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Crossword clues for crime

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
crime
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a crime carries a penalty
▪ Murder carries a minimum penalty of 15 years in prison.
a crime carries a sentence (=that is the punishment for that crime)
▪ Rape should carry an automatic life sentence.
a crime drama (=about a crime or crimes)
▪ 'American Gangster' is a crime drama set in 1970s New York.
a crime wave (=a sudden increase in crime)
▪ The city is experiencing a crime wave.
a news/crime/sports reporter
▪ He started as a news reporter on Radio 1.
a serious crime/offence
▪ Kidnapping is a serious crime.
a violent crime
▪ He has a number of convictions for violent crime.
a war crime (=a cruel act in a war which is against international law)
▪ They will be charged with war crimes.
alleged offence/crime/incident etc
▪ their alleged involvement in international terrorism
▪ The alleged victim made the complaint at a police station in York.
car crimeBritish English
▪ Car crime in the area has risen rapidly.
combat inflation/crime/racism etc
▪ To combat inflation, the government raised interest rates.
commit a crime/offence
▪ People who commit crimes end up in jail.
compound a crime/an offence etc
▪ He compounded the offence by calling his opponents liars.
crime wave
▪ More police officers are being brought in to help tackle the current crime wave.
crime/accident/fire etc prevention
▪ Effective crime prevention must be our main goal.
▪ a fire prevention officer
crime/drug etc kingpin
▪ a mafia kingpin
crime/economic/unemployment etc statistics
▪ The economic statistics tell a grim story.
cut crime
▪ Cameras have helped to cut crime in the town centre.
despicable crime
▪ a despicable crime
gang crime (=crime committed by gangs)
▪ The initiative aims to cut gang crime in Los Angeles.
hate crime
heinous crime
▪ a heinous crime
knife crime (=crimes in which people are attacked with knives)
▪ Knife crime is on the increase.
organized crime
▪ Organized crime is involved in drug trafficking.
soft on crime
▪ No politician wants to seem soft on crime.
solve a crime/case
▪ The crime was never solved.
street crime/violence (=when people are attacked in the street)
▪ Young men are most likely to be victims of street crime.
tackle crime
▪ The police set up a special task force to tackle street crime in the capital.
the crime rate
▪ Our crime rate is one of the lowest in the country.
the punishment should fit the crime (=it should be appropriate)
▪ The public believe that the punishment should fit the crime.
turn to drink/crime/drugs etc
▪ addicts who turn to crime to finance their habit
war crime
▪ He was put on trial for war crimes.
war crimes tribunal (=court judging war crimes)
▪ an international war crimes tribunal
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
corporate
▪ Thus, such crimes as embezzlement and other examples of employee theft will not be included in this discussion of corporate crime.
▪ The practice fosters corporate crime, and the governing ethic-that public service ought not be parlayed into private profitis often eclipsed.
▪ That definition, which is taken from Box's study, is rather long-winded, but corporate crime is a complex issue.
▪ But when bills are introduced in Congress to help curb the epidemic of corporate crime, there is an eerie silence.
▪ The evidence is, in the case of corporate crime, that nothing much happens by way of public scandal and social ruin.
▪ Before proceeding to estimate the costs of corporate crime, one last distinction needs to be made.
▪ Indifference rather than intention may be the cause of greater human suffering, particularly with regard to corporate crime.
▪ Below we will concentrate on an examination of corporate, business crime, the law-breaking of businesses and corporations.
heinous
▪ The argument of all crackdown law is that it applies special, draconian measures to tackle some heinous crime.
▪ We not only face the heinous crimes dead on, we face our fellow viewers.
▪ For Mankins, seeing Harris die was simple retribution for a heinous crime.
high
▪ Both types of survey show a far higher figure for crimes committed than do the official statistics produced by the police.
▪ His ruling may have been an abomination, but it was neither a high crime nor a misdemeanor.
▪ A succession of sensational crimes has capped a 23-year high in serious crimes.
▪ Studies show a disproportionately high amount of crime attributable to kids born after long, difficult labors with forceps deliveries.
▪ It is no use the Home Secretary saying that the high crime rate is due to other factors.
▪ Starring newcomer Johnny Depp, it was about four young cops who battled high school crime.
▪ When the economy is bad and unemployment high, crime is rife.
▪ Not a necessary social misdemeanor, as most bootlegging was contemporaneously regarded, but a high crime in any age.
juvenile
