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Crossword clues for dress

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
dress
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a cotton shirt/dress/jacket etc
▪ Egyptian cotton sheets are very expensive here.
a dress code (=rules about what you must wear)
▪ Some of the more expensive clubs have a dress code.
a dress designer (=for clothes for women)
▪ Christian Lacroix was one of Paris's most flamboyant dress designers.
a fancy dress partyBritish English, a costume party American English (= one where people wear unusual clothes, for example so they look like someone from a story)
▪ She went to the fancy dress party as Snow White.
a party dress
▪ The little girls were wearing white party dresses.
be dressed in … clothes
▪ The man was dressed in ordinary clothes.
casually dressed
▪ a casually dressed young man
cocktail dress
dress a wound (=clean it and cover it with cloth)
▪ The nurse dressed my wound.
dress circle
dress rehearsal
dress sense
dress shirt
dress uniform
dress/clothes sense (=an ability to choose clothes well)
▪ Her dress sense was faultless.
dressed warmly
▪ Make sure that the children are dressed warmly.
dressing gown
dressing room
dressing table
evening dress
evening wear/dress (=formal clothes that people wear to social events in the evening)
▪ a shop specializing in glamorous evening wear
fancy dress
▪ an invitation to a fancy-dress party
French dressing
full dress
▪ officers in full dress uniform
fully dressed
▪ She collapsed fully dressed on the bed.
morning dress
national dress
power dressing
salad dressing
wedding dress
window dressing
▪ All these glossy pamphlets are just window dressing – the fact is that the new mall will ruin the neighborhood.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
beautiful
▪ It was a beautiful dress, white seersucker dotted with small mauve flowers.
▪ She had the most beautiful dresses.
▪ The trouble was, she was fat, so the beautiful dress and the beautiful coat didn't really matter very much.
▪ Jane saw Gabby quietly standing in a corner in a beautiful gray wool dress Francois Brac had designed for her.
▪ Almost as beautiful as the dress you are wearing.
▪ They had bought a paper pattern, and followed the instructions carefully; it would be the most beautiful dress ever seen.
▪ Anne looked beautiful in a dress of white organdie with a wreath of orange blossom on her dark hair.
▪ The slaves grew it and the children spun it and people like Miss Harker were wearing beautiful dresses.
black
▪ I settled on one of my favourites-a simple black dress.
▪ She is wearing a black dress and pearls, and a stole is strewn on the front seat.
▪ Biddy, in her neat little black dress, was busy serving food.
▪ It was easier to keep up a black dress than a white one.
▪ She was a blonde in a black dress, wearing a tiny hat with a visor of veil.
▪ She was singing on a stage in back of the bar and was wearing a black dress.
▪ The women wore severe black dresses or full-length black kimono.
blue
▪ On one occasion they unearthed a blue taffeta ball dress with small bouquets of pink and cream brocade roses.
▪ Tipper Gore will wear a Jennifer George blue wool dress and jacket set topped by a sapphire alpaca coat for day.
▪ Mum wore a pretty blue dress and Dad was wearing his best suit.
▪ I had heard him telling an old woman at the house that her blue dress suited her wonderfully.
▪ She was wearing the blue and green dress and it suited her every bit as well Claudia had thought it would.
▪ Dark-haired and dark-skinned, a pale blue dress and ivory sweater.
▪ They closed protectively round Flora in their red, green and blue dresses.
▪ She had tinted blond hair, large glasses, a blue dress cinched at the waist by a wide glossy belt.
casual
▪ He scrapped segregated dining rooms and often walked around barefoot and in casual dress, eating bananas.
▪ Some have actually instituted casual dress on snowy days so that workers can dress comfortably and warmly when the weather turns sour.
▪ On reflection she believed it was something to do with the way she looked - her casual dress.
▪ Californians are casual in dress, even at the opera or in the finest restaurants.
▪ It turns out that casual dress had not erased that distinction.
dark
▪ The woman wore a dark heavy dress with three-quarter-length sleeves.
▪ She wore a dark green strapless dress with an enormous skirt.
▪ She chose a dark green fitted dress - not quite in mourning, but a sombre colour to match her mood.
▪ Her dark dress has a creamy collar and cuffs, daubed with salmon trim.
▪ She took a step into the room and noticed a dark red dress on the sofa.
▪ She sighed as she inspected her one good dark blue wool dress, its seat shiny with wear.
▪ She was wearing the dark green woollen dress that showed off her still remarkable contours.
▪ She wears a dark print dress with a black lace collar; her large hands rest on her lap.
full
▪ Archer was in full evening dress.
▪ The closet was full of dresses.
▪ The 2000-strong audience wore full evening dress.
▪ There is a partial recreation of a dramatic battle scene, with life-size models in armour and full battle dress.
▪ At ten o'clock Morton put on full evening dress, and took a cab to the Beresfords' mansion.
▪ Perhaps this was his idea of full dress for a ceremonial occasion.
▪ Against the walls sat row behind row of chiefs, in all the glory of full dress.
▪ Busacher arrived first, looking grand and archaic in full evening dress, white tie and tails.
green
▪ And what she saw was a handsome dark-haired young man who sat laughing with a girl in a bright green dress.
▪ She was wearing the blue and green dress and it suited her every bit as well Claudia had thought it would.
▪ She was wearing a green print dress and a canvas hat with a sun visor.
▪ He liked it then she wore her green dress, with the belt that had a brass buckle.
