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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
feat
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
an impossible feat (=something that is impossible to do)
▪ She achieved the seemingly impossible feat of breaking the world record.
remarkable feat/achievement/accomplishment
▪ It’s a remarkable achievement for the company.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
considerable
▪ He achieved the very considerable feat of isolating a material, demonstrating its purity and getting an analysis of the elements present.
▪ At one level this has enabled him to achieve the considerable feat of maintaining reasonably stable government for more than twenty years.
▪ It is a considerable feat to have condensed 150 years of complex history into some hundred readable pages.
difficult
▪ But, to my mind, Colin Watson brings off almost every time the difficult feat he attempts.
▪ He proved how difficult this feat is by failing to repeat it at the second time of asking.
▪ That way, says Denis, you can achieve the sometimes difficult feat of appearing interested in what is being said.
extraordinary
▪ An extraordinary feat of biological engineering.
▪ That was an extraordinary feat of bravery.
▪ Not one hospital, school or daycare centre closed-a formidable testament to an extraordinary feat of economic juggling.
▪ Athletes, it seems, also appropriate this knowing to accomplish extraordinary feats.
▪ The contest is an extraordinary feat of wrestling.
▪ The sports literature suggests that a few individuals who are able to perform extraordinary feats view reality in this way.
great
▪ Crawford was still in camp during the 1918 season, and was able to perform great feats for Wellington.
▪ One more great feat of arms he did before his fighting ended for ever.
▪ It represents one of man's great architectural feats and was technically a major step forward.
▪ None the less, great feats of mental gymnastics were per-formed to make them into atmospheric phenomena.
▪ Dry warm days and long light evenings drive on the smallholder to even greater feats of energy and determination.
▪ He thought it a great feat that she had got in from the Point in an hour and a quarter.
impossible
▪ He considered it an impossible feat, tantamount to asking for eighteen miracles in a row.
▪ There were more impossible feats waiting to be performed at Niagara than at any other place on the continent.
incredible
▪ Stale soul purifier Souls, like bodies and minds, are capable of incredible feats of endurance.
▪ It was an incredible feat of engineering, dug by hand.
▪ It would be an incredible feat for a side built from unsung players.
▪ He attempted to envisage and explain the incredible feat of navigation undertaken by Captain Bligh after the Mutiny.
▪ It's an exciting life by any standards and this description of Watson's incredible feats certainly makes exciting reading.
major
▪ Simply staying on a 500 is a major feat.
▪ The following day is filled with fatigue and irritability, and just making it through the workday is a major feat.
▪ Just getting away from the madding crowd proves to be a major feat on the most crowded island on Earth.
▪ The court sits next to the family garden, where a rock commemorates a major Ferry athletic feat.
mean
▪ On Tuesday Invergordon Distillers reported a marginal improvement in underlying profits, no mean feat given the difficulties facing the whisky sector.
▪ Given that there are some 20,000 such fastenings in a boat of this size, this is no mean feat.
▪ This is no mean feat as the statute has 108 sections divided into 12 separate parts, together with 15 schedules.
▪ Was only beaten once by Tilson and given the game Tillo was having that is no mean feat.
▪ The discovery of an effect with such a long latent period was no mean feat of epidemiology.
remarkable
▪ Just such a remarkable feat happened two years running in 1928 and 1929, with Tipperary Tim and Gregalach respectively.
▪ How do babies accomplish such a remarkable feat?
▪ The mounting and supply of the expedition was a remarkable feat.
▪ But it is a remarkable feat of alchemy indeed.
▪ This remarkable feat of arms is largely unrecognised.
▪ For a leading Democrat to chastise his own party at its own nominating convention was a remarkable political feat.
▪ I had achieved the remarkable feat of uniting the two factions at the party in mockery of me.
▪ I was capable of holding watch for most of a day without the slightest trembling or consciousness of my remarkable feat.
small
▪ No small feat and something quite alien to ourselves, difficult to imagine.
■ VERB
accomplish
▪ Now you reset the glasses and invite others to accomplish your feat.
▪ How do babies accomplish such a remarkable feat?
▪ Ian Wilmut, of the Roslin Institute, near Edinburgh, has already accomplished this feat in his second cloned sheep.
▪ The lucky boy accomplished the feat, and caught the evil, greedy king in a curse at the same time.
▪ How can they accomplish this feat?
▪ He collected the $ 25, 000 prize Raymond Orteig had put up for anyone who could accomplish the astounding feat.
▪ Athletes, it seems, also appropriate this knowing to accomplish extraordinary feats.
achieve
▪ He achieved the very considerable feat of isolating a material, demonstrating its purity and getting an analysis of the elements present.
▪ He could become the first Buck to achieve the statistical feat for the season since Kareem Abdul-Jabbar did it in 1974-75.
▪ Givaudon achieved his feat simply by soaking the growing shoots of plants in colchicine.
▪ Powell achieved a similar feat, but then resigned.
▪ That way, says Denis, you can achieve the sometimes difficult feat of appearing interested in what is being said.
▪ At one level this has enabled him to achieve the considerable feat of maintaining reasonably stable government for more than twenty years.
▪ I had achieved the remarkable feat of uniting the two factions at the party in mockery of me.
perform
▪ Crawford was still in camp during the 1918 season, and was able to perform great feats for Wellington.
▪ The traders performed astonishing feats of gluttony never before seen at Salomon.
▪ After all, here was a company that had just performed unparalleled feats.
▪ The sports literature suggests that a few individuals who are able to perform extraordinary feats view reality in this way.
▪ In 1882 and in 1883 he performed the feat of taking the half-mile, one-mile, four-mile, and ten-mile championships.
▪ Latterly Dad had sobered much when he was no longer able to perform his old feats of strength and daring.
▪ How they perform such amazing navigational feats is unknown.
▪ And it may perform this stupendous reproductive feat annually for thirty or forty years.
repeat
▪ Thornaby skipper Mike Priestley will be hoping he can repeat that feat for him a few times this season.
▪ The Kings have won back-to-back games only four times this season and had gone 20 games without repeating the feat.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
no mean feat/achievement/task etc
▪ But that was no mean achievement.
▪ For an immigrant boy this marital alliance was no mean achievement.
▪ Given that there are some 20,000 such fastenings in a boat of this size, this is no mean feat.
▪ In particular the notion that nurse training is for the young and for women only must be dispelled; no mean task.
▪ In this case it was no mean task.
▪ On Tuesday Invergordon Distillers reported a marginal improvement in underlying profits, no mean feat given the difficulties facing the whisky sector.
▪ This is no mean feat as the statute has 108 sections divided into 12 separate parts, together with 15 schedules.
▪ This is no mean task, especially if they have not been doing any recruitment for the past few months.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ acrobatic circus feats
▪ He led his team to victory for the tenth time, a feat no captain had achieved before.
▪ The circus acrobats perform amazing feats on the trapeze.
▪ Using the code requires incredible feats of memory.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He proved how difficult this feat is by failing to repeat it at the second time of asking.
▪ In the great outdoors, the merit of any feats become meaningless.
▪ Powell achieved a similar feat, but then resigned.
▪ The lucky boy accomplished the feat, and caught the evil, greedy king in a curse at the same time.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Feat