▪ Mr Clarke also stressed the role of schools in combating juvenile crime and demanded more effective treatment of disruptive pupils.
▪ Governor Bush has made his mark building prisons, toughening laws on juvenile crime and calling for lower property taxes.
▪ I emphasise that juvenile crime is not the same as adult crime.
▪ The breakdown of community has brought far more problems than personal malaise, of course. Juvenile crime is up.
▪ Children of welfare-dependent single-parent families have neither a monopoly on juvenile crime nor a disdain for conventional values.
▪ Between 1990 and 1994, there was a 57 percent increase in juvenile violent crime arrests.
▪ Kids Count also reports a 47 percent rise in juvenile violent crime arrests since 1985.
▪ By comparison, Sanders said juvenile crime has been up significantly in many other big cities.
only
▪ This is the only crime for which the judges concede there is sufficient evidence.
▪ Once upon a time the only crime in this neck of the woods was domestic.
▪ Mr Clinton's only crime so far is to have been accused by an ageing cabaret artiste of infidelity.
▪ Now he was dead, brutally murdered, and Corbett knew his only crime was that some one had watched them talk.
▪ Violence was the only crime for which he found any link with unemployment.
▪ Tell the King that Mohamed Srifi's only crime seems to have been the expression of his peaceful political views.
▪ Street robbery was not the only crime to be viewed leniently in the interwar years.
▪ In that respect, Johnson's only crime was naïvety.
petty
▪ As the years had progressed a series of petty crimes had seen him in remand homes, borstals and finally prison.
▪ Economic deprivation has increased both petty and violent crimes, turning some cities into murder capitals.
▪ He has convictions there for a number of theft and similar petty crime offences since leaving St Patrick's.
▪ Johnson had two prior convictions for residential burglaries and a history of petty crimes.
▪ The place was suffused with struggle and resentment and frustration. Petty crime was commonplace.
▪ How do three-strikers endure the thought of spending life in prison for a relatively petty crime?
▪ If the government no longer differentiates between petty crime and murder, why should they?
recorded
▪ Yet recorded crime fell by one-third despite increased willingness among the police and public to institute prosecutions.
▪ The statistics show that recorded crime is predominantly working-class.
▪ Firstly, improved police efficiency will affect the rate of recorded crime.
▪ Thus recorded crime can only be seen as an indication of criminal activity.
▪ Changes in either or both will produce changes in recorded crime trends.
▪ But this can not be taken as carteblanche for assuming that long-term recorded crime trends correspond to victimization.
▪ More than half of all recorded crimes are car crimes, involving the theft of vehicles or the theft of property from vehicles.
rising
▪ All those factors are linked to rising crime rates.
▪ Viktor Barannikov gave an old-style speech warning of the threat of foreign intelligence services and rising crime.
▪ He takes over at a time when latest figures show Gloucestershire with the fasting rising crime rate in the country.
▪ Voice over At Thames Valley police headquarters today rising crime statistics were on the agenda of a meeting of the police authority.
▪ The insurance industry is also very concerned about rising car crime.
▪ Read in studio Police have launched a new initiative to tackle a rising wave of crime.
▪ It's no good just bleating on about the rising tide of crime to get money out of the government.
serious
▪ Petty crime was commonplace. Serious crime was the stuff of stairhead gossip.
▪ Although the Navy had substantial evidence of several serious crimes, there was never a trial for any of them.
▪ Bigamy, for example, is a serious crime in Britain yet it is normal and accepted practice in other countries.
▪ The second man faces charges for being an accomplice to a serious crime.
▪ As we saw in Chapter 1, women commit fewer crimes, less serious crimes and do less often.
▪ Consider the following:-Statistically, only a small percentage of people become victims of a serious crime.
▪ New closed prisons were built for convicted offenders serving long fixed sentences or life imprisonment for the most serious crimes.
▪ However the failure of some one to go to mass is considered to be a serious crime.
soft
▪ On Saturday, Dole piled on, using Napolitano to blast Clinton judicial appointees as soft on crime.
▪ But criticism of the Stack nomination is not the same as accusing Clinton of being soft on crime.
▪ Dole aides believe they can paint the president as soft on crime by hammering his judicial nominees.
tough
▪ If Feinstein takes on Lungren, she must have a Washington record of being tough on crime.
▪ Everyone wants to get tough on crime, until the bill comes in.
violent
▪ Most of those arrested were reported to have been previously convicted of drug and arms trafficking and violent crimes.
