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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
farm
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a factory/farm/office worker
▪ Factory workers threatened strikes.
a farm/factory/school etc gate
▪ I carefully shut the farm gate behind me.
▪ Lots of parents were waiting outside the school gate.
a farming community
▪ a small farming community of about 1,000 inhabitants
a farming method
▪ Farming methods have changed a lot over the last 100 years.
agricultural/farm produce
▪ The government bought surplus agricultural produce from farmers.
collective farm
dairy farm
factory farming
farmed fish (=fish that are from a fish farm)
▪ We also know that farmed fish don’t have as much omega 3 as wild salmon.
fat farm
fish farm
funny farm
fur farming (=keeping and killing animals for their fur)
▪ a ban on fur farming
health farm
irrigated land/farms/crops
mixed farming
organic farmers/farms
▪ Organic farmers build up soil fertility by crop rotation.
▪ Synthetic fertilisers are banned on organic farms.
organic farming (=farming without using artificial chemicals)
▪ the environmental benefits of organic farming
server farm
truck farm
walking/riding/farming etc country
▪ To the east is an area of rich farming country.
wild/domestic/farm animals
▪ cattle, sheep, and other domestic animals
wind farm
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
collective
▪ Soloukhin told me of watching a collective-farm worker in a church turned granary.
▪ In October 1956 collectivization began, with the establishment of collective farms.
▪ Farmers given right to leave collective farms with allotment of land and equipment.
▪ Milda was no longer allowed to live in Riga but had been ordered to do hard physical work on a collective farm.
▪ Agriculture is crippled, too, by the miserable conditions on the collective farms.
▪ He doesn't mean as drones on some collective farm.
▪ People's banks are being set up as cooperatives, and collective farms are replacing small landholdings.
▪ Here and there the landscape was broken by dreary gray buildings that had been thrown up to house members of collective farms.
large
▪ Now, industrialised countries are almost self-sufficient in basic foodstuffs due to the use of fertilisers, mechanisation and larger farm units.
▪ In the countryside, large working farms interrupted a landscape of mountains, meadow, marshland, and abandoned quarries.
▪ Jess is a quiet, intense kid from a large, close-knit farm family in Washington.
▪ From here descend into Liddesdale, aiming towards a group of large green farm sheds across the valley.
▪ When I was nine he started a large poultry farm west of Delray Beach, Florida.
▪ In Ayrshire, with some world-famous herds, the larger farms would receive less than 5 percent. of the compensation.
▪ Irrigation projects provide water for large commercial farms, not smallholders.
local
▪ From boyhood he worked on local farms and became an itinerant Methodist preacher.
▪ Cook and then move on across the Canterbury Plains for an overnight on a local farm.
▪ They therefore attracted labour without any hindrance, providing jerry-built, damp and insanitary hovels for letting to local farm workers.
▪ Most people I knew took their first few feet of sliding down a local farm field with a rope tow.
▪ In addition to their milling activities, the Ayliffes also operated cider-making equipment, their portable unit moving annually around local farms.
▪ Uncle would visit the local farms, trying to find work for them.
▪ In May he prepared his own aircraft for flight from the local farm.
▪ She used to visit local farms, struck up a friendship with my Aunt Hannah and was introduced to Father.
old
▪ I came to the site of an old farm that had been overgrown and then clearcut five years ago.
▪ Champany Inn Old converted farm steading, furnished in antique Victoriana.
▪ We are starting with an old farm, while nature may have started with a glacial moraine ten thousand years ago.
▪ The road ended just there, in a long concrete hardstand where a cart and some rusting old farm machinery were parked.
▪ It was one of the oldest hop farms in the Derwent Valley, and this minor valley took its name from it.
▪ To the old farm for lunch, but what about the seals?
▪ After all, the 27-year-#old farm worker fully intended to return to work when his 30-minute lunch break was over.
organic
