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Crossword clues for jaw

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
jaw
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
fractured skull/jaw/rib etc
▪ She suffered a fractured skull in the accident.
Jaws of Life
set smile/teeth/jaw
▪ ‘Damn you,’ he said through set teeth.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
broken
▪ He was detained in Middlesbrough General Hospital with a broken jaw and lacerations.
▪ She had a broken jaw and cheekbone.
▪ He was knocked out in a brawl at a Hollywood restaurant, suffering a broken jaw and three shattered teeth.
▪ The older McNab fell to the ground with a broken jaw.
▪ He has a broken jaw and other facial injuries and is in the neurological ward of Middlesbrough General Hospital.
▪ Another badger has suffered a broken jaw.
▪ By 4 am Gary Humphreys was dead, having suffered a broken jaw and choked to death on his own blood.
low
▪ Mr Hallam was seen by a surgeon who found that his lower jaw was broken and he had damaged teeth.
▪ Rothman believes the muscle helps to lift the lower jaw and move it from side to side.
▪ For this species also, therefore, preferential destruction of upper and lower jaws is indicated.
▪ The lower jaw is easily unhinged and brought aboard.
▪ However, some skins had long side-burns terminating at the lower jaw.
▪ The other end attached to a bony spot on the mandible, or lower jaw.
▪ It has relatively large eyes and a small mouth, with small sharp teeth on both upper and lower jaws.
▪ Abscesses form classically under the lower jaw but can occur in other sites.
open
▪ He seemed about to hurl the weapon between her open jaws.
strong
▪ Most of the horned dinosaurs evolved even stronger jaw and biting muscles behind eye sockets.
upper
▪ For this species also, therefore, preferential destruction of upper and lower jaws is indicated.
▪ His four front teeth are through and two more in the upper jaw are pressing.
▪ It has relatively large eyes and a small mouth, with small sharp teeth on both upper and lower jaws.
▪ Both have small, numerous teeth in their upper and lower jaws.
▪ Their upper jaws become hooked and their teeth grow into long fangs.
▪ There are up to twenty-nine teeth in the upper jaw and twenty-five or twenty-six in the lower.
▪ As for the upper jaws, percentage incisor loss appears to be a more sensitive indicator of breakage than molar loss.
▪ You place your index finger against your chin and rest the upper jaw on the top of it.
■ NOUN
muscle
▪ Living reptiles have a skull like a rigid box, with a simple arrangement of jaw muscles.
▪ Mrs Popple lay on the bathroom floor, her jaw muscles having gone into spasms.
■ VERB
break
▪ Collins was benched last week, the result of a series of events that began in training camp with a broken jaw.
▪ A broken jaw to Javier Mejia created an opening in the rotation.
▪ He was reported to have also suffered cracked ribs and a broken jaw as a result of the difference of opinion.
▪ He would run around like a broken top with his jaws open, all the kids screaming as they scattered.
▪ Next Norman Bowler went down and also got embroiled, receiving a kick in the face that broke his jaw.
clench
▪ She slopped some of the egg mixture over the side of the bowl and clenched her jaw impatiently.
▪ Clinton clenched his jaw and stood silently beside the coffin as an honor guard handed him the folded flag.
▪ Now clench your jaw tight, then on an outward breath let it flop open.
▪ Some dancers were sucking lollipops to counteract the clenching of the jaws caused by amphetamines.
▪ I often clench my jaw. 9.
▪ He swallowed the bile and clenched his jaws until he thought his teeth would crack.
▪ He clenched his jaw as the pain barrier seemed to break with every passing second.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
clench your fists/teeth/jaw etc
▪ He clenched his fists and remained where he was.
▪ He clenched his fists even tighter.
▪ He clenched his fists in frustration and annoyance.
▪ He clenched his teeth together but the first syllable forced itself around the corner of his mouth.
▪ He clenched his teeth, pulled back his shoulders and began to stride up the road.
▪ I clenched my teeth, wondering what to do now.
▪ Papa clenched his fists and lips in the dark wood.
sb's jaw dropped
▪ Conley's jaw dropped, and she left without saying anything.
set your jaw
▪ Tom set his jaw and stared at the officer.
▪ Tom set his jaw, frowning, listening, and concentrating doggedly on his own life.
the Jaws of Life
the set of sb's face/jaw/shoulders etc
▪ He hated the set of different faces glaring up at him night after night.
▪ Her husband's brow furrowed as he noted the set of her face.
▪ Something in the set of his shoulders suggested that his pursuers were not far behind.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a strong jaw
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Did your jaw touch your hand?
▪ His jaw was clenched tightly, his eyes narrowed.
▪ His jaw was set and his eyes were narrow.
▪ In mid-scream, he was choked into silence by a hand that came over his face, forcing his jaw shut.
▪ She is young and she is beautiful, jaw jutting forth, hair swept back, eyes deep and direct.
▪ Tom set his jaw, frowning, listening, and concentrating doggedly on his own life.
II.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
the Jaws of Life
the set of sb's face/jaw/shoulders etc
▪ He hated the set of different faces glaring up at him night after night.
▪ Her husband's brow furrowed as he noted the set of her face.
▪ Something in the set of his shoulders suggested that his pursuers were not far behind.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Drago cleared the last three colours in the decider after McCulloch had jawed a straight forward blue.
▪ He scored 17 in the first half, jawing at Cooper after every basket like Reggie Miller did in Indiana last month.
▪ He went on jawing a while longer then returned to home plate.
▪ To gossip: to natter, to prattle, to chatter, to tittle-tattle, to jabber, to jaw.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Jaw