▪ It is by now well known that about half of all violent crime is committed by and against blacks.
▪ There is now much more public demand for support to the victims of violent crime.
▪ As a police reporter for the Miami Herald, she covered thousands of murders and other violent crimes.
▪ The state executes drug smugglers, murderers, rapists and those convicted of other violent crimes.
▪ Between 1990 and 1994, there was a 57 percent increase in juvenile violent crime arrests.
▪ Overall crime rates fell by 2.7 % in the year to March, but violent crime increased.
▪ Kids Count also reports a 47 percent rise in juvenile violent crime arrests since 1985.
■ NOUN
car
▪ Higher insurance as car crime rockets.
▪ By then, car crime had pushed insurance rates up beyond the ozone and way past the stratosphere.
▪ Two types of car crime offenders concern us.
▪ Painfully little has been done specifically to tackle car crime, which is a major aspect of youth crime.
▪ And the more car crime there is, the more it costs to insure.
▪ The police have taken action to combat the wave of car crime.
▪ More than 1.5 million car crimes were committed last year, one in five by people under 21, a survey found.
▪ More than half of all recorded crimes are car crimes, involving the theft of vehicles or the theft of property from vehicles.
hate
▪ Murder, rape and other hate crimes could be a mere provocation away.
▪ Vista Unified School District trustees became so concerned that they now expel students caught committing hate crimes.
▪ The Anti-Defamation League has compiled hate crime statistics from law enforcement throughout the county and recorded 413 incidents from 1992-94.
▪ Exactly what makes a hate crime?
▪ But Roth said investigations showed few of the reports reflected actual hate crimes.
▪ On Tuesday, Symington vetoed a bill that would have allowed judges to increase prison sentences for hate crimes.
▪ Thirty-six states have similar hate-crimes laws, and reports of hate crimes have been on the rise in Arizona, Woods says.
▪ And statewide, only 215 of 750 law enforcement agencies reported any hate crimes.
prevention
▪ Talk about crime and crime prevention.
▪ Last month, the governor's office announced the county would get $ 10.3 million from a statewide crime prevention act.
▪ Ten schools from the area took part in the competition which tested knowledge of crime prevention and personal safety.
▪ But Stevens said the goal should be set higher to give officers more time for crime prevention.
▪ But some speakers emphasised the importance of crime prevention, community liaison and education.
▪ I can confirm, however, that on 11 February I shall announce a major campaign - car crime prevention year.
▪ They offer confidential counselling, basic crime prevention advice and help with practical details like insurance claims.
▪ So crime prevention should be too.
rate
▪ All those factors are linked to rising crime rates.
▪ Truancy rates have dropped 42 percent, and daytime crime rates have dropped 35 percent.
▪ He failed to make only one comparison - that on crime rates.
▪ Yet when crime rates rise, the police buy more squad cars.
▪ Any Government who are seriously concerned about dealing with the escalating crime rate must begin to tackle crime at its roots.
▪ Warlock has gone so far as to link the rate of out-of-wedlock births to crime rates.
▪ He takes over at a time when latest figures show Gloucestershire with the fasting rising crime rate in the country.
▪ And the male crime rate during any nine-day period is still higher than the female crime rate during the premenstrual period.
scene
▪ Unfortunately, there was no solid proof of this beyond his own memory of the previous crime scenes.
▪ John Night Sky, you must visit a variety of colorful crime scenes, gathering evidence and interviewing suspects and witnesses.
▪ After the incident, police allegedly allowed hospital officials to clean up the crime scene, destroying any evidence.
▪ The Bruno Magli shoes linked to the crime scene are a particularly rare and pricey style.
▪ Of how evidence was moved at the crime scene.
▪ But sitting through nearly 111 minutes of bloody crime scenes, test-tube shots and gruesome autopsy scenes is just unpleasant and boring.
▪ Investigators have said the crime scene outside Scuttons' computer store produced little usable evidence.
▪ Petrocelli also produced 31 photos of Simpson wearing the same style Bruno Magli shoes that left bloody footprints at the crime scene.
statistics
▪ The best example of this is crime statistics.
▪ They agree about the seriousness of the crime statistics and the importance of full disclosure.
▪ Voice over At Thames Valley police headquarters today rising crime statistics were on the agenda of a meeting of the police authority.
▪ The Anti-Defamation League has compiled hate crime statistics from law enforcement throughout the county and recorded 413 incidents from 1992-94.
▪ It is normal, then, to expect a high representation of black youth in youthful crime statistics.