▪ The prime culprit is organic farm waste, such as cattle slurry and silage, and even milk.
▪ For a crash course on the subject, consider subscribing to an organic farm with a delivery service in your area.
▪ Next week a new residential block opens at its organic farm, Kilcranny House, just outside Coleraine.
▪ They say I must come and see them on their new organic farm - more land, less house, says Johnson.
▪ A well-run organic farm could hold many times that number.
▪ This was made up of the organic residues of farms, forestry, industry and domestic refuse.
▪ Mr Wilson says organic farms reverse many modern agricultural trends.
▪ By exterminating farm animals, the option of small organic farms is eroded.
small
▪ Mr MacSharry's answer is: merely for being farmers on small farms.
▪ Stephen moved out of the city to a small farm owned by a Mrs Dodge.
▪ Easily Accessible: Downhayes is set in an area of small working farms with few public footpaths in the immediate area.
▪ Acquire the use of a small farm along the route with sufficient line-of-sight access to the radiated energy. 3.
▪ Land fragmentation, as a result of inheritance laws and social custom, compounds the widespread problem of small farm size.
▪ The residents grew their own rice, set up a small poultry farm, wove baskets and cultivated the orchard.
▪ These quintas are large houses in their own spacious grounds which often include a small farm.
▪ Had those surpluses been directed elsewhere in the valley, they could have created a great many small irrigated farms.
■ NOUN
animal
▪ Under increasing public pressure, farmers are taking a greater interest in free-range systems which give a fairer deal to farm animals.
▪ The farm animals begin to stir, the roosters consider crowing.
▪ The next shelf we stopped on was filled with farm animals.
▪ Look out for our forthcoming profile of Sir Richard Body, and articles on farm animal welfare.
▪ Though London Zoo remains open, its children's section-where youngsters can touch farm animals-has been shut.
▪ So far, there had been as much romance as when the farm animals mated.
▪ Smith has been carting farm animals around Britain for 30 years.
bill
▪ He did sign a farm bill passed by Congress.
▪ The action occurred as the Senate voted 64-32 for a seven-year farm bill which would replace fixed-level crop subsidies with declining payments.
▪ The House has not yet considered the farm bill where a bipartisan group of lawmakers led by Rep.
▪ Hurt himself with Iowa farmers by missing a key vote on the federal farm bill.
▪ The vote came on an amendment to a sweeping farm bill aimed at weaning farmers from federal subsidies.
▪ He has a farm bill amendment ready that would phase out the peanut program over six years.
▪ However, he said crunch time has come to get a farm bill enacted into law.
▪ Supporters argue that the peanut program has been reformed under the Senate farm bill and the proposed House legislation.
building
▪ For economy in building costs, these three types of farm buildings were sometimes combined into a single building.
▪ The farm buildings so often found below the galleries are situated further away in this case.
▪ At last, at about 0345 hours, the farm buildings become defined against the woods and fields beyond.
▪ Of the other farm buildings on our site, apart from a small bath-house, only barns and rural out-buildings were found.
▪ A well and cheese press are below in the yard with the farm buildings situated below and behind the gallery.
▪ He provided a comprehensive network of farm buildings connected, it is said, by a telegraph system.
▪ There is certainly nothing new in converting farm buildings.
dairy
▪ The most extensive tracts are taken up by five dairy farms.
▪ They live together on a lushly beautiful dairy farm.
▪ In 1915 the farm was taken over by Fauchons who ran it as a dairy farm.
▪ He turned the beef holding into a dairy farm and soon began expanding by leasing other dairy farms all over Ireland.
▪ With Marjorie, she rented a tiny cottage at the edge of a dairy farm in Dorset, Vermont.
▪ He turned the beef holding into a dairy farm and soon began expanding by leasing other dairy farms all over Ireland.
▪ Livestock sales are down 1%, while turnover on dairy farms could fall by up to 10%.
family
▪ Speyside was an area where the lack of adequate housing had provided particular problems in keeping family farms going.