▪ She wore a dark green strapless dress with an enormous skirt.
▪ They closed protectively round Flora in their red, green and blue dresses.
▪ I saw her sitting there, in her green tartan dress.
little
▪ Biddy, in her neat little black dress, was busy serving food.
▪ Louise picked out a pretty little pink dress that nobody could possibly take exception to and so honour was satisfied.
▪ And no, a little black cocktail dress will not do.
▪ First, the little black dress: it's the only permissible way with black this winter.
▪ The child was awash in the boiling water; her drenched little dress clung to her.
▪ Just add a little black dress to show the necklace off to maximum effect.
▪ The little black designer dress had been an impulse buy earlier in the year, and she'd never worn it.
long
▪ This dress reminds me of my first long dress.
▪ Jill Franklin wore a long white cotton dress with small roses in its pattern.
▪ Lady Thomson, Midge and Chris were wearing long dresses.
▪ Then I saw her, standing in the orchard in her long white dress.
▪ Obediently, Martha studied the image of a glassy-eyed young white woman in a long white dress and tiara.
▪ In this light of evolutionary time, ecology can be seen as one long dress rehearsal.
▪ Money was made by long runs of dresses successfully sold.
▪ At every bus stop there were colourful clutches of women in long dresses with well-scrubbed children, bound for church.
modern
▪ Of course, the statue was in modern dress.
▪ Has to be modern dress obviously, and ideally an elderly character.
new
▪ Every evening I watched Eliza and Georgiana putting on their new dresses and going out to parties.
▪ Mom grew up during the Depression, always doing without a new dress.
▪ I've got to go now as it's time for me to get my new dresses fitted.
▪ You know when a woman has a life change and puts on a new dress?
▪ I wished for a new dress as I washed and ironed my old yellow home-made mini for the hundredth time.
▪ She fell into another and tore her new red dress.
▪ Maybe I could have a new dress.
▪ She'd treated herself to the new dress, from the boutique recommended by Anneliese.
pink
▪ When found, she was wearing a pink floral dress, lilac tights, a white cardigan and black patent leather shoes.
▪ Something about the slave girl fascinated Heather as she took in the pink silk dress hugging the curves of her body.
▪ I wore a sweet pink dress with dark pink roses patterning it.
▪ Would Papa consent, in a few years' time, to his marrying the quiet young woman in the pink dress?
▪ The baby, obviously a girl in a pale pink broderie anglaise dress, was beautiful.
▪ She wore a pale pink dress that swirled around slender legs and her hair was caught back with a matching headband.
▪ Louise picked out a pretty little pink dress that nobody could possibly take exception to and so honour was satisfied.
▪ Benny was large and square, but she wouldn't look like that in the pink velvet dress.
pretty
▪ That's a very pretty dress you're wearing.
▪ She told him to bring her a pretty dress and her best handkerchief.
▪ She took particular care with her preparations and chose a light, pretty dress and sensational earrings.
▪ Mum wore a pretty blue dress and Dad was wearing his best suit.
▪ She thought this was the prettiest dancing dress she had ever seen.
▪ Drowsily, achingly she allowed him to explore her flesh where it was revealed above the neckline of her pretty dress.
▪ But I've walked past so many pretty dresses and little socks with lacy tops, I'd almost given up.
▪ Louise picked out a pretty little pink dress that nobody could possibly take exception to and so honour was satisfied.
red
▪ She was wearing a tight red dress which showed off her shapely legs.
▪ She slips on a bright red party dress and she becomes a fun teenager.
▪ McDougal arrives in a faded red dress and good spirits.
▪ Her red dress had not been made to walk in and had seen better days.
▪ Finally, pleased with the results, I put on my petticoats, my camisole, and then my red plaid dress.
▪ A woman was moving on stage, a woman wearing a red dress.
▪ She wore sunglasses, and that thin red gingham dress he liked on her.
short
▪ She was wearing a short lilac dress and a pale cashmere jacket, beneath which the jet pendant glimmered in inky symbolism.
▪ Women were wearing short dresses ending at their knees and hats that looked like overturned pots.
▪ They keep their legs slightly apart so as not ro bruise the boils under their too short dresses and thin cotton underpants.
▪ The arms say the light of day in a short sleeved dress and they are like the arms of a prize fighter.
▪ Alter baptism, she cuts her hair short and dresses like a man.
▪ Anna wore a short cream dress, from which her long legs emerged, seemingly, for ever.
▪ She wore a short black dress and glass earrings.
white
▪ In the garden in her white dress, she knew she had done the wrong thing.
▪ I would have helped you bathe and dress, I would have made you a white dress, silk or linen.
▪ The white dress lay on the bed.
▪ The white dresses, the long white gloves, the limos, the whole nine yards.
▪ Nice? she wanted to scream, wanted to grab those scrawny arms in that cheap white dress and demand, Nice?
▪ Obediently, Martha studied the image of a glassy-eyed young white woman in a long white dress and tiara.
▪ The heat made her white dress stick to her.
yellow
▪ She was wearing her favourite yellow linen dress and pretty cream high-heeled shoes with Jim's pearls gleaming against her elegant neck.
▪ The photo filled the cover, the photo of Cory Aquino in her yellow dress, Woman of the Year.
▪ Her yellow dress, her hands searching her black hair.
▪ He saw the figure in the yellow dress become smaller and smaller.
▪ Nan wore the smart navy coat she had worn yesterday, but this time over a pale yellow wool dress.
▪ Liza took a yellow cotton button-through dress out of her wardrobe.
▪ She could not get the image of a yellow piqué dress crumpled on a white bed out of her mind.