Feat \Feat\ (f[=e]t), n. [OE. fet, OF. fet, fait, F. fait, factum, fr. L. facere, factum, to make or do. Cf. Fact, Feasible, Do.]

  1. An act; a deed; an exploit.

    The warlike feats I have done.
    --Shak.

  2. A striking act of strength, skill, or cunning; a trick; as, feats of horsemanship, or of dexterity.

Feat

Feat \Feat\, v. t. To form; to fashion. [Obs.]

To the more mature, A glass that feated them.
--Shak.

Feat

Feat \Feat\, a. [Compar. Feater; superl. Featest.] [F. fait made, shaped, fit, p. p. of faire to make or do. See Feat, n.] Dexterous in movements or service; skillful; neat; nice; pretty. [Archaic]

Never master had a page . . . so feat.
--Shak.

And look how well my garments sit upon me Much feater than before.
--Shak.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
feat

mid-14c., "action, deeds," from Anglo-French fet, from Old French fait "action, deed, achievement" (12c.), from Latin factum "thing done," a noun based on the past participle of facere "make, do" (see factitious, and compare fact). Sense of "exceptional or noble deed" arose c.1400 from phrase feat of arms (French fait d'armes).

Wiktionary
feat
  1. (context archaic English) dexterous in movements or service; skilful; neat; pretty n. A relatively rare or difficult accomplishment. v

  2. (context obsolete English) To form; to fashion.