▪ Instead of a family farm raising potatoes and grain, they also own the horse-breeding farm of their dreams.
▪ Therefore family farms also cross-subsidise the profits from copper mining.
▪ Earlier, he had highlighted Clinton-administration backed research programs at a stop at a nearby family farm.
▪ This was achieved partly through capitalist agriculture driving out family farms.
▪ The agricultural economy, based on family farms and home workshops, shifted to an industrial one.
▪ Reformed systems of direct support, aimed in particular at helping family farms and crofts.
▪ As a child, he watched a river sweep away the wheat planted on the family farm in Indiana.
gate
▪ Those with milking herds had a ready market for farm gate sales of butter and cheese.
▪ The tractor ruts led straight on to a farm gate.
▪ And here, barring the road, was the familiar old farm gate still in place.
health
▪ The following week was Guildford and I decided to stay at Grayshott Hall, the health farm.
▪ At the foot of the Quantock Hills in rural Somerset is one of the most luxurious health farms in the country.
▪ Thereby completely missing the point of being at a health farm.
▪ By this stage we were beginning to realise the formula is two days in Paris, six days in a health farm.
▪ If you need a break there's nothing better than being pampered at a health farm.
▪ Rebuild the Roman villa and use it for a hydro and health farm.
hill
▪ Other hill farms are owned and worked as a unit linked with a lowland farm.
▪ I believed I had been locked up all my life, up there on that hill farm in North Chittendon.
▪ Opposite a riding stable follow a track leading past Windy Hill farm and to the beach.
▪ Asa bought the hill farm in 1856 from Orin Perkins, married Elmira Wilkins, and settled there.
▪ As a result some of the hill farms are being joined together - amalgamated - and farm labourers are becoming unemployed.
land
▪ Dartmoor and Exmoor, with their wild moorland, some farm land and villages, are National Parks.
▪ The loch covers an area of 550 acres, surrounded north, west and south by farm lands and fresh-water marshes.
▪ Farmwatch will also deal with the threat of travellers invading farm land and prevent scenes like those at Castlemoreton.
▪ Another consequence of population growth is a demand for new farm land.
▪ Lead head Please identify this object I found recently on ploughed farm land.
▪ High percentage of farm land or all land in permanent pasture made up of rough grazing.
▪ What has happened to the farm land?
▪ Why may farmers wish to sell the remaining farm land?
machinery
▪ He's launched a scheme which gives these farmers access to modern farm machinery and he teaches them how to use it.
▪ Until the combine appeared, the self-binder had been the mechanical marvel of the farm machinery industry for forty years.
▪ A fire service spokeswoman said the outhouses contained mostly farm machinery.
▪ They were brothers; they were transporting farm machinery from Los Angeles to Minnesota and making good money at it.
▪ These included providing extra farm machinery and manpower, including 20,000 troops.
▪ They were one of the first, and certainly one of the most successful, manufacturers of steam-powered farm machinery.
▪ The road ended just there, in a long concrete hardstand where a cart and some rusting old farm machinery were parked.
▪ Dead sheep and lambs were found in farm machinery.
manager
▪ The project high-lighted the key role of the expert advisors which are used by farm managers in undertaking their roles.
▪ I just pay his farm manager our rent.
▪ You work so hard as my farm manager that I want you to have a larger share of the profits.
▪ Nicky Brown, the farm manager, was born to the land.
▪ She no longer took such an interest in the farm, and very sensibly appointed Gabriel Oak her farm manager.
▪ His body was still warm when it was discovered by police after his farm manager had reported him missing.
▪ These large abscesses were pointed out by the farm manager to Mrs Brough, who photographed them.
subsidy
▪ We hear about farm subsidies and the social wage.
▪ Federal farm subsidies are riddled with hypocrisies.
▪ Republicans would put a first-ever annual limit on farm subsidies.
▪ Moreover, farm subsidies undermine the efforts of developing countries to follow Washington's economic prescriptions.
▪ The price rises wiped out the need for farm subsidies.
wind
▪ The Countryside Commission has called for planning guidelines on wind farms to be issued to local authorities.