▪ They say that crime statistics have fallen among nearly all age groups nationwide.
▪ If Catholics figure disproportionately in the crime statistics, it is because Protestants are more law-abiding.
▪ At that meeting on July 10, the board was stunned by an independent audit of four years of crime statistics.
street
▪ The 1989 Home Office report found that victims of burglary become more fearful of street crime as well.
▪ Yet, viewing the Situation rationally, there are no old perpetrators of street crimes.
▪ More police officers visibly going about their business is the most commonly advanced solution to street crime.
▪ Citizens in inner-city areas are desperately worried and rightly so, about street crime.
▪ Manchester police have an even simpler explanation for the current rise in street crime.
▪ From there they go to Madrid and Barcelona, where they are already being blamed for an increase in street crime.
▪ Apart from a few pickpockets in Rangoon, street crime does not exist.
tribunal
▪ The outside world talks of a war crimes tribunal but nobody supposes that anything will come of that.
▪ Today, that could land you in front of a war crimes tribunal.
▪ External pressure for an independent, international war crimes tribunal has been rebuffed.
▪ Milosevic has been indicted by the U.N. war crimes tribunal.
▪ If it ever comes to a war crimes tribunal for him, our town can provide a few witnesses for the prosecution.
victim
▪ At a ceremony at the Capitol to honor crime victims, Gov.
▪ Officials were required to obtain such a statement under a federal program for crime victims.
war
▪ It was set up after a three-year campaign by an all-party war crimes group.
▪ Milosevic has been indicted by the U.N. war crimes tribunal.
▪ Others have spoken of war crimes and reparations.
▪ The outside world talks of a war crimes tribunal but nobody supposes that anything will come of that.
▪ The new democratic regime has carried out very few investigations into war crimes.
▪ The conspiracy succeeded in frustrating the United Nations war crimes investigation.
▪ He is also indicted for war crimes.
wave
▪ Along with other rural areas, the villages have suffered a crime wave recently.
▪ On Wednesday, he said he will help Maskhadov fight a postwar crime wave.
▪ He believes the police are overstretched and moves are urgently needed to tackle Darlington's crime wave.
▪ He was part of a crime wave that shot up a house, robbed some one and then killed some one else.
▪ A supposed crime wave is sweeping the land.
▪ The crime wave that spurred them has been falling steadily in times of greater economic prosperity.
▪ He concludes that changes in genetic factors obviously can not explain the crime wave.
▪ The election-year crime wave is starting in Congress.
youth
▪ These predictions have yet to materialise, and youth crime rates have been on the decline for several years.
▪ Anyone wishing to tackle crime rates must pay enormous attention to youth crime because of its sheer scale.
▪ Painfully little has been done specifically to tackle car crime, which is a major aspect of youth crime.
▪ There is a tidal wave of youth crime, and the Government have not begun to answer it.
▪ They blame youth crime on unemployment and lack of respect for the law.
▪ Voice over Joyriding is the youth crime of the 90s.
▪ There is a national crisis of youth crime, but the Bill does not deal with its roots.
■ VERB
accuse
▪ But it should apply to the accused too until the crime is proved.
▪ This is not about depriving people accused of crimes of their legitimate rights, including the presumption of innocence.
▪ Two prisoners are accused of a crime.
▪ Weeks later, on July 12, 1986, Hall and her then-husband, Peter, were accused of the crime.
▪ Oh, nobody can accuse me of a crime.
▪ The subjects of the investigation have not been accused of any crimes.
▪ He had not been accused of a crime, yet Curtis Brown spent 10 of his last days in a jail cell.
allege
▪ Military prosecutors have brought charges in only eight alleged crimes against Chechen civilians.
▪ Ratko Mladic, are brought to justice for alleged war crimes.
charge
▪ He is charged with 20 war crimes, including genocide and crimes against humanity.
▪ President Lazaro Cardenas outlawed casinos during his 1934-1940 term in office, charging they promoted crime and vice.
▪ Their goal is not money, but freedom for a client charged with a crime he did not commit.
▪ The 17-year-old has not been charged with the crime.
▪ On the other hand, every person charged with a crime is entitled to testify to his own intentions.
▪ The farmers, in Buner, an area controlled by the government, were charged with the crime of growing opium.
▪ She was not under arrest, nor charged with any crime.
combat
▪ Breeders have established their own intelligence network in a bid to combat the crime.
▪ Vasconcellos has long argued that to combat crime, the state should attack the root causes, such as low self-esteem.
▪ Murders too were more frequent, and in order to combat the rising crime rate parliament introduced a psychological deterrent.
