile, her lower limbs yet had the ripple of fined-down muscle about them, the promise of animal movement.
▪ She moaned and her body stretched, her lower limbs pressing tight against him, his thigh filling her inner thighs.
▪ Anyway, there's considerable loss of blood, massive lower limb and pelvic damage and some chest injuries.
torn
▪ Then it is torn limb from limb up in the tree.
■ NOUN
bone
▪ Fig. 3.9 Proportions of proximal against distal ends of limb bones.
▪ The other rib and limb bones eventually hardened from their vestigial origins in the cartilage of fishes.
bud
▪ For example, in certain limbless lizards and snakes a limb bud develops but the apical ridge dies thus stopping limb development.
▪ Cells in the limb bud must record whether they are forelimb or hindlimb cells and so alter their programme.
▪ We tested this by grafting the tip of a limb bud to the flank of the embryo.
tree
▪ There would be a broken tree limb, she could sit quietly, think of other things.
▪ I loved the tree limbs fallen across the road.
▪ It also had a mobile shoulder joint that would allow it to hang from tree limbs.
▪ The tree limbs were covered with leaves and the green grass cushioned the sapphire blue of the sky.
▪ Waves up to 30 feet tore away the beachfront of the Huatulco Sheraton and other bays, leaving tree limbs scattered everywhere.
▪ In addition, tree limbs blowing constantly against the house can tear roof edges, damage siding and create a leak.
■ VERB
break
▪ If a camel slid and fell, it could easily break pelvis or limb and that would be the end of it.
▪ When the prefect learned that Hadrian had been baptized, he had him broken limb from limb.
lose
▪ I don't think anything is worth the risk of losing your life or losing a limb.
▪ They cite numbers and percentages of casualties, they give names of comrades who lost eyesight and limbs.
▪ It was easy to manage, but it felt like I'd lost a limb!
move
▪ Fig.15 During an Alexander Lesson, you may be asked to lie on a table while the teacher moves your limbs.
▪ But at least Baby Wiggles and Giggles has moving limbs and pretty blue eyes.
risk
▪ Villeneuve, who had collided with Ralf Schumacher, gets paid £10MILLION for risking life and limb in Formula One.
stretch
▪ Even twenty yards back they could not stand up, but they could crouch and stretch each limb in turn.
▪ They build up physical strength, stretching their limbs and testing their agility.
▪ Or stretch her limbs and laugh at the careworn ways of her elders?
▪ She moaned and her body stretched, her lower limbs pressing tight against him, his thigh filling her inner thighs.
tear
▪ I thought he was going to tear me limb from limb.
▪ They slew the gentle musician, tearing him limb from limb, and flung the severed head into the swift river Hebrus.
▪ Had she known, she'd have torn him limb from limb, bitten his sun-browned flesh till the blood flowed.
▪ Like the very first poet, Orpheus, torn limb from limb...
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
life and limb
▪ The array of rules and regulations dealing with transport and behaviour on the highway are concerned with protecting life and limb.
▪ The Malvern Hills Classic meeting ... now in its fourth year ... isn't all about risking life and limb though.
▪ This meant I didn't have to get risk life and limb to get a good close up shot.
▪ Villeneuve, who had collided with Ralf Schumacher, gets paid £10MILLION for risking life and limb in Formula One.
▪ We're talking serious grievous bodily here, maybe loss of life and limb.
tear sb limb from limb
▪ Garcia's opponents are angry enough to tear him limb from limb.
▪ Had she known, she'd have torn him limb from limb, bitten his sun-browned flesh till the blood flowed.
▪ I thought he was going to tear me limb from limb.
▪ They slew the gentle musician, tearing him limb from limb, and flung the severed head into the swift river Hebrus.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Hundreds of children have lost limbs after stepping on mines.
▪ The calf stood up slowly, with trembling limbs and took its first, uncertain steps.
▪ When babies are born they have very little control over their limbs.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Anyway, there's considerable loss of blood, massive lower limb and pelvic damage and some chest injuries.
▪ Even Jack felt a curious stiffening of the limbs.
▪ Here again, the descending limb of the loop of Henle in freely permeable to water but not to solute.
▪ My limbs fail, my mouth is parched, my hair is standing on end.
▪ Strength of limb, willingness of spirit-that would be sufficient.
▪ Their limbs moved in naked smoothness, shifting against each other, intertwining.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Limb

Limb \Limb\, v. t.