■ NOUN
cocktail
▪ Northern Whites Cream chenille sweaters, warm oatmeal jackets and ivory cocktail dresses guide the way into winter.
▪ And no, a little black cocktail dress will not do.
▪ Ruth shifted uncomfortably in her azure crêpe de Chine cocktail dress.
▪ Smart casual wear is quite in order for dinner time, but bring one cocktail dress for the Captain's cocktail party.
▪ I have seen her before, in a cocktail dress at some one's party, or at an exhibition perhaps.
code
▪ It's a cool drinking venue, with a noir dress code observed by the arty crowd and staff.
▪ Usually, there is something behind a dress code, some reasoning.
▪ Instead of simplifying life, relaxed business dress codes have become an expensive and troublesome burden.
▪ I have discovered a dress code among Labour party members.
▪ I knew the language, the dress codes, what the leisure weekend activites were.
▪ The dress code in the East Links clubhouse required only that entrants not wear spikes.
▪ Most public schools already have dress codes.
cotton
▪ Ruth wore the pale lavender cotton dress which Mrs Carson had given her.
▪ I settle on a simple cotton dress, black, and a pair of dangling earrings.
▪ Jill Franklin wore a long white cotton dress with small roses in its pattern.
▪ She was wearing a pale green cotton dress.
▪ Maria was wearing a simple cotton dress and sandals.
▪ With this criterion in mind she'd picked a neat black cotton dress, short-sleeved and V-necked.
▪ The other girls are carrying purses and wearing seersucker and madras cotton blouses or printed cotton dresses and penny loafers.
designer
▪ Ossie Clark, Sixties dress designer, 51.
▪ She wants to be a dress designer.
▪ I also had a meeting with the dress designer for the Palladium show.
▪ Beginning at 11am, the discussion will be opened by well-known dress designer Joanne Ferguson.
evening
▪ Archer was in full evening dress.
▪ A man and woman in evening dress alighted from it.
▪ The 2000-strong audience wore full evening dress.
▪ Princess Margaret wore a pretty blue silk evening dress, and sat in the front row of the circle.
▪ The first three rows of the stalls were filled with people in evening dress.
▪ It is absolutely vital to the sales of a popular car, a hi-fi radio, a camera or an evening dress.
▪ The Oistrakhs bow and scrape in evening dress, on Emi-tape.
▪ Busacher arrived first, looking grand and archaic in full evening dress, white tie and tails.
party
▪ She slips on a bright red party dress and she becomes a fun teenager.
▪ The sunlight glimmered off these blades and when the sea breeze swept through they rippled like sequins on a party dress.
▪ She does a little pose, having worn a real party dress.
▪ At the hospital George Cummings swung aside the ambulance door and pulled out a girl still in her white party dress.
▪ Maire Carroll arrived wearing a proper party dress.
▪ I can remember a party dress that I loved - a white one with bright, tiny flowers on and lace trimming.
shirt
▪ Zach put it on and when the jacket was done up it looked as if he was wearing a proper dress shirt.
▪ He wears a suit and a dress shirt without a tie, along with a straw hat that is out of style.
▪ For one thing, I forgot to turn off the iron and nearly burnt the Professor's dress shirt I was ironing.
▪ He held up his arms to show the unfastened cuffs of his dress shirt sticking out from the sleeves of his jacket.
▪ He wore a short-sleeved dress shirt with the collar open and his necktie at half-mast.
▪ He threw my dress shirt over it so all was pale blue.
▪ Every day Mones came to class in a short-sleeved dress shirt and shiny black tie-up shoes.
shop
▪ Rituals and Cults Sessions at the make-up table, in dress shops, hairdressers and beauty parlours.
▪ She was also determined to spend as much time in dress shops as she possibly could!
▪ Part of the ground floor had become a dress shop.
▪ She worked as an assistant in a dress shop and it was important that she looked smart.
silk
▪ Lyddy interrupted her reverie with the cream silk dress laid across her arms like an offering.
▪ Something about the slave girl fascinated Heather as she took in the pink silk dress hugging the curves of her body.
▪ Lucy wore a petrol blue watered silk dress with matching velvet jacket and had hyacinth pips in her hair.
▪ She was swathed in a red silk dress that fitted where it touched.
▪ She walked into his rooms without knocking, wearing an emerald-green silk dress, no hat, and the Conway pearls.
summer
▪ She was ready for Stephen promptly at eleven, wearing a summer dress of wild silk in a rich pink-peach colour.
▪ The countryside had put on its summer dress, so many shades of green and everything fresh and clean.
▪ Instead, I kissed her tenderly on the arm, just below the sleeve of her summer dress.
▪ Men in shirtsleeves and women in summer dresses were strolling around the airport and ice-cream vendors were doing a brisk trade.
▪ Her stomach rumbled with hunger and she was chilled in her light summer dress.
▪ She felt the full skirt of her Summer dress being swept up to bare her silken thighs and round firm bottom.
▪ Her pretty summer dress was soiled where she had knelt on the pavement.
▪ One wore a tattered summer dress in pink spotted cotton with double flounces, the other a pinafore over a checked blouse.
uniform
▪ In spite of the heat, parties in full dress uniform were sent to scour the countryside.
▪ My father attended in his dress uniform.
wedding
▪ Brides-to-be can also catch a glimpse of a specially commissioned wedding dress.
▪ That night I was again subjected to the ordeal by wedding dress.
▪ Inside, buried in acid-free tissue paper, was her wedding dress.
▪ So will the new wedding dress.
▪ He also designed Princess Margaret's wedding dress in 1960.
▪ I've got this smart suit on and Marie's wearing this white wedding dress with all these frilly bits.
■ VERB
buy