▪ To combat crime effectively, the police need the full support of the Government and the public.
▪ Tonight he starts his series of reports with a look at how to combat crime.
▪ He supported the demand for private farmers to be allowed the use of firearms to combat rising crime against them.
▪ The long-term strategy to combat knife crimes through schemes like Operation Blade is to achieve a change in the law.
▪ The police are increasingly looking to technology - and to information technology in particular - to help them combat increasing crime.
commit
▪ Women nevertheless do commit crimes and contribute to the tariff of most offence categories.
▪ Vista Unified School District trustees became so concerned that they now expel students caught committing hate crimes.
▪ Perpetrators of such crimes are legally permitted shorter prison terms than those who commit similar crimes for other reasons.
▪ There is a general belief that police commit nearly as many crimes as they prevent or solve.
▪ Those are the people who commit most car crime and who take away and drive away most motor vehicles.
▪ Mesa was acquitted a year later of committing a crime on the two women.
▪ Male speaker A lot of law-abiding youngsters may feel the way to get a holiday is to commit a crime.
▪ We do not intend to commit any crimes.
convict
▪ Table 3.1 below shows the ratio of females to males convicted for certain crimes and makes clear the male domination of criminality.
▪ Years after the bombing, a former Klansman was convicted of the crime.
▪ The nightmare of being wrongly accused and convicted of a crime certainly sends shivers down my spine.
▪ Naturalization Service improperly permitted naturalization of immigrants convicted of serious crimes.
▪ The state executes drug smugglers, murderers, rapists and those convicted of other violent crimes.
▪ All but one had been convicted for violent crimes.
▪ Eight or nine men are convicted of crimes for every single female.
▪ He was convicted of 23 crimes and paroled in 1994.
fight
▪ And pleas from his predecessor for 50 more officers to fight crime have so far gone unanswered by the Home Office.
▪ The latest announcement was part of a series of programs the president has embraced since January to fight teen crime.
▪ It's a return to the old way of the community helping to fight crime.
▪ Neither are his ideas on fighting crime and courting voters.
▪ And 51 percent rated it above fighting crime.
▪ Male speaker It's important to discuss with the public how they can help the police to fight crime.
▪ He said the plans form part of a nationwide battle Fox has launched to fight corruption and crime.
involve
▪ Police work is only marginally involved in crime.
▪ Of necessity, some become involved in organized crime to survive.
▪ They are alleged to have dealt in drugs in the Milton Keynes and Aylesbury areas and were involved in car crime.
▪ Several Chinatown leaders have denied the Hip Sing is involved in crime.
▪ The feature-length pilot involved a number of crimes, strung like colourful washing on a line.
▪ Traces of more than 37, 000 guns from those cities show that Ring of Fire guns were often involved in crime.
▪ Most often they are involved in crimes against property - shop-lifting, burglary, vandalism.
▪ The program, popular in many departments, involves working to stop crime at its roots.
organize
▪ And war must be waged on organized crime.
▪ No, the smugglers were mostly from organized crime cartels based in Bombay.
▪ Of necessity, some become involved in organized crime to survive.
▪ The old joke went: Q.. What do they call organized crime in Oklahoma?
▪ The property claim signals prosecutors' intention to dismantle what they consider an organized crime syndicate.
▪ And I was thinking it was organized crime.
reduce
▪ His immediate focus is on eliminating high-level corruption and reducing violent crime.
▪ He noted that New York City had crime problems and that officials there successfully reduced crime without federal intervention.
▪ A little religion is thought, furthermore, to be the way to reduce crime and promote a stable society.
▪ A side benefit, according to the Dallas Police Force: reduced crime rates.
▪ The exact relationship between these objectives and reducing crime will depend on the specification of the programme and on the individual participant.
▪ Many people also stressed the need for increasing job opportunities and reducing crime in their neighborhoods.
▪ If in his new post as security overseer he can reduce crime, well and good.
▪ It is doubtful that such a new constitutional protection would do much to reduce crime.
report
▪ The recorded figures exaggerate the increase in victimization which is occurring, mainly because of a greater public propensity to report certain crimes.
▪ Only one in 10 rape victims reports the crime to authorities, he noted.
▪ It is hoped that this will make people feel safer and encourage them to report crimes.
▪ The biggest criticism was leveled against transit administrators for not following law enforcement standards for reporting crime.
