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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
cursor
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
key
▪ This is placed between two staves and moved to wherever you want it by using the cursor keys.
▪ These people supposedly cherished cursor keys and took deep offense at their absence on Macintosh.
▪ That said, editing in the old-fashioned way - with cursor keys - is probably quicker anyway, and works just as well.
position
▪ A function returning the vertical cursor position.
▪ The text of that paragraph, from the cursor position down, will move down to the next line.
▪ The second defines a procedure which clears from the current cursor position to the end of line on an 80 column screen.
■ VERB
move
▪ Then, hold down the Shift key and move the cursor to the end of the block you want selected.
▪ Press 1. 8. Move the cursor to position 1 of the first row. 9.
▪ To check how much a paragraph is inset move the cursor into that paragraph and look at the ruler line.
▪ Just move the cursor and type away.
▪ If you delete a character by mistake, move the cursor to where it was lost and type it in again.
▪ In text editing, moving the cursor is a single-click.
▪ In the Command Area they move the cursor between prompts and between branches of the Command tree.
▪ This moves the cursor back one tab stop. 6.
place
▪ The mouse pointer can be used to place the text cursor anywhere on the document and also to activate menus and commands.
▪ Press Home Home up arrow. 2. Place the cursor on the word origin in the first paragraph.
▪ Do this on the entry line by placing the cursor at each cell reference in turn and pressing F4.
▪ Press Enter twice to place the cursor on the Type of Forms option. 7.
▪ Alterations made by placing the cursor between two such embedded marks will conform with those instructions.
▪ But if you place the cursor on a word, double-clicking the mouse highlights that word.
▪ Press F4 to place the cursor on the indented position. 5.
▪ Press Home Home up arrow to place the cursor at the beginning of the document. 5.
use
▪ This is placed between two staves and moved to wherever you want it by using the cursor keys.
▪ Each instantiation will appear in the suspended activities list and you may use the cursor control keys to select the appropriate instantiation.
▪ Figure 5.15 Point locations on an image can be found using a cross-wire cursor.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ All other text editing and file commands are made with an active cursor in the Command Area.
▪ Make sure that your cursor is in the sum column of the answer table, and choose the option Image Graph Viewgraph.
▪ Place the cursor at the start of the first row, on the S in Stanley C.. Arkin. 2.
▪ Press Enter twice to place the cursor on the Type of Forms option. 7.
▪ So to search the entire document, first move the cursor to either its start or end.
▪ These movements are directly converted to movements of the screen cursor, or pointer as it is ten called.
▪ These people supposedly cherished cursor keys and took deep offense at their absence on Macintosh.
▪ To check how much a paragraph is inset move the cursor into that paragraph and look at the ruler line.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Cursor

Cursor \Cur"sor\ (k?r"s?r), n. [L., a runner. See Cursitor.] Any part of a mathematical instrument that moves or slides backward and forward upon another part.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
cursor

computer sense is 1967 extension of name for the sliding part of a slide rule or other instrument (1590s), earlier "a running messenger" (c.1300), from Latin cursor "runner," also "errand-boy," from curs-, past participle stem of currere "to run" (see current (adj.)).

Wiktionary
cursor

n. 1 A part of any of several scientific instruments that moves back and forth to indicate a position 2 (context graphical user interface English) A moving icon or other representation of the position of the pointing device. 3 (context graphical user interface English) An indicator, often a blinking line or bar, indicating where the next insertion or other edit will take place. Also referred to as "the caret". 4 (context databases English) A reference to a row of data in a table, which moves from row to row as data is retrieved by way of it. 5 (context programming English) A design pattern in object oriented methodology in which a collection is iterated uniformly, also known as the iterator pattern. vb. (context intransitive computing English) To navigate by means of the cursor keys.

WordNet
cursor

n. (computer science) indicator consisting of a movable spot of light (an icon) on a visual display; moving the cursor allows the user to point to commands or screen positions [syn: pointer]

Wikipedia
Cursor (user interface)

In computer user interfaces, a cursor is an indicator used to show the current position for user interaction on a computer monitor or other display device that will respond to input from a text input or pointing device. The mouse cursor is also called a pointer, owing to its resemblance in usage to a pointing stick.