▪ The government has responded by planning offshore wind farms on the Ijsselmeer.
▪ At the moment, only inshore wind farms have been erected but there is great potential in offshore wind.
▪ Offshore wind farms would be more expensive to establish but far less of an eyesore.
work
▪ Any farm outbuildings or their contents or any liability for domestic employees engaged for farm work are excluded.
▪ He also said that these days camels are only really sold for farm work carts and ploughs.
▪ Shift work could clash with farm work especially with attendance at sales.
▪ I threw myself into farm work, as absorbed by this job as I had once been by literature and teaching.
▪ The pattern of farm work done by those with a full-time off-farm job was mainly evening and weekend work.
▪ In two cases where father and son were both working shifts they had arranged alternate shifts thus allowing uninterrupted farm work.
▪ Lessons took up only two hours a day and the farm work was badly organised.
▪ This was not ideal because of fatigue and farm work that had to be carried out at those times.
worker
▪ Secondly, it is often argued that farm workers are compensated for their low wages by a cornucopia of payments in kind.
▪ The daughter of an itinerant farm worker, Ward now rubs shoulders with the rich, famous and glamorous.
▪ There is little reason to suppose that the consequences of these changes will in themselves lead farm workers to become more militant.
▪ He says the country is not facing a shortage of farm workers, according to his spokesman Allen Kay.
▪ It was being driven towards Weatherbury by two farm workers, who had not noticed Gabriel.
▪ These boundaries draw in children of immigrant farm workers and, at the other extreme, children of high-tech millionaires.
▪ It took place on the Monday after Twelfth Day when the farm workers returned to work after the Christmas holiday.
▪ Instead the newcomers tend to evaluate the farm worker and the other villagers on the basis of urban criteria for allocating prestige.
■ VERB
run
▪ He'd been working too hard in college, and even harder since he'd been running the farm.
▪ Great-Grandfather was running a farm at the same time, so he must have been a very busy man.
▪ A third brother, Ben, runs the farm shop.
▪ He delivered the letters and ran a little bit of a farm he owned, whilst his wife looked after the Post Office.
▪ For three years he would supply funds to run the farm, any profits being split equally between Tom and himself.
▪ Her husband, Michael became so bogged down with the worry of running their farm, he killed himself.
▪ Plus she ran the farm which she had no idea about.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
bet the farm/ranch
intensive farming/agriculture
▪ About 90 percent of wildflower-rich meadows have disappeared since the Second World War due to intensive agriculture and drainage.
▪ Also of concern is not only the cost but the amount of fossil energy subsidy required for intensive agriculture.
▪ Our increase in intensive farming has brought with it an increase in outbreaks of food poisoning.
▪ The corncrake and marsh fritillary have been the victims of intensive agriculture as ploughing and pesticides destroy habitat and insects.
▪ The increasing adoption of less intensive agriculture should further encourage a hare recovery.
▪ They said they didn't have strong views on intensive farming.
▪ They were replaced by cities dependent on intensive farming to feed them and on great armies to defend them.
▪ We now realise the importance of hedgerows, of small fields, of clean rivers and of less intensive agriculture.
model prison/farm/school etc
▪ A model farm was built for the herd in 1850 but after 1870 the herd's size was never more than 100.
▪ Before applying the impact of support charges, his model farm produced a farm gross margin of £101,000 under farm income-optimising calculations.
▪ The Economic Societies encouraged local industries, set up model farms, and sponsored new crops.
▪ The jail is less than a year old and has been hailed as a model prison.
▪ There he built a model farm specialising in truffles - the regional speciality - potatoes and nuts.
▪ Wave of unrest hits model prison.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a farm in southern Alberta
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ After a while Bathsheba said goodnight to her farm workers, and closed the sitting-room door and windows.
