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Crossword clues for feel

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
feel
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a feeling of anger
▪ He was overcome by a sudden feeling of anger against the people who had put him there.
a feeling of happiness
▪ Being by the ocean gave her a feeling of great happiness.
a feeling of joy
▪ A feeling of total joy swept over him.
a feeling of nausea
▪ Many women have feelings of nausea in early pregnancy.
a feeling/sense of gratitude
▪ She had a sudden feeling of gratitude towards him.
a feeling/sense of guilt (also guilt feelings)
▪ I had a permanent feeling of guilt that I didn't see Mum and Dad as often as I should.
a feeling/sense of nostalgia
▪ Did it give you a sense of nostalgia to see the play on Broadway again?
a feeling/sense of pity
▪ Annie experienced a sudden feeling of pity for the young man.
a lived-in look/feel
▪ The most fashionable jeans this winter have a lived-in look.
a sense/feeling of disappointment
▪ For days he couldn't get over his sense of deep disappointment.
a sense/feeling of doom
▪ Everyone in the business has a feeling of doom at the moment.
a sense/feeling of excitement
▪ He woke up that morning with a feeling of excitement.
a sense/feeling of importance (=a feeling that you are an important person)
▪ Sitting behind the big desk gave her a feeling of importance.
a sense/feeling of panic
▪ She looked out to sea with a rising sense of panic.
a sense/feeling of relief
▪ She was filled with an overwhelming sense of relief.
a sense/feeling of satisfaction
▪ performing such a difficult piece gave her a deep sense of satisfaction.
a sense/feeling of well-being
▪ A good meal promotes a feeling of well-being.
a strong feeling
▪ I have a lot of strong feelings on the issue.
a vague sense/feeling
▪ She had a vague feeling that she had let something important slip away.
be/feel enthusiastic
▪ The Irish are very enthusiastic about horse racing.
be/feel happy for sb
▪ What a wonderful opportunity! I’m so happy for you.
be/feel honour bound to do sth (=feel that you should do something, because it is morally right or your duty to do it)
▪ My father felt honour bound to help his sister.
check/feel sb's pulse
▪ The nurse left the room after checking the girl's pulse.
convey a feeling
▪ How could he convey his feelings for her?
feel a bond
▪ The people of the island feel a strong bond with each other.
feel a right/proper charlie (=feel very stupid)
feel a thrillwritten:
▪ I felt a thrill of anticipation as I waited for her train to arrive.
feel an effect (=notice it)
▪ Small companies will feel the effect of the recession first.
feel an obligation
▪ When his mother died, he felt an obligation to continue her work.
feel comfortable
▪ You’ll probably feel most comfortable wearing cotton clothes.
feel committed
▪ I never really felt committed to the job.
feel concern
▪ A lot of people felt some concern about the proposal.
feel confident
▪ He began to feel confident that Zaborski was only guessing.
feel depressed
▪ The boy said he was unhappy at school and felt depressed.
feel dizzy
▪ The heat and the champagne made him feel dizzy.
feel embarrassed
▪ I felt embarrassed that he had seen me cry.
feel fine
▪ I feel fine, really.
feel for a pulse (=try to find and check someone's pulse)
▪ I felt for a pulse, but I couldn't find one.
feel funny
▪ I always feel funny after a long car ride.
feel giddy
▪ Greg stared down from the seventh floor and began to feel giddy.
feel gratitude
▪ He felt a certain gratitude to Eleanor for giving him this idea.
feel guilt
▪ She didn’t feel any guilt; she had done nothing wrong.
feel hatred
▪ It was terrifying to know that someone could feel such hatred towards me.
feel ill
▪ I’ve been feeling ill since I woke up this morning.
feel important
▪ They carry guns because it makes them feel important.
feel inadequate
▪ The teacher made us feel inadequate and stupid if we made mistakes.
feel inferior
▪ Women are made to feel inferior by men's violence towards them.
feel jealousy
▪ He felt a lot of jealousy at the thought of her with Tony.
feel like crying
▪ I feel like crying every time I think about that day.
feel loyalty towards sb/sth
▪ Marco felt an intense loyalty to his native country.
feel lucky
▪ I feel so incredibly lucky to have had that experience.
feel nervous
▪ He looked at her for so long that she began to feel nervous.
feel nostalgia
▪ He didn't feel any nostalgia for his school days.
feel obliged to do sth (=feel that you have a duty to do something)
▪ Many parents feel obliged to pay for at least part of the wedding.
feel OK
▪ Do you feel OK now?
feel pain
▪ The dentist told me that I wouldn’t feel any pain.
feel panic
▪ He felt a mild panic.
feel pity (for sb)
▪ No one can look at these photographs and not feel pity.
feel queasy
▪ The sea got rougher, and I began to feel queasy.
feel relief
▪ I felt nothing but relief when it was over.
feel relieved
▪ She was tired, and felt relieved when they all decided to go.
feel resentment
▪ He felt resentment at the criticism.
feel safe
▪ She doesn’t feel safe in the house on her own.
feel satisfaction
▪ As she looked at what she had created, she felt a quiet satisfaction.
feel scared
▪ She was beginning to feel a bit scared.
feel secure
▪ Workers no longer feel secure about the future.
feel so inclined
▪ You can visit our chat rooms, if you feel so inclined.
feel sorry for yourself (=feel unhappy and pity yourself)
▪ It’s no good feeling sorry for yourself. It’s all your own fault.
feel special
▪ a teacher who made every child feel special
feel the impact of sth
▪ The industry has felt the impact of rising fuel prices.
feel unhappy
▪ After a while I didn’t feel quite so unhappy.
feel welcome
▪ I didn’t feel welcome in the club.
feel...alive
▪ It was the kind of morning when you wake up and feel really alive.
feel...confident
▪ I feel quite confident about the future.
feel...confident
▪ I feel much more confident about myself and my abilities these days.
feel/experience an emotion
▪ Seeing him with his new wife, she felt emotions that she did not want to feel again.
feel/experience joy
▪ He had never felt the joy of watching the seasons come and go.
feel...faint
▪ The heat made him feel quite faint.
feel...guilty
▪ I feel really guilty at forgetting her birthday again.
feel/have a sense of sth
▪ I felt a great sense of pride.
feel/have an urge
▪ I still sometimes feel an urge to have a cigarette.
feel/have/experience a sensation
▪ He felt a tingling sensation down his left side.
feeling all right
▪ Are you feeling all right?
feeling distinctly
▪ Paul was left feeling distinctly foolish.
feeling empty
▪ The divorce left him feeling empty and bitter.
feeling miserable
▪ I spent the weekend feeling miserable.
feeling the squeeze (=noticing the effects of a difficult financial situation)
▪ All manufacturers are feeling the squeeze .
feeling weak
▪ The illness left her feeling weak.
feeling...better
▪ I’m feeling much better, thank you.
feeling...blue
▪ I’ve been feeling kind of blue.
feeling...good
▪ Lyn’s not feeling too good today.
feeling...peckish
▪ She was feeling a bit peckish.
feeling...randy
▪ She was feeling very randy.
feel/look/sound offended
▪ Stella was beginning to feel a little offended.
feel...nostalgic
▪ Seeing those old school photographs has made me feel quite nostalgic.
feel/show/have compassion
▪ Did he feel any compassion for the victim of his crime?
feel/suffer from anxiety
▪ The child may feel anxiety about being away from home.
feel...well-disposed
▪ I did not feel particularly well-disposed towards him.
feel...well
▪ I don’t feel very well.
fellow feeling
▪ As an only child myself, I had a fellow feeling for Laura.
felt a glow of
▪ Sophie felt a glow of pride.
felt a kinship
▪ He felt a kinship with the only other American on the base.
felt compelled
▪ She felt compelled to resign because of the scandal.
felt elated
▪ He felt elated and mildly drunk.
felt happier
▪ I’ve never felt happier in my life.
felt hurt
▪ Rachel felt hurt and betrayed.
felt muzzy
▪ Juliet’s head felt muzzy, and she hoped she hadn’t a cold coming on.
felt proprietorial
▪ She felt proprietorial about the valley.
felt queasy
▪ Many Democrats felt queasy about the issue.
felt slighted
▪ Derek felt slighted when no one phoned him back.
felt so alone
▪ I cried like a child because I felt so alone.
felt stiff
▪ I never felt stiff after training until I was in my thirties.
felt...daunted
▪ He felt utterly daunted by the prospect of moving to another country.
felt...groggy
▪ I felt really groggy after 15 hours on the plane.
felt...grotty
▪ The next day I felt a bit grotty.
felt...insecure
▪ She felt lonely and insecure away from her family.
felt...naked
▪ Standing in front on his first day of teaching, Brad felt completely naked.
felt...nauseous
▪ I felt slightly nauseous.
felt...shiver
▪ She felt a shiver of apprehension.
funny feeling
▪ I had a funny feeling something was going to happen.
get/feel/be seasick
▪ Hal was seasick almost at once.
had...sinking feeling
▪ I had a sinking feeling inside as I realized I was going to fail yet again.
have/feel an impulse to
▪ Rosa had an impulse to tell Henry the truth.
have/feel no compunction about (doing) sth
▪ He had no compunction about interfering in her private affairs.
have/feel sympathy for sb
▪ It’s hard not to feel sympathy for the losing team.
have/feel/show etc nothing but contempt
▪ The public should have nothing but contempt for bad journalism.
I have a horrible feeling that
I have a horrible feeling that we’re going to miss the plane.
ill feeling
▪ ‘I’m sorry. No ill feeling?’ ‘None,’ she replied.
look/feel foolish
▪ He’d been made to look foolish.
look/feel your age (=look or feel as old as you really are)
▪ The singer is 46, but she doesn’t look her age at all.
▪ I keep getting aches in my legs and I’m starting to feel my age.
look/sound/feel bored
▪ Some of the students were starting to look bored.
look/sound/feel/taste/seem like
▪ The garden looked like a jungle.
▪ At last he felt like a real soldier.
make...feel welcome
▪ We try to make the new students feel welcome.
nagging feeling/doubt/suspicion etc
▪ There was still a nagging doubt in the back of her mind.
nasty feeling/suspicion
▪ I had a nasty feeling that a tragedy was going to happen.
sb can’t help feeling/thinking/wondering etc sth
▪ I can’t help feeling that there has been a mistake.
▪ I couldn’t help thinking about the past.
sense/feeling of inferiority
▪ He had a deep-rooted feeling of inferiority.
sense/feeling of unease