  1. To supply with limbs. [R.]
    --Milton.

  2. To dismember; to tear off the limbs of.

Limb

Limb \Limb\, n. [L. limbus border. Cf. Limbo, Limbus.] A border or edge, in certain special uses.

  1. (Bot.) The border or upper spreading part of a monopetalous corolla, or of a petal, or sepal; blade.

  2. (Astron.) The border or edge of the disk of a heavenly body, especially of the sun and moon.

  3. The graduated margin of an arc or circle, in an instrument for measuring angles.

Limb

Limb \Limb\ (l[i^]m), n. [OE. lim, AS. lim; akin to Icel. limr limb, lim branch of a tree, Sw. & Dan. lem limb; cf. also AS. li[eth], OHG. lid, gilid, G. glied, Goth. li[thorn]us. Cf. Lith, Limber.]

  1. A part of a tree which extends from the trunk and separates into branches and twigs; a large branch.

  2. An arm or a leg of a human being; a leg, arm, or wing of an animal.

    A second Hector for his grim aspect, And large proportion of his strong-knit limbs.
    --Shak.

  3. A thing or person regarded as a part or member of, or attachment to, something else.
    --Shak.

    That little limb of the devil has cheated the gallows.
    --Sir W. Scott.

  4. An elementary piece of the mechanism of a lock.

    Limb of the law, a lawyer or an officer of the law. [Colloq.]
    --Landor.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
limb

"part or member," Old English lim "limb, joint, main branch of a tree," from Proto-Germanic *limu- (cognates: Old Norse limr "limb," lim "small branch of a tree"), a variant of *liþu- (source of Old English liþ, Old Frisian lith, Old Norse liðr, Gothic liþus "a limb;" and with prefix ga-, source of German Glied "limb, member"), from PIE root *lei- "to bend, be movable, be nimble." The parasitic -b began to appear late 1500s for no etymological reason (perhaps by influence of limb (n.2)). In Old and Middle English, and until lately in dialects, it could mean "any visible body part."The lymmes of generacion were shewed manyfestly. [Caxton, "The subtyl historyes and fables of Esope, Auyan, Alfonce, and Poge," 1484]Hence, limb-lifter "fornicator" (1570s). To go out on a limb in figurative sense "enter a risky situation" is from 1897. Life and limb in reference to the body inclusively is from c.1200.

limb

late 14c., "edge of a quadrant or other instrument," from Latin limbus "border, hem, fringe, edge," of uncertain origin. Klein suggests cognate with Sanskrit lambate "hangs down," and English limp. But Tucker writes that "the sense appears to be that of something which twists, goes round, or binds ... not of something which hangs loose," and suggests cognates in Lithuanian linta "ribbon," Old Norse linnr "whether." Astronomical sense of "edge of the disk of a heavenly body" first attested 1670s.

Wiktionary
limb

Etymology 1 n. 1 A major appendage of human or animal, used for locomotion (such as an arm, leg or wing). 2 A branch of a tree. 3 (lb en archery) The part of the bow, from the handle to the tip. 4 (lb en botany) The border or upper spreading part of a monopetalous corolla, or of a petal or sepal; blade. 5 (lb en astronomy) The border or edge of the disk of a heavenly body, especially of the sun or moon. 6 The graduated margin of an arc or circle in an instrument for measuring angles. 7 An elementary piece of the mechanism of a lock. 8 A thing or person regarded as a part or member of, or attachment to, something else. vb. 1 To remove the limbs from an animal or tree. 2 To supply with limbs. Etymology 2

n. 1 (context astronomy English) The apparent visual edge of a celestial body. 2 (context on a measuring instrument English) The graduated edge of a circle or arc.

WordNet
limb
  1. n. one of the jointed appendages of an animal used for locomotion or grasping: arm; leg; wing; flipper

  2. any of the main branches arising from the trunk or a bough of a tree [syn: tree branch]

  3. (astronomy) the circumferential edge of the apparent disc of the sun or the moon or a planet

  4. either of the two halves of a bow from handle to tip; "the upper limb of the bow"

  5. the graduated arc that is attached to an instrument for measuring angles; "the limb of the sextant"

  6. any projection that is thought to resemble an arm; "the arm of the record player"; "an arm of the sea"; "a branch of the sewer" [syn: arm, branch]

Wikipedia
Limb (Foetus album)

Limb is a compilation album Foetus, released on May 15, 2009 by Ectopic Ents. Limb collects out-of-print and previously unreleased instrumental tracks from the early days of Foetus (Thirlwell's instrumental tracks would later be released under the names Steroid Maximus and Manorexia). Limb is packaged with a DVD featuring Clément Tuffreau's NYC Foetus documentary about Thirlwell's life in New York, along with several live performances of Thirlwell's ensembles and commissioned music.