▪ Any herbs that are added are also organically produced on the farm.
▪ Get an insight into life on the farm past and present.
▪ In other words, it is compensation for assets financed from the farm overheads.
▪ Instead of killing these families, they decided to construct an ant farm for them.
▪ It was the equivalent of the labor of migrant farm laborers.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
acre
▪ His grandfather farmed 250 acres across the border in County Monaghan.
▪ He farms half an acre of a friend's land in Mid-Glamorgan.
land
▪ Nicky Brown, the farm manager, was born to the land.
▪ The healthy cotton is grown on family plots, the neglected crop on land farmed by co-operatives.
▪ The cossacks were given allotments of land and farmed there as the wooden fortifications gradually rotted away.
▪ The land is already farmed organically.
▪ Their land is farmed very intensively.
▪ Apart from the small plots given to each member family for their house and garden, all the land is farmed collectively.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
country/farming etc folk
▪ Its country folk are very much at one with the land.
▪ Louisa's parents were country folk and believed very much in herbal remedies.
▪ Sadly, country folk have caught on.
▪ The big occasion for country folk was the A&P Show.
▪ The customers were mostly farming folk, a hardworking and hard-drinking set of locals who, in general, were convivial and congenial.
▪ The difference is essentially one of the spirit and it manifests itself in the habits and attitudes of country folk.
▪ Umbria is a wonderful region where life is simple and the people are unpretentious country folk.
intensive farming/agriculture
▪ About 90 percent of wildflower-rich meadows have disappeared since the Second World War due to intensive agriculture and drainage.
▪ Also of concern is not only the cost but the amount of fossil energy subsidy required for intensive agriculture.
▪ Our increase in intensive farming has brought with it an increase in outbreaks of food poisoning.
▪ The corncrake and marsh fritillary have been the victims of intensive agriculture as ploughing and pesticides destroy habitat and insects.
▪ The increasing adoption of less intensive agriculture should further encourage a hare recovery.
▪ They said they didn't have strong views on intensive farming.
▪ They were replaced by cities dependent on intensive farming to feed them and on great armies to defend them.
▪ We now realise the importance of hedgerows, of small fields, of clean rivers and of less intensive agriculture.
model prison/farm/school etc
▪ A model farm was built for the herd in 1850 but after 1870 the herd's size was never more than 100.
▪ Before applying the impact of support charges, his model farm produced a farm gross margin of £101,000 under farm income-optimising calculations.
▪ The Economic Societies encouraged local industries, set up model farms, and sponsored new crops.
▪ The jail is less than a year old and has been hailed as a model prison.
▪ There he built a model farm specialising in truffles - the regional speciality - potatoes and nuts.
▪ Wave of unrest hits model prison.
subsistence farming/agriculture etc
▪ In the early l960s Bengali agriculture consisted mainly of subsistence farming.
▪ It report points out that, in many developing countries, women are primarily responsible for subsistence farming.
▪ It was there in 1903 that quarrymen went on strike for three and a half years, surviving on subsistence farming.
▪ Preferential interest rates also favor commercial over subsistence farming in many countries.
▪ She will most probably be involved in agriculture, in subsistence farming of crops like rice.
▪ The graphite boom temporarily reduced the social and economic importance of subsistence agriculture in the Low Country.
▪ This vast, dispersed rural workforce would need, and would receive, only the education needed for manual subsistence farming.
▪ Wine formed the most important cash crop, while cereal production generally took the form of subsistence farming.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ My family has farmed here since 1901.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Foreshadowing yet another Communist practice, he formed colonies of soldiers to farm virgin areas.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Farm