▪ As she neared the door, Amy felt a growing sense of unease.
▪ public unease about defence policy
share a feeling
▪ I know that many people do not share my feelings.
sound/taste/smell/feel etc great
▪ I worked out this morning and I feel great.
▪ You look great in that dress.
tingling feeling/sensation
▪ Graham felt a tingling sensation in his hand.
unconscious feeling/desire/need etc
▪ an unconscious need to be loved
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
better
▪ When they began to move the flow of blood came back to their stiffened limbs and they felt better.
▪ Young said it felt better on Monday, and he hoped to practice Thursday or Friday.
▪ When the giant dresser disappeared for ever I felt better still.
▪ I wanted to be so independent, but here I am waiting for some man to make me feel better about myself.
▪ We'd got some work behind us at last, and felt better for it.
▪ I guess if it makes you feel better, you should do it.
so
▪ Poor little thing, she would be feeling so lonely and frightened, and Jean's kind heart went out to her.
▪ But they also told these stories because they felt so disturbed by the alienation and hostility of some black students.
▪ I felt so cross with myself, so stupid for wearing a short skirt.
▪ I feel so overwhelmed with hopelessness.
▪ Sadness over mining deaths I FEEL so incredibly sad about the miners who died and were hurt at Wearmouth Colliery.
▪ I feel so fortunate to be back.
▪ Why did it have to make her feel so horrid and ashamed?
▪ Have you felt so proud to get at the meaning of poems?
still
▪ Nightmare wore off somewhat during the day, but still feel things have gone awry since the weekend.
▪ Seeing events from this perspective, I felt and still feel justified in defending Jack.
▪ I took her hand in mine and it was warm, and I felt still that strong persistent throb of life.
▪ He was a winner who still felt he could challenge the field each and every week.
▪ Then she tantalisingly hints at the bitterness she still feels towards his first wife.
▪ She could still feel the points in her throat where the Nina Thing's fingers had fastened.
▪ I still felt a hunger inside me.
■ NOUN
need
▪ By then he felt no need to take William Joyce with him.
▪ Why he felt the need to record these deaths he could not explain.
▪ Yet even when they are, we feel the need to justify them; which is where Rollin resorts to moral theory.
▪ Very briefly, closing her eyes, Kathy felt the need to cry.
▪ I feel the need for another fattening snack.
▪ Why did Joe Fogarty feel the need to protect Jack Diamond?
▪ Roughly half the children who are adopted feel an urgent need to discover their origins.
▪ They felt a desperate need for credible values and a personal spiritual center.
sense
▪ He felt a sense of guilt but at the same time knew he could never have spoken to her anyway.
▪ He feels, in a sense, betrayed.
▪ I feel strongly now the sense of other worlds, worlds which I will never know.
▪ For the first time in many years, maybe ever, he felt a sense of sureness about himself.
▪ Charles felt an uncomfortable sense of urgency.
▪ As a black woman, I want to feel a greater sense of control.
▪ Again he felt that sense of an unseen force, an intense will.
■ VERB
make
▪ It does mean we have to make extra effort to make visitors and newcomers feel welcome.
▪ Most important, their impact rests on how they made you feel about yourself.
▪ We may succumb to flattery because it makes us feel good.
▪ I laughed at how easily the man could make me feel like a fool.
▪ Somehow it made even him feel uncomfortable.
▪ Other questions have more to do with making the recipient feel safe than with medicine.
▪ People like feeling pity for people, it makes them feel lucky.
▪ The situation made me feel like an applicant who is absurdly unqualified for a job-or a felon appearing before a parole board.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(be/feel) like a fish out of water
▪ I felt like a fish out of water.
▪ In his first interview since the move, he still looks like a fish out of water.
I don't feel too hot/so hot/very hot
I know the feeling
▪ "She makes me so mad I could scream!" "I know the feeling."
a feeling for sth
▪ And yet he had a feeling for her.
▪ Blues singers do well in Ireland, as Celts have a feeling for Negro music.
▪ Fat Vince has a feeling for me also, I reckon.
▪ Firstly, look at a few maps of zodiacs already published to get a feeling for them.
▪ Individuals should enjoy themselves, but also keep a feeling for the collectivity.
▪ Rather we get a feeling for the differences in the island societies through encounters with restaurant owners.
▪ Singer's religion is also a feeling for the power of the community to censure and reject.
▪ You have a feeling for these people.
bad/ill feeling
▪ There have been bad feelings between area residents and police.
▪ Even though Amelia participated so little in school activities, she harbored no ill feelings toward Hyde Park.
▪ I figure there had to be some bad feeling.
▪ I got a very bad feeling as we pitched into the bathroom and-fumbled for the mouthwash.
▪ I have bad feelings for the smugglers, though.
▪ It's got bad feelings for me, this room.
▪ It was the start of bad feeling between the two.
▪ Jane Blasio harbors no ill feelings toward Hicks.
▪ There is no bad feeling between us.
be/feel at home
▪ As it was with Kip, Martinez seemed to be at home with himself.
▪ But it is here, at this Hillcrest hospital, where he feels at home.
▪ Edwin was the only one in the family who felt at home in Los Angeles and remained there.
▪ The g was less, and that made me feel at home.
▪ This immediate social environment is merely that in which he feels at home.
▪ With the politics of action too, I feel at home.
▪ Would she ever feel at home in this relentless, pitiless city?
be/feel bound to do sth
▪ Even as she felt bound to her family, she felt a childish need to rebel.
▪ If you were married to me I wouldn't expect you to be bound to the house all day, every day.
▪ It had been a solemn and impressive ceremony and, whatever my uncertainties, I felt bound to respond.
▪ Just as, in writing, I think little men should be bound to mere journeyman work...
▪ She seemed unwilling to acknowledge that this might not be wise and would be bound to cause her parents concern.
▪ Some human would be bound to see you.
▪ They would be bound to see such a use as virtual expropriation, without compensation.
be/feel conflicted (about sth)
be/feel constrained to do sth
▪ I feel constrained to tell the truth.
▪ Alternatively, the collective good is seen as paramount, and individual freedom must be constrained to achieve that collective good.
▪ Because they are unsure of their male identities, they feel constrained to prove them continually.
▪ Mr. Davis felt constrained to accept that such a case might be within the purview of the legislation.
▪ Republicans who used to back it because the president liked it will no longer feel constrained to do so.
▪ You could take Richard anywhere too but you would feel constrained to keep explaining he was a genius.
be/feel disinclined to do sth
▪ The President said that he was disinclined to send in American troops.
▪ He felt disinclined to argue while the calendar was there to remind him that he was down to his last twenty-five days.
be/feel hard done by
▪ Having played in the previous winning Eisenhower Trophy team with distinction I think he can feel hard done by.
▪ The idea of a passenger going without pudding and then leaving the aircraft feeling hard done by troubles them.
▪ Thomas felt hard done by, contested the will and lost.
▪ To any readers who feel hard done by or annoyed please accept my sincere apologies.
▪ You've every right to feel hard done by, so don't start thinking that you're being selfish.
be/feel honour bound to do sth
▪ Don't you tell him either, because he'd feel honour bound to do something about it.
be/feel in the mood (for sth)
be/feel inclined (to do sth)
▪ After reading this book, you might be inclined to think so.
▪ I would be inclined to add an external canister filter to your set-up, such as an Eheim 2215.
▪ I would be inclined to remove the odd fish, though.
▪ Still, when he makes a statement such as you refer to, I would be inclined to believe him.
▪ The faster the heart beats the more rapidly we may be inclined to breathe and the more oxygen we take in.
▪ The Fed chief implied the central bank might be inclined to wait until its March 20 meeting before taking such a step.
▪ We might be inclined to reject the arrangement because it seems unattractive and not what we want.
▪ We naturally feel inclined to reject these theories for that reason.
be/feel like a new man/woman
be/feel on top of the world
▪ In the spring of 1995, Astros first baseman Jeff Bagwell appeared to be on top of the world.
be/feel ready for sth
▪ Crews had to be ready for hostile fire from the ground.
▪ He seems to be ready for the more burdensome necessities of the job.
▪ I think he will be ready for a place in the 2003 World Cup... perhaps.
▪ It must be child development with this goal: that every child be ready for school when that child comes of age.
▪ Manufacture is now proceeding and the equipment will be ready for installation on Reactor 2 in May 1993.
▪ Novel No. 80 should be ready for publication soon.
▪ Pitching coach Dave Wallace said that Radinsky still has time to be ready for the season opener.
▪ The financial statement will be ready for the A.G.M. The donations from the general public show a decrease on previous years.
be/feel sorry for sb
▪ For a minute, she felt sorry for the girl.
▪ I just feel sorry for the ones who didn't make the team.
▪ A minute earlier he had been feeling sorry for the men who were still out on house-to-house questioning.
▪ He feels sorry for himself, torn between two jealousies.
▪ Nobody felt sorry for my sister.
▪ One feels sorry for the little ones in some circumstances and they nearly become like children - but not quite.
▪ They'd be sorry for me, they'd give me whisky and aspirins and send me to a psychiatrist.
▪ Watching him shuffle off to the press room, I felt sorry for poor Feels.
▪ Yet he made her feel sorry for Miss Lavant, a woman she'd hardly thought about before.
▪ Your problem is that every time a relationship goes bad, you feel sorry for yourself and become more of a loner.
be/feel/look like your old self
▪ After five months in the hospital, I'm feeling like my old self again.
be/feel/look/get cold
▪ Aren't you cold?
▪ Come inside before you get cold.
▪ But no, he decided, the boss was getting colder and colder and his voice quieter.