▪ Why not buy a dress with this year's fashion colour!
▪ Everybody seemed to have bought a new dress for the occasion, and she had hardly finished paying for her suit.
▪ And for each of the 15 girls buying dresses, there is an escort in need of a tuxedo.
▪ They reassured her that she looked beautiful, and she knew they had bought the dress for her.
put
▪ Every evening I watched Eliza and Georgiana putting on their new dresses and going out to parties.
▪ When Sonya brought in the food, I noticed she had put on a new dress.
▪ You put her dress and the necklace in the boiler room.
▪ But he begged sick and I put on my dress and we walked into the corn holding hands.
▪ All the same, most of them were splendid and she was glad she had put on a dress today.
▪ You know when a woman has a life change and puts on a new dress?
▪ Not only words, but ideas had to be put into other dress.
▪ She was sorry she had to put on the dress she had been wearing yesterday.
wear
▪ Zach put it on and when the jacket was done up it looked as if he was wearing a proper dress shirt.
▪ I was wearing my black dress and moved among the trees like a living shadow.
▪ She does a little pose, having worn a real party dress.
▪ She was singing on a stage in back of the bar and was wearing a black dress.
▪ Some of them wore dresses with bulky trainers showing at the bottom.
▪ She is wearing a black dress and pearls, and a stole is strewn on the front seat.
▪ She seemed to be wearing Anna's evening dress, long and black and trailing on the floor, winking with spangles.
▪ She was wearing a green print dress and a canvas hat with a sun visor.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
best dress/shoes/clothes etc
▪ Everyone was in black because their best clothes were for funerals, and everyone danced.
▪ I washed them, then dressed them in their best clothes, but never new ones.
▪ She had her best shoes on, and a new hat.
▪ She had the best dress sense of any girl in Benedict's and a passion for altering the colour of her hair.
▪ The best car, the wittiest put-down, and the best dress.
▪ The first best clothes were only for Sunday and when visitors came.
▪ The princess arrayed herself in her best clothes and jewels.
▪ They would never let you in alone, even though you are wearing your best clothes.
dressed (up) to the nines
▪ Now, remember the elegant woman, always dressed to the nines, with the infectious laugh.
dressed to kill
▪ In her black velvet cocktail dress, Elaine Russell was dressed to kill.
▪ Erica, who had been dressed to kill when he got to the flat, had agreed.
▪ He is dressed to kill with no place to go.
full-length skirt/dress/coat etc
get dressed
▪ I got dressed quickly and ran outside.
▪ Rob got dressed in a hurry.
▪ Sandra's in the bedroom getting dressed.
▪ After washing, we wandered around outside the tents drying in the sun and getting dressed.
▪ I just wanted to get dressed in peace.
▪ It took me fifteen minutes to get dressed.
▪ Liz dragged her out of bed and stood over her while she got dressed.
▪ Ruta, get dressed, get dressed quick.
▪ The nappy changes, the meal times, the endless trips round supermarkets, school times, getting dressed and so on?
it bag/dress/shoes etc
midi skirt/dress/coat
strapless dress/gown/bra
▪ She wore a dark green strapless dress with an enormous skirt.
▪ Susanna wore a black silk strapless dress.
suitably dressed/prepared/equipped etc
▪ But one must be suitably dressed for a country visit and I had absolutely nothing fit to wear.
▪ They, too, regardless of the loss of their leader, were intent on being suitably dressed for Bank Holiday.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Do you like my new dress?
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And for each of the 15 girls buying dresses, there is an escort in need of a tuxedo.
▪ Anita's dress, £180, Karen Boyd.
▪ Arrested for attending Quaker and Seeker meetings, he was excused by a judge who noted his fine dress.
▪ Her dress was sticking uncomfortably to her back and her palms were wet.
▪ Minna, as if she were proving some point, wore an old dress and had not bothered-to comb her hair properly.
▪ The first time I meet her, I wear an unflattering dress.
▪ Your spokesman will also need some advice on dress for television.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
all
▪ They were all dressed in black.
▪ He is dressed all in black, except for a white shirt.
▪ It was just too galling, seeing him all dressed up for some one else.
▪ Larger than he used to be, if not larger than life, he is dressed all in black.
▪ There are 11 people in the band, all dressed to project their own characters.
▪ Ralph asked their father as he did every time the family came out all dressed up.
▪ Another dead kid, and all dressed up in Mosse's old clothes.
▪ I have recoiled from a picture of myself in our family photograph album, all dressed up in this costume.
casually
▪ On one famous occasion Diana, barefoot and casually dressed in jeans, buttered toast for an astonished footman.
▪ She and her polite staff dress casually.
▪ I was more casually dressed in corduroys and a black leather jacket.
▪ Among them: Free everyone to dress casually because there are no credible studies linking job performance with attire.
▪ He was casually dressed and had a rumpled look.
▪ BankAmerica employees like dressing casually so much they are willing to pay for the privilege.
▪ He dressed casually in a red golfing sweater, pale blue trousers, and deceptively ordinary-looking hand-made shoes.
▪ Marsha sits at her office desk, casually dressed, as usual.
fully
▪ He was lying face downwards in the shadow of the short diving-board, fully dressed in a blazer and white linen trousers.
▪ He was still fully dressed, except for the jacket and he, literally, hugged his side of the bed.
▪ She took one step forward and toppled Mitch fully dressed in to the swimming-pool without a moment's hesitation.