Farm \Farm\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Farmed; p. pr. & vb. n. Farming.]

  1. To lease or let for an equivalent, as land for a rent; to yield the use of to proceeds.

    We are enforced to farm our royal realm.
    --Shak.

  2. To give up to another, as an estate, a business, the revenue, etc., on condition of receiving in return a percentage of what it yields; as, to farm the taxes.

    To farm their subjects and their duties toward these.
    --Burke.

  3. To take at a certain rent or rate.

  4. To devote (land) to agriculture; to cultivate, as land; to till, as a farm.

    To farm let, To let to farm, to lease on rent.

Farm

Farm \Farm\, n. [OE. ferme rent, lease, F. ferme, LL. firma, fr. L. firmus firm, fast, firmare to make firm or fast. See Firm, a. & n.]

  1. The rent of land, -- originally paid by reservation of part of its products. [Obs.]

  2. The term or tenure of a lease of land for cultivation; a leasehold. [Obs.]

    It is great willfulness in landlords to make any longer farms to their tenants.
    --Spenser.

  3. The land held under lease and by payment of rent for the purpose of cultivation.

  4. Any tract of land devoted to agricultural purposes, under the management of a tenant or the owner.

    Note: In English the ideas of a lease, a term, and a rent, continue to be in a great degree inseparable, even from the popular meaning of a farm, as they are entirely so from the legal sense.
    --Burrill.

  5. A district of country leased (or farmed) out for the collection of the revenues of government.

    The province was devided into twelve farms.
    --Burke.

  6. (O. Eng. Law) A lease of the imposts on particular goods; as, the sugar farm, the silk farm.

    Whereas G. H. held the farm of sugars upon a rent of 10,000 marks per annum.
    --State Trials (1196).

Farm

Farm \Farm\, v. i. To engage in the business of tilling the soil; to labor as a farmer.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
farm

c.1300, "fixed payment (usually in exchange for taxes collected, etc.), fixed rent," from Old French ferme "a rent, lease" (13c.), from Medieval Latin firma "fixed payment," from Latin firmare "to fix, settle, confirm, strengthen," from firmus "firm" (see firm (adj.)).\n

\n Sense of "tract of leased land" is first recorded early 14c.; that of "cultivated land" (leased or not) is 1520s. A word of confused history, but there is agreement that "the purely agricultural sense is comparatively modern" [Century Dictionary]. There is a set of Old English words that appear to be related in sound and sense; if these, too, are from Latin it would be a very early borrowing. Some books strenuously defend a theory that the Anglo-Saxon words are original (perhaps related to feorh "life").\n

\nPhrase buy the farm "die in battle," is at least from World War II, perhaps a cynical reference to the draftee's dream of getting out of the war and going home, in many cases to a peaceful farmstead. But fetch the farm is prisoner slang from at least 1879 for "get sent to the infirmary," with reference to the better diet and lighter duties there.

farm

mid-15c., "to rent (land)," from Anglo-French fermer, from ferme "a rent, lease" (see farm (n.)). The agricultural sense is from 1719. Original sense is retained in to farm out.

Wiktionary
farm

n. 1 (context obsolete English) food; provisions; a meal 2 (context obsolete English) A banquet; feast 3 (context obsolete English) A fixed yearly amount (food, provisions, money, etc.) payable as rent or tax 4 (context historical English) A fixed yearly sum accepted from a person as a composition for taxes or other moneys which he is empowered to collect; also, a fixed charge imposed on a town, county, etc., in respect of a tax or taxes to be collected within its limits. 5 (context historical English) The letting-out of public revenue to a ‘farmer’; the privilege of farming a tax or taxes. 6 The body of farmers of public revenues. 7 The condition of being let at a fixed rent; lease; a lease 8 A tract of land held on lease for the purpose of cultivation 9 A place where agricultural and similar activities take place, especially the growing of crops or the raising of livestock 10 (context usually in combination English) A location used for an industrial purpose, having many similar structures 11 (context computing English) A group of coordinated servers vb. 1 (context intransitive English) To work on a farm, especially in the growing and harvesting of crops. 2 (context transitive English) To devote (land) to farming. 3 (context transitive English) To grow (a particular crop). 4 To give up to another, as an estate, a business, the revenue, etc., on condition of receiving in return a percentage of what it yields; to farm out. 5 (context obsolete English) To lease or let for an equivalent, e.g. land for a rent; to yield the use of to proceeds. 6 (context obsolete English) To take at a certain rent or rate. 7 (context video games chiefly online gaming English) To engage in grinding (repetitive activity) in a particular area or against specific enemies for a particular drop or item.