▪ You should note that the penal codes of some nations impose time limits for the reporting of crime.
▪ And statewide, only 215 of 750 law enforcement agencies reported any hate crimes.
▪ So do not lose any more time in reporting this crime.
▪ The reported incidence of this crime rose 28. 6 percent between 1974 and 1983, more than any other major offense.
rise
▪ New Right philosophies, as applied in Britain, also exploited rising popular anxieties about crime and delinquency.
▪ Kids Count also reports a 47 percent rise in juvenile violent crime arrests since 1985.
solve
▪ Will Robin solve the fiendish crimes?
▪ The two casts of characters, although ostensibly cooperating to solve a crime of mutual interest, detest each other.
▪ The role of the press is rarely condemnatory of the police and usually supportive of the official efforts to solve crime.
▪ Koch decides once again to solve the crime.
▪ Besides, he reasoned, he might even get closer to solving the crime this way.
▪ He made no headway, came not one step closer to solving the crime.
▪ Sometimes they are keen to have media help in solving a crime, other times they are more reluctant.
▪ He has vowed to solve the crime almost as often as he has vowed to resume the life he used to live.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
capital offence/crime
▪ It is capital crime, and a black disgrace to the races of civilized mankind.
▪ Loss of privileges in peacetime; in war, a capital offence.
▪ New capital crimes would include the use of firearms; hostage-taking; torture; sale of drugs to minors and racketeering.
▪ No government has ever made abortion a capital crime or executed either a pregnant woman or an abortionist for murder.
▪ The word from Lilongwe now is that Chihana will be charged with sedition, a capital offence.
catalogue of mistakes/crimes/cruelty etc
copycat crime/attack etc
▪ However, 44% of you feel that these reports should leave the gory details out and 39% feel they encourage copycat crimes.
▪ What about fingerprints, copycat crimes and serial murders?
crime-buster/budget-buster/sanctions-buster etc
crime-busting/union-busting/budget-busting etc
partners in crime
▪ Imagine two criminals, partners in crime, who are arrested and placed in separate cells with no means of communication.
petty crime
▪ As the years had progressed a series of petty crimes had seen him in remand homes, borstals and finally prison.
▪ He has convictions there for a number of theft and similar petty crime offences since leaving St Patrick's.
▪ How do three-strikers endure the thought of spending life in prison for a relatively petty crime?
▪ If the government no longer differentiates between petty crime and murder, why should they?
▪ Johnson had two prior convictions for residential burglaries and a history of petty crimes.
▪ Stretched to the limit ... police chief says petty crime is going unchecked.
▪ There's petty crime and crime on a grand scale, well organised.
white-collar crime
▪ But white-collar crime seems to be the new image of the law profession.
▪ Crimes which are committed by those in higher positions in the social stratification system are commonly referred to as white-collar crimes.
▪ Edwin Sutherland's famous pioneering work in 1940 produced evidence that white-collar crime might be substantially underestimated in official criminal statistics.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Crime is a complex social problem with no single cause or solution.
▪ Compared to most cities, Cedar Rapids has very little crime.
▪ He was sentenced to 25 years in prison for rape and other sexual crimes against women.
▪ Increasing the number of patrol cars on the street has not had any effect on the level of serious crime.
▪ Investigators believe that the crime was committed at around 7.30 p.m.
▪ Not surprisingly, the police say that 50% of serious crimes are drug-related.
▪ Reynolds became involved in petty crime at a very young age.
▪ The demonstrators called on the governor to make solving the crime a priority.
▪ the growing problem of crime in the inner cities
▪ The number of crimes reported in the New York City area has decreased dramatically over the last ten years.
▪ Violent crime increased by 11% last year.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ For everyone there is a problem in understanding the nature of the crime when no motive can be identified.
▪ He called for making payment delinquency a felony crime in some cases.
▪ In his past, however, there is an unsolved crime that continues to torment him.
▪ The agency also recently hosted a meeting of prefectural police to coordinate investigations into crimes tied to the bad loans.
▪ The cops believe they have both participated in an alleged crime and wish to get one or both to give evidence.
▪ The police would let him use their files because he usually brought back good tips from the crime underworld.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Crime