▪ She was fully dressed, wearing a hat and coat.
▪ When the bell is deployed, the divers descend fully dressed.
▪ After a while I went back to my room and lay down, fully dressed, waiting.
▪ As I suspected, Richard was fully dressed.
smartly
▪ Elegantly restored ballroom that plays house, garage and disco to a smartly dressed, trendy crowd-no jeans or trainers.
▪ Each has a young, smartly dressed teacher in front of a blackboard.
▪ He was smartly dressed in a white shirt and dark trousers.
▪ The same guidelines apply as at more conventional interviews, including presenting yourself confidently and being smartly dressed.
▪ He was particularly smartly dressed in black trousers and waistcoat, white shirt and red bow-tie.
▪ Contrary to the popular stereotype, they take care to dress smartly, according to current youth fashions.
▪ In spite of the heat he was very smartly dressed in a dark three-piece suit.
▪ He was smartly dressed in a two piece suit.
up
▪ We thought anyone who dresses up in dresses we want to go and see.
▪ You really ought to dress up more, Cal.
▪ We don't dress up and go out dancing.
▪ I love to get dressed up.
▪ You don't have to get dressed up, I just like to.
▪ It was just too galling, seeing him all dressed up for some one else.
▪ Mum had dressed up, and was looking all sweet in a blue dress with a bow at the front.
▪ Dinah Asshe could not remember a time when she had not enjoyed dressing up.
well
▪ He passed the Post Office, where a young black man, tall and well dressed, stood talking quietly to himself.
▪ Sitting on the next bench were two young women, dazzling creatures, well dressed and well fed.
▪ This is partly because - as he realizes with a shock - he is remarkably well dressed.
▪ The mole: Handsome and well dressed as moles go; he wanted to marry Thumbelina.
▪ He could afford to dress well for the pay was good.
▪ Nora tried her best to get round the wartime restrictions so that Constance could be well dressed.
▪ Beyond that, it promises to provide a weekly primer on dopey and unctuous behavior among upscale hillbillies who dress well.
■ NOUN
body
▪ They also may apply cosmetics to provide a natural appearance, and then dress the body and place it in a casket.
▪ I myself questioned the royal physician who dressed the body for burial at Jedburgh Abbey, Duncan MacAirth.
▪ There was a line there of shabbily dressed shuffling bodies.
▪ What I felt I was doing, as I dressed my shivering body in layer upon layer, was protecting myself.
▪ Her wound was dressed, her body and clothes were clean, and her hair was neat.
clothes
▪ There were people dressed in gay bright clothes walking on the promenade.
▪ Teen-age girls cut their hair and dressed in baggy clothes to be less attractive to the mysterious killer.
▪ To blackmail a man because he likes dressing in women's clothes.
▪ Normal stores have security people dressed in such plain clothes you wonder how they can afford to do any shopping.
▪ When they wake they dress in the loosest clothes, skip breakfast and head for the tennis courts.
▪ Daniel removes Mordecai to rooms in Chelsea, dresses him in new clothes, and brings Mirah to her brother.
▪ They were both pale-faced, hot and dishevelled, and dressed in loose-fitting crumpled clothes.
▪ He is dressed in differ-ent clothes.
costume
▪ Everyone was dressed in Music Hall costume.
▪ Some have made pilgrimages to re-enact ancient rituals in caves, others have dressed in costumes and objects evoking traditional Goddess images.
▪ The dinner will be held in a marquee in Friary Gardens, Richmond, with guests dressed in Victorian costume.
▪ Consequently, Julius Caesar was dressed in Elizabethan costume because no one thought that he ought to be dressed any differently.
▪ I have recoiled from a picture of myself in our family photograph album, all dressed up in this costume.
▪ Staff dressed in period costume, and a photographic display recording the Branch's history was unveiled in the banking hall.
▪ Charles made himself up for the new role, and dressed in the new costume.
dinner
▪ He was dressed for dinner and she knew without doubt that they were not going to be invited to join him.
▪ Corinne and Joe dressed formally for dinner each evening, met in the small study for cocktails, and dined by themselves.
▪ He would stride on to the concert platform, a tall, self-assured man impeccably dressed in a dinner jacket.
▪ Pauline Davis taught the young man how to dress for a formal dinner and how to observe the required etiquette.
▪ Jim and William Reid don't dress for dinner.
▪ While we were dressing for dinner, Jasper spent a long time trying to teach me how to tie it.
▪ One day, it was a Saturday between matinee and evening, I got dressed to go for dinner.
▪ Tea was served at four-thirty, and after tea everybody would rush upstairs to dress for dinner.
evening
▪ The band, dressed in evening wear and sitting on a raised dais, were at the far end of the hall.
▪ You are dressed in formal evening clothes, and it is obvious you are competing in a ballroom dance contest.
hair
▪ In youth she would have dressed her hair to cover them.
▪ In the dark she put on a fresh silk dress and brushed her hair.
▪ She dried herself, dressed, brushed her hair and re-applied her make-up, then inspected her reflection in the mirror.
jeans
▪ On one famous occasion Diana, barefoot and casually dressed in jeans, buttered toast for an astonished footman.
▪ Alvin dressed in blue jeans, shirts and boots and looked like the renegade that he felt he was.
▪ Like her, he was dressed in jeans, and a denim shirt.
▪ She turned off the water and stepped out on to the rug, dried herself, and dressed in jeans and a shirt.
▪ Jimmy, dressed in jeans and a black leather jacket, had arrived on his motorbike.
▪ Then she dressed quickly in jeans and a long-sleeved shirt and pulled on her thick Aran cardigan.
▪ Young and slim, dressed in blue jeans and denim jacket, the man worked the Dancing Fly.