WordNet
farm

n. workplace consisting of farm buildings and cultivated land as a unit; "it takes several people to work the farm"

farm
  1. v. be a farmer; work as a farmer; "My son is farming in California"

  2. collect fees or profits

  3. cultivate by growing, often involving improvements by means of agricultural techniques; "The Bordeaux region produces great red wines"; "They produce good ham in Parma"; "We grow wheat here"; "We raise hogs here" [syn: grow, raise, produce]

Gazetteer
Wikipedia
Farm

A farm is an area of land that is devoted primarily to agricultural processes with the primary objective of producing food and other crops; it is the basic facility in food production. The name is used for specialised units such as arable farms, vegetable farms, fruit farms, dairy, pig and poultry farms, and land used for the production of natural fibres, biofuel and other commodities. It includes ranches, feedlots, orchards, plantations and estates, smallholdings and hobby farms, and includes the farmhouse and agricultural buildings as well as the land. In modern times the term has been extended so as to include such industrial operations as wind farms and fish farms, both of which can operate on land or sea.

Farming originated independently in different parts of the world as hunter gatherer societies transitioned to food production rather than food capture. It may have started about 12,000 years ago with the domestication of livestock in the Fertile Crescent in western Asia, soon to be followed by the cultivation of crops. Modern units tend to specialise in the crops or livestock best suited to the region, with their finished products being sold for the retail market or for further processing, with farm products being traded around the world.

Modern farms in developed countries are highly mechanized. In the United States, livestock may be raised on rangeland and finished in feedlots and the mechanisation of crop production has brought about a great decrease in the number of agricultural workers needed. In Europe, traditional family farms are giving way to larger production units. In Australia, some farms are very large because the land is unable to support a high stocking density of livestock because of climatic conditions. In less developed countries, small farms are the norm, and the majority of rural residents are subsistence farmers, feeding their families and selling any surplus products in the local market.

Farm (revenue leasing)

Farming is a technique of financial management, namely the process of commuting (changing), by its assignment by legal contract to a third party, a future uncertain revenue stream into fixed and certain periodic rents, in consideration for which commutation a discount in value received is suffered. It is most commonly used in the field of public finance, where the state wishes to gain some certainty about its future taxation revenue for the purposes of medium-term budgetting of expenditure. The tax collection process requires considerable expenditure on administration and the yield is uncertain both as to amount and timing, as taxpayers delay or default on their assessed obligations, often the result of unforeseen external forces such as bad weather affecting harvests. Governments (the lessors) have thus frequently over history resorted to the services of an entrepreneurial financier (the farmer) to whom they lease or assign the right to collect and retain the whole of the tax revenue due to the state in return for his payment into the treasury of fixed sums (sometimes called "rents", but with a different meaning from the common modern term). Sometimes ( Miguel de Cervantes is an example) the tax farmer was a government employee, paid a salary, and all monies collected went to the government.

Tax farmers did not usually deal with individuals; the tax was imposed on a community or other polity, and how the community raised the funds to pay the tax was its own business. Tax farming usually required on-site tax-collecting visits, as postal and banking systems were inadequate or non-existent.

Farming in this sense has nothing to do with agriculture, other than metaphorically.

Farm (disambiguation)

A farm is an area of land or water that is primarily devoted to agricultural or aquacultural processes.