▪ He was getting cold, too.
▪ It was getting cold in the room.
▪ My chips will be cold by now.
▪ She felt cold and sick and wished she could crawl away and lie down.
▪ She was afraid his skin would be cold.
▪ Since we were making plans to camp at Mammoth, we expected it to be cold.
▪ Unfortunately he, the lover, had got cold feet at the last minute.
be/feel/seem etc disposed to do sth
▪ Congress has had a torrent of learned advice on this amendment, none of which it seems disposed to listen to.
▪ Ernest Conway had never felt disposed to adopt a conventional, benign, grandfatherly role.
▪ Gradually the talkative groups settled into a contented silence, but no one seemed disposed to go to sleep.
▪ Headteachers say governors come to school on special occasions but don't seem disposed to become involved more routinely in school affairs.
▪ James didn't seem disposed to take the hint.
▪ Seb's father was a large, comfortable-looking man who did not seem disposed to make a fuss.
▪ The brothers exchanged glances, neither saying a word, though they seemed disposed to.
▪ The very houses seemed disposed to pack up and take trips.
feel bad
▪ I feel bad about not going to Debbie's party, but I've just got too much to do.
▪ I feel bad about what I said. Things haven't been easy for either of us.
▪ I felt bad about not being able to come last night.
▪ I should have told Helen I was sorry. I feel really bad that I didn't.
▪ We had a long talk about it afterwards and I know she felt bad.
▪ Being with the nuns only made it feel worse.
▪ Continually feeling bad about how your body looks limits your self-esteem, which eventually undercuts your immune power.
▪ Do I feel bad, exploited, put down?
▪ I felt bad about David, whose roots are in labor.
▪ It's very ... I felt bad afterwards.
▪ That makes me feel bad because I don't want to go anywhere else.
▪ Turning the mirror over, I feel worse than before.
▪ Whenever I go to London I feel bad for Georgie.
feel free
▪ But she tells me she still does not feel free.
▪ Help him or her feel free to talk.
▪ How did you say you felt free for the first time in your life?
▪ I felt free in a new way.
▪ If not, feel free to discard them and draw your own.
▪ If you should wish to look inside the packet, before sending it, feel free to do so.
▪ So he felt free to go for broke.
▪ So how is it they feel free to ask those parallel questions of other people?
feel like/turn to jelly
feel lousy
▪ He had himself escaped, but, he said matter-of-factly, he had always felt lousy about the others.
▪ I feel lousy when I have some terrific game to review and there's no space on my hard drive for it.
▪ I was prepared to feel lousy and to continue to feel lousy.
▪ One time after a close loss, I told him I felt lousy and I didn't want to go shake hands.
▪ Will you spend the rest of the day feeling lousy?
feel peculiar/come over all peculiar
feel rotten
▪ I've felt rotten all day.
▪ If Rosa Lee felt like having a good time, or felt rotten, she would get high.
feel rough
▪ Don't get up if you're feeling rough - I'll bring you some breakfast in bed.
▪ Liz said she was feeling pretty rough yesterday -- I don't think she'll come to work today.
▪ A worn braid feels rough and is best cut away and the line joined by a blood knot.
▪ The altitude had suddenly hit her and she was feeling rough.
▪ The skin feels rough and dry like the bark of trees.
▪ We say this as readily as we say that they taste sweet, feel rough, or look red.
feel sick
▪ He developed a severe headache and felt very sick by day three.
▪ I felt sick after I ate all that candy.
▪ I had no urge to smoke when I was pregnant. It made me feel sick to my stomach.
▪ If you feel sick, there's the bowl, okay?
▪ We'd only been in the car two minutes when David said he felt sick.
▪ When I was pregnant, the smell of coffee made me feel sick to my stomach.
▪ He felt good and then felt sick about the way he had pissed him off on the phone like that.
▪ He is talking directly to us and we do feel sick.
▪ I feel sick, and we still have a few minutes left.
▪ I looked at the picture and felt sick.
▪ It smears my file, and I feel sick every time I look at it.
▪ Sometimes after I watch a match, I feel sick because of it.
▪ We crossed the street, I felt sick.
▪ When he heard the girls were dead he felt sick.
feel strange
▪ I left the debate feeling strange - I didn't know what to believe.
▪ But after one particularly long session of playing on it he began to feel strange.
▪ He says that he felt strange and fell on to the floor.
▪ I was tired and felt strange and lost in a faraway, disgusting place.
▪ It felt strange to be in possession of two hats.
▪ It felt strange to be in the schoolhouse at night.
▪ It must have felt strange for her not to head directly for the Loreto Convent at Entally.
▪ One reason Muriel felt strange in Atchison was that she had to be on her best behavior for her grandparents.
▪ When I first went in, it felt strange.
feel suffocated
▪ I felt suffocated living in the city.
▪ Although the gear had no contact with any of my breathing apparatus, I felt suffocated.
▪ His eyes seemed to have gathered more gold from somewhere ... Her heart tripped unevenly, and she felt suffocated.
▪ I felt suffocated and found it physically very difficult to breathe.
▪ I make you feel suffocated, do I, with my loving?
feel the pinch
▪ Local stores and businesses are beginning to feel the pinch from the economic crisis.
▪ Chichester was not the only Sussex town to feel the pinch of economic decay.
▪ He felt the pinch of depravity.
▪ In addition, parish priests were feeling the pinch through reduced income from alms and tithes.
▪ Meanwhile, with its future hanging in the balance, Fokker is starting to feel the pinch.
▪ Membership of the club has dwindled from 70 to 20 and its clear commuters are feeling the pinch.
▪ Schools in the poorest areas, already short of resources, are certainly feeling the pinch.
▪ Small businesses dependent on the government also are feeling the pinch.
feel your gorge rise
▪ Wendy and I felt our gorge rise, and simply could not eat.
feel/be beholden to sb
▪ Ludwig is beholden to the President, who gave him his job.
▪ I don't like to be beholden to anybody, I like to be my own boss.
▪ There was no longer any need for her to be beholden to Fen Marshall.
▪ Yet most judges I know are beholden to Power-by that I mean unalterably pledged to the dominant force of the system.
feel/be lost
▪ I'd be lost without all your help.
▪ Energy expressed in a passive way is lost for ever.
▪ I walked on and yet it was all new and different and I realized I was lost again.
▪ I was lost in a little ocean of fog.
▪ Many pilots will drift into other careers and be lost to the industry for good.
▪ Some will revel in having more time for themselves; others will feel lost.
▪ Sometimes, valuable time can be lost.
▪ The sickening feel of woollen gloves being pulled on to your hands and hitting and blunting your fingertips so touch was lost.
▪ To his bemusement there was no chill, or else the chill was lost on him.
feel/know sth in your bones
▪ I know nothing's ever going to happen - I can feel it in my bones.
▪ And he was innocent of murder; she felt it in her bones.
▪ He could feel it in his bones, and he knew he could trust the feeling.
▪ He felt sure in his bones that their man would try something tonight.
▪ I can feel it in my bones.
▪ She could feel it in her bones.
▪ Something was very wrong, she could feel it in her bones, but what was it?
▪ The fog horn started booming, a deep, thrilling vibration that Madame Astarti could feel resonate in her bones.
feel/look like a million bucks
feel/look like hell
▪ He looks like hell and sounds awful, but then, as he's the first to admit, he always did.
▪ In that case I would peak earlier and higher and then feel like hell for the rest of the day.
feel/look like shit
▪ I woke up with a hangover and felt like shit for the rest of the day.
▪ And it used to make me feel like shit to hear that.
▪ Everytime I am about to go to a cup match I imagine myself travelling back home feeling like shit.
▪ Here goes ... I expected to look like shit but this was ridiculous.
▪ I try to think of nice ways to comment on his appearance without saying he looks like shit.
▪ It's a terrible thing to be told that and then to do what the director says and it feels like shit.
▪ The school made you feel like shit.
▪ We really do look like shit.
▪ You looked like shit the other night.
gut reaction/feeling/instinct
▪ But my gut reaction was that, despite his reputation for being hot tempered, he was a friendly, likable child.
▪ For the ordinary viewer, logical argument gives way to his or her gut reactions and personal experience in responding to people.
▪ I have a gut feeling that the old partnerships between nature and culture have momentarily slipped out of our reach.
▪ It is more a gut feeling-a visceral distrust of foreigners.
▪ It was just a gut feeling, a sense of unease.
▪ Male speaker There's gut feeling amongst the officers on the ground that it may be drugs related.
▪ Personal reflections My gut reaction has always been against the placing of bolts, and I've never used them.
▪ We worked on gut feeling and it was very difficult to control and manage all the development work because of the technology involved.
have a sneaking feeling/suspicion/admiration
have a vague idea/feeling/recollection etc (that)
▪ I can remember nothing of them, but I have a vague feeling of having been well cared for.
have/get the feeling (that)
▪ As I contemplate the process of separation / individuation I may have feelings and sensations that I can not articulate.
▪ As soon as things are really good, I always have a feeling the rug is about to be pulled out from under me.
▪ But I have feeling in my hand back.
▪ Certainly, younger children show affection and have feelings of liking and disliking.
▪ I have a feeling he will win.
▪ I have a feeling that there is now more of my past life than my future.
▪ I have a feeling we may be wrong about the taxes.
▪ I have a feeling you won't need that radio.
look/feel awful
▪ You look awful - what's wrong?
▪ Every time we lose, I just feel awful inside.
▪ For all her cheerfulness it was painfully obvious that she was feeling awful.
▪ He took it away and tried to look normal but he felt awful.
▪ I felt awful, ill, all beaten up.
▪ In fact she felt awful, nauseous and light-headed and clammy.
▪ Oh, and did we mention the damn stuff looked awful, stunk and tasted lousy?
▪ The next morning I felt awful.
▪ Tom felt quite confident of his safety, but physically he felt awful.