WordNet
feat

n. a notable achievement; "he performed a great deed"; "the book was her finest effort" [syn: deed, effort, exploit]

Wikipedia
Feat (d20 System)

In the d20 System, a feat is one type of ability a character may gain through level progression. Feats are different from skills in that characters can vary in competency with skills, while feats typically provide set bonuses to or new ways to use existing abilities.

Feats were first implemented in the d20 System-premiering Dungeons & Dragons Third Edition, and were carried over into Dungeons & Dragons 3.5 Edition as well as most other d20-based role playing games. The addition of feats has generally been received approvingly by players, though some criticize a perceived focus on combat and potential for abuse by powergamers.

Characters typically start with one feat and gain one feat at each subsequent level which is evenly divisible by 3. Human characters typically start with an additional feat (as do Fighters in Dungeons and Dragons). Many feats have prerequisite levels, base attack bonuses, or other skills, feats or abilities which must be obtained before they can be acquired.

Feat

A feat is a rare or difficult act or accomplishment.

Feat or FEAT may also refer to:

  • FEAT (album), a 2012 The Hood Internet album
  • Feat (d20 System), concept in role-playing game system d20
  • An abbreviation for featuring used in credit lists to indicate a guest appearance (common in music).
  • Far Eastern Air Transport
FEAT (album)

FEAT (pronounced "F-E-A-T") is the first studio album by Chicago-based record production duo The Hood Internet. It was released on Decon on October 2, 2012. The album features guest appearances from A.C. Newman, Cadence Weapon, and Class Actress, among others. Music videos were created for "Won't Fuck Us Over", "One for the Record Books", and "More Fun".

The remix album, FEAT Remixes, was released on December 18, 2012.

Usage examples of "feat".

Had this not been the case the escape of the two would have been a feat of little moment, since Meriem was scarcely a whit less agile than Korak, and fully as much at home in the trees as he.

And though a landing aboard the carrier at night in bad weather was far and above the most challenging feat of airmanship one could attempt, making the same approach on a fixed, unmoving airfield posed a different kind of threat--just as deadly, but far more subtle.

A man hanging at the end of the alpenstock might conceivably swing into the fissure, but h would necessitate a feat of acrobatics far beyond the powers of either himself or Gabula.

Unfortunately the reserve commanded by common decency was not a guest at their amorous feats, and the scandal became so notorious that the Government was compelled to notify to Croce the order to quit the city, and to seek his fortune in some other place.

Who knows what Herculean poetic feats might be left to him in perhaps the score of years between a premature apologia and death?

In addition, Jesus backed up his claim to being God through miraculous feats of healing, astounding demonstrations of power over nature, unrivaled teaching, divine understanding of people, and with his own resurrection, which was the final authentication of his identity.

Brunhild was outdone in all three feats, and, according to her own promise, belonged to the victor, Gunther, to whom she now bade her people show all due respect and homage.

Here they remained until the 26th, when they marched to Berber, and then to a camp ten miles north of the Atbara, where they arrived on the 4th of March, having covered a hundred and forty-four miles in six days and a half, a great feat in such a climate.

Van Bummels, who inhabit the pleasant borders of the Bronx: these were short fat men, wearing exceeding large trunk-breeches, and were renowned for feats of the trencher.

The prodigious feat had been noted in the Press of all countries with every circumstance--the five violins he had tired out, the invitation he had received to preside over a South American Republic, the special steamer he had chartered to keep an engagement in North America, and his fainting fit in Moscow after the Beethoven and Brahms concertos, the Bach chaconne, and seventeen encores.

I found myself completely outwitted, but the thing was done so pleasantly that all I could do was to put a good face on it--a feat which I found sufficiently easy from the relief I felt at no longer being bound to send a messenger to I did not know whom.

Everybody is in a state of astonishment at your feat, as I could not help telling the miracle to all my acquaintances.

The solution of the purple machine was, in fact, the greatest feat of cryptanalysis the world had yet known.

I am, I repeat, he who is to revive the Knights of the Round Table, the Twelve Peers of France, the Nine Worthies, he who is to make the world forget the Platirs, Tablants, Olivants, and Tirants, the Phoebuses and Be-lianises, and the entire horde of famous knights errant of a bygone age, by performing in this time in which I find myself such great and extraordinary deeds and feats of arms that they will overshadow the brightest they ever achieved.

She liked the slim, athletic engineery types who were modest about their feats and never spoke of them but could fix a balky engine or conjugate a French verb, often simultaneously.