Crime \Crime\ (kr[imac]m), n. [F. crime, fr. L. crimen judicial decision, that which is subjected to such a decision, charge, fault, crime, fr. the root of cernere to decide judicially. See Certain.]

  1. Any violation of law, either divine or human; an omission of a duty commanded, or the commission of an act forbidden by law.

  2. Gross violation of human law, in distinction from a misdemeanor or trespass, or other slight offense. Hence, also, any aggravated offense against morality or the public welfare; any outrage or great wrong. ``To part error from crime.''
    --Tennyson.

    Note: Crimes, in the English common law, are grave offenses which were originally capitally punished (murder, rape, robbery, arson, burglary, and larceny), as distinguished from misdemeanors, which are offenses of a lighter grade. See Misdemeanors.

  3. Any great wickedness or sin; iniquity.

    No crime was thine, if 'tis no crime to love.
    --Pope.

  4. That which occasion crime. [Obs.]

    The tree of life, the crime of our first father's fall.
    --Spenser.

    Capital crime, a crime punishable with death.

    Syn: Sin; vice; iniquity; wrong.

    Usage: Crime, Sin, Vice. Sin is the generic term, embracing wickedness of every kind, but specifically denoting an offense as committed against God. Crime is strictly a violation of law either human or divine; but in present usage the term is commonly applied to actions contrary to the laws of the State. Vice is more distinctively that which springs from the inordinate indulgence of the natural appetites, which are in themselves innocent. Thus intemperance, unchastity, duplicity, etc., are vices; while murder, forgery, etc., which spring from the indulgence of selfish passions, are crimes.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
crime

mid-13c., "sinfulness," from Old French crimne (12c., Modern French crime), from Latin crimen (genitive criminis) "charge, indictment, accusation; crime, fault, offense," perhaps from cernere "to decide, to sift" (see crisis). But Klein (citing Brugmann) rejects this and suggests *cri-men, which originally would have been "cry of distress" (Tucker also suggests a root in "cry" words and refers to English plaint, plaintiff, etc.). Meaning "offense punishable by law" is from late 14c. The Latin word is glossed in Old English by facen, also "deceit, fraud, treachery." Crime wave first attested 1893, American English.

Wiktionary
crime

n. 1 (context countable English) A specific act committed in violation of the law. 2 (context uncountable English) The practice or habit of committing crimes. 3 (context uncountable English) criminal acts collectively. 4 Any great wickedness or sin; iniquity. 5 (context obsolete English) That which occasions crime. vb. (lb en nonstandard rare) To commit #Noun(s).

WordNet
crime
  1. n. (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes" [syn: law-breaking]

  2. an evil act not necessarily punishable by law; "crimes of the heart"

Wikipedia
CRIME

CRIME ("Compression Ratio Info-leak Made Easy") is a security exploit against secret web cookies over connections using the HTTPS and SPDY protocols that also use data compression. When used to recover the content of secret authentication cookies, it allows an attacker to perform session hijacking on an authenticated web session, allowing the launching of further attacks. CRIME was assigned CVE-2012-4929.

Crime (disambiguation)

A crime is an act that violates the law.