look/feel etc like nothing on earth
look/feel ghastly
▪ Anders was already in his bunk, looking ghastly.
▪ If the old man had looked ill in the train, he looked ghastly now.
▪ Jacqui looked ghastly when she opened the door.
▪ She was sober now but she felt ghastly.
▪ They both looked ghastly white and tense.
look/feel like a million dollars/bucks
▪ I felt like a million dollars.
look/feel like death warmed up
look/feel small
▪ A stream that looked small on the map had grown to be about 15 feet across.
▪ Corrigan felt small beads of sweat run from his armpits down his sides.
▪ Darren, looking small and extremely disgruntled, was slumped in the front left-hand seat.
▪ It makes him feel small and worthless.
▪ No to make me look small, that's her object!
▪ Ruth felt small and insecure, as if she were a child again.
▪ She stood trembling, staring at the blank window, feeling smaller than a baby.
make sb feel at home
▪ He had done his best to make Harvey feel at home.
▪ It is our duty to make them feel at home here.
▪ Or some chum of Matt's put it there to make him feel at home.
▪ The g was less, and that made me feel at home.
▪ Tourists too can expect a right Royal welcome, for the traditional friendliness of the islanders makes everyone feel at home.
make your presence felt
▪ Bruce wasted little time making his presence felt by scoring in the first ten minutes of the game.
▪ A sense of urgency begins to make its presence felt.
▪ After two miles of road, and maybe the first blisters and unknown muscles making their presence felt, came the test!
▪ But Kiker quickly made his presence felt.
▪ Eva was more used to making her presence felt.
▪ In music, art, architecture, and so on, they make their presence felt.
▪ She was a very pretty girl and made her presence felt almost at once.
▪ Some ant cuckoo females make their presence felt in more dramatic fashion.
▪ There were also other things moving around and making their presence felt.
not be/feel themselves
not be/feel/seem herself
not be/feel/seem himself
▪ He had not felt himself a part of what governments decided.
▪ He had not felt himself bound by their rules - basically, he hadn't felt himself.
not feel/be myself
not seem/be/feel yourself
shade of meaning/opinion/feeling etc
▪ As a solo instrument following a melodic line, the violin can convey every imaginable shade of feeling.
▪ From a sociologist's point of view, work has shades of meaning which are individual to each of us.
▪ In this more tolerant environment several newspapers representing different shades of opinion have already sprung up, especially in the urban areas.
▪ It represented all shades of opinion, but it was dominated by Sukarno.
▪ There was in most works an allowance for shades of feeling and meaning, and for the existence of doubt.
▪ These two directions or shades of opinion are not necessarily as starkly polarised as may appear.
▪ To teach me to perceive the shades of beauty and the shades of meaning ....
the feeling is mutual
▪ Well, if Dave doesn't want to play with me, then the feeling is mutual.
the germ of an idea/theory/feeling etc
▪ It represents the germ of an idea which someday might explode into a national objective.
with feeling
▪ Baktiar spoke of Iran with deep feeling.
▪ I want you to sing it once more, this time with feeling.
▪ She writes with great feeling about the fate of the refugees, having been a refugee herself in the last year.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "The flowers look so real - I can't believe they're silk," she said, feeling the petals.
▪ Doctor Wright felt the baby's stomach, checking that it was not hard.
▪ He's feeling guilty for not writing her back.
▪ How does it feel to be home?
▪ I feel sorry for her.
▪ I feel that we're just beginning to make progress, and that it would be wrong to stop now.
▪ I felt a definite sense of danger and impending disaster.
▪ I felt like if I didn't speak up then, I would never do it.
▪ I felt someone was following me, but when I turned around, there was nobody there.
▪ I always felt I had the ability to become a reasonable actor.
▪ I don't really feel hungry yet.
▪ It felt great to be up in the mountains.
▪ It felt kind of weird being back in school.
▪ It is a common experience to feel that an author writes well without being able to say exactly why.
▪ Just feel this material - it's so soft!
▪ Liz's parents feel she isn't old enough to leave home.
▪ She felt okay last night, but she had a fever this morning.
▪ She felt that something else was going to happen and that it wouldn't be good.
▪ The clothes still feel slightly damp.
▪ The earthquake was felt as far south as Carpenteria.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And the increase in temperature will not be felt evenly.
▪ But the feeling of justice requires that the wrong be righted.
▪ I felt very proud of her and read her the letter.
▪ I think people felt we were aiming for this point, but we never had the opportunity to do it before.
▪ In a way, his presence will continue to be felt in the department even after he is gone.
▪ This Secretary of State does not feel the need to go through such a consultation process.
▪ This time the other customers do not feel hungry.
▪ To be sure, some investors feel the impact of a weaker yen on bonds may be limited.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
different
▪ We will concentrate on styling and giving them a different driving feel.
▪ The dough has a discernibly different feel about it when this transformation occurs.
▪ It had a different feel to it, a different look, a different smell.
▪ Does the dash have a different feel about it, different to the feel of speech marks?
good
▪ It had a good feel about it.
▪ I have a better feel for the offense.
▪ You can give them theory, you can give them a good feel for it, and work on the individual skills.
▪ They should have a good feel for the sector's long-term confidence.
▪ It is not comprehensive but gives you a good feel for each of its 196 entries.
real
▪ Here you get the real feel of the ocean.
▪ Just 100 yards from the seafront and you step back through the centuries, giving you a real feel of medieval life.
smooth
▪ It has a smooth, soft feel to the skin, is fully breathable, windproof and easy care.
▪ Under-fired glazes may be dull and do nor have a smooth glassy feel.
▪ Libby liked the smooth feel of the stems, the way they splintered.
soft
▪ It has a smooth, soft feel to the skin, is fully breathable, windproof and easy care.
▪ The soft, perished feel of the old washer which rubbed black on your fingers as you took it out of the tap.
▪ The soft, fine feel tells you this is pure lambswool, pure luxury.
▪ This has a nice soft feel to it.
■ VERB
get
▪ Walk around the Tor and on the footpaths of the surrounding levels to get a feel for this legend-full land.
▪ It was here that I first started to get a closer feel for what the military operations were.
▪ Experiment with the machine until you get the feel.
▪ Whenever possible I devoured local newspapers, trying to get a feel for the politics and social conditions of each place.
▪ Katharine concentrates on getting the feel of Benji, as they work in.
▪ Playing the game itself is lots of fun, once you get a feel for the actual shot settings.
▪ But this stage is vitally important for the researcher to get the feel of the situation.
give
▪ The demo has a five-minute time limit but gives you a precise feel for the game.
▪ You can give them theory, you can give them a good feel for it, and work on the individual skills.
▪ The master bedroom is equally charming with delicate lace draped across the archway to give an almost Eastern feel.
▪ It is not comprehensive but gives you a good feel for each of its 196 entries.
love
▪ He runs downhill, loving the feel of the air rushing past him.
▪ She loved the feel of his arm around her.
make
▪ The aim was to make Fong feel wanted.
▪ Alex had thought, You're throwing me away and trying to make yourself feel good about it.
▪ It makes me feel like the bars are clamped on the window.
▪ Did I want to seek publicity just to make myself feel better?
▪ It's silly to make yourself feel bad.
▪ There was something in the quality of his quiet, confiding tone that made her feel there was an intimacy between them.
▪ It is making the poor feel rich.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(be/feel) like a fish out of water
▪ I felt like a fish out of water.
▪ In his first interview since the move, he still looks like a fish out of water.
I don't feel too hot/so hot/very hot
be/feel at home
▪ As it was with Kip, Martinez seemed to be at home with himself.
▪ But it is here, at this Hillcrest hospital, where he feels at home.
▪ Edwin was the only one in the family who felt at home in Los Angeles and remained there.
▪ The g was less, and that made me feel at home.
▪ This immediate social environment is merely that in which he feels at home.
▪ With the politics of action too, I feel at home.
▪ Would she ever feel at home in this relentless, pitiless city?
be/feel bound to do sth
▪ Even as she felt bound to her family, she felt a childish need to rebel.
▪ If you were married to me I wouldn't expect you to be bound to the house all day, every day.
▪ It had been a solemn and impressive ceremony and, whatever my uncertainties, I felt bound to respond.
▪ Just as, in writing, I think little men should be bound to mere journeyman work...
▪ She seemed unwilling to acknowledge that this might not be wise and would be bound to cause her parents concern.
▪ Some human would be bound to see you.
▪ They would be bound to see such a use as virtual expropriation, without compensation.
be/feel called to do sth
▪ Back then, people believed they were called to the ministry.
▪ Father really felt he was called to preach by God.
▪ Paul and his helpers were called to be missionaries for Jesus Christ.
▪ Sandy felt called to do missionary work.
▪ But the most controversial is expected to be called to the witness stand.
▪ He said that the police would be called to investigate Dempsey and he would be out of a job.
▪ How many more outrageous examples of excess in political fund raising and spending do they need to be called to action?
▪ Managers who live in the hotel usually have regular work schedules, but they may be called to work at any time.
▪ Responsibility refers to the liability of a person to be called to account for his/her actions and results.
▪ The general meeting of the shareholders of the target company may be called to decide upon defence measures.
▪ We are praying that very ordinary people will be called to a very special task.