Limb

Limb can refer to:

  • Limb (anatomy), an appendage of a human or animal
  • Limb Music, a record label
  • Limb, in astronomy, the apparent border or edge of the disk of a celestial body ( star, planet, etc.), as in lunar limb, limb darkening, atmospheric limb sounding, etc. See also: horizon.
  • Limb, a large or main branch of a tree
  • Limb, in a measuring instrument, the graduated edge of a circle or arc
  • Limb, in botany, the border or upper spreading part of a sympetallous corolla, or of a petal or sepal
  • Limbs, in archery, the upper and lower working parts of the bow, also see recurve bow
  • "Limbs", a song by Emma Pollock from her 2007 album Watch the Fireworks
  • Limb in law: a limb constitutes a ground for appeal, an argument
Limb (anatomy)

A limb (from the Old English lim), or extremity, is a jointed, or prehensile (as octopus arms or new world monkey tails), appendage of the human or other animal body. In the human body, the upper and lower limbs are commonly called the arms and the legs.

Most animals use limbs for locomotion, such as walking, running, or climbing. Some animals can use their front limbs (or upper limbs in humans) to carry and manipulate objects. Some animals can also use hind limbs for manipulation.

Human legs and feet are specialized for two-legged locomotion – most other mammals walk and run on all four limbs. Human arms are weaker, but very mobile allowing us to reach at a wide range of distances and angles, and end in specialized hands capable of grasping and fine manipulation of objects.

Usage examples of "limb".

Had scarce burst forth, when from afar The ministers of misrule sent, Seized upon Lionel, and bore His chained limbs to a dreary tower, In the midst of a city vast and wide.

And he saw her afar as leaves in the winds of autumn, and in winter as a star upon a hill, but a chain was upon his limbs.

Through the gnarled limbs Aganippe saw two great rounded folds of earth, with a dark cleft between them, topped by a tuft of trees and brush.

It breathed and blew bubbles and occasionally caressed an agate or two with its prehensile limbs.

If you got the power, or know somebody that does, you can be ageless, nearly immortal, just about never get sick, grow back lost limbs, even, under certain circumstances, be brought back from the dead.

Juss, enforcing his half frozen limbs to resume the ascent, beheld a sight of woe too terrible for the eye: a young man, helmed and graithed in dark iron, a black-a-moor with goggle-eyes and white teeth agrin, who held by the neck a fair young lady kneeling on her knees and clasping his as in supplication, and he most bloodily brandishing aloft his spear of six foot of length as minded to reave her of her life.

Apart from running miles all over the place, we had long periods of PT down on the rain-swept prom with the wind cutting in from the sea on I ALL THYNGS WISE AND WONDERFUL133 our goose-pimpled limbs.

Whether or not her concerns had been allayed, she set about her work without further delay, and in short order, a feeling of well-being suffused my limbs.

That seemed to satisfy Amir in some obscure manner and he kissed each of her knees then placed his mouth to the soft muscle inside each limb and fiercely suckled and bit, leaving a bold mark like a brand on each.

Most terrible of all were the octopoid creatures, reconjoined in a blasphemous, crawling chaos of tentacles, claws, human and amphibian limbs, human heads protruding like cancerous growths from their rubbery flesh.

Angell and Elsner in March, 1895, reported a case of anencephaly, or rather pseudencephaly, associated with double divergent strabismus and limbs in a state of constant spastic contraction.

Instantly armatures popped out from every direction, metal limbs swinging into place.

The guilty wretch was fastened to two trees forcibly drawn towards each other, and his limbs were torn asunder by their sudden separation.

He stirred his limbs in the thick, gold liquid, found that he had less mobility than an embryo, that his fingers had turned to fins, that his muscles had atrophied to weak rags, and that this pain was the true medium and placental fluid of the universe.

With the horned moon hooked round the topmost limb, And the owl awatch on the branch below, What is the song of the winds that blow Through your boughs so mysteriously?