salad
▪ Use nonfat or low-fat salad dressing as a dip.
▪ Diet drinks and water are also unlimited ò Unlimited salad with fat-free dressing may be served with lunch and dinner.
▪ A lot of it, and some salad dressing.
▪ Add the salad dressing and any juice from the orange and mix well.
▪ Need a spicy low-fat salad dressing?
▪ She was in the middle of making a salad dressing when some one rang her doorbell.
▪ They suggest serving it for a light supper with couscous and a mesclun salad dressed with raspberry vinaigrette.&038;.
shirt
▪ He was smartly dressed in a white shirt and dark trousers.
▪ Gilfoyle sat in the dock dressed in a white shirt, dark blue tie, and grey cardigan.
▪ They washed at a pump behind the church, and each child was dressed in a clean shirt.
▪ He was dressed in a flannel shirt that was covered in sawdust.
▪ Jen came out of the bathroom, dressed in a shirt this time, and crawled into bed alongside me.
▪ He was fully dressed, his shirt creased enough to imply he had not been to bed at all.
suit
▪ He was dressed in a suit that looked as if it needed pressing.
▪ Some are dressed in business suits.
▪ The youths, aged about 15, dressed in brightly shell suits were riding mountain bikes.
▪ By now the cross-country vehicle had disgorged its complement of heavyweight occupants, also dressed in identical blue suits.
▪ As told to Cathy Troupp Peter was 33, six feet tall, and dressed in a well-worn suit and tie.
▪ He is dressed in an immaculate suit, but he is wearing bedroom slippers.
▪ There was a lovely picture of him on telly last night peering woefully over the fence dressed in snazzy suit.
▪ Although they were dressed formally in dark suits, both men were wearing heavy rubber boots in deference to winter.
uniform
▪ She dressed in an unvarying uniform of black ski pants and pink mohair pullover which became grubbier as the weeks passed.
▪ Row upon row they seemed to march, reminding Lucy of soldiers dressed in Prussian green uniforms.
▪ He was dressed in that uniform with its fancy red flashes when he came to Claudia's aid.
▪ The huts would look like they used to and inside there'd even be staff dressed in period uniform.
▪ Harvey was dressed in a khaki uniform with colonel's insignia on the collar.
▪ I woke before six and dressed in casual uniform and went to my office to get things ready for the day.
▪ There were others seated away from the table whose function was not clear to Holman, but three were dressed in military uniforms.
▪ She may be dressed in a different uniform, and therefore must explain her role to the patient.
window
▪ I will never forget, the shop windows were dressed beautifully with mauve velvet.
▪ The Raiders passing game was mere window dressing.
▪ It is, by itself, little more than window dressing on the part of the Government.
▪ Viewed in this light, the conference was mere window-dressing.
▪ Twelve Zekes were used as window dressing for the Akagi scenes.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
best dress/shoes/clothes etc
▪ Everyone was in black because their best clothes were for funerals, and everyone danced.
▪ I washed them, then dressed them in their best clothes, but never new ones.
▪ She had her best shoes on, and a new hat.
▪ She had the best dress sense of any girl in Benedict's and a passion for altering the colour of her hair.
▪ The best car, the wittiest put-down, and the best dress.
▪ The first best clothes were only for Sunday and when visitors came.
▪ The princess arrayed herself in her best clothes and jewels.
▪ They would never let you in alone, even though you are wearing your best clothes.
dress the part
▪ He would dress the part, even though he wore a cloak or hood.
▪ I had to admit he dressed the part.
▪ They dress the part and are convinced there's a market for them.
dressed (up) to the nines
▪ Now, remember the elegant woman, always dressed to the nines, with the infectious laugh.
dressed to kill
▪ In her black velvet cocktail dress, Elaine Russell was dressed to kill.
▪ Erica, who had been dressed to kill when he got to the flat, had agreed.
▪ He is dressed to kill with no place to go.
full-length skirt/dress/coat etc
get dressed
▪ I got dressed quickly and ran outside.
▪ Rob got dressed in a hurry.
▪ Sandra's in the bedroom getting dressed.
▪ After washing, we wandered around outside the tents drying in the sun and getting dressed.
▪ I just wanted to get dressed in peace.
▪ It took me fifteen minutes to get dressed.
▪ Liz dragged her out of bed and stood over her while she got dressed.
▪ Ruta, get dressed, get dressed quick.
▪ The nappy changes, the meal times, the endless trips round supermarkets, school times, getting dressed and so on?
it bag/dress/shoes etc
midi skirt/dress/coat
mutton dressed as lamb
strapless dress/gown/bra
▪ She wore a dark green strapless dress with an enormous skirt.
▪ Susanna wore a black silk strapless dress.
suitably dressed/prepared/equipped etc
▪ But one must be suitably dressed for a country visit and I had absolutely nothing fit to wear.
▪ They, too, regardless of the loss of their leader, were intent on being suitably dressed for Bank Holiday.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Dress the salad with lemon, olive oil, and a little black pepper.
Dress warmly - it's cold out.
▪ Ask Mom if she needs help dressing the turkey.
▪ Can you dress the kids while I make breakfast?
▪ Clean the area thoroughly before dressing the wound.
▪ How do most of the people dress at your office?
▪ It's a costume party, so she's dressing as a clown.
▪ Patty's just learning to dress herself.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Check that those who can dress themselves are coping.
▪ He dresses and acts more like a 36-year-old electrical engineer.
▪ I didn't dress it up; no wonder she took it as life letting her down once more.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Dress