▪ Why, then, should lawyers be called to task for protecting the rights of the accused under the Constitution?
be/feel conflicted (about sth)
be/feel constrained to do sth
▪ I feel constrained to tell the truth.
▪ Alternatively, the collective good is seen as paramount, and individual freedom must be constrained to achieve that collective good.
▪ Because they are unsure of their male identities, they feel constrained to prove them continually.
▪ Mr. Davis felt constrained to accept that such a case might be within the purview of the legislation.
▪ Republicans who used to back it because the president liked it will no longer feel constrained to do so.
▪ You could take Richard anywhere too but you would feel constrained to keep explaining he was a genius.
be/feel disinclined to do sth
▪ The President said that he was disinclined to send in American troops.
▪ He felt disinclined to argue while the calendar was there to remind him that he was down to his last twenty-five days.
be/feel hard done by
▪ Having played in the previous winning Eisenhower Trophy team with distinction I think he can feel hard done by.
▪ The idea of a passenger going without pudding and then leaving the aircraft feeling hard done by troubles them.
▪ Thomas felt hard done by, contested the will and lost.
▪ To any readers who feel hard done by or annoyed please accept my sincere apologies.
▪ You've every right to feel hard done by, so don't start thinking that you're being selfish.
be/feel honour bound to do sth
▪ Don't you tell him either, because he'd feel honour bound to do something about it.
be/feel honoured (to do sth)
▪ But, of course, writing something into a constitution does not necessarily mean that it will be honoured in practice.
▪ Existing hardware support and service agreements will be honoured, it says.
▪ Going down now to a place where his certainties would finally be honoured.
▪ He doubted if his hatred of Dysart could even be honoured with the description of revenge.
▪ He, too. is convinced that a contract signed has to be honoured.
▪ In such cases the courts have said that the promise must be honoured.
▪ Individual boatmen should also be honoured through clubs nominating skippers for their ability to find fish and their helpfulness towards anglers.
▪ It should be remembered, and she should be honoured for it.
be/feel in the mood (for sth)
be/feel inclined (to do sth)
▪ After reading this book, you might be inclined to think so.
▪ I would be inclined to add an external canister filter to your set-up, such as an Eheim 2215.
▪ I would be inclined to remove the odd fish, though.
▪ Still, when he makes a statement such as you refer to, I would be inclined to believe him.
▪ The faster the heart beats the more rapidly we may be inclined to breathe and the more oxygen we take in.
▪ The Fed chief implied the central bank might be inclined to wait until its March 20 meeting before taking such a step.
▪ We might be inclined to reject the arrangement because it seems unattractive and not what we want.
▪ We naturally feel inclined to reject these theories for that reason.
be/feel left out
▪ The whole time I went to the youth group I felt completely left out.
▪ A man can feel left out during pregnancy.
▪ But some will be left out.
▪ Can it really be left out?
▪ Gwendolen McEwen had always felt left out when her schoolfriends went to see their grandparents, because she had none.
▪ Had we picked Emburey, I think Willis would have been the one to be left out.
▪ It was a testimonial to his personality that he could take his roots with him without making others feel left out.
▪ They tried to see she didn't feel left out but Jean is very shy and sensitive.
▪ Those waiting for Washington to successfully deal with these issues will be left out in the cold.
be/feel like a new man/woman
be/feel obligated
▪ A.. No, but they usually do because they feel obligated to follow the wishes of the caucus-goers.
▪ Do not feel obligated to drive faster than is comfortable for you just because others do.
▪ Doing something you feel obligated to do is not bad.
▪ I don't know how she put up with it but she said she felt obligated.
▪ You can make people follow you by scaring them, and you can make people follow by having them feel obligated.
be/feel on top of the world
▪ In the spring of 1995, Astros first baseman Jeff Bagwell appeared to be on top of the world.
be/feel ready for sth
▪ Crews had to be ready for hostile fire from the ground.
▪ He seems to be ready for the more burdensome necessities of the job.
▪ I think he will be ready for a place in the 2003 World Cup... perhaps.
▪ It must be child development with this goal: that every child be ready for school when that child comes of age.
▪ Manufacture is now proceeding and the equipment will be ready for installation on Reactor 2 in May 1993.
▪ Novel No. 80 should be ready for publication soon.
▪ Pitching coach Dave Wallace said that Radinsky still has time to be ready for the season opener.
▪ The financial statement will be ready for the A.G.M. The donations from the general public show a decrease on previous years.
be/feel sorry for sb
▪ For a minute, she felt sorry for the girl.
▪ I just feel sorry for the ones who didn't make the team.
▪ A minute earlier he had been feeling sorry for the men who were still out on house-to-house questioning.
▪ He feels sorry for himself, torn between two jealousies.
▪ Nobody felt sorry for my sister.
▪ One feels sorry for the little ones in some circumstances and they nearly become like children - but not quite.
▪ They'd be sorry for me, they'd give me whisky and aspirins and send me to a psychiatrist.
▪ Watching him shuffle off to the press room, I felt sorry for poor Feels.
▪ Yet he made her feel sorry for Miss Lavant, a woman she'd hardly thought about before.
▪ Your problem is that every time a relationship goes bad, you feel sorry for yourself and become more of a loner.
be/feel trapped
▪ At 31, Peggy feels trapped in a boring job.
▪ I felt trapped inside this person that was taking up more and more room.
▪ If they delayed any longer they'd be trapped.
▪ It means you could be trapped in the flat if fire breaks out.
▪ Many employees in bureaucratic governments feel trapped.
▪ She wanted to be gone, away from this turmoil of passion, and yet she felt trapped by a sensuality undreamed of.
▪ Someday he will probably be trapped.
▪ They would be trapped in sun and light enough crossing the great unwinking glare and oven breath on their journey home.
▪ Without it, I fear, I could be trapped in Tuzla.
be/feel/look like your old self
▪ After five months in the hospital, I'm feeling like my old self again.
be/feel/look/get cold
▪ Aren't you cold?
▪ Come inside before you get cold.
▪ But no, he decided, the boss was getting colder and colder and his voice quieter.
▪ He was getting cold, too.
▪ It was getting cold in the room.
▪ My chips will be cold by now.
▪ She felt cold and sick and wished she could crawl away and lie down.
▪ She was afraid his skin would be cold.
▪ Since we were making plans to camp at Mammoth, we expected it to be cold.
▪ Unfortunately he, the lover, had got cold feet at the last minute.
be/feel/seem etc disposed to do sth
▪ Congress has had a torrent of learned advice on this amendment, none of which it seems disposed to listen to.
▪ Ernest Conway had never felt disposed to adopt a conventional, benign, grandfatherly role.
▪ Gradually the talkative groups settled into a contented silence, but no one seemed disposed to go to sleep.
▪ Headteachers say governors come to school on special occasions but don't seem disposed to become involved more routinely in school affairs.
▪ James didn't seem disposed to take the hint.
▪ Seb's father was a large, comfortable-looking man who did not seem disposed to make a fuss.
▪ The brothers exchanged glances, neither saying a word, though they seemed disposed to.
▪ The very houses seemed disposed to pack up and take trips.
cop a feel
feel bad
▪ I feel bad about not going to Debbie's party, but I've just got too much to do.
▪ I feel bad about what I said. Things haven't been easy for either of us.
▪ I felt bad about not being able to come last night.
▪ I should have told Helen I was sorry. I feel really bad that I didn't.
▪ We had a long talk about it afterwards and I know she felt bad.
▪ Being with the nuns only made it feel worse.
▪ Continually feeling bad about how your body looks limits your self-esteem, which eventually undercuts your immune power.
▪ Do I feel bad, exploited, put down?
▪ I felt bad about David, whose roots are in labor.
▪ It's very ... I felt bad afterwards.
▪ That makes me feel bad because I don't want to go anywhere else.
▪ Turning the mirror over, I feel worse than before.
▪ Whenever I go to London I feel bad for Georgie.
feel boxed in
▪ Married for only six months, Dawn already felt boxed in.
feel cheated
▪ Many of the workers feel cheated by not getting their bonuses.
▪ But they do, and then feel cheated.
▪ Fear of litigation by shareholders who felt cheated quickly established this practice after some early abuses.
▪ If you do, your readers are likely to feel cheated.
▪ It revealed Docherty to be a witty, compulsive and outspoken man who feels cheated by the past.
▪ Magnanimously, I jumped in and offered to pay the discount difference so that my dining friend would not feel cheated.
▪ Nor is she the only one who feels cheated by Death Row.
▪ Sherman was relieved for a moment, but then he felt cheated.
feel free
▪ But she tells me she still does not feel free.
▪ Help him or her feel free to talk.
▪ How did you say you felt free for the first time in your life?
▪ I felt free in a new way.
▪ If not, feel free to discard them and draw your own.
▪ If you should wish to look inside the packet, before sending it, feel free to do so.
▪ So he felt free to go for broke.
▪ So how is it they feel free to ask those parallel questions of other people?
feel like/turn to jelly
feel lousy
▪ He had himself escaped, but, he said matter-of-factly, he had always felt lousy about the others.
▪ I feel lousy when I have some terrific game to review and there's no space on my hard drive for it.
▪ I was prepared to feel lousy and to continue to feel lousy.
▪ One time after a close loss, I told him I felt lousy and I didn't want to go shake hands.
▪ Will you spend the rest of the day feeling lousy?
feel peculiar/come over all peculiar
feel rotten
▪ I've felt rotten all day.
▪ If Rosa Lee felt like having a good time, or felt rotten, she would get high.
feel rough
▪ Don't get up if you're feeling rough - I'll bring you some breakfast in bed.