Farm may also refer to:

  • Wind farm, for the production of electricity by means of turbines
  • Prison farm, a facility where prisoners perform hard labor
  • Ant farm, a toy to see living ants in
  • Server farm, a clustered group of computer servers
    • Compile farm, a group of computers used for compiling computer programs
    • Link farm, a website designed to spoof search engine indexers
    • Render farm, a clustered group of computers used for 3D rendering
    • Wiki farm, a server farm hosting a wiki
  • Farming, a strategy for acquiring resources in a video game; see: Gold farming

Other uses include:

  • Farm Lake, a lake in Minnesota
  • Farm Sanctuary, an organization which cares for rescued farm animals
  • Farm team, a team providing experience and training for young players
  • Farm (revenue leasing), "Farming out" a tax or rent or other revenue, for a governing power to lease to someone the right to collect that revenue
  • Farm (album), an album by the alternative rock band Dinosaur Jr.
Farm (album)

Farm is the ninth studio album by the American alternative rock band Dinosaur Jr. It is the band's first release on the record label Jagjaguwar.

The first editions of the album came with a free white-vinyl 7 inch with the songs "I Don't Wanna Go There" and "Tarpit", recorded live for Pitchfork TV.

The original European version had a mastering error - the volume was 3dB too loud. The European label PIAS Recordings recalled the affected copies to exchange them with correct ones.

The band released a video for "Over It," directed by Mark Locke. It featured the band members riding around an urban setting on BMX bikes and a skateboard, performing stunts and pratfalls; professional riders were used as stunt doubles. It featured a brief cameo from Mike Watt.

Farm debuted at #29 on the Billboard 200.

Usage examples of "farm".

The Signora knew of a man who owned a farm at Percile up in the Abruzzi to the east of Roma.

The prospect of months on his farm doing as he pleased gave Adams a lift of heart as little else could have.

Jefferson remained at Monticello, Adams at his farm, which he had lately taken to calling Stoneyfield, instead of Peacefield, perhaps feeling the new name was more in keeping with New England candor, or that it better defined the look of the political landscape at the moment.

But then neither did Adams write of his own increasing worry and sorrow over his son Thomas, who, having failed in the law, was drinking heavily and employed now primarily as a caretaker for his father and the farm.

The first occupation to suffer seriously because of the Africans oul ere was farming.

The big alligator farms pulled people in, and then they stayed and paid good tourist dollars for airboat rides, canoe treks along the endless canals at sunset, and even camping in traditional chickees.

The Alamanni are nomads, who have never planted farms or vineyards or even homesteads.

There, a number of recent raids by Alemanni on local farms and villages seemed to foretell a larger, better-planned movement by Chonodomarius in the near future.

Raised by her parents from Mahon on a small farm in the Sahel, she was very young when she married a slender and delicate man, also of Mahon origin, whose brothers had already settled in Algeria by 1848, after the tragic death of the paternal grandfather, a sometime poet who composed his verses mounted on a donkey and riding around the island between stone walls that bordered vegetable gardens.

One of the strongest impressions I had gained when I first came into country practice was that farming was the hardest way of all of making a living, and now I was finding out for myself.

Oh, how the labourers swore and the farmers chuckled, when he put up steam-engines on all his farms, refused to give away a farthing in alms, and enforced the new Poor-law to the very letter.

Maybe McDermott has a relative on a farm, Alphonse decides, and they are going visiting.

These were mesa-top ruins, and Longarm had read enough about Mesa Verde to know that the Anasazi people had lived and farmed up on the flat mesa centuries before building their famed cliff dwellings.

A Central Planning Council, on which he sat, determined the proper economic mix and crops grown, coordinating with other Anchors as well, but otherwise the farms were communally held and run affairs, autonomous and sharing in the profits by getting what they wanted or needed from other communes in exchange for what they produced.

By now Alexandra was unwinding as an anchorwoman and winding back up as a born-and-raised farm girl who was excited to be nearing home.