CURSOR

CURSOR: Programs for PET Computers was the name of an early computer-based "magazine" that was distributed on cassette from 1978 and into the early 1980s. Each issue, consisting of the cassette itself and a short newsletter including a table of contents, contained programs, utilities, and games. Produced for users of the Commodore PET, and available by subscription only, CURSOR was a forerunner of the later disk magazines ("diskmags") that came about as floppy disk drives became common, and eventually ubiquitous, in home and personal computing during the 1980s.

Ron Jeffries and Glen Fisher, of the software company The Code Works of Goleta, California, was CURSOR's publisher and editor, respectively.

Each issue came with five or six programs, preceded by a "cover page" program (which was initially a simple animation, but in later issues became more sophisticated, allowing the user to select a program to be loaded from the tape). Among programs circulated by CURSOR included rudimentary animations, such as "Dromeda", which was an adaptation of the film The Andromeda Strain; games, such as a version of the Star Trek text-based campaign game, "Twonky" (a version of Hunt the Wumpus), and "Ratrun", an early dungeon crawl-style game (only with the player as a mouse searching for a piece of cheese in a 3D maze); and simple utility programs such as spreadsheets and code-tweakers (including a utility that allowed the PET to display lower-case lettering). Initially, programs (specifically games and animations) distributed on Cursor did not have sound, as the PET did not initially have this capability. As external audio devices such as Soundware became available for PET models, sound-capable programs began to appear in Cursor; these programs were identified by an exclamation point (!) in the title. For example: "Aliens!" or "Dromeda!".

CURSOR was discontinued in the early 1980s when the PET was superseded by other platforms. In total, 30 issues of the magazine were published. Issue #30 had the date May, 1982.

Cursor (databases)

In computer science, a databasecursor is a control structure that enables traversal over the records in a database. Cursors facilitate subsequent processing in conjunction with the traversal, such as retrieval, addition and removal of database records. The database cursor characteristic of traversal makes cursors akin to the programming language concept of iterator.

Cursors are used by database programmers to process individual rows returned by database system queries. Cursors enable manipulation of whole result sets at once. In this scenario, a cursor enables the rows in a result set to be processed sequentially.

In SQL procedures, a cursor makes it possible to define a result set (a set of data rows) and perform complex logic on a row by row basis. By using the same mechanics, a SQL procedure can also define a result set and return it directly to the caller of the SQL procedure or to a client application.

A cursor can be viewed as a pointer to one row in a set of rows. The cursor can only reference one row at a time, but can move to other rows of the result set as needed.

Usage examples of "cursor".

At a guess, he called the furies of the southern air to assist Amara or one of the other Cursors northeither to the capital or to the Valley itself.

Now he was turning onto La Cienega and the little green cursor on the clash was doing the same.

Smith input the English approximation, activated the conversion program and in a moment the Arabic script equivalent to the words Iftah ya simsim appeared in the wake of the blinking amber cursor, which moved right to left, the direction Arabic script was read.

He fiddled with the control, producing a pair of cursors which indicated two systems: Griffin and Redwing.

He took her into the volunteer center, where volunteers ignored ringing telephones and blinking cursors on computer screens to stare.

Kristian zipped the cursor to the item he wanted, clicked on it, and the screen changed again.

When the menu appeared on the screen, she moved the cursor down to the program she wanted and clicked the mouse.

He tapped out the appropriate code and saw the cursor outline a second orbit, deviating by several degrees from the earlier one and with the return path intersecting the orbit of the fifth planet and spiraling in!

Then he transferred his hands from the trackball and cursor keys to the laptop’.

As a way to get started, he pulled the chair close to the keyboard and pressed the cursor keys.

Sandra tapped the cursor keys on her palmtop computer, consulting her list of questions.

He moved the cursor to Financial Market Information and hit enter.

Johnnie snapped open the cover of his own controls, slid the magenta cursor along the docks with his joystick, and began tapping a function key.

But Kelly was not listening, she was pressing more buttons and moving the cursor, already trying to get something to happen, to get a help screen, something.

Honor and Henries looked at him, and he used the holo controls to throw a cursor into the display.