▪ Liz said she was feeling pretty rough yesterday -- I don't think she'll come to work today.
▪ A worn braid feels rough and is best cut away and the line joined by a blood knot.
▪ The altitude had suddenly hit her and she was feeling rough.
▪ The skin feels rough and dry like the bark of trees.
▪ We say this as readily as we say that they taste sweet, feel rough, or look red.
feel sick
▪ He developed a severe headache and felt very sick by day three.
▪ I felt sick after I ate all that candy.
▪ I had no urge to smoke when I was pregnant. It made me feel sick to my stomach.
▪ If you feel sick, there's the bowl, okay?
▪ We'd only been in the car two minutes when David said he felt sick.
▪ When I was pregnant, the smell of coffee made me feel sick to my stomach.
▪ He felt good and then felt sick about the way he had pissed him off on the phone like that.
▪ He is talking directly to us and we do feel sick.
▪ I feel sick, and we still have a few minutes left.
▪ I looked at the picture and felt sick.
▪ It smears my file, and I feel sick every time I look at it.
▪ Sometimes after I watch a match, I feel sick because of it.
▪ We crossed the street, I felt sick.
▪ When he heard the girls were dead he felt sick.
feel strange
▪ I left the debate feeling strange - I didn't know what to believe.
▪ But after one particularly long session of playing on it he began to feel strange.
▪ He says that he felt strange and fell on to the floor.
▪ I was tired and felt strange and lost in a faraway, disgusting place.
▪ It felt strange to be in possession of two hats.
▪ It felt strange to be in the schoolhouse at night.
▪ It must have felt strange for her not to head directly for the Loreto Convent at Entally.
▪ One reason Muriel felt strange in Atchison was that she had to be on her best behavior for her grandparents.
▪ When I first went in, it felt strange.
feel suffocated
▪ I felt suffocated living in the city.
▪ Although the gear had no contact with any of my breathing apparatus, I felt suffocated.
▪ His eyes seemed to have gathered more gold from somewhere ... Her heart tripped unevenly, and she felt suffocated.
▪ I felt suffocated and found it physically very difficult to breathe.
▪ I make you feel suffocated, do I, with my loving?
feel your gorge rise
▪ Wendy and I felt our gorge rise, and simply could not eat.
feel/be beholden to sb
▪ Ludwig is beholden to the President, who gave him his job.
▪ I don't like to be beholden to anybody, I like to be my own boss.
▪ There was no longer any need for her to be beholden to Fen Marshall.
▪ Yet most judges I know are beholden to Power-by that I mean unalterably pledged to the dominant force of the system.
feel/be lost
▪ I'd be lost without all your help.
▪ Energy expressed in a passive way is lost for ever.
▪ I walked on and yet it was all new and different and I realized I was lost again.
▪ I was lost in a little ocean of fog.
▪ Many pilots will drift into other careers and be lost to the industry for good.
▪ Some will revel in having more time for themselves; others will feel lost.
▪ Sometimes, valuable time can be lost.
▪ The sickening feel of woollen gloves being pulled on to your hands and hitting and blunting your fingertips so touch was lost.
▪ To his bemusement there was no chill, or else the chill was lost on him.
feel/be put out
▪ A very limited edition single was put out by Red Rhino, to promote the album it was actually unable to release.
▪ Could they not be put out to stud?
▪ I think it's understandable if Trevor was put out by this favoured treatment Sinatra got.
▪ Not surprisingly they take the easy way out when food is put out for them each day.
▪ That team was nowhere near as good as the sides Leeds are putting out now.
▪ The match was put out for new offers and Kasparov is due to make an announcement in London on March 22.
▪ There was no trust and everybody was putting out fires.
▪ When you are reacting, you are putting out fires.
feel/know sth in your bones
▪ I know nothing's ever going to happen - I can feel it in my bones.
▪ And he was innocent of murder; she felt it in her bones.
▪ He could feel it in his bones, and he knew he could trust the feeling.
▪ He felt sure in his bones that their man would try something tonight.
▪ I can feel it in my bones.
▪ She could feel it in her bones.
▪ Something was very wrong, she could feel it in her bones, but what was it?
▪ The fog horn started booming, a deep, thrilling vibration that Madame Astarti could feel resonate in her bones.
feel/look like a million bucks
feel/look like hell
▪ He looks like hell and sounds awful, but then, as he's the first to admit, he always did.
▪ In that case I would peak earlier and higher and then feel like hell for the rest of the day.
feel/look like shit
▪ I woke up with a hangover and felt like shit for the rest of the day.
▪ And it used to make me feel like shit to hear that.
▪ Everytime I am about to go to a cup match I imagine myself travelling back home feeling like shit.
▪ Here goes ... I expected to look like shit but this was ridiculous.
▪ I try to think of nice ways to comment on his appearance without saying he looks like shit.
▪ It's a terrible thing to be told that and then to do what the director says and it feels like shit.
▪ The school made you feel like shit.
▪ We really do look like shit.
▪ You looked like shit the other night.
have a sneaking feeling/suspicion/admiration
have a vague idea/feeling/recollection etc (that)
▪ I can remember nothing of them, but I have a vague feeling of having been well cared for.
look/feel awful
▪ You look awful - what's wrong?
▪ Every time we lose, I just feel awful inside.
▪ For all her cheerfulness it was painfully obvious that she was feeling awful.
▪ He took it away and tried to look normal but he felt awful.
▪ I felt awful, ill, all beaten up.
▪ In fact she felt awful, nauseous and light-headed and clammy.
▪ Oh, and did we mention the damn stuff looked awful, stunk and tasted lousy?
▪ The next morning I felt awful.
▪ Tom felt quite confident of his safety, but physically he felt awful.
look/feel etc like nothing on earth
look/feel ghastly
▪ Anders was already in his bunk, looking ghastly.
▪ If the old man had looked ill in the train, he looked ghastly now.
▪ Jacqui looked ghastly when she opened the door.
▪ She was sober now but she felt ghastly.
▪ They both looked ghastly white and tense.
look/feel like a million dollars/bucks
▪ I felt like a million dollars.
look/feel like death warmed up
look/feel small
▪ A stream that looked small on the map had grown to be about 15 feet across.
▪ Corrigan felt small beads of sweat run from his armpits down his sides.
▪ Darren, looking small and extremely disgruntled, was slumped in the front left-hand seat.
▪ It makes him feel small and worthless.
▪ No to make me look small, that's her object!
▪ Ruth felt small and insecure, as if she were a child again.
▪ She stood trembling, staring at the blank window, feeling smaller than a baby.
make sb feel at home
▪ He had done his best to make Harvey feel at home.
▪ It is our duty to make them feel at home here.
▪ Or some chum of Matt's put it there to make him feel at home.
▪ The g was less, and that made me feel at home.
▪ Tourists too can expect a right Royal welcome, for the traditional friendliness of the islanders makes everyone feel at home.
make your presence felt
▪ Bruce wasted little time making his presence felt by scoring in the first ten minutes of the game.
▪ A sense of urgency begins to make its presence felt.
▪ After two miles of road, and maybe the first blisters and unknown muscles making their presence felt, came the test!
▪ But Kiker quickly made his presence felt.
▪ Eva was more used to making her presence felt.
▪ In music, art, architecture, and so on, they make their presence felt.
▪ She was a very pretty girl and made her presence felt almost at once.
▪ Some ant cuckoo females make their presence felt in more dramatic fashion.
▪ There were also other things moving around and making their presence felt.
not be/feel themselves
not be/feel/seem herself
not be/feel/seem himself
▪ He had not felt himself a part of what governments decided.
▪ He had not felt himself bound by their rules - basically, he hadn't felt himself.
not feel/be myself
not seem/be/feel yourself
sb can be forgiven for thinking/believing/feeling etc sth
shade of meaning/opinion/feeling etc
▪ As a solo instrument following a melodic line, the violin can convey every imaginable shade of feeling.
▪ From a sociologist's point of view, work has shades of meaning which are individual to each of us.
▪ In this more tolerant environment several newspapers representing different shades of opinion have already sprung up, especially in the urban areas.
▪ It represented all shades of opinion, but it was dominated by Sukarno.
▪ There was in most works an allowance for shades of feeling and meaning, and for the existence of doubt.
▪ These two directions or shades of opinion are not necessarily as starkly polarised as may appear.
▪ To teach me to perceive the shades of beauty and the shades of meaning ....
sinking feeling
▪ And Dot had a sinking feeling because she realized she'd known all along even though she hadn't wanted to.
▪ And so we got on that old boat, and I had the worst sinking feeling.
▪ But the sight of pink carpe: and pink walls gave him a distinct sinking feeling.
▪ It was enough to give serious journalists a sinking feeling.
▪ People who lived through the Clinton impeachment are entitled to get a sinking feeling.
▪ Then, with a sinking feeling, I went to the caravan.
▪ Titanic job with a sinking feeling It's all in the red bag.
▪ With a sinking feeling, Katherine rearranged the items in her satchel.
the germ of an idea/theory/feeling etc
▪ It represents the germ of an idea which someday might explode into a national objective.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ I love the feel of leather.
▪ The car has a sporty feel to it.
▪ The movie has the feel of a big summer hit.
▪ The seats look good and have a sturdy feel.
▪ There was nothing Lucy liked more than the feel of fur against her skin.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ It has a smooth, soft feel to the skin, is fully breathable, windproof and easy care.
▪ Mostly through o-j-t, trial and error, gut feel, and mistakes.
▪ One of the rooms in Sivitsa's school has a science-fiction feel.
▪ She is a born golfer and one who, like Laura Davies, plays almost entirely by feel.
▪ The heavy feel is produced by the thickened rim.
▪ The keyboard had a mushy feel, which is characteristic of Toshibas.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Feel