Dress \Dress\ (dr[e^]s), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Dressed (dr[e^]st) or Drest; p. pr. & vb. n. Dressing.] [OF. drecier to make straight, raise, set up, prepare, arrange, F. dresser, (assumed) LL. directiare, fr. L. dirigere, directum, to direct; dis- + regere to rule. See Right, and cf. Address, Adroit, Direct, Dirge.]

  1. To direct; to put right or straight; to regulate; to order. [Obs.]

    At all times thou shalt bless God and pray Him to dress thy ways.
    --Chaucer.

    Note: Dress is used reflexively in Old English, in sense of ``to direct one's step; to address one's self.''

    To Grisild again will I me dresse.
    --Chaucer.

  2. (Mil.) To arrange in exact continuity of line, as soldiers; commonly to adjust to a straight line and at proper distance; to align; as, to dress the ranks.

  3. (Med.) To treat methodically with remedies, bandages, or curative appliances, as a sore, an ulcer, a wound, or a wounded or diseased part.

  4. To adjust; to put in good order; to arrange; specifically: (a) To prepare for use; to fit for any use; to render suitable for an intended purpose; to get ready; as, to dress a slain animal; to dress meat; to dress leather or cloth; to dress or trim a lamp; to dress a garden; to dress a horse, by currying and rubbing; to dress grain, by cleansing it; in mining and metallurgy, to dress ores, by sorting and separating them.

    And the Lord God took the man, and put him into the garden of Eden to dress it.
    --Gen. ii. 1

  5. When he dresseth the lamps he shall burn incense.
    --Ex. xxx. 7.

    Three hundred horses . . . smoothly dressed.
    --Dryden.

    Dressing their hair with the white sea flower.
    --Tennyson .

    If he felt obliged to expostulate, he might have dressed his censures in a kinder form.
    --Carlyle. (b) To cut to proper dimensions, or give proper shape to, as to a tool by hammering; also, to smooth or finish. (c) To put in proper condition by appareling, as the body; to put clothes upon; to apparel; to invest with garments or rich decorations; to clothe; to deck.

    Dressed myself in such humility. -- Shak.

    Prove that ever Idress myself handsome till thy return.
    --Shak. (d) To break and train for use, as a horse or other animal.

    To dress up or To dress out, to dress elaborately, artificially, or pompously. ``You see very often a king of England or France dressed up like a Julius C[ae]sar.''
    --Addison.

    To dress a ship (Naut.), to ornament her by hoisting the national colors at the peak and mastheads, and setting the jack forward; when dressed full, the signal flags and pennants are added.
    --Ham. Nav. Encyc.

    Syn: To attire; apparel; clothe; accouter; array; robe; rig; trim; deck; adorn; embellish.

Dress

Dress \Dress\, v. i.

  1. (Mil.) To arrange one's self in due position in a line of soldiers; -- the word of command to form alignment in ranks; as, Dress right, dress!

  2. To clothe or apparel one's self; to put on one's garments; to pay particular regard to dress; as, to dress quickly. ``To dress for a ball.''
    --Latham.

    To flaunt, to dress, to dance, to thrum.
    --Tennyson .

    To dress to the right, To dress to the left, To dress on the center (Mil.), to form alignment with reference to the soldier on the extreme right, or in the center, of the rank, who serves as a guide.

Dress

Dress \Dress\, n.

  1. That which is used as the covering or ornament of the body; clothes; garments; habit; apparel. ``In your soldier's dress.''
    --Shak.

  2. A lady's gown; as, silk or a velvet dress.

  3. Attention to apparel, or skill in adjusting it.

    Men of pleasure, dress, and gallantry. -- Pope.

  4. (Milling) The system of furrows on the face of a millstone.
    --Knight.

    Dress parade (Mil.), a parade in full uniform for review.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
dress

early 14c., "make straight; direct, guide, control, prepare for cooking," from Old French dresser, drecier "raise (oneself), address, prepare, lift, raise, hoist, set up, arrange, set (a table), serve (food), straighten, put right, direct," from Vulgar Latin *directiare, from Latin directus "direct, straight" (see direct (v.)).\n

\nSense of "decorate, adorn" is late 14c., as is that of "put on clothing." Original sense survives in military meaning "align columns of troops." Dress up "attire elaborately" is from 1670s; dressing down "wearing clothes less formal than expected" is from 1960. To dress (someone) down (1769) is ironical. Related: Dressed; dressing.

dress

c.1600, originally any clothing, especially that appropriate to rank or to some ceremony; sense of "woman's garment" is first recorded 1630s, with overtones of "made not merely to clothe but to adorn." Dress rehearsal first recorded 1828.

Wiktionary
dress

n. (context countable English) An item of clothing (usually worn by a woman or young girl) which both covers the upper part of the body and includes skirts below the waist. vb. (context obsolete reflexive intransitive English) To prepare oneself; to make ready. (14th-16thc.)