Jaw \Jaw\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Jawed; p. pr. & vb. n. Jawing.]

  1. To scold; to clamor. [Law]
    --Smollett.

  2. To talk idly, long-windedly, or without special purpose.

Jaw

Jaw \Jaw\ (j[add]), n. [A modification of chaw, formed under the influence of F. joue the cheek. See Chaw, Chew.]

  1. (Anat.)

    1. One of the bones, usually bearing teeth, which form the framework of the mouth.

    2. Hence, also, the bone itself with the teeth and covering.

    3. In the plural, the mouth.

  2. Fig.: Anything resembling the jaw of an animal in form or action; esp., pl., the mouth or way of entrance; as, the jaws of a pass; the jaws of darkness; the jaws of death.
    --Shak.

  3. (Mach.)

    1. A notch or opening.

    2. A notched or forked part, adapted for holding an object in place; as, the jaw of a railway-car pedestal. See Axle guard. (b) One of a pair of opposing parts which are movable towards or from each other, for grasping or crushing anything between them, as, the jaws of a vise, or the jaws of a stone-crushing machine.

  4. (Naut.) The inner end of a boom or gaff, hollowed in a half circle so as to move freely on a mast.

  5. Impudent or abusive talk. [Slang]
    --H. Kingsley.

    Syn: lip.

    Jaw bit (Railroad), a bar across the jaws of a pedestal underneath an axle box.

    Jaw breaker, a word difficult to pronounce. [Obs.]

    Jaw rope (Naut.), a rope which holds the jaws of a gaff to the mast.

    Jaw tooth, a molar or grinder; a back tooth.

Jaw

Jaw \Jaw\, v. t. To assail or abuse by scolding. [Law]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
jaw

late 14c., "the bones of the mouth," perhaps from Old French joue "cheek," from Gaulish *gauta "cheek," or perhaps a variant of Germanic words related to chew (q.v.); compare also jowl. Replaced Old English ceace, ceafl.

jaw

1610s, "to catch in the jaws, devour," from jaw (n.). In slang from 1748, "to gossip, to speak" 1810, "to scold." Related: Jawed; jawing. Hence 19c. U.S. slang jawsmith "talkative person" (1887).

Wiktionary
jaw

n. 1 One of the bones, usually bearing teeth, which form the framework of the mouth. 2 The part of the face below the mouth. 3 (context figuratively English) Anything resembling the jaw of an animal in form or action; especially plural, the mouth or way of entrance. 4 A notch or opening. 5 A notched or forked part, adapted for holding an object in place. 6 One of a pair of opposing parts which are movable towards or from each other, for grasping or crushing anything between them. 7 (context nautical English) The inner end of a boom or gaff, hollowed in a half circle so as to move freely on a mast. 8 (context slang dated English) Impudent or abusive talk. 9 (context slang English) axle guard. 10 (context snooker English) The curved part of the cushion#snooker marking the entry to the pocket. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To assail or abuse by scolding. 2 (context intransitive English) To scold; to clamor. 3 (context intransitive informal English) To talk; to converse. 4 (context snooker transitive intransitive English) (of a ball) To stick in the jaws of a pocket.