Feel \Feel\ (f[=e]l), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Felt (f[e^]lt); p. pr. & vb. n. Feeling.] [AS. f[=e]lan; akin to OS. gif[=o]lian to perceive, D. voelen to feel, OHG. fuolen, G. f["u]hlen, Icel. f[=a]lma to grope, and prob. to AS. folm palm of the hand, L. palma. Cf. Fumble, Palm.]

  1. To perceive by the touch; to take cognizance of by means of the nerves of sensation distributed all over the body, especially by those of the skin; to have sensation excited by contact of (a thing) with the body or limbs.

    Who feel Those rods of scorpions and those whips of steel.
    --Creecn.

  2. To touch; to handle; to examine by touching; as, feel this piece of silk; hence, to make trial of; to test; often with out.

    Come near, . . . that I may feel thee, my son.
    --Gen. xxvii. 21.

    He hath this to feel my affection to your honor.
    --Shak.

  3. To perceive by the mind; to have a sense of; to experience; to be affected by; to be sensible of, or sensitive to; as, to feel pleasure; to feel pain.

    Teach me to feel another's woe.
    --Pope.

    Whoso keepeth the commandment shall feel no evil thing.
    --Eccl. viii. 5.

    He best can paint them who shall feel them most.
    --Pope.

    Mankind have felt their strength and made it felt.
    --Byron.

  4. To take internal cognizance of; to be conscious of; to have an inward persuasion of.

    For then, and not till then, he felt himself.
    --Shak.

  5. To perceive; to observe. [Obs.]
    --Chaucer.

    To feel the helm (Naut.), to obey it.

Feel

Feel \Feel\, v. i.

  1. To have perception by the touch, or by contact of anything with the nerves of sensation, especially those upon the surface of the body.

  2. To have the sensibilities moved or affected.

    [She] feels with the dignity of a Roman matron.
    --Burke.

    And mine as man, who feel for all mankind.
    --Pope.

  3. To be conscious of an inward impression, state of mind, persuasion, physical condition, etc.; to perceive one's self to be; -- followed by an adjective describing the state, etc.; as, to feel assured, grieved, persuaded.

    I then did feel full sick.
    --Shak.

  4. To know with feeling; to be conscious; hence, to know certainly or without misgiving.

    Garlands . . . which I feel I am not worthy yet to wear.
    --Shak.

  5. To appear to the touch; to give a perception; to produce an impression by the nerves of sensation; -- followed by an adjective describing the kind of sensation.

    Blind men say black feels rough, and white feels smooth.
    --Dryden.

    To feel after, to search for; to seek to find; to seek as a person groping in the dark. ``If haply they might feel after him, and find him.''
    --Acts xvii. 27.

    To feel of, to examine by touching.

Feel

Feel \Feel\, n.

  1. Feeling; perception. [R.]

    To intercept and have a more kindly feel of its genial warmth.
    --Hazlitt.

  2. A sensation communicated by touching; impression made upon one who touches or handles; as, this leather has a greasy feel.

    The difference between these two tumors will be distinguished by the feel.
    --S. Sharp.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
feel

early 13c., "sensation, understanding," from feel (v.). Meaning "action of feeling" is from mid-15c. That of "sensation produced (by an object, surface, etc.)" is from 1739. Slang sense of "a sexual grope" is from 1932; from verbal phrase to feel (someone) up (1930).

feel

Old English felan "to touch or have a sensory experience of; perceive, sense (something)," in late Old English "have a mental perception," from Proto-Germanic *foljan (cognates: Old Saxon gifolian, Old Frisian fela, Dutch voelen, Old High German vuolen, German fühlen "to feel," Old Norse falma "to grope"), from PIE root *pal- "to touch, feel, shake, strike softly" (cognates: Greek psallein "to pluck (the harp)," Latin palpare "to touch softly, stroke," palpitare "to move quickly"), perhaps ultimately imitative.\n

\nThe meaning in Old English was "to perceive through senses which are not referred to any special organ." Sense of "be conscious of a tactile sensation, sense pain, pleasure, illness, etc.; have an emotional experience or reaction," developed by c.1200, also "have an opinion or conviction;" that of "to react with sympathy or compassion" is from mid-14c. Meaning "to try by touch" is from early 14c. From late 14c. as "know (something) beforehand, to have foreknowledge of." To feel like "want to" attested from 1829.

Wiktionary
feel

Etymology 1 n. 1 A quality of an object experienced by touch. 2 A vague mental impression. 3 An act of fondle. 4 A vague understanding. 5 An intuitive ability. 6 Alternative form of feeling. vb. 1 (lb en heading) ''To use the sense of touch.'' 2 # (lb en transitive copulative) To become aware of through the skin; to use the sense of touch on. 3 # (lb en transitive) To find one's way (literally or figuratively) by touching or using cautious movements. 4 # (lb en intransitive) To receive information by touch or by any neurons other than those responsible for sight, smell, taste, or hearing. 5 # (lb en intransitive) To search by sense of touch. 6 (lb en heading) ''To sense or think emotionally or judgmentally.'' 7 # (lb en transitive) To experience an emotion or other mental state about. Etymology 2

  1. (alternative form of fele English) adv. (alternative form of fele English) pron. (context dialectal or obsolete) (alternative form of fele English)

WordNet
feel
  1. n. an intuitive awareness; "he has a feel for animals" or "it's easy when you get the feel of it";

  2. the general atmosphere of a place or situation and the effect that it has on people; "the feel of the city excited him"; "a clergyman improved the tone of the meeting"; "it had the smell of treason" [syn: spirit, tone, feeling, flavor, flavour, look, smell]

  3. a property perceived by touch [syn: tactile property]

  4. manual-genital stimulation for sexual pleasure; "the girls hated it when he tried to sneak a feel"

  5. [also: felt]

feel
  1. v. undergo an emotional sensation; "She felt resentful"; "He felt regret" [syn: experience]

  2. come to believe on the basis of emotion, intuitions, or indefinite grounds; "I feel that he doesn't like me"; "I find him to be obnoxious"; "I found the movie rather entertaining" [syn: find]

  3. perceive by a physical sensation, e.g., coming from the skin or muscles; "He felt the wind"; "She felt an object brushing her arm"; "He felt his flesh crawl"; "She felt the heat when she got out of the car" [syn: sense]

  4. seem with respect to a given sensation given; "My cold is gone--I feel fine today"; "She felt tired after the long hike"

  5. have a feeling or perception about oneself in reaction to someone's behavior or attitude; "She felt small and insignificant"; "You make me feel naked"; "I made the students feel different about themselves"

  6. undergo passive experience of:"We felt the effects of inflation"; "her fingers felt their way through the string quartet"; "she felt his contempt of her"

  7. be felt or perceived in a certain way; "The ground feels shaky"; "The sheets feel soft"

  8. grope or feel in search of something; "He felt for his wallet"

  9. examine by touch; "Feel this soft cloth!"; "The customer fingered the sweater" [syn: finger]

  10. examine (a body part) by palpation; "The nurse palpated the patient's stomach"; "The runner felt her pulse" [syn: palpate]

  11. find by testing or cautious exploration; "He felt his way around the dark room"

  12. produce a certain impression; "It feels nice to be home again"

  13. pass one's hands over the sexual organs of; "He felt the girl in the movie theater"

  14. [also: felt]

Wikipedia
Feel (Robbie Williams song)

"Feel" is a song by British singer-songwriter Robbie Williams. It was released on December 2, 2002 as the lead single from his fifth studio album, Escapology. The song became an international hit, reaching the top of the charts in Austria, Poland, Germany, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, and top five positions in countries such as Denmark, Ireland and the United Kingdom.