Crime or Crimes or The Crime may also refer to:

Crime (band)

Crime was an early American punk band from San Francisco. The band was formed in 1976 by Johnny Strike (vocals, guitar), Frankie Fix (vocals, guitar), Ron "The Ripper" Greco (bass; ex- Flamin' Groovies), and Ricky Tractor ( Ricky Williams) (drums). Their debut, the self-financed double A-side, " Hot Wire My Heart" and "Baby You're So Repulsive", appeared at the end of 1976, and is the first single released by a U.S. punk act from the West Coast.

The band's sound was characterized by simple rock-and-roll arrangements played at intensely high volumes. Michael Goldberg, critic for New York Rocker magazine, wrote in 1978: "Crime play loud. So loud that the plate glass window at the opposite end of the club shakes, tables tremble and people hang onto their drinks. Loudness may be Crime's only musical raison d'etre. This band is a literal translation of the concept 'minimal.' Drummer Hank Rank thumps out a simple Bo Diddley beat that is only adequate in the context of the rest of the band. Bassist Ron the Ripper coaxes a thick rumble from his amp that reminds one of the thunder of a bulldozer rolling over rugged terrain. And the guitar playing of [Johnny] Strike and Frankie Fix make you feel like you've been forcefully held underwater for the full 25 minutes of the set."

In Issue #13 of Ugly Things Magazine, critic Mike Stax wrote: "CRIME's music didn't conform to the norm either. They didn't use the standard-issue highspeed buzzsaw guitar approach. Instead their noisy attacks were an unpredictable stew of clanging, howling guitars and shuddering rhythms - more of an intense sonic RUMBLE than anything else."

Crime (novel)

Crime is a 2008 novel by Scottish writer Irvine Welsh. It is the sequel to his earlier novel, Filth.

Usage examples of "crime".

He had figured to himself some passionate hysterique, merciless as a cat in her hate and her love, a zealous abettor, perhaps even the ruling spirit in the crime.

Probably these things counted as abominations, crimes against the common humanity in the Constitution.

If he wept at the sight of an old tapestry which represented the crime and punishment of the son of Chosroes, if his days were abridged by grief and remorse, we may allow some pity to a parricide, who exclaimed, in the bitterness of death, that he had lost both this world and the world to come.

But when the right to vote at any election for the choice of electors for President and Vice President of the United States, Representatives in Congress, the Executive and Judicial officers of a State, or the members of the Legislature thereof, is denied to any of the male inhabitants of such State, being twenty-one years of age, and citizens of the United States, or in any way abridged, except for participation in rebellion, or other crime, the basis of representation therein shall be reduced in the proportion which the number of such male citizens shall bear to the whole number of male citizens twenty-one years of age in such State.

Bushranging was revived on an unprecedented scale, so were crimes of violence, and men absconded almost at will.

I read, and turning my face to the Heavens, thanked God that I was absolved by the dear subject of my crimes.

The fact that these drug abusers were in jail proved, once and for all, that drugs drove people to crime.

Glenn Alien Abies and Charles Mellis are charged with serious crimes and pose an immediate threat to the community.

Maybe somebody posted it on their intranet just as a convenience to their own employees, never realizing that it made the information available to everyone on the Internet who has access to a good search engine such as Google -including the just-plain-curious, the wannabe cop, the hacker, and the organized crime boss.

McIntyre contends that Turnbull forged the letter and stole the securities, then fearing his guilt would become known, committed still another crime - that of suicide, he could have swallowed a dose of aconitine while at the police court.

I heard the sound of the scene of the crime squad arriving, and Aden and I both turned our heads instinctively toward the noise.

And so the devil was not satisfied with instigating to a desire for riches and honors, but he went so far as to tempt Christ, for the sake of gaining possession of these things, to fall down and adore him, which is a very great crime, and against God.

Renz be the Mask, with the profits of crime buried somewhere, Alker would be unjustly sentenced to the electric chair.

Yang was responsible for the crimes of the Sui Dynasty and allowed the Ancestress to retire in luxury.

There was no rule of which Dandy was aware that just because Kate had once investigated sex crimes for the district attorney in Anchorage that she automatically got whatever extra job came with the new trooper post in Niniltna.