WordNet
dress
  1. adj. suitable for formal occasions; "formal wear"; "a full-dress uniform"; "dress shoes" [syn: full-dress]

  2. (of an occasion) requiring formal clothes; "a dress dinner"; "a full-dress ceremony" [syn: full-dress]

dress
  1. n. a one-piece garment for a woman; has skirt and bodice [syn: frock]

  2. clothing of a distinctive style or for a particular occasion; "formal attire"; "battle dress" [syn: attire, garb]

  3. clothing in general; "she was refined in her choice of apparel"; "he always bought his clothes at the same store"; "fastidious about his dress" [syn: apparel, wearing apparel, clothes]

dress
  1. v. put on clothes; "we had to dress quickly"; "dress the patient"; "Can the child dress by herself?" [syn: get dressed] [ant: undress]

  2. provide with clothes or put clothes on; "Parents must feed and dress their child" [syn: clothe, enclothe, garb, raiment, tog, garment, habilitate, fit out, apparel] [ant: undress]

  3. put a finish on; "dress the surface smooth"

  4. dress in a certain manner; "She dresses in the latest Paris fashion"; "he dressed up in a suit and tie" [syn: dress up]

  5. dress or groom with elaborate care; "She likes to dress when going to the opera" [syn: preen, primp, plume]

  6. kill and prepare for market or consumption; "dress a turkey" [syn: dress out]

  7. arrange in ranks; "dress troops" [syn: line up]

  8. decorate (food), as with parsley or other ornamental foods [syn: trim, garnish]

  9. provide with decoration; "dress the windows" [syn: decorate]

  10. put a dressing on; "dress the salads"

  11. cultivate, tend, and cut back the growth of; "dress the plants in the garden" [syn: snip, clip, crop, trim, lop, prune, cut back]

  12. cut down rough-hewn (lumber) to standard thickness and width

  13. convert into leather; "dress the tanned skins"

  14. apply a bandage or medication to; "dress the victim's wounds"

  15. give a neat appearance to; "groom the dogs"; "dress the horses" [syn: groom, curry]

  16. arrange attractively; "dress my hair for the wedding" [syn: arrange, set, do, coif, coiffe, coiffure]

Wikipedia
Dress

A dress (also known as a frock or a gown) is a garment consisting of a skirt with an attached bodice (or a matching bodice giving the effect of a one-piece garment). In Western culture, dresses are more often worn by women and girls.

The hemlines of dresses vary depending on the whims of fashion and the modesty or personal taste of the wearer.

Dress (disambiguation)

A dress is a garment consisting of a skirt with an attached bodice or with a matching bodice giving the effect of a one-piece garment.

Dress may also refer to:

  • Clothing in general
  • Costume, fancy dress
  • Standard diving dress, the old heavy canvas diving suit with a large metal helmet
  • DRESS syndrome, Drug Rash (or Reaction) with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms, also known as Drug Hypersensitivity Syndrome
  • "Dress" (Buck-Tick song), 1993
  • "Dress" (PJ Harvey song), 1991
  • Dress (film), an award winning short film

As a verb:

Dress (PJ Harvey song)

"Dress" is the debut single by English singer-songwriter PJ Harvey from her debut album Dry. Released in 1991, two promotional music videos were also recorded.

Dress (Buck-Tick song)

"Dress" is the seventh single released by the Japanese rock band Buck Tick, released on May 21, 1993. It appeared 6 times in the Oricon Chart during 1993.

Dress (film)

Dress is an award winning short film shot in Hawaii and directed by Henry Ian Cusick who also plays the lead role of Ben Granger.

Usage examples of "dress".

The beautifully rolled lawns and freshly painted club stand were sprinkled with spring dresses and abloom with sunshades, and coaches and other vehicles without number enclosed the farther side of the field.

On the dressing table, ably guarded by a dark Regency armchair cushioned in yet another floral, sat an assemblage of antique silver-hair accessories and crystal perfume flacons, the grouping flanked by two small lamps, everything centered around a gold Empire vanity mirror.

Even so dressed, James Ludlow managed to look slightly out of place, very like a man who was too refined for life aboard a ship.

The wound was still abscessed, its dressing changed twice a day, but now Harper and Isabella had to wipe the sweat that poured from Sharpe and listen to the ravings that he muttered day and night.

I had all the clothing, body armor, abseil kit, the lot, and the weapons that any member of the assault group would be taking, and there was Fat Boy, who was dressed up in the kit.

I liked the way the hem of her dress flapped over her legs, the dust coming aburst like a big gray flower all around her.

Sachs dressed in the white Tyvek suit and accessorized with rubber bands around her feet.

She ached to be outside in the fresh air, to be dressed in her oldest jeans, turning over spades full of soft loamy earth, feeling the excitement and pleasure of siting the bulbs, of allowing her imagination to paint for her the colourful picture they would make in the spring, in their uniform beds set among lawn pathways and bordered by a long deep border of old-fashioned perennial plants.

Because of their acidity the leaves make a capital dressing with stewed lamb, veal, or sweetbread.

At the second ballet at the opera an actress dressed in a tippet held out her cap to the bones as if to beg an alms, while she was dancing a pas de deux.

He also took off a cloak of fine material, in which he had dressed himself that day, and dressed the king in it, and sent for some colored boots, which he put on his feet, and he put a large silver ring on his finger, because he had heard that he had admired greatly a silver ornament worn by one of the sailors.

Finding himself grievously wounded, and the blood flowing apace, he, with such presence of mind as cannot be sufficiently admired, instead of proceeding to the palace, which was at some distance, ordered the coachman to return to Junqueria, where his principal surgeon resided, and there his wounds were immediately dressed.

He was thinking of something so widely different, being seated, in fact, just opposite to Sara, who, fresh from her afternoon sleep, was looking adorably pensive in her black dress edged with a soft white frill that took a heart-shaped curve in front, just wide enough to show the exquisite hollow in the lower part of her throat.

She begged me to go into her sitting-room while she dressed, and we then went down and dined with the wretched secretary, who adored her, whom she did not love, and who must have borne small love to me, seeing how high I stood in her graces.

I had bought them dresses and linen in abundance, they were well lodged and well fed, I took them to the theatre and to the country, and the consequence was they all adored me, and seemed to think that this manner of living would go on for ever.