Feel (Kumi Koda song)

"Feel" (stylized as feel) is a smooth R&B song by Japanese singer and songwriter Kumi Koda. For the song, she worked closely with composer Hitoshi Shimono, who had composed the instrumental. The single is Kumi's sixth single in her 12 Singles Collection and charted at #1 on Oricon with 39,110 copies sold within the first week. As with some of the other singles released in the collection, feel was limited to 50,000 copies.

Feel

Feel may refer to:

  • Feeling
Feel (company)

, stylized as feel. is a Japanese based company established by ex- Studio Pierrot staff that specializes in the production of anime.

Feel (Human Drama album)

Feel is an album by Human Drama, released by RCA Records in 1989.

Feel (Glenn Hughes album)

Feel is a studio album by former Deep Purple, Black Sabbath and Trapeze vocalist/ bassist Glenn Hughes. It was released in 1995 on Zero Corporation and SPV records and was Hughes’ fourth solo studio album.

Feel (Polish band)

Feel is a Polish band which was formed in Katowice ( Upper Silesia) in 2005. Originally called 'Q2', the band later adopted 'Kupicha Band' as its name and then finally 'Feel'.

The group released its debut album 'Feel' on November 26, 2007. Up to now their biggest success is winning the Bursztynowy Słowik (main award) as well as the People's Choice award at the 2007 Sopot International Song Festival with pop stars like Emmanuel Moire, Sophie Ellis-Bextor, Monrose, The Cloud Room, Thierry Amiel and September also in contention. The group enjoys great popularity in Poland, with both singles released so far achieving tremendous success, to the bewilderment of many independent music critics.

Their biggest hit, well known throughout the country, is called A gdy jest już ciemno "And When the Dusk Comes". Other popular songs include No Pokaż Na Co Cię Stać ("Show Me What You Can Do"), Jak Anioła Głos ("Like an Angel's Voice"), Pokonaj Siebie ("Defeat Yourself"), W Odpowiedzi na Twój List ("In Reply To Your Letter") and Pokaż Mi Niebo ("Show Me The Sky")

The band covered the 1993 song by The Beloved, " Sweet Harmony".

Feel (Nagisa Ni te album)

Feel is the third studio album by Japanese psychedelic-folk rock duo Nagisa ni te. It was released in 2002 by Org Records. In 2002, P-Vine Records re-released this album followed by Jagjaguwar in 2002 for North American/European distribution.

Characterized by a very clear production sound, Feel can be regarded as one of their most acoustic. After Geographic's Songs for a Simple Moment compilation, Feel is among their first studio releases to have a western distribution.

Feel (Feel album)

Feel is first album released by a Polish pop rock band Feel. The album has earned Diamond certification in Poland.

Feel (George Duke album)

Feel is the seventh album of George Duke. This album was released by BasfMPS on October 28, 1974. George Duke began experimenting with synthesizer orchestration on this album, which is considered the beginning of his unique style. This album is further characterized by the contributions of Kerry McNabb, Flora Purim and Frank Zappa.

Feel (New York band)

Feel was a New York City-based studio urban-oriented dance-pop band, active between 1982 and 1983. Originally consisted of Players Association arrangers and music producers Chris Hills and Danny Weiss, while vocals were provided by Gail Freeman. Freeman later released two singles titled "Mr. Right" (in 1985) and "Danger In The Airwaves" (in 1989). Freeman also played clavinet on Aurra's album Live and Let Live.

Feel's first record was "I'd Like To", released by Sutra Records in the United States and by Buddah Records in United Kingdom. The single reached number 53 on the Billboard Top Dance Singles chart and also was chosen into Top Single Picks, a list of recommended recordings published by Billboard. "I'd Like To" was then followed by "Let's Rock (Over & Over Again)", which was released in the same year by the same label and managed to reach #58 on the Black Singles chart. Their next record "Got To Have Your Lovin'" released in 1983 was a change to electropop sound, yet without receiving any commercial success.

Feel (Sleeping with Sirens album)

Feel is the third studio album by American post-hardcore band Sleeping with Sirens. The album was released on June 4, 2013. The first single, "Low", was released on April 23, 2013. The second single, "Alone", featuring rapper MGK, was released on May 21, 2013. The album also features guest appearances by Fronz ( Attila), Matty Mullins ( Memphis May Fire) and Shayley Bourget ( Dayshell, ex- Of Mice & Men). The entire album was produced by Cameron Mizell who had produced their debut album. On May 26, 2013 the entire album was streamed on the Rise Records YouTube channel.

The album debuted at number 3 on the US Billboard 200 chart, selling around 60,000 copies in its first week, making the album one of the highest charting post-hardcore albums of all time. It has sold 180,000 copies in the US as of March 2015. The album also debuted at number 36 on UK Albums Chart and number 14 on Australian Albums Chart. It is the final album to feature rhythm guitarist Jesse Lawson after his departure from the band later in 2013.

Feel (Namie Amuro album)

Feel (stylized as FEEL) is the eleventh studio album and second bilingual album by Japanese recording artist Namie Amuro, released by Dimension Point through Avex Trax on July 10, 2013. After launching Dimension Point in early 2013, Amuro recorded new material with both Japanese and International producers and songwriters in both Japan and Los Angeles, California. The album is predominantly a pop music album which orientates into house, disco, rave and other various electronic dance music elements. The album's lyrical content regards love, partying, relationships, self-empowerment and courage. Amuro promoted the album with her Namie Amuro Feel 2013 concert tour.

The album received generally favourable reviews from contemporary music critics, many of whom commended Amuro's progression with international producers, and their production work on the album, alongside the composition and fluidity. However, some critics had criticized Amuro's incomprehensible English pronunciation. Feel became Amuro's eighth number one album on the Japanese Oricon Albums Chart and was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of Japan (RIAJ) for shipments of 250,000 units, and sold over 400,000 units in total. The album also charted in South Korea and Taiwan at twenty-five and six, respectively. Feel finished at number six on the Best Selling Albums of 2013 in Japan.

Feel spawned one physical single and three digital singles. Released in March 2013, the physical single " Big Boys Cry/Beautiful" reached number four on the Japanese Oricon Singles Chart but has resulted as her lowest-selling single to date. The three digital singles; " Contrail", "Hands on Me", and " Heaven" all charted on the Japan Hot 100 chart, their component charts, and the first was certified platinum by RIAJ for digital sales of 250,000 units.

Usage examples of "feel".

Hutchinson has little leisure for much praise of the natural beauty of sky and landscape, but now and then in her work there appears an abiding sense of the pleasantness of the rural world--in her day an implicit feeling rather than an explicit.

His telepathic ability is almost nil, but he feels the surges of energy.

Now that the words were out and there was no abjuration possible, she felt as if her bones were made of sand.

I felt it advisable to keep my mind wholesomely occupied, for it would not do to brood over the abnormalities of this ancient, blight-shadowed town while I was still within its borders.

The abomination of it all, the vengeance of destiny which exacted this sacrilege, filled her with such a feeling of revolt that at the moment when vertigo was about to seize her and the flooring began to flee from beneath her feet, she was lashed by it and kept erect.

Then all the satisfaction she had derived from what she had heard Madame Bourdieu say departed, and she went off furious and ashamed, as if soiled and threatened by all the vague abominations which she had for some time felt around her, without knowing, however, whence came the little chill which made her shudder as with dread.

I used to feel so sorry for these Aboriginal people, I wondered how they could come to be so poor.

A period of wandering as a nomad, often as undertaken by Aborigines who feel the need to leave the place where they are in contact with white society, and return for spiritul replenishment to their traditional way of life.

He could feel the points abrading his skin and saw stars for a moment behind his closed lids.

She grasped his shoulders then, moving her legs, reveling in the abrasive feel of his hair roughened skin against the softness of her thighs.

Beyond, the woods and hills of the tiny world appeared to drop with an increasing, breath-taking abruptness, so that he felt as if he were perched insecurely on the top of a great green ball, afloat in a chasm of starry purple-blue.

Before he could abscond to the police station, Farrokh felt obliged to set a trap for Mr Garg.

The Republicans had made a good showing in 1972, aided by the Nixon landslide, and they felt that if they could get enough absentee ballots thrown out, they might reverse the results of the local elections.

He felt in no mood for conversation, and as he sipped his absinth he let his mind run rather sorrowfully over the past few weeks of his life.

As such minute doses of the salts of ammonia affect the leaves, we may feel almost sure that Drosera absorbs and profits by the amount, though small, which is present in rainwater, in the same manner as other plants absorb these same salts by their roots.