WordNet
jaw
  1. v. talk socially without exchanging too much information; "the men were sitting in the cafe and shooting the breeze" [syn: chew the fat, shoot the breeze, chat, confabulate, confab, chitchat, chatter, chaffer, natter, gossip, claver, visit]

  2. talk incessantly and tiresomely [syn: yack, yack away, rattle on, yap away]

  3. chew (food); "He jawed his bubble gum"; "Chew your food and don't swallow it!"; "The cows were masticating the grass" [syn: chew, masticate, manducate]

  4. censure severely or angrily; "The mother scolded the child for entering a stranger's car"; "The deputy ragged the Prime Minister"; "The customer dressed down the waiter for bringing cold soup" [syn: call on the carpet, rebuke, rag, trounce, reproof, lecture, reprimand, dress down, call down, scold, chide, berate, bawl out, remonstrate, chew out, chew up, have words, lambaste, lambast]

jaw
  1. n. the part of the skull of a vertebrate that frames the mouth and holds the teeth

  2. the bones of the skull that frame the mouth and serve to open it; the bones that hold the teeth

  3. holding device consisting of one or both of the opposing parts of a tool that close to hold an object [syn: jaws]

Wikipedia
Jaw

The jaw is any opposable articulated structure at the entrance of the mouth, typically used for grasping and manipulating food. The term jaws is also broadly applied to the whole of the structures constituting the vault of the mouth and serving to open and close it and is part of the body plan of most animals.

Usage examples of "jaw".

He urged her back against the closed door and kissed her neck, the bristle from his shaven jaw abrading her and making her skin tingle.

Though usually in such cases the growth is of an unbalanced or localized sort, as in acromegaly, where the bones of the hands or jaw become abnormally enlarged.

As the humans whipped around the outer edges of the dancing whirlpool, the afanc swam in quick lunges and ripped them free in its jaws.

Is there not something horrible in the look and sound of the word afanc, something connected with the opening and shutting of immense jaws, and the swallowing of writhing prey?

They were maras, a sort of agouti, a little larger than their congeners of tropical countries, regular American rabbits, with long ears, jaws armed on each side with five molars, which distinguish the agouti.

But Rae had lived through the inverted version of Alameda, and the closer she got to the old neighborhood, the tighter she clenched her jaw.

Ialdabaeoth burst from the alembic in a shattering of glass and a sulfurous stench, already the size of a bear and still growing as it reared up, fanged jaws agape.

Ray saw Keene set his jaw and knew what he was thinking: no one could mix grandiosity and arrogance like Fredrick Van Alman and, yes, sometimes you wanted to punch out his lights.

Keene set his jaw and knew what he was thinking: no one could mix grandiosity and arrogance like Fredrick Van Alman and, yes, sometimes you wanted to punch out his lights.

His bold cheekbones, aggressive nose, and strong jaw were as exotic, compelling, and mysterious to Amaryllis as the alien artifacts themselves.

I have been dutifull, and you so loving and kinde as to save me from the jaws of death, help me now to protect my honour, convey me hence, let me not live here to please his appetite, but cast me to some unknown place, where like an Anchoret I may live from all the World, and never more to see the face of Man, for in that name all horrour strikes my Senses, and makes my Soul like to some furious thing, so affrighted it hath been.

The Germans held stubbornly on to the jaws of the gap at Falaise and Argentan, and, giving priority to their armour, tried to extricate all that they could.

The articular and quadrate bones of her jaw were crushed, with additional comprehensive damage to the structure of the dentary plate.

And anyway, I was riled up by now so I jutted my jaw and stared at her, feeling faint because my heart was locked into atrial fibrillation.

As it tore down the autobahn toward Frankfurt, the bumping caused the heavy springs above the front wheels to retract slightly, crushing the small bulb between the jaws of the bomb trigger to